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My Take: Jesus would believe in evolution and so should you
The most compelling evidence for evolution comes from the study of genes.
April 10th, 2011
01:00 AM ET

My Take: Jesus would believe in evolution and so should you

Editor's Note: Karl W. Giberson, Ph.D., is vice president of The BioLogos Foundation and is the author or coauthor of seven books, including The Language of Science and Faith.

By Karl W. Giberson, Special to CNN

Jesus once famously said, “I am the Truth.”

Christianity at its best embodies this provocative idea and has long been committed to preserving, expanding and sharing truth. Most of the great universities of the world were founded by Christians committed to the truth—in all its forms—and to training new generations to carry it forward.

When science began in the 17th century, Christians eagerly applied the new knowledge to alleviate suffering and improve living conditions.

But when it comes to the truth of evolution, many Christians feel compelled to look the other way. They hold on to a particular interpretation of an ancient story in Genesis that they have fashioned into a modern account of origins - a story that began as an oral tradition for a wandering tribe of Jews thousands of years ago.

This is the view on display in a $27 million dollar Creation Museum in Kentucky. It inspired the Institute for Creation Research, which purports to offer scientific support for creationism.

And it’s hardly a fringe view. A 2010 Gallup poll indicated that 4 in 10 Americans think that “God created human beings pretty much in their present form at one time within the last 10,000 years or so.” (http://www.gallup.com/poll/145286/four-americans-believe-strict-creationism.aspx)

While Genesis contains wonderful insights into the relationship between God and the creation, it simply does not contain scientific ideas about the origin of the universe, the age of the earth or the development of life.

For more than two centuries, careful scientific research, much of it done by Christians, has demonstrated clearly that the earth is billions years old, not mere thousands, as many creationists argue. We now know that the human race began millions of years ago in Africa - not thousands of years ago in the Middle East, as the story in Genesis suggests.

And all life forms are related to each other though evolution. These are important truths that science has discovered through careful research. They are not “opinions” that can be set aside if you don’t like them.

Anyone who values truth must take these ideas seriously, for they have been established as true beyond any reasonable doubt.

There is much evidence for evolution. The most compelling comes from the study of genes, especially now that the Human Genome Project has been completed and the genomes of many other species being constantly mapped.

In particular, humans share an unfortunate “broken gene” with many other primates, including chimpanzees, orangutans, and macaques. This gene, which works fine in most mammals, enables the production of Vitamin C. Species with broken versions of the gene can’t make Vitamin C and must get it from foods like oranges and lemons.

Thousands of hapless sailors died painful deaths scurvy during the age of exploration because their “Vitamin C” gene was broken.

How can different species have identical broken genes? The only reasonable explanation is that they inherited it from a common ancestor.

Not surprisingly, evolution since the time of Darwin has claimed that humans, orangutans, chimpanzees, and macaques evolved recently from a common ancestor. The new evidence from genetics corroborates this.

Such evidence proves common ancestry with a level of certainty comparable to the evidence that the earth goes around the sun.

This is but one of many, many evidences that support the truth of evolution - that make it a “sacred fact” that Christians must embrace in the name of truth. And they should embrace this truth with enthusiasm, for this is the world that God created.

Christians must come to welcome - rather than fear - the ideas of evolution. Truths about Nature are sacred, for they speak of our Creator. Such truths constitute “God’s second book” for Christians to read alongside the Bible.

In the 17th century, Galileo used the metaphor of the “two books” to help Christians of his generation understand the sacred truth that the earth moves about the sun. “The Bible,” he liked to say, “tells us how to go to heaven, not how the heavens ago.”

To understand how the heavens go we must read the book of Nature, not the Bible.

The Book of nature reveals the truth that God created the world through gradual processes over billions of years, rather than over the course of six days, as many creationists believe.

Evolution does not contradict the Bible unless you force an unreasonable interpretation on that ancient book.

To suppose, as the so-called young earth creationists do, that God dictated modern scientific ideas to ancient and uncomprehending scribes is to distort the biblical message beyond recognition. Modern science was not in the worldview of the biblical authors and it is not in the Bible.

Science is not a sinister enterprise aimed at destroying faith. It’s an honest exploration of the wonderful world that God created.

We are often asked to think about what Jesus would do, if he lived among us today. Who would Jesus vote for? What car would he drive?

To these questions we should add “What would Jesus believe about origins?”

