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September 14th, 2010
07:56 AM ET

Mira Sorvino finds faith in new movie

Editor's Note: Academy Award winning actress Mira Sorvino sat down with CNN's Belief Blog to talk about her new film Like Dandelion Dust. The film is based on the book by Christian author Karen Kingsbury. CNN's Chris Ford filed this report.

Academy Award winning actress Mira Sorvino is the star of the latest film aimed at the faith community. Sorvino says she found faith in the story of a mother who gave her child up for adoption but has decided to try and get him back.

While not overtly a religious film, Sorvino says "Like Dandelion Dust" contains religious values: forgiveness, love, and redemption. Watch what she had say in our interview.

The film also stars Barry Pepper, Cole Hauser, Kate Levering, and Maxwell Perry Cotton and is directed by Jon Gunn. It is rated PG-13 for mature thematic material including domestic violence and alcohol abuse. It will be playing in select theaters Sept. 24.

- CNN Belief Blog

Filed under: Art • Christianity

soundoff (185 Responses)
  1. Frank

    I thought Mira Sorvino was an atheist?

    October 1, 2010 at 12:57 am |
  2. brittany suellen

    let me just say. you cannot judge what you are unsure of.

    September 29, 2010 at 2:36 pm |
  3. Alan Miller

    I am 52 and as a kid growing up with a catholic mother and protestant father from Scotland, I was aware of the many problems that lay in ignorance. I grew up in Minneapolis and my parents made a point of taking me to all types of churches, and introduced me to all religions so that my brothers and I could make our own choices. For me, I believe in what all religions teach us on how to treat one another and to make the best of the short time we have on earth, Overall, I do not believe in a god, but have great respect for those who have belief.

    September 28, 2010 at 1:34 pm |
    • M

      Not to judge but that wasn't very Christianly of your apparently Christian parents to purposely lead their children away from God.

      February 2, 2012 at 10:57 am |
  4. Lourdes

    I agree with Sarah's point. And i don't think she's being "naive" or "ignorant" as Howard puts it..I believe that "goodness" is the original state of all human beings, created as such by God . I believe that "Goodness" has an objective basis...It's rooted in our faith in God who is the source of all goodness. And this is TRUE whether one professes it consciously or not. It's written in every human heart. I echo Robin's sentiment. Thanks for you very enlightening post Mike Ferris...

    September 22, 2010 at 10:32 pm |
    • Doc Vestibule

      Putting aside the concept of original sin, which states that all humans are born bad, if one accepts the concept of an omnipotent creator then that deity is the source of all evil as well as goodness.
      @Robin
      I concur that the human body is an astoundingly complex machine. Determining it's inner workings is a study that has piqued human curiosity since time immemorial. Only in the last generation have we truly begun to understand the basic building blocks of organic life. However – irreducible complexity is a self-defeating argument. Awe is the proper response to the beauty and complexity of life and the universe, but to explain it all away by stating "God did it" is to stifle our development as a species.
      As for who determines standards of behaviour – it is always man himself who determines and enforces these standards. Codes of conduct are required for a social creature such as ourselves, but it is absurd to postulate a divine source for morality. If that was the case, then why have not all cultures had the same concept of propriety the world over and all throughout history?
      Humans create and enforce their own morality.
      Religion codifies the rules of conduct and joins people together into a community not necessarily based on proximal community, which can be a good thing. However, whenever a group gets together and decides that "Truth" is determined by consensus, they will spread that "truth" by any means necessary. Preachers and missionaries are the polite first attempt, which is inevitably followed by the armies of God, bringing truth and light at sword point.
      The conceit that one cultures morality is superior to another's is the catalyst for war!

      If we had been born and raised in Aztec culture, we would find Cannibalism to not only be acceptable and moral, but a blessed practice as well for both the consumers and the consumed!

      September 23, 2010 at 9:57 am |
  5. Robin

    Mike Ferris

    Hey Howard; David

    Forgiveness, love, and redemption are not "religious value", they are just values of any good person....This is actually not a true statement. There is no good or evil in the absence of an absolute moral authority such as a God. The concept of a "good person" is absurd for anyone who believes in moral relativism. The entire world is reduced to actions which have no actual moral value but only ethical standards against which to act. In other words; we have to have some standard to go by. I know you're an evolution believing Atheist that believes man just by himself can be moral, but think about It.; who determines that? Will it be you, me, or someone else? There is a God who created you just like there was someone who created this computer and the Internet by which we can communicate anywhere in the world due to satellite technology that was created by someone too. The human body is far more complexly designed than anything man has created, yet there are those like you who still want to deny the existence of a creator. We are answerable to God and His laws, just like we are answerable to man's laws here on earth.

