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August 20th, 2010
12:14 PM ET

Opinion: 'Burn Quran Day' an outrage to Muslims

By Akbar Ahmed, Special to CNN

Editor's note: Akbar Ahmed is professor and Ibn Khaldun Chair of Islamic Studies at American University in Washington. He is author of "Journey into America: The Challenge of Islam," Brookings Press 2010.

In less than a month, Pastor Terry Jones of the Dove World Outreach Center in Florida plans to host "Burn a Quran Day" to mark the ninth anniversary of the 9/11 attacks.

The pastor, author of the book "Islam is of the Devil," is using the burning to urge American Christians to "stand up" to what he describes as a monolithic Muslim threat. A Facebook page for the event has accrued thousands of "likes" and Jones has said people have been mailing him Qurans to burn.

Read the full story

- CNN Belief Blog Co-Editor

Filed under: Books • Christianity • Islam • Opinion • Quran

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soundoff (180 Responses)
  1. Keith

    Still no takers on the 8:39 am post? It's a VERY valid point.

    August 21, 2010 at 7:53 pm |
    • David Johnson

      @keith

      You are a typical Christian fundie. LOL!

      What's your best argument for there being a god? Pray about it. Ask the baby Jesus to give you the best argument ever. Amaze me! Dazzle me! Amuse me.

      August 21, 2010 at 11:57 pm |
    • Keith

      David Johnson, The god of this world, Satan, has blinded your eyes. Your wisdom is foolishness to God and to me. I think I'll shake the dust off my feet and leave you with your depravity. Good luck when you do draw that last breath. If you don't figure it out before then, the horror of the error of your thinking will be known. And it will be too late to reconsider. "It is a fearful thing to fall into the hands of the living God."

      August 22, 2010 at 9:15 am |
    • David Johnson

      @Keith

      You said, "The god of this world, Satan, has blinded your eyes. Your wisdom is foolishness to God and to me. I think I'll shake the dust off my feet and leave you with your depravity. "

      Yes, Kieth. It is time for you to go. You came to the blog spouting your hate in the name of your god. You were arrogant. You leave now saying, "Your wisdom is foolishness to God and me." But you could not refute my wisdom. You told me your argument was indisputable. It lies at your feet, broken. Your god has no clothes.

      August 22, 2010 at 11:32 am |
    • Keith

      David Johnson, you may want to see that I refuted your "errors". My God still stands. I am sure, however, that the things I say will soon be "hate speech" in this country thanks to Vaughn Walker's prop 8 decision and the wording he used. We will become like Canada in that regard. And I know you may find this offensive too, but yes the Bible predicted it. These days will get darker and darker for Christians until He returns. Many of the signs are birth pangs increasing in both frequency and intensity. In case you haven't noticed, it appears Iran has lit the fuse for what will eventually become WW lll by fueling their reactor. Cheers.

      August 22, 2010 at 9:09 pm |
    • Keith

      Yeah, I'm the arrogant one. No. I think I'll stick around just because you said that. cheers.

      August 24, 2010 at 2:56 pm |
  2. zacc

    Gus
    Your remark on Mohammad (PBUH) is disrespectful. I feel your sad, lonely individual, hey do you have a religion cause if you do pls share it with me and let me correct you on some manners for other faiths. Islam is a peaceful religion and guess what it teaches you to be kind to every living being from all walks of life, not to discriminate, abuse, disrespect other peoples religions. What burning the Quran is going to get rid of Islam no it will bring people closer to Islam and more will sit up and learn what is this religion everybody is talking about.

    Wake up Gus smell the coffee!!!!!!

    August 21, 2010 at 7:40 pm |
  3. Gus

    This is what mohammed looks like. {{:-o>>

    August 21, 2010 at 3:57 pm |
    • David Johnson

      Dude! That is sooo wrong.

      August 21, 2010 at 6:29 pm |
    • SR

      Gus
      Compared to the defiling and defacing of our Hindu Temples that these Muslims have done, what you have done is nothing,

      Look at how they are foaming at the mouth here, all these "peace loving" Muslims!

      Scratch a moderate and you will find an extremist!

      August 22, 2010 at 1:19 pm |
  4. k

    Interesting to see how this "virtues" Preacher and his congregation, who want to stand up to the muslims and their ways in America, got arrested this morning for child pornography charges. Maybe CNN needs to pick up on this story to, God only knows if it was another denomination or religion the media would have blanketed the country with the news.

    August 21, 2010 at 3:51 pm |
  5. A Proud Muslim

    May allah,The Only God, giude you all to the straight path.

    August 21, 2010 at 3:25 pm |
    • David Johnson

      Why do you feel Allah is the only God? I'm not going to argue with you. I just want to compare your reasons with Christian's.

      August 21, 2010 at 3:36 pm |
  6. Keith

    David Johnson and kuwait, gotta go for now...catch you later

    August 21, 2010 at 2:23 pm |
  7. Keith

    kuwait, you seem like a reasonable person. May I share with you what I believe about heaven? I believe God will judge me against His holy law. I have broken ALL of the Ten Commandments. I am therefore guilty and the punishment is the lake of fire for me. However, God sent His Son Jesus to die on a cross and pay my fine. He was raised up on the 3rd day. If I repent(stop sinning willfully and seek God) and believe that He died for me, then I can pass from eternal death to eternal life. Am I better than other people? No. But I am better off. Do I still sin? Yes, but I fall into it. I don't dive in willingly head first. I recognize that I've sinned, ask God for forgiveness, pick myself up, brush myself off and continue on. God's grace is amazing. I hope you don't mind if I pray for you, kuwait.

    August 21, 2010 at 1:11 pm |
    • David Johnson

      @Keith

      There is no one to hear your prayer. Jesus may or may not have ever lived. What is certain, is that he died. I think he has been dead for the past 2000 years. You will pass, as I will, from life to death. You brain will cease to function. You as a person will be gone. Pray all you like. Prayer does not work. Cheers!