And the answer? Jesus would believe evolution, of course. He cares for the Truth.

The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of Karl W. Giberson.

- CNN Belief Blog Co-Editor

Filed under: Bible • Christianity • Culture & Science • Culture wars • Opinion • Science

soundoff (3,562 Responses)
  1. Reality

    The topic starts off on the wrong foot which is typical for any article on the "history and theology challenged" religion called Christianity.

    To wit:

    Searching for the real truth:- some examples

    "I am the Truth" i.e. John 14:6. This passage was not said by the historical Jesus but was wishful thinking and an embellishment by John to make Jesus more like the ancient and local gods of first century Palestine. http://wiki.faithfutures.org/index.php?ti-tle=210_Place_of_Life

    And From Professor Gerd Ludemann's book, Jesus After 2000 Years, p. 416, "Anyone in search of the historical Jesus will not find him in the Gospel of John......This verdict is the consensus among New Testament scholars."

    April 10, 2011 at 10:54 am |
  2. CatS

    God doesn't write books. Men write books. God writes in the hearts of men and men of letters try to interpret the voice of God within. Men are flawed and the Bible is flawed because it was written by men.If the Bible had beed written by God it would be perfect. If it were perfect, we wouldn't need priests and preachers to 'interpret' the Word for us. It would be perfectly understood. Jesus didn't teach from the Bible – or the Torah. And he had contempt for those that 'interpreted' scripture for their own ends. Most of Jesus' teachings are that you have to search for God and listen for His Voice inside you. That is what he found after 40 days in the desert – NOT 40 days reading the Bible/Torah.

    April 10, 2011 at 10:54 am |
  3. umbuna

    Everyone want heaven; nobody want dead.

    April 10, 2011 at 10:54 am |
  4. S. Wilson

    Absolutely he would. He created it! What better way to promote species adaptation to the changing environment?

    April 10, 2011 at 10:54 am |
  5. MM

    To the evolutionist: when does man stop evolving? What is the next stage of man's evolution? If it ends then what?

    Well, I believe in both creation and evolution. I believe that God created the world/universe billions of years ago. I also believe that God is still making things. I believe that God created man just as we are today – fully formed. The only thing that I see that continues to evolve in humans is knowledge. With that said, I sure hope the baboon's and the animal kingdom's knowledge does not evolve and overtake the human's knowledge. We'd be in lot's of trouble.

    April 10, 2011 at 10:53 am |
    • Backralker85

      "when does man stop evolving?"
      When there is no longer a reason to evolve.

      "What is the next stage of man's evolution?"
      There may not be a next stage.

      "If it ends then what?"
      Then we stop, and live like we have.

      April 10, 2011 at 11:20 am |
    • mcore

      READ A BOOK. Obviously you've never even looked at a basic biology text. All of your questions will be answered. Everything that is alive is evolving. Always. Mutations happen every day. And there is no way to predict where it's all going. We're just along for the ride. Buckle up.

      April 10, 2011 at 11:23 am |
    • CatS

      Back – I'm afraid there is one last rule of evolution you missed – what doesn't change, dies. Man must continue to evolve or mankind will die out. Predicting where human evolution will go is like trying to foretell what the world will be like in 100,000 years. Impossible. It's not like we have other examples to go by in making our prediction. It's like what a man said about predicting how many worlds in the universe are inhabited by intelligent life. If by chance, intelligence is so rare, that it only happened once in all the universe- we're it. Sorta screws up the statistical analysis. 😉

      April 10, 2011 at 11:29 am |
    • Backtalker85

      "If by chance, intelligence is so rare, that it only happened once in all the universe- we're it."

      And that would make me really, really sad.

      April 10, 2011 at 11:37 am |
  6. Robert Evans

    Let me commend you, Dr. Giberson, for your reasoned (and reasonable) attempt to explain why science and religious belief are not incompatible (at least to the open mind). I am a scientist (of more than fifty years' experience), in my youth I was brought up as a christian, but now have no religious beliefs whatsoever.
    I am intellectually alive to what the planet and the rest of the universe have to offer the open mind, and am not afraid of the mysteries humankind has yet to explain. What saddens me is the tone of some of the commenters who seem unable to tolerate a divergent opinion. If I were religious I would suggest to those intolerant individuals that we use the greatest of god's gifts (if there are such things) to us: our minds. Ah, the joy I have had in trying to figure things out through the agency of my mind. I wish that everyone would be able to learn something new on the day of his or her death.
    The billions of years of Earth's history have enabled the processes of evolution and its companion, natural selection, to work and allow our survival. But if we are not careful, our own arrogance and selfishness may bring about our early extinction. What a tragedy that would be for all of us: the ignorant, the intolerant, the benign and the peace-loving. Our collective suicide will not discriminate among those groups!
    May we all continue the search for truth.