    Excellent comment Mike Ferris! I would like to hear some of the more vocal athiest answers to this.

    September 18, 2010 at 9:05 am |
  6. brad

    We often hear that people can be moral (i.e. forgiving, altruistic, etc.) without religion. But being moral without religion has never been tried. Here's an analogy: in the American southwest the temperatures will soar well over 100 F for days on end. The streets bake and absorb heat every day. When the sun goes down, pavement is still hot because of the heat given off. Then someone will stand onn the dark street and say "See. I can be warm without the sun." Morality is like this. Humanity has been "soaked" in the Judeo/Christian tradition for 4000 years. Any morality humanity possesses has been borrowed from religion. We will never be able to go back, eliminate religion, and see what morality develops. Probably just something based on survival of the fittest.

    September 17, 2010 at 4:17 pm |
  7. Doug McAlexander

    Christians were first called Christians at Antioch. They were tagged with this label because each of them exhibited the conduct of a "little Christ”. The term Christian was not intended to be a term of endearment but an accusation. Some of the non-believers would poke fun at these believers by calling them a little Christ!

    And when he had found him, he brought him to Antioch. So it was that for a whole year they assembled with the church and taught a great many people. And the disciples were first called Christians in Antioch. (Acts 11:26)

    Technically to be labeled a Christian is something we should hope for. One can be a believer but not always act like a little Christ. The Apostle Paul wrote of this in his letter to the Church at Rome (Romans 7 and 8). We should strive to live our life in such a way that we can be accused of being a Christian.

    Just because a believer fails to live up to the label of little Christ doesn’t mean they are not sincere in their faith. Paul makes this abundantly clear in Romans 7 and 8. Fortunately, for those who have asked for their sins to be forgiven, and have placed their faith in Jesus The Christ, God will judge their intentions before He judges their actions. Those who choose not to become a believer unless they can find a perfect Christian condemn themselves to an eternity of separation from God. This goes against all survival insticts.

    September 17, 2010 at 1:37 am |
  8. Luana

    Debbie, whoever you are, no, Christians don't think they "corner the market on moral values". But they DO know that scripture corners the market on moral values. Scripture is but our (yours and mine) guide to light the way through the darkness.
    "Like Dandelion Dust" is a beautifl movie, with heart, and warmth, and meaning.... Embrace the message, don't fight it.

    September 16, 2010 at 12:57 am |
    • Doc Vestibule

      @Luana
      I would beg to differ.
      There have been countless moral codices throughout human history – "scripture" being just one of them. There is much in the Abrahamic scripture that modern people find abhorrent, or absurd at best. See much of Leviticus for examples.
      Even four of the ten commandments are not moral guidelines, per se – they are simply methods of ensuring subservience.
      Morality is often contingent on environment. Practices that some societies think are immoral are perfectly acceptable in others.
      Sin lies only in harming others unnecessarily. All other sin is invented nonsense.

      September 16, 2010 at 12:53 pm |
  9. Mike Ferris

    Hey Howard; David

    Forgiveness, love, and redemption are not "religious value", they are just values of any good person....This is actually not a true statement. There is no good or evil in the absence of an absolute moral authority such as a God. The concept of a "good person" is absurd for anyone who believes in moral relativism. The entire world is reduced to actions which have no actual moral value but only ethical standards against which to act. In other words; we have to have some standard to go by. I know you're an evolution believing Atheist that believes man just by himself can be moral, but think about It.; who determines that? Will it be you, me, or someone else? There is a God who created you just like there was someone who created this computer and the Internet by which we can communicate anywhere in the world due to satellite technology that was created by someone too. The human body is far more complexly designed than anything man has created, yet there are those like you who still want to deny the existence of a creator. We are answerable to God and His laws, just like we are answerable to man's laws here on earth.

    September 15, 2010 at 11:12 am |
  10. RelationShip

    Why do people argue over these labels of belief systems, instead of honor each others' mutual higher values? Why is it man/woman against man/woman, when the gift of life, God-given or not, is blessed by each of us in the act of acknowledging others' worth? That's forgiveness, love and redemption all in one, call the act what you will. Why have disputes over appropriate behavior within the human family when we can practice it instead? I think practice is the operative word.

    September 15, 2010 at 10:53 am |
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The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.