      August 21, 2010 at 1:56 pm |
    • Keith

      David Johnson, Christ was witnessed to be alive after his crucifiction. Skeptics say he faked his own death or was in a coma. Even the skeptics admit to Him being seen. After giving instruction to the disciples, He ascended into Heaven. He will come back the same way He left. He will appear in the clouds. Please read Luke 16: 19-31. It talks about a man much like yourself.

      August 21, 2010 at 2:18 pm |
    • David Johnson

      @Keith

      There are no eye witness accounts of Jesus. The New Testament was written to "prove" that Jesus was the Messiah and to establish the Christian religion. The bible is your only "proof". Some might say it is biased. LOL.

      August 21, 2010 at 2:43 pm |
    • Keith

      David Johnson, I'm not going to waste a lot of time on this because it really isn't diputable. Tallus. The Jewish Talmud. Cornelius Tacitus affirmed that Jesus suffered under Pilate. In general the whole of creation PROVES the existence of God. Check out Hubblesite.org. Those pictures scream an intelligent Creator. From beginning to end the universe has order. Looking at it and saying there's no Creator is like looking at a building and saying there was no builder. Romans 1:20-21 For since the creation of the world His invisible attributes are clearly seen, being understood by the things that are made, even His eternal power and Godhead, so that they are without excuse, because, although the knew God, they did not glorify Him as God, nor were thankful, but became futile in their thoughts, and their foolish hearts were darkened. We now have the benefit of modern technology to show us His creation. This wasn't around even 50 years ago. As this age comes to a close, I personally think God is making it that much more obvious to us that He is who He claims to be. Yet so many still reject Him.

      August 21, 2010 at 7:33 pm |
    • David Johnson

      @Keith

      You said, "I'm not going to waste a lot of time on this because it really isn't diputable"

      I could care less if you spend a lot of time on this or not. I write this not to change you, but to keep curious readers from thinking you know what you are talking about. All of what you say is disputed. If it weren't, the entire world would be Christian.

      Thallus:
      In a lost work referred to by Julius Africanus in the third century, the pagan writer Thallus reportedly claimed that Jesus's death was accompanied by an earthquake and darkness. However, the original text is in fact lost, and we can confirm neither the contents of the text or its date. It is possible that Thallus was merely repeating what was told to him by Christians, or that the passage which Africanus cites is a later interpolation. Outside of the New Testament, no other references to earthquakes or unusual darkness occur in the contemporary literature. This is very surprising, given the effect these sorts of events would presumably have had on the populace.

      The Jewish Talmud:
      References to Jesus in the Talmud and other Jewish religious writings, as well as the gnostic Christian texts tend to contradict New Testament accounts, and so are seldom cited by Christian apologists.

      The writings of Tacitus: Wasn't born until after Christ was in the ground. 55 AD
      Did Tacitus really write this, or is this a later Christian interpolation?
      Is this really an independent confirmation of Jesus's story, or is Tacitus just repeating what some Christians told him?

      Tacitus may just be repeating what he was told by Christians about Jesus. If so, then this passage merely confirms that there were Christians in Tacitus' time, and that they believed that Pilate killed Jesus during the reign of Tiberius. This would not be independent confirmation of Jesus's existence. If, on the other hand, Tacitus found this information in Roman imperial records (to which he had access) then that could constitute independent confirmation. There are good reasons to doubt that Tacitus is working from Roman records here, however. For one, he refers to Pilate by the wrong title (Pilate was a prefect, not a procurator). Secondly, he refers to Jesus by the religious title "Christos". Roman records would not have referred to Jesus by a Christian title, but presumably by his given name. Thus, there is excellent reason to suppose that Tacitus is merely repeating what Christians said about Jesus, and so can tell us nothing new about Jesus's historicity.

      All you have is the New Testament. And it contains errors.

      August 21, 2010 at 8:17 pm |
    • David Johnson

      @Keith

      Thallus:
      In a lost work referred to by Julius Africanus in the third century, the pagan writer Thallus reportedly claimed that Jesus's death was accompanied by an earthquake and darkness. However, the original text is in fact lost, and we can confirm neither the contents of the text or its date. It is possible that Thallus was merely repeating what was told to him by Christians, or that the passage which Africanus cites is a later interpolation. Outside of the New Testament, no other references to earthquakes or unusual darkness occur in the contemporary literature. This is very surprising, given the effect these sorts of events would presumably have had on the populace. Dead people walking around! Zombies! Oh sure dude

      August 21, 2010 at 8:20 pm |
    • David Johnson

      @Keith

      The Jewish Talmud:
      References to Jesus in the Talmud and other Jewish religious writings, as well as the gnostic Christian texts tend to contradict New Testament accounts, and so are seldom cited by Christian apologists.

      August 21, 2010 at 8:22 pm |
    • David Johnson

      @Keith

      The writings of Tacitus:
      Did Tacitus really write this, or is this a later Christian interpolation?

      Tacitus may just be repeating what he was told by Christians about Jesus. If so, then this passage merely confirms that there were Christians in Tacitus' time, and that they believed that Pilate killed Jesus during the reign of Tiberius. This would not be independent confirmation of Jesus's existence. If, on the other hand, Tacitus found this information in Roman imperial records (to which he had access) then that could constitute independent confirmation. There are good reasons to doubt that Tacitus is working from Roman records here, however. For one, he refers to Pilate by the wrong title (Pilate was a prefect, not a procurator). Secondly, he refers to Jesus by the religious title "Christos". Roman records would not have referred to Jesus by a Christian title, but presumably by his given name. Thus, there is excellent reason to suppose that Tacitus is merely repeating what Christians said about Jesus, and so can tell us nothing new about Jesus's historicity.

      August 21, 2010 at 8:23 pm |
    • David Johnson

      @Keith

      Tacitus:
      There are good reasons to doubt that Tacitus is working from Roman records here, however. For one, he refers to Pilate by the wrong title (Pilate was a prefect, not a procurator). Secondly, he refers to Jesus by the religious title "Christos". Roman records would not have referred to Jesus by a Christian title, but presumably by his given name. Thus, there is excellent reason to suppose that Tacitus is merely repeating what Christians said about Jesus, and so can tell us nothing new about Jesus's historicity.