    April 10, 2011 at 10:53 am |
  7. Jack

    Giberson is presenting opinions as if they were fact, and they are most certainly not. The fact is, some scientists believe that the geologic record indicates that the earth is billions of years old, but others do not. Scientists also once believed that the earth was flat, but now we know that they were wrong.

    One fact is certain. And that is that to believe that we understand all the geologic, astronomic and biologic processes of the universe is to be extremely naive and/or extremely arrogant. Some things are beyond the level of simple knowledge.
    For instance, there are explanations to show how the universe could have expanded to the point where stars are billions of light years apart while still being only a few thousand years old. It’s called General Relativity. In Einstein’s theory of General Relativity, gravity affects time. If God did create the universe as according to the “Big Bang” model, the entire mass of the universe would have been originally concentrated toward the center of the event. Where mass is highly concentrated, time slows down. Therefore, while the universe experienced most of its expansion in the first few thousand years, an observer on the earth, in its current location, would look back toward the center of the universe and conclude that billions of years had passed from the origin, and all because of the effects of gravity according to the theory of General Relativity. Have I understood that correctly? Maybe and maybe not. However, one thing we know is that time is not a constant.

    Another thing we know is that God sometimes creates things with the appearance of age. Adam was not created as a baby, but as an adult man. In the end, one thing we see is that we do best to humble ourselves and admit that we don’t know everything.

    April 10, 2011 at 10:52 am |
    • mcore

      You sir, are wrong. In the world scientific community, there is no longer any debate about the age of the earth, the age of the universe or the fact that evolution is a process working in every living thing. Your false beliefs are feeble attempts to explain away the mountains of collaborating evidence, carefully gathered by scientists working independently in unrelated fields over hundreds of years, that clearly shows the earth is over 4 billion years old. It's so easy to see that a child could understand it. But nothing can get through to people who remain willfully blind and ignorant.

      April 10, 2011 at 11:21 am |
  8. thegadfly

    If you don't believe the Bible is 100% true, why do you believe any of it's true? Personally, I find it hard to even take seriously, but far too many people think that any doubts they may have about its authenticity are "temptations".

    The bottom line is that science has (of course not perfectly) worked long and hard to discover truths, while "believers" think they can find truth "revealed" by God in writings He purportedly inspired in a particular bunch of yokels in a particular backward culture at a particular backward time. Never mind all the other yokels in all the other cultures at all the other times (most of whom also considered themselves "chosen"). And never mind the circular logic by which the Bible must be true because the Bible says so.

    I have summed it up like this:

    Revealed truth is not.
    Truth is not revealed.

    April 10, 2011 at 10:51 am |
  9. Bob

    I think the apes got a bum rap !!!

    April 10, 2011 at 10:50 am |
  10. Leo D

    A man born during the Iron Age, who lives in modern times, would believe anything, whether it's science or a get-rich-quick money scheme. So yes, Jesus would believe in evolution... and homeopathy.... and Big Foot...

    It has nothing to do whether evolution is true. It has a lot to do with a person's capacity for receiving and processing information using reason, something people in the Iron Age performed far worse than the people of modern times.

    April 10, 2011 at 10:50 am |
  11. Ed

    The basic idea of evolution, that species change over time, is not new. It developed with the ancient Greeks, long before Jesus was born. It was widely known at the time of Jesus. Since he never spoke out against this belief, we can only assume that, like those around him, they accepted this as non controversials.

    April 10, 2011 at 10:49 am |
  12. Unbeliever

    It truly astounds me that any sizable amount of people still disbelieve in evolution and still believe in a mythical all knowing, all seeing being. I am sure it is comforting even if it is nonsense.
    I face the darkness resolutely and fearfully but honestly. And there are atheists in foxholes and all around you. We just feel no need to prothlizise.

    April 10, 2011 at 10:48 am |
  13. PRISM 1234

    @Albert

    The "truth" is, science has itself become a religion. It has it's share of false prophets. It is decided in what they believe. And many of its beliefs are flawed. Many take science at face value. If science says it, it must be true. Yes, the Science Gods have their share of blind sheep."

