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April 11th, 2011
11:21 AM ET

Leading atheist publishes secular Bible

By Jessica Ravitz, CNN

The question arose early in British academic A.C. Grayling’s career: What if those ancient compilers who’d made Bibles, the collected religious texts that were translated, edited, arranged and published en masse, had focused instead on assembling the non-religious teachings of civilization’s greatest thinkers?

What if the book that billions have turned to for ethical guidance wasn’t tied to commandments from God or any one particular tradition but instead included the writings of Aristotle, the reflections of Confucius, the poetry of Baudelaire? What would that book look like, and what would it mean?

Decades after he started asking such questions, what Grayling calls “a lifetime’s work” has hit bookshelves. “The Good Book: A Humanist Bible,” subtitled “A Secular Bible” in the United Kingdom, was published this month. Grayling crafted it by using more than a thousand texts representing several hundred authors, collections and traditions.

The Bible would have been “a very different book and may have produced a very different history for mankind,” had it drawn on the work of philosophers and writers as opposed to prophets and apostles, says Grayling, a philosopher and professor at Birkbeck College, University of London, who is an atheist.

“Humanist ethics didn’t claim to be derived from a deity," he says. "(They) tended to