      August 21, 2010 at 8:28 pm |
    • David Johnson

      @Keith

      Tacitus:
      He refers to Pilate by the wrong title (Pilate was a prefect, not a procurator).
      He refers to Jesus by the religious title "Christos". Roman records would not have referred to Jesus by a Christian title.

      Thus, there is excellent reason to suppose that Tacitus is merely repeating what Christians said about Jesus.

      August 21, 2010 at 8:35 pm |
    • David Johnson

      @Keith

      ~acitus:
      Did not use Roman records. Pilate given wrong title.

      Jesus given a religious title. Romans wouldn't have done that.

      The Christian would have done that. LOL

      August 21, 2010 at 8:40 pm |
    • David Johnson

      @Keith

      Tacitus:
      There is excellent reason to suppose that Tacitus is merely repeating what Christians said about Jesus.

      The moderator gods will not let me list them.

      August 21, 2010 at 8:43 pm |
    • David Johnson

      @Keith

      You said, "I'm not going to waste a lot of time on this because it really isn't diputable"

      I could care less if you spend a lot of time on this or not. I write this not to change you, but to keep curious readers from thinking you know what you are talking about. All of what you say is disputed. If it weren't, the entire world would be Christian.

      Thallus:
      In a lost work referred to by Julius Africanus in the third century, the pagan writer Thallus reportedly claimed that Jesus's death was accompanied by an earthquake and darkness. However, the original text is in fact lost, and we can confirm neither the contents of the text or its date. It is possible that Thallus was merely repeating what was told to him by Christians, or that the passage which Africanus cites is a later interpolation. Outside of the New Testament, no other references to earthquakes or unusual darkness occur in the contemporary literature. This is very surprising, given the effect these sorts of events would presumably have had on the populace.

      The Jewish Talmud:
      References to Jesus in the Talmud and other Jewish religious writings, as well as the gnostic Christian texts tend to contradict New Testament accounts, and so are seldom cited by Christian apologists.

      The writings of Tacitus: Wasn't born until after Christ was in the ground. 55 AD
      Did Tacitus really write this, or is this a later Christian interpolation?
      Is this really an independent confirmation of Jesus's story, or is Tacitus just repeating what some Christians told him?

      Tacitus may just be repeating what he was told by Christians about Jesus. If so, then this passage merely confirms that there were Christians in Tacitus' time, and that they believed that Pilate killed Jesus during the reign of Tiberius. This would not be independent confirmation of Jesus's existence. If, on the other hand, Tacitus found this information in Roman imperial records (to which he had access) then that could constitute independent confirmation. There are good reasons to doubt that Tacitus is working from Roman records here, however. For one, he refers to Pilate by the wrong title (Pilate was a prefect, not a procurator). Secondly, he refers to Jesus by the religious ~title "Christos". Roman records would not have referred to Jesus by a Christian ~title, but presumably by his given name. Thus, there is excellent reason to suppose that Tacitus is merely repeating what Christians said about Jesus, and so can tell us nothing new about Jesus's historicity.

      All you have is the New Testament. And it contains errors.

      August 21, 2010 at 8:47 pm |
    • David Johnson

      @Keith

      You said, "In general the whole of creation PROVES the existence of God. Check out Hubblesite.org. Those pictures scream an intelligent Creator."

      Using all caps when you type "proves", does not make your evidence any better. LOL.

      The argument from design:
      I'm afraid it begs the question. Your argument assumes the universe is designed in order to prove that it is the work of a designer. The argument also suppresses evidence: for all its beauty and grandeur, the universe is also full horrible things. Babies born without brains, good people suffering monstrous tortures such as neurofibromatosis, evil people basking in the sun and enjoying long lives. Volcanoes erupting, earthquakes killing thousands, hurricanes and tornadoes blindly wiping out thousands of lives.

      You are looking at the universe, through your, as Ken Ham would say, bible glasses. He has people put these glasses on, before he spouts his theories. Take those glasses off.

      When you say, "I'm not going to waste a lot of time on this because it really isn't diputable." You are kidding right? Your arguments are garbage. LOL, LOL 'till my sides ache.

      August 21, 2010 at 9:08 pm |
    • kuwait

      keith >> thanks for sharing ur opinion with me >> there is so many things to say about that >> like we muslims and in quran we read jesus story how he came from mother marie and she wasnt married she was virgin !! people with there relegion say it was god son ! it was god prophet in earth people act as how they heard it and how they explain it but here or there it was a mericle from god to show us the path !! to belive in him !! dear keith i dont want to go into these religous thing becouse im muslim but still im sinning in my days !! im not praying everyday ! im not fasting every year im not wearing cover for my head ( hejab) so im not in the position to say or teach people what is islam in words !! but what im saying is simple !! when people respect each others and not judging 8 million people of what 1000 people did !! i like ur way how to explain urself and ur religion i hope we can chat more and show others how we can realy be good together >> not only as muslim and christian !! no as people in this small world !! and this is my email mesmorph@hotmail.com and pin : 215E3097

      August 22, 2010 at 12:04 pm |
    • David Johnson

      @keith

      You said, "We now have the benefit of modern technology to show us His creation. This wasn't around even 50 years ago. As this age comes to a close, I personally think God is making it that much more obvious to us that He is who He claims to be. Yet so many still reject Him."

      Couldn't let this one pass.

      God is a myth. Man concocted this myth, because they feared death and to explain things that they did not understand. What makes lightening? God makes lightening. Why does the mountain rumble? God is angry. This is called God of the Gaps, because we used a god to fill in our gaps of knowledge. But science progresses. It is running over your sky god.
      We know what causes lightening. We know why the mountain rumbles. Each day, the gaps in man's knowledge get smaller. Each day there are less gaps for god to hide in.