    Well said!

    April 10, 2011 at 10:46 am |
    • Connie Blankenship

      I'll tell you one thing for sure. The science people are more broad minded than the "holy rollers" and are always seeking the truth. The H.R.'s won't believe physical evidence if it isn't in the Bible.

      April 10, 2011 at 10:58 am |
    • jbob16523

      You are a complete brainwashed religious fool. You have no idea how science operates and even if you did, you would still make idiotic comments such as these. In science there are no false prophets because scientists are, above all else, skeptical. No scientist will accept anything as truth before they see overwhelming evidence that it is true. People like you degrade and destroy the very fabric of our society, our nation, and our species.

      April 10, 2011 at 11:03 am |
    • mcore

      At least science is self-correcting. When a long-held theory becomes obviously wrong due to a better understanding of the universe, that old theory is rejected and replaced. Science constantly evolves and improves and refines as opposed to religion which hangs onto obviously foolish and false world views until it completely stagnates and becomes irrelevant. The history of the world is the history of science trumping religion at every turn.

      April 10, 2011 at 11:12 am |
  14. CdnJim

    To those who believe the earth is only 6,000 years old: WHy do you not believe your own eyes? When you look up at the night sky and see the stars and galaxies, many of which are thousands or millions of light years away. If there was nothing prior to creation 6,000 years ago, then we should not be able to see those stars and galaxies, since their light will not reach us for a few million years hence? If you see them today, they were here way back when.

    April 10, 2011 at 10:46 am |
  15. Havildar

    No the monkeys and you did come from a common ancestor from Africa.

    April 10, 2011 at 10:46 am |
  16. pithymcgee

    My I.Q. is lower by 80 points after reading these comments from the Holy-rollers.

    April 10, 2011 at 10:44 am |
    • Tim S

      Illigitimi non carborundum

      April 10, 2011 at 11:03 am |
  17. MM

    The author writes: We now know that the human race began millions of years ago in Africa – not thousands of years ago in the Middle East, as the story in Genesis suggests.

    He clearly has no idea that what we he calls the Middle East did not exist during 'creation' time. It was all AFRICA! So he's correct in saying that creation began in Africa, but to mention Middle East is totally wrong because the region was not known by that name back then. It only takes a minute to look at an ancient map of the region.

    April 10, 2011 at 10:44 am |
    • pithymcgee

      Just because it wasn't known as "the Middle East" doesn't mean the land wasn't there. It's absolutely reasonable for the man to reference this area by the region name we use today.

      April 10, 2011 at 10:47 am |
    • Havildar

      Abraham / Ibrahim came out of present day Iraq. Middle East is actually Western Asia. Yes man originated in Africa.

      April 10, 2011 at 11:01 am |
    • Edgar

      In modern times, we call it the Middle East, but just because they didn't call it the Middle East in the ancient world doesn't mean that the land didn't exist. He's just using the modern designation, like he did with Africa. Do you think millions of years ago, our common ancestor called the large land mass they inhabited Africa? He was just referring to the fact that of the 4 rivers mentioned in genesis, two are the Tigris and Euphrates, which are located in the Middle East. Although exact locations of the fantastical Eden are disputed, it is thought to be somewhere in the Middle East because of the landmarks given in the Bible and because the early Jews didn't have much of a worldview beyond the Middle East. That is perfectly understandable because that's where they lived and that's what they knew.

      April 10, 2011 at 11:34 am |
    • Edgar

      Also, thousands of years ago, it was not all Africa. About 65 million years ago the continents started to resemble pretty much what they are like today. Were talking at the most 10,000 years or so for "creation time." I'm only giving you that because that seems to be the number creationists like to fall back on. So again it was not all Africa. I really don't know what maps or history books you're reading, but they are either misinformed or you've misread them.

      April 10, 2011 at 11:44 am |
  18. WeirdIdeas

    Another theory men invented. They wanna be like God. If evolution is true and we share the same genes with the apes then why are there still apes around? It evolution is true then when do we stop evolving? Would we turn into something else after millions of years??? Perhaps humans came first and we evolve into APES someday lol guess that's gonna happen when you consider men's thinking nowadays 😀 Guess its a reverse process you know LOL

    April 10, 2011 at 10:43 am |
    • Michael

      you're an idiot... yes evolution is still going on, yes we're changing every day and yes millions of years from nowwho knows what we'll look like... why there's still apes around? that's one the species that the ancient apes evolved in.. moron

      April 10, 2011 at 10:57 am |
    • CB

      Did you finish high school?

