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August 31st, 2010
03:54 PM ET

Church helps in New Orleans 5 years later

Editor's note: CNN's Melissa Morgenweck brings us this story about a church in New York and its efforts to help rebuild New Orleans five years after Hurricane Katrina. Faith groups have been one of the driving forces behind helping people in New Orleans get back into their homes.

Grace Church New Orleans sent a letter asking for help from other Grace Churches around the United States after its building was flooded in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina.

Grace Church New York City responded, and eight volunteers traveled to New Orleans in 2006. The group helped with repairs on the church and volunteered with an Episcopal Community Services rebuilding program cleaning out flooded homes.

The Rev. Linda Bartholomew of Grace Church NYC says it was immediately evident that one volunteer trip would not be enough. She made the decision for Grace Church NYC to make a 10-year commitment to help rebuild New Orleans.

Nell Bolton, who heads up Episcopal Community Services New Orleans, says there was great power in that decision: “At a time when a lot of people in Louisiana were still in shock and awe of everything that needed to be done, Grace saw something that we couldn’t yet see.”

The group of volunteers from New York has grown and this year included a skilled carpenter and plumbers. Over the years the group has helped rebuild a dozen homes.

- CNN Belief Blog

Filed under: Christianity • Episcopal

soundoff (28 Responses)
  1. FYI

    Thanks Reality...that worked. I will read it over this evening.
    I wi;ll comment after. Have a Good Day!

    September 2, 2010 at 11:04 am |
  2. Reality

    Warning!!!

    The moderators of this blog have set up a secret forbidden word filter which unfortunately not only will delete or put in the dreaded "waiting for moderation" category but also will do the same to words having fragments of these words. For example, "t-it" is in the set but the filter will also pick up words like Hitt-ite, t-itle, beati-tude, practi-tioner and const-tution. Then there words like "an-al" thereby flagging words like an-alysis and "c-um" flagging acc-umulate or doc-ument and s-ex and se-xual, hom-os-exual. You would think that the moderators would have corrected this by now considering the number of times this has been commented on but they have not. To be safe, I typically add hyphens in any word that said filter might judge "of-fensive".

    September 1, 2010 at 11:56 pm |
  3. FYI

    I was not to successful navigating the pages at the link you provided. Can you list those here so we can see them please? Thanks! (Crossan Inventory pages)

    September 1, 2010 at 7:39 pm |
    • Reality

      The moderators do not typically allow the posting of a full webpage address. Hmmm, the address I originally listed got the dreaded "waiting for moderation" but I see said address has the forbidden "t-it" in "ti'tle" in the address. Try this one:

      wiki.faithfutures.org/index.php?ti-tle=Crossan_Inventory. Type the address in your web browser leaving out the hyphen in t-ti-tle.

      September 1, 2010 at 11:51 pm |
  4. Reality

    There are many contemporary an-alyses of the historic Jesus. One of the best is free and is online at faithfutures.org at the Crossan Inventory pages. Other historic Jesus exegetes besides Professor JD Crossan are: Borg, Funk, Vermes, Pagels, Meyer, Mack, Doherty, Ehrman, Eisenman, Fredriksen, Ludemann, Macoby, Meier, Sanders, Freke and Gandy, Horsley, Johnson, Wright, Strauss, Holtzmann, Bultmann, Kasemann, Robinson and Schweitzer. Add Reimarus and also Thomas Jefferson for an extension of the contemporary time period.

    September 1, 2010 at 10:42 am |
  5. FYI

    Reality

    An-alyses of Jesus’ life by many contemporary New Testament scholars via the New Testament and related docu-ments have concluded that only about 30% of Jesus' sayings and ways noted in the New Testament were authentic
    and they were?

    September 1, 2010 at 8:59 am |
    • David Johnson

      Good point. It is best we know the 30% that are authentic.

      September 1, 2010 at 9:36 am |
  6. Reality

    An-alyses of Jesus’ life by many contemporary New Testament scholars via the New Testament and related docu-ments have concluded that only about 30% of Jesus' sayings and ways noted in the New Testament were authentic.

    September 1, 2010 at 8:38 am |
    • Mike

      "contemporary" that is funny, what about the original people that were there the 500 that Paul mentioned witness the resurrection and were still alive at the time at the writings. Do you know there are "contemporary" people today that do not belive the holo-caust did not occur either. Maybe 300 years from now, if the Lord tarries, there will be "contemporary" people who don't believe in 9-11? I say this for edification, you put to much faith in Crossan's work, especially when he has been debunked on several points.