      Pretty soon, god will have nothing to do. Good thing he has carpentry skills, huh?

      August 22, 2010 at 12:15 pm |
    • verify

      Keith

      You said, "David Johnson, Christ was witnessed to be alive after his crucifiction." (August 21, 2010 at 2:18 pm) - interesting misspelling there (crucifiction) - a little Freudian slip?

      August 22, 2010 at 12:38 pm |
    • Keith

      kuwait, If I'm not mistaken, islam says you have to earn your way to heaven? The Bible says the ONLY way is to trust that Jesus Christ paid your penalty at the cross. Repent(turn away) from your sins. Seek the Lord by reading the Bible and you will find Him. Please go to livingwaters.com and click on "save yourself some pain". Good luck my friend. God bless you.

      August 22, 2010 at 9:21 pm |
  8. Keith

    kuwait, how do you get to heaven?

    August 21, 2010 at 12:51 pm |
  9. kuwait

    muslim burns the bibble !! becouse they r stupid !! this is wrong !! befor u had the racist thing !!! this is wrong and all of us know that this is wrong !! but still yet u have some people still racist !! thats mean that wherever u go what ever u do it has to be like that !! people understand everything and people animals they dont have brain to think with so !!

    August 21, 2010 at 12:16 pm |
  10. Reality

    A summary in the 21st century:

    Google "Muslims bible burning" to get all said references about Muslims burning the bible but note that once the "bowers" of Islam see how they have been conned by their imams and ayatollahs for the last 1400 years, they too will burn their copies of the koran i.e. the angel Gabriel never existed so there is no way that the warmongering, womanizing, and hallucinating Mohammed got any koranic passages from some god. Tis the great angelic con game. Joe Smith was the latest to pull it off with his "angelic" Moroni. The significant stupidity and gullibility of it all!!!!!

    And ditto when we the "pew peasants" of Christianity finally realize the con that has been pulled on us, we too will burn our bibles. I have not burned my copy but have relegated it to the mostly fiction section of my reference library.

    August 21, 2010 at 12:04 pm |
    • Keith

      realiity, is it possible for you to come up with something new or pay your buddy down the street $5 to write you some fresh posts. Sheeeesh!

      August 21, 2010 at 12:58 pm |
    • David Johnson

      @Keith

      You said, "I'm not going to waste a lot of time on this because it really isn't diputable"

      I could care less if you spend a lot of time on this or not. I write this not to change you, but to keep curious readers from thinking you know what you are talking about. All of what you say is disputed.

      Thallus:
      In a lost work referred to by Julius Africanus in the third century, the pagan writer Thallus reportedly claimed that Jesus's death was accompanied by an earthquake and darkness. However, the original text is in fact lost, and we can confirm neither the contents of the text or its date. It is possible that Thallus was merely repeating what was told to him by Christians, or that the passage which Africanus cites is a later interpolation. Outside of the New Testament, no other references to earthquakes or unusual darkness occur in the contemporary literature. This is very surprising, given the effect these sorts of events would presumably have had on the populace.

      The Jewish Talmud:
      References to Jesus in the Talmud and other Jewish religious writings, as well as the gnostic Christian texts tend to contradict New Testament accounts, and so are seldom cited by Christian apologists.

      The writings of Tacitus:
      Did Tacitus really write this, or is this a later Christian interpolation?
      Is this really an independent confirmation of Jesus's story, or is Tacitus just repeating what some Christians told him?

      Tacitus may just be repeating what he was told by Christians about Jesus. If so, then this passage merely confirms that there were Christians in Tacitus' time, and that they believed that Pilate killed Jesus during the reign of Tiberius. This would not be independent confirmation of Jesus's existence. If, on the other hand, Tacitus found this information in Roman imperial records (to which he had access) then that could const itute independent confirmation. There are good reasons to doubt that Tacitus is working from Roman records here, however. For one, he refers to Pilate by the wrong ~itle (Pilate was a prefect, not a procurator). Secondly, he refers to Jesus by the religious ~itle "Christos". Roman records would not have referred to Jesus by a Christian ~itle, but presumably by his given name. Thus, there is excellent reason to suppose that Tacitus is merely repeating what Christians said about Jesus, and so can tell us nothing new about Jesus's historicity.

      All you have is the New Testament. And it contains errors.

      August 21, 2010 at 9:59 pm |
    • Keith

      David Johnson, What errors name one.

      August 22, 2010 at 8:59 am |
    • David Johnson

      @Keith

      New Testament Errors:
      The geneaologies of Matthew and Luke contradict each other

      1) Matthew incorrectly attributes a prophecy by Zechariah to Jeremiah

      2) Matthew 27:9 Then was fulfilled that which was spoken by Jeremy the prophet, saying, And they took the thirty pieces of silver, the price of him that was valued, whom they of the children of Israel did value...

      Actually, this prophecy is found in Zechariah.

      Zechariah 11:12-13 And I said unto them, If ye think good, give me my price; and if not, forbear. So they weighed for my price thirty pieces of silver. And the Lord said unto me, Cast it unto the potter: a goodly price that I was prised at of them. And I took the thirty pieces of silver, and cast them to the potter in the house of the Lord.

      3) There is no external support for Herod's murder of the children

      In Matthew 2:16, Matthew records that Herod ordered the execution of all children under two years of age in Bethlehem. This event is not recorded in secular history. The Jewish historian Josephus, in his book Antiquities of the Jews, has a long history of Herod and his crimes (Antiquities, Book XIV, Chapter VIII and following). The massacre at Bethlehem is not among them.

      4) A number of New Testament passages indicate that Christ was supposed to return before his generation had died. This would have been sometime in the first century AD.

      First, there is the testimony of Jesus himself, who explicitly stated that some of his disciples would not die until Jesus instituted the Kingdom, and that his generation would not pass away until all his prophecies of the end of the world had been fulfilled.