      April 10, 2011 at 10:57 am |
    • Meh06

      There are answers for your questions. It would only take a few hours of your time and you would understand how evolution works. Even though I am an atheist I still took the time to read the bible so i could come up with my own conclusion on what to believe. I suggest you look at both sides as well rather then just mocking science.

      April 10, 2011 at 10:58 am |
    • Brian

      THere is a difference between "we evolved from Apes" and "we evolved from a common ancestor with Apes". The first statement is, according to the theories of evolution, false. The latter statement is what people believe. That "ancestor" was not an Ape, and that ancestor is also no longer around. Apes didn't exist back then.

      Also, of course we are continuing to evolve. Evolution takes place over millions of years so in our tiny insignificant life we are going to see very little, but it is always happening.

      April 10, 2011 at 11:02 am |
    • futuregeneticist

      i do not think you understand how evolution works.. THIS is the problem that the world has
      but can you really blame people? i'm not trying to put myself on a pedestal here, it's just that i am a biology student, so i have to know this stuff. we as humans are doing a really bad job at providing good science education.
      evolution does not select for the most complex organism
      natural selection is based on the most optimal set of qualities given the current environment
      qualities that will allow the species to propogate and survive under the adverse conditions
      this does not necessarily mean increased intelligence
      after all... do you really need to be that smart to keep warm during colder months? of course not! just a nice coat of fur.
      please look at a phylogenetic tree and you will understand... (hopefully)
      humans did not evolve from monkeys
      we co-evolved with chimps from a common ancestor!
      this in itself was a completely crap explanation, but i have to go to the library and study for my genetics final... lol

      April 10, 2011 at 11:05 am |
    • mcore

      If you would just read a science book, all of your questions would be satisfactorily answered. Evolution is happening all around you constantly. Every species is evolving. It happens through mutation. But the process takes millions of years to create new species, far too slowly for humans to witness first hand. We know it has happened by examining the fossil record and through modern DNA sequencing.

      April 10, 2011 at 11:06 am |
    • Scott

      I use to obsess over this issue of evolution. It virtually derailed my faith. BUT then I really started to read Genesis and compare what science says happened and how we got here. From the beginning of the universe (Big Bang) to the rise of man... Genesis beautifully explains these principals! When God spoke everything into existence, I would assume it was a rather BIG BANG. And he created man from the dust of the earth? Sounds like evolution to me. So to anyone who would ask "Why are their still apes", because we didn't evolve from apes. Its the BIGGEST misconception about evolution. We evolved from the same ancestors. It happened, folks. Stop being so scared of God's process.

      April 10, 2011 at 11:24 am |
    • Hilikus00

      Your post shows you have denied evolution without even a shred of understanding of it. Any research at all would show you what you said is absolutely ridiculous. If you don't care enough to look into your beliefs, are they really yours, or what someone told you to believe?

      April 10, 2011 at 12:15 pm |
  19. Mike

    Today, Jesus would believe in Evolution. But then there are plenty of Christians who would condemn Him. Some people just don't get it, and I guess, its OK, because He would also understand and forgive their ignorance.

    April 10, 2011 at 10:42 am |
    • Backralker85

      here we go some one that gets it. thank you for just being a live.. really no joke, thank you.

      April 10, 2011 at 10:50 am |
    • Connie Blankenship

      Of course Jesus would believe in it. After all evolution didn't create itself.

      April 10, 2011 at 10:51 am |
    • Havildar

      Everytime the Conservative Christians deny the poor (cutting Healthcare/ Medicare/Welfare and aid to the poor) their are Crucifying Jesus Christ with their Greed.

      April 10, 2011 at 10:56 am |
  20. 2011

    Fundamentalist Christianity which embraces creationism has become a cult today. Many of its followers were brainwashed into believing this ridiculous creationist pseudo-science. There is no reason or evidence, just blind faith.

    April 10, 2011 at 10:41 am |
    • Havildar

      Fundamentalist Conservative Right wing Christians are a cult as these people are the followers of "Simon the Magician" not Jesus Christ.