      September 2, 2010 at 8:52 am |
  7. Reality

    Analyses of Jesus’ life by many co-ntemporary New Testament scho-lars via the New Testament and related documents have co-ncluded that only about 30% of Jesus' sayings and ways noted in the New Testament were authentic.

    September 1, 2010 at 8:35 am |
  8. Reality

    continued from above:

    The 30% of the NT that is authentic Jesus like everything in life was borrowed
    /pla- giarized and/or improved from those who came before. In Jesus' case, it was the ways and sayings of the Babylonians, Greeks, Persians, Egyptians, Hitt-ites, Canaanites, OT, John the Baptizer and possibly the ways and sayings of traveling Greek Cynics.

    For added pi-zza-zz, Catholic theologians divided god the singularity into three persons and invented atonement as an added guilt trip for the pew people to go along with this trinity of overseers. By doing so, they made god the padre into god the fi-lic-ide.

    .Luther, Calvin, Joe Smith, Henry VIII, Wesley, Roger Williams, the Great Babs et al, founders of Christian-based religions or combination religions also suffered from the belief in/hallucinations of pretty wingie thingie visits and prophecies for profits analogous to the myths of Catholicism (resurrections, apparitions, ascensions and im-ma-culate con-ceptions).

    Current problems:

    Ped-ophilic priests, adul-terous preachers, propheteering/ profiteering evangelicals and atonement theology.

    September 1, 2010 at 8:31 am |
  9. Reality

    Christianity from an historic standpoint:

    Jesus was an illiterate, Jewish, peasant, simple preacher man who suffered from hal-lu-cinations and who has been characterized anywhere from the Messiah from Nazareth to a mythical character from mythical Nazareth to a ma-mzer from Nazareth. –

    September 1, 2010 at 8:27 am |
    • David Johnson

      @Reality

      I must disagree with you, on Jesus being illiterate. A fundie told me that there is proof Jesus could read and write:
      "Jesus stooped down, and with his finger wrote on the ground"

      I hated to correct you, but it had to be done.

      September 1, 2010 at 9:18 am |
    • Toffsman

      @David Johnson

      If Jesus existed and was not illiterate, where are the documents he produced? Where are his very own words? I believe they were deliberately destroyed if they ever existed in the first place.
      Religion is the anti-truth

      September 1, 2010 at 10:21 am |
    • Sconetwo3

      @David Johnson

      You think Jesus exIsted?
      And that if he did he was able to read and write? Then what happened to all the things he must have written throughout his lifetime and "ministry"?
      Where did those very important documents go, David Johnson?

      September 1, 2010 at 10:26 am |
    • Filtertest24

      @David Johnson

      You think Jesus exIsted?
      And that if he did he was able to read and write? Then what happened to all the things he must have written throughout his lifetime?
      Where did they go, David Johnson?

      September 1, 2010 at 10:28 am |
    • Reality

      There is only one place in the NT that suggests Jesus could read i.e. Luke 4:16. This passage is not attested to in any other NT passage or in any other related doc-ument making it a later addition or poor translation as per most NT scholars' analyses.

      See also Professor Crossan and Professor Reed's book, Excavating Jesus, p. 30.

      See also Professor Bruce Chilton's commentary in his book, Rabbi Jesus, An Intimate Biography, pp 99-101- An excerpt:

      "What Luke misses is that Jesus stood in the synagogue as an illiterate ma-mzer in his claim to be the Lord's anointed".

      It is very unfortunate that Jesus was illiterate for it resulted in many gospels and epistles being written years after his death by non-witnesses. This resulted in significant differences in said gospels and epistles and with many embellishments to raise Jesus to the level of a deity to compete with the Roman gods and emperors. See Raymond Brown's 878 page book, An Introduction to the New Testament, (Luke 4:16 note on p. 237) for an exhaustive review of the true writers of the gospels and epistles.

      September 1, 2010 at 10:48 am |
    • Mike

      Also...

      Matthew 7:28-29
      Mark 1:21-22
      Luke 2:46-47 (what were you doing at 12?)

      Hey Dave, yesterday an atheist was shot dead during a hostage situ-tion looks like those stats for atheist in jail are still going to remain the same.