      Matthew 16:28 Verily I say unto you, There be some standing here, which shall not taste of death, till they see the Son of man coming in his kingdom.
      Matthew 23:36 Verily I say unto you, All these things shall come upon this generation.
      Matthew 24:34 Verily I say unto you, This generation shall not pass, till all these things be fulfilled.

      It is important to note that Jesus' long discourse on the end of the world, recorded in Matthew 24 and 25, was spoken in private to his own disciples.

      Matthew 24:3 And as he sat upon the mount of Olives, the disciples came unto him privately, saying, Tell us, when shall these things be? and what shall be the sign of thy coming, and of the end of the world?

      In this discourse, Jesus makes a number of assertions about the fate of his disciples. One of the signs of the end would be the persecution of his disciples.

      Matthew 24:9 Then shall they deliver you up to be afflicted, and shall kill you: and ye shall be hated of all nations for my name's sake.

      While tradition records that the disciples were persecuted and martyred, this was not followed by the return of Christ, as he promised.

      The Apostle Paul, too, seemed to think that Christ would return for his generation.

      I Thessalonians 4:15-17 For this we say unto you by the word of the Lord, that we which are alive and remain unto the coming of the Lord shall not prevent them which are asleep. For the Lord himself shall descend from heaven with a shout, with the voice of the archangel, and with the trump of God: and the dead in Christ shall rise first: Then we which are alive and remain shall be caught up together with them in the clouds, to meet the Lord in the air: and so shall we ever be with the Lord.

      Note that Paul twice uses the phrase '...we which are alive and remain...'. This seems to preclude the theory that Paul was speaking of some far future generation. Paul made a similar assertion in First Corinthians.

      I Corinthians 15:51,52 Behold, I shew you a mystery; We shall not all sleep, but we shall all be changed, In a moment, in the twinkling of an eye, at the last trump: for the trumpet shall sound, and the dead shall be raised incorruptible, and we shall be changed.

      Note that Paul said that '...we shall not all sleep...'. In other words, he expected that at least some of his generation would not see death. Again, there is nothing in the text to indicate the Paul was speaking about some far future generation.

      Paul reiterated his belief in a soon return of Christ in the Book of Romans.

      Romans 13:11-12 And that, knowing the time, that now it is high time to awake out of sleep: for now is our salvation nearer than when we believed. The night is far spent, the day is at hand: let us therefore cast off the works of darkness, and let us put on the armour of light.

      The other New Testament writers had similar thoughts about the iminence of Christ's return.

      James 5:8 Be ye also patient; establish your hearts: for the coming of the Lord draweth nigh.

      I John 2:18 Little children, it is the last time: and as ye have heard that antichrist shall come, even now are there many antichrists; whereby we know that it is the last time.

      I Peter 4:7 But the end of all things is at hand: be ye therefore sober, and watch unto prayer.

      The Apocalyptic Book of Revelations repeatedly has Christ saying that he would return soon.

      Revelation 22:20 He which testifieth these things saith, Surely I come quickly....

      By no stretch of the imagination can 2,000 years be considered 'quickly'.

      If the bible is the inerrant word of god, not even a single uncrossed "t" should exist. The bible was written by men.

      There are other problems, but these four should suffice. Cheers!

      August 22, 2010 at 11:53 am |
    • David Johnson

      @Keith

      New Testament Errors:
      The geneaologies of Matthew and Luke contradict each other

      1) Matthew incorrectly attributes a prophecy by Zechariah to Jeremiah

      2) Matthew 27:9 Then was fulfilled that which was spoken by Jeremy the prophet, saying, And they took the thirty pieces of silver, the price of him that was valued, whom they of the children of Israel did value...

      Actually, this prophecy is found in Zechariah.

      Zechariah 11:12-13 And I said unto them, If ye think good, give me my price; and if not, forbear. So they weighed for my price thirty pieces of silver. And the Lord said unto me, Cast it unto the potter: a goodly price that I was prised at of them. And I took the thirty pieces of silver, and cast them to the potter in the house of the Lord.

      3) There is no external support for Herod's murder of the children

      In Matthew 2:16, Matthew records that Herod ordered the execution of all children under two years of age in Bethlehem. This event is not recorded in secular history. The Jewish historian Josephus, in his book Antiquities of the Jews, has a long history of Herod and his crimes (Antiquities, Book XIV, Chapter VIII and following). The massacre at Bethlehem is not among them.

      4) A number of New Testament passages indicate that Christ was supposed to return before his generation had died. This would have been sometime in the first century AD.

      First, there is the testimony of Jesus himself, who explicitly stated that some of his disciples would not die until Jesus inst ituted the Kingdom, and that his generation would not pass away until all his prophecies of the end of the world had been fulfilled.

      Matthew 16:28 Verily I say unto you, There be some standing here, which shall not taste of death, till they see the Son of man coming in his kingdom.
      Matthew 23:36 Verily I say unto you, All these things shall come upon this generation.
      Matthew 24:34 Verily I say unto you, This generation shall not pass, till all these things be fulfilled.

      It is important to note that Jesus' long discourse on the end of the world, recorded in Matthew 24 and 25, was spoken in private to his own disciples.

      Matthew 24:3 And as he sat upon the mount of Olives, the disciples came unto him privately, saying, Tell us, when shall these things be? and what shall be the sign of thy coming, and of the end of the world?

      In this discourse, Jesus makes a number of assertions about the fate of his disciples. One of the signs of the end would be the persecution of his disciples.

      Matthew 24:9 Then shall they deliver you up to be afflicted, and shall kill you: and ye shall be hated of all nations for my name's sake.

      While tradition records that the disciples were persecuted and martyred, this was not followed by the return of Christ, as he promised.

      The Apostle Paul, too, seemed to think that Christ would return for his generation.

      I Thessalonians 4:15-17 For this we say unto you by the word of the Lord, that we which are alive and remain unto the coming of the Lord shall not prevent them which are asleep. For the Lord himself shall descend from heaven with a shout, with the voice of the archangel, and with the trump of God: and the dead in Christ shall rise first: Then we which are alive and remain shall be caught up together with them in the clouds, to meet the Lord in the air: and so shall we ever be with the Lord.