      April 10, 2011 at 10:50 am |
    • Jack

      Giberson is presenting opinions as if they were fact, and they are most certainly not. The fact is, some scientists believe that the geologic record indicates that the earth is billions of years old, but others do not. Scientists also once believed that the earth was flat, but now we know that they were wrong.
      One fact is certain. And that is that to believe that we understand all the geologic, astronomic and biologic processes of the universe is to be extremely naive and/or extremely arrogant. Some things are beyond the level of simple knowledge.
      For instance, there are explanations to show how the universe could have expanded to the point where stars are billions of light years apart while still being only a few thousand years old. It’s called General Relativity. In Einstein’s theory of General Relativity, gravity affects time. If God did create the universe as according to the “Big Bang” model, the entire mass of the universe would have been originally concentrated toward the center of the event. Where mass is highly concentrated, time slows down. Therefore, while the universe experienced most of its expansion in the first few thousand years, an observer on the earth, in its current location, would look back toward the center of the universe and conclude that billions of years had passed from the origin, and all because of the effects of gravity according to the theory of General Relativity. Have I understood that correctly? Maybe and maybe not. However, one thing we know is that time is not a constant.
      Another thing we know is that God sometimes creates things with the appearance of age. Adam was not created as a baby, but as an adult man. In the end, one thing we see is that we do best to humble ourselves and admit that we don’t know everything.

      By the way, you have absolutely zero grounds to show that Christianity is a cult today and your words show the bitterness of your heart. Biblical Christianity is the same as it's been since the first century.

      April 10, 2011 at 10:56 am |
    • Sam

      For all science does right, it is their weakness to see how they are deficient in understanding Christians, their views and their doctrine and how scientists offers these misunderstandings to the world in general.

      Myself and the other Christians that I know share the belief that God and science can and do exist in harmony.

      The contention with evolution first appears in the third paragraph when the writer presents "...when it comes to the truth of evolution,...". Let's talk about truth. It is that irrefutable, verifiable, absolute about a matter. Often it seems the best we can do is to approach what we think truth to be.

      Evolution is a theory; it is not "truth". It should be approached in that manner.

      What I believe is a widely held Christian view is that all life does change, adapt, and adjust based on traits and conditions. This speaks to the light/dark moths, island isolation, etc. The rub for me with evolution is that it fails to even reasonably explain the origins of life and the separation of species. Why do so many scientists that vehemently defend evolution fail to contend with this anomaly? And why, given that we do not know the origins of life, do so many scientists absolutely refuse to consider a 'creator' or superior being 'genisising' the process? That in itself is a violation of scientific approach.

      April 10, 2011 at 11:23 am |
    • Jalcide

      Jack - In reply to your musing on general relativity, "would look back toward the center of the universe and conclude that billions of years had passed from the origin." This is indeed incorrect, as there is no "center," as it's the expansion of space-time, itself. It is the same everywhere and doing so equally in all places. Another way of saying it is, the universe is not expanding into 3-dimensional space, it is 3-dimensional space, itself. Therefore a "center" is only what our minds tend to conjure when we attempt to visualize something 3-dimensional expanding into a 3-dimentional space.

      Also, time is relative for those bodies not experiencing gravity or a change in acceleration and in any kind of reasoning along these lines, for them, the frame of reference is preserved so that no arguments as to differences could be made. For the other situation where time does indeed run slower in an agreed upon by all parties manner - those experiencing gravity or acceleration (same thing) - the amounts and effects would be tiny compared to the scale of the estimated age of the universe. So, no matter how you wanted to look at it - it just couldn't come into play.

      We think we know the age of the universe for other reasons. Mainly, Hubble's Law that observed all objects in space have a doppler shift (color shift) relative to earth and each other. This allows us to measure distance (and time) in way not affect by any sort of time-dilation reasoning.

      In general, though an Atheist myself, I don't think evolution should be incompatible with religious beliefs. I mean, something with God-like power would be much more apt to use God-like tools. Evolution is a very elegant and God-like tool. Using powerful, simple "rules" of physics is way more impressive that having to be everywhere to "design" or "paint" everything. That's way too fussy and inelegant. Even we ourselves, as we become more technologically advanced, are using more elegant and overarching approaches. Example: We use a few simple rules of math and physics in our video games to render very complex and convincing worlds to explore. The game designers don't have to design and render every possible view by hand.

      No, a God, if there is one, would totally use something awesome like evolution.

      April 10, 2011 at 1:17 pm |
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