      September 2, 2010 at 8:47 am |
  10. ICEMAN

    They had to think about it...;-0 , and it took them 5 years lol

    September 1, 2010 at 5:17 am |
  11. Frogist

    Now that should be the purpose of religion – helping people in need.

    September 1, 2010 at 12:06 am |
    • David Johnson

      Helping people? You mean instead of trying to make the country a Chrisitian Nation, where the fundies decide what is moral and what is not? Helping people instead of trying to become the voice of god through the political system?
      What a novel idea.

      September 1, 2010 at 9:11 am |
    • Frogist

      @ David Johnson: Yeah you're right... these guys probably aren't REAL christians anyway since they work with those darn episcopalians. They didn't even get paid for their labour building up some town miles away from their home. Sounds like socialism to me. Or worse yet... Maybe they're building a mosque. After all each and every one of them didn't go on the tv and say they weren't terrorists. Very suspicious... 😉

      September 1, 2010 at 11:58 am |
  12. Reality

    Once again, all that work on a church that provides "worthless worship" due the severe flaws in the history and theology of Christianity. And then there is the situation where the next level 5 hurricane that hits NO will simply wash away the church.

    August 31, 2010 at 11:47 pm |
    • Iggy

      @reality. I'm so sorry for your life experiences. They've obviously left you in a hopeless state of mind.

      September 1, 2010 at 12:45 am |
    • Reality

      Christianity from an historic standpoint:

      Jesus was an illiterate, Jewish, peasant/carpenter/simple preacher man who suffered from hal-lu-cinations and who has been characterized anywhere from the Messiah from Nazareth to a mythical character from mythical Nazareth to a ma-mzer from Nazareth. –

      Analyses of Jesus’ life by many co-ntemporary NT scholars via the NT and related documents have concluded that only about 30% of Jesus' sayings and ways noted in the NT were authentic. The rest being embe-llishments e.g. miracles/ha-lluc-inations made/had by the NT authors to impress various Christian, Jewish and Pagan se-cts.

      The 30% of the NT that is authentic Jesus like everything in life was borrowed
      /pla- giarized and/or improved from those who came before. In Jesus' case, it was the ways and sayings of the Babylonians, Greeks, Persians, Egyptians, Hitt-ites, Canaanites, OT, John the Baptizer and possibly the ways and sayings of traveling Greek Cynics.

      For added pi-zza-zz, Catholic theologians divided god the singularity into three persons and invented atonement as an added guilt trip for the pew people to go along with this trinity of overseers. By doing so, they made god the padre into god the fi-lic-ide.

      .Luther, Calvin, Joe Smith, Henry VIII, Wesley, Roger Williams, the Great Babs et al, founders of Christian-based religions or combination religions also suffered from the belief in/hallucinations of pretty wingie thingie visits and prophecies for profits analogous to the myths of Catholicism (resurrections, apparitions, ascensions and im-ma-culate con-ceptions).

      Current problems:

      Ped-ophilic priests, adul-terous preachers, propheteering/ profiteering evangelicals and atonement theology.

      September 1, 2010 at 8:24 am |
    • Reality

      Christianity from an historic standpoint:

      Jesus was an illiterate, Jewish, peasant/carpenter/simple preacher man who suffered from hal-lu-cinations and who has been characterized anywhere from the Messiah from Nazareth to a mythical character from mythical Nazareth to a ma-mzer from Nazareth. –

      Analyses of Jesus’ life by many co-ntemporary NT scholars via the NT and related documents have concluded that only about 30% of Jesus' sayings and ways noted in the NT were authentic. The rest being embe-llishments e.g. miracles/ha-lluc-inations made/had by the NT authors to impress various Christian, Jewish and Pagan se-cts.

      September 1, 2010 at 8:26 am |
    • Reality

      continued from above:

      Analyses of Jesus’ life by many co-ntemporary New Testament scholars via the New Testament and related documents have concluded that only about 30% of Jesus' sayings and ways noted in the New Testament were authentic. The rest being embe-llishments e.g. miracles and ha-lluc-inations made or had by the New Testament authors to impress various Christian, Jewish and Pa-gan se-cts.

      September 1, 2010 at 8:30 am |
    • David Johnson

      @Iggy

      I was watching the news, and a commercial came out, asking for donations to a children's hospital.

      What brings tears to my eyes, is all the money donated to churches. That money could be donated to help sick children.

      Why does god need so much money anyway?

      September 1, 2010 at 9:32 am |
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The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.