      Note that Paul twice uses the phrase '...we which are alive and remain...'. This seems to preclude the theory that Paul was speaking of some far future generation. Paul made a similar assertion in First Corinthians.

      I Corinthians 15:51,52 Behold, I shew you a mystery; We shall not all sleep, but we shall all be changed, In a moment, in the twinkling of an eye, at the last trump: for the trumpet shall sound, and the dead shall be raised incorruptible, and we shall be changed.

      Note that Paul said that '...we shall not all sleep...'. In other words, he expected that at least some of his generation would not see death. Again, there is nothing in the text to indicate the Paul was speaking about some far future generation.

      Paul reiterated his belief in a soon return of Christ in the Book of Romans.

      Romans 13:11-12 And that, knowing the time, that now it is high time to awake out of sleep: for now is our salvation nearer than when we believed. The night is far spent, the day is at hand: let us therefore cast off the works of darkness, and let us put on the armour of light.

      The other New Testament writers had similar thoughts about the iminence of Christ's return.

      James 5:8 Be ye also patient; establish your hearts: for the coming of the Lord draweth nigh.

      I John 2:18 Little children, it is the last time: and as ye have heard that antichrist shall come, even now are there many antichrists; whereby we know that it is the last time.

      I Peter 4:7 But the end of all things is at hand: be ye therefore sober, and watch unto prayer.

      The Apocalyptic Book of Revelations repeatedly has Christ saying that he would return soon.

      Revelation 22:20 He which testifieth these things saith, Surely I come quickly....

      By no stretch of the imagination can 2,000 years be considered 'quickly'.

      If the bible is the inerrant word of god, not even a single uncrossed "t" should exist. The bible was written by men.

      There are other problems, but these four should suffice. Cheers!

      August 22, 2010 at 12:01 pm |
    • Keith

      David Johnson, So sorry to neglect you-was busy clinging to my Bible and cleaning my guns, you know. 1 & 2 , You will find this prophecy alluded to in Jeremiah 18:1-4 and evidently quoted from Zechariah 11:12-13. It is credited to Jeremiah simply because in Jesus' day Jeremiah was the first of the books of the prophets, and that section was identified by the name of the first book. 3) Just because you or I can't find secular history to back this doesn't mean it didn't happen. For crying out loud, man thought that the earth was a flat disk for how long? When the book of Isaiah says the earth was round. 4) There are two explanations that I'm aware of: 1)These are signs of the Tribulation, as this is only 7 years long, obvioiusly the generation to see these signs will see Christ's 2nd Advent. 2) The generation to see the re-birth of Israel in 1948 is the generation spoken of. So much for my God being left broken in pieces at my feet. You should expend some of that research energy into looking FOR God. If you seek Him, you will find Him. But you are like a criminal who says he can't find a cop. If I choose to leave the blog world, it won't be because of you. You are a legend in your own mind, David.

      August 22, 2010 at 8:52 pm |
    • Keith

      ooops, almost forgot the geneaologies thing. Matthew has the lineage of Joseph. Luke of Mary. They are significant because they show Jesus was a Jew and has legitimate claim to throne because He come from the line of David.

      August 23, 2010 at 7:14 am |
  11. TopJimmy

    If Islam is such a great and peaceful religion, why does the Koran state "Take neither a Christian or Jew as your friend." I've never heard anyone explain that away.

    August 21, 2010 at 10:59 am |
  12. Keith

    Still no takers on 8:39 am post? Shocker.

    August 21, 2010 at 10:58 am |
  13. Aftab

    I Think whats going on isn't very good, we should stop all this stupid nonsense these people who are saying to burn the quran, are just thugs. sad people with no purpose in life.

    August 21, 2010 at 10:40 am |
    • Bosh

      @Aftab

      Oh, they have a purpose, all right. They want to attack. They feel threatened and have chosen this silly option as a way of fighting back.
      They are feeding their hate. What they want is attention to justify their actions. That's their inner life. Wild demonstrations to strike back in the only way they feel is effective.
      If they didn't feel so disenfranchised, it never would have gotten this far.

      August 21, 2010 at 11:19 am |
    • MootHypocrisy

      @Bosh

      And your reasons for posting your opinion is what? Do you feel "disenfranchised" as well? I do, and I'm guessing that you do, too.
      I think Aftab has a point in saying they don't have anything better to do, just like all of us here. If those people were kept busy with something more constructive, maybe they wouldn't be acting like loose cannons.

      August 21, 2010 at 10:29 pm |
    • peace2all

      @MootHypocrisy

      Maybe we need to find some common ground between us. I get a sense that we probably agree more on issues than disagree.

      It seems that I am getting from your post to @Bosh commenting on @Aftab.... that you are in agreement that a national burning of the Qur'an day is..... well, probably not a great idea...? i.e...."keep them busy with purpose and more constructive things to do, so they won't act like loose cannons." I read into that we are in agreement....?

      I know that you commented on my post above, and I posted back......

      Sense I really am trying to find the best ways for peace.... assuming you do too... maybe some more constructive dialogue, and learning to understand where the other is coming from may be in order...?

      Then, I think, we won't have to throw out opinions of..."losing respect on your postings because of unrealistic points of view."

      Peace to you.....

      August 22, 2010 at 9:39 am |
  14. freetime1

    The quran and the bible are both lies and a full of evil. They both call for death for things like adulty. The reasons this group is burning the quran might be off, but I do not care who burns the quran or the bible, because the world would be a better place without them both. They have the freedoms here to do this. Lets keep the freedom safe.

    August 21, 2010 at 9:51 am |
  15. kuwait

    on 9.11 they killed somany people who have families and have souls !! they killed people who maybe between them muslims also !! they r stupid and animals !! this is not our mistake !! we love christians ! we live with them ! we eat with them ! we love usa .. they helped us to get free from the iraqi invasion they mixed with us and some of them got married to our muslim kuwaity girls !! and still we have friends from lot of states !! we dont blame u !! people of ur own died becouse some stupid muslims thought that doing this is right and will take them to heaven !! but we know this is wrong !! who wont !! if this happened in our country god knows what we will do !! sure ill do the same >> !! god will have mercy on people who murdered on 9.11

    August 21, 2010 at 9:03 am |
    • Keith

      kuwait, is your country the same as Saudi Arabia when it comes to possessing a Bible or wearing a Cross around your neck? Islam is intolerant. Does islam support ho-mo se-xual marriage? Truth is, not only don't they support it, but you can be executed for being one.

      August 21, 2010 at 10:56 am |
    • kuwait

      keith yes you can wear cross on ur neck u can wear cross on ur t.shirt you can go to church and we have 1 kuwaity man was muslim and became christian preist and he is every sunday in the church .. on new years eve police men which is kuwaity muslim men stay near churches and help people to do there prayer on christmas >> and we do parties on new year and singers come from everywhere >> we r not like saudi arabia at all !! im showing you that we r not the same !!

      August 21, 2010 at 11:26 am |
    • Keith

      Kuwait, that is somewhat encouraging. I am glad you're not like the Saudis. But just who are the police protecting the Christians from?

      August 21, 2010 at 11:47 am |
    • Reality

      Koranic-driven terror and horror was present before and after 9/11. Some examples:

      1a) 179 killed in Mumbai/Bombay, 290 injured

      1b) Assassination of Benazir Bhutto and Theo Van Gogh

      2) 9/11, 3000 mostly US citizens, 1000’s injured

      3) The 24/7 Sunni-Shiite centuries-old blood feud currently being carried out in Iraq, US Troops killed in action, 3,481 and 924 died in non-combat, 97,172 – 106,047 Iraqi civilians killed as of 8/10/2010

      4) Kenya- In Nairobi, about 212 people were killed and an estimated 4000 injured; in Dar es Salaam, the attack killed at least 11 and wounded 85.[2]

      5) Bali-in 2002-killing 202 people, 164 of whom were foreign nationals, and 38 Indonesian citizens. A further 209 people were injured.

      6) Bali in 2005- Twenty people were killed, and 129 people were injured by three bombers who killed themselves in the attacks.

      7) Spain in 2004- killing 191 people and wounding 2,050.

      8. UK in 2005- The bombings killed 52 commuters and the four radical Islamic suicide bombers, injured 700.

      9) The execution of an eloping couple in Afghanistan on 04/15/2009 by the Taliban.

      10) Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan: US troops killed in action 1,116 902
      killed in non-combat situations as of 08/10/2010. Over 40,000 Afghan civilians killed because of the koranic driven, dark age, mentality of the Taliban.

      11) The killing of 13 citizen soldiers at Ft. Hood by a follower of the koran.

      12) 38 Russian citizens killed on March 29, 2010 by Muslim women suicide bombers.

      13) The May 28, 2010 attack on a Islamic religious minority in Pakistan, which have left 98 dead,

      14) Lockerbie is known internationally as the site where, on 21 December 1988, the wreckage of Pan Am Flight 103 crashed as a result of a terrorist bomb. In the United Kingdom the event is referred to as the Lockerbie disaster, the Lockerbie bombing, or simply Lockerbie. Eleven townspeople were killed in Sherwood Crescent, where the plane's wings and fuel tanks plummeted in a fiery explosion, destroying several houses and leaving a huge crater, with debris causing damage to a number of buildings nearby. The 270 fatalities (259 on the plane, 11 in Lockerbie) were citizens of 21 nations

      August 21, 2010 at 11:59 am |
    • kuwait

      becouse lot of christian in kuwait and they only have 2 churches its so crouded and lot of problems happenes between them and this is normal !! thats why police stay there to help them and to ease there prayer without disturbance 🙂 and we r not like saudi here women vote drive cars work and do whatever they want ! and for myself i love who ever respect himself and the others and thats what im doing 🙂

      August 21, 2010 at 12:06 pm |
    • SR

      Kuwait:

      Nice Taqquiya here!

      Saying " they post police to protect Christians from themselves". Hahaha. Why would that be?

      What about your protection of Hindus in your nice little land? Millions of Hindu workmen have toiled years to build your fancy houses and offices. What about their Temples?

      August 22, 2010 at 9:53 am |
    • kuwait

      you are realy something ! sr >>>when u go to crouded place !! no fights happenes ? traffic jam ! ur thinking with limits and trying to find any mistake on us ... you are the kind of people im talking about who cant think above hate !!

      August 22, 2010 at 12:45 pm |
  16. Keith

    On a side note...Doesn't cnn realize that sign from the Wantagh Memorial Church of Laodicea could be perceived as offensive to real Christians? I would like cnn to find a mosque that supports judge walker's decision. Just one. Just one little imam who supports this decision. You won't find one because they don't exist. Certainly they can call CAIR and find someone there who supports judge walker's decision? Maybe Rick Sanchez can interview that imam or spokesman? After all, islam, "the religion of peace", must certainly be in support of this decision since islam is so very tolerant. Any takers???

    August 21, 2010 at 8:39 am |
    • Kate

      You probably got no reply because that image isn't being displayed as part of the topic – if you look at the titling, it's a "Photo of the Day" type thing out of the iReport section – probably auto generated as a teaser to get you to click into the iReport section and selected as a "Latest" – probably automated to boot.

      So you're effectively waiting for a reply about a non-issue from CNN's server software.

      Just sayin'

      August 21, 2010 at 1:02 pm |
    • David Johnson

      Some might think you are a bigot. But not me. LOL Cheers!

      August 21, 2010 at 9:15 pm |
  17. Naseer Hussain

    I totally disagree with this september 11 day ' burn the quran'. This holy book is there to quide the people to the right way and should be respected as we muslims show respect to the other religious books. If a person does not agree with the book that does not mean he should burn it, maybe he does not understand the religion of Isalm and should therfore learn because it is for peace, care and love religion.

    August 21, 2010 at 6:25 am |
    • Reality

      What we see in regards to koranic-driven horror and terror:

      1a) 179 killed in Mumbai/Bombay, 290 injured

      1b) Assassination of Benazir Bhutto and Theo Van Gogh

      2) 9/11, 3000 mostly US citizens, 1000’s injured

      3) The 24/7 Sunni-Shiite centuries-old blood feud currently being carried out in Iraq, US Troops killed in action, 3,481 and 924 died in non-combat, 97,172 – 106,047 Iraqi civilians killed as of 8/10/2010

      4) Kenya- In Nairobi, about 212 people were killed and an estimated 4000 injured; in Dar es Salaam, the attack killed at least 11 and wounded 85.[2]

      5) Bali-in 2002-killing 202 people, 164 of whom were foreign nationals, and 38 Indonesian citizens. A further 209 people were injured.

      6) Bali in 2005- Twenty people were killed, and 129 people were injured by three bombers who killed themselves in the attacks.

      7) Spain in 2004- killing 191 people and wounding 2,050.

      8. UK in 2005- The bombings killed 52 commuters and the four radical Islamic suicide bombers, injured 700.

      9) The execution of an eloping couple in Afghanistan on 04/15/2009 by the Taliban.

      10) Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan: US troops killed in action 1,116 902
      killed in non-combat situations as of 08/10/2010. Over 40,000 Afghan civilians killed because of the koranic driven, dark age, mentality of the Taliban.

      11) The killing of 13 citizen soldiers at Ft. Hood by a follower of the koran.

      12) 38 Russian citizens killed on March 29, 2010 by Muslim women suicide bombers.

      13) The May 28, 2010 attack on a Islamic religious minority in Pakistan, which have left 98 dead,
      14) Lockerbie is known internationally as the site where, on 21 December 1988, the wreckage of Pan Am Flight 103 crashed as a result of a terrorist bomb. In the United Kingdom the event is referred to as the Lockerbie disaster, the Lockerbie bombing, or simply Lockerbie. Eleven townspeople were killed in Sherwood Crescent, where the plane's wings and fuel tanks plummeted in a fiery explosion, destroying several houses and leaving a huge crater, with debris causing damage to a number of buildings nearby. The 270 fatalities (259 on the plane, 11 in Lockerbie) were citizens of 21 nations

      August 21, 2010 at 11:55 am |
  18. Todd Smith

    Peace2all...sorry to be so blunt ...unfortunately as much as I love to be promoting peace & love, as the true champion journalist Helen Thomas said, the world would be a better place if Israel and it's staunch zionist supporter were not there...99% problems would disappear. Jews, Araba & Christians would live side by side as they had done for decades & things would go back to normal..ever since the creation of this cancer state in 1947, the world has turned upside down.. they should remove the state and bring Jews, Arabs, Muslim, Christians, and everyone else back together. Take away, this excuse from the Al Qauda, another cancer created by the CIA....belive me, the world would be a better place..then we would truly have peace!! BTW, why are we paying each Israeli citizen $100K per annum whilst 50 mil Amricans don have 2 pennies to rub together? And why is Israel the money laundery capital of he world? Our money gets sent there in cash and comesback in form of new banks in USA & Europe?

    August 21, 2010 at 2:53 am |
    • peace2all

      @Todd Smith

      I certainly understand your perspective and feelings. Nothing wrong with being blunt. I must say though that your posting still seems to be extremely hate-filled and biased towards a group of fellow human beings and another country. To still call Israel the 'cancer' of the world is extremely biased, one-sided and not factual.

      And..... still not a way to make things better nor promoting any kind of peace here...

      And...Todd.... Helen Thomas and her quote.... really....? You agreed with that....? really...?

      Oh well.....

      Peace to you.....

      August 21, 2010 at 4:09 am |
  19. Todd Smith

    Buring anyone's Holy book is wrong..I have some Muslim friends and they are he best of the best in every aspect...if Quran is what they are following, then it must be great!! Also, our prisons are filled w rednecks, a lot of them here, making comments. Even though we have around 10 million Muslims in US (at least) if you count the Nation of Islam, they occupy the lowest percentage in prison system. Also all the criminal who convert to Islam in prisons come out and trun their lives and everybody else's around..You Quan burners, do what you do .. I am warning you, you will be cursed and DAMNED even if you support it in your heart.....we are a nation of tolerance and freedom..if that is taken away from us we wil become like Israel, the cancer of the world!!!

    August 21, 2010 at 2:27 am |
    • peace2all

      @Todd Smith

      I thought your posting was pretty good. You had me all the way up to, when you did a 'kind of a u turn' .... calling Israel the 'cancer' of the world...?

      You have GOT to be kidding right....?

      Please...no more hate-mongering....

      Peace.....

      August 21, 2010 at 2:32 am |
  20. Mark Smith

    I am an American and I have the right to burn a Koran! Try and stop me!

    August 21, 2010 at 1:57 am |
    • peace2all

      @Mark Smith

      Wow... that was helpful... You feel better now that you are going to burn a Qur'an....?

      Geez....

      Peace....

      August 21, 2010 at 2:30 am |
    • Keith

      Well, at least he didn't stick it in jar of urine with a pig fetus.

      August 21, 2010 at 7:27 am |
    • kuwait

      i am kuwaiti ..i am muslim .. i have the holy bibble ... i adore this book and would never try to burn it or leave it on ground !! why !! becouse i read it and there is stories of prophits and name of god and jesus !! ( stupid ) dosent think ! coz u dont have brain !!

      August 21, 2010 at 8:55 am |
    • Woozle

      @Mark Smith

      Why stop you if you are destroying your own property on your own land?

      Why tell anyone about it unless you are deliberately trying to provoke simple-minded people?

      If you're going to do something no one else wants or needs to see, why not just keep it to yourself?

      August 21, 2010 at 11:12 am |
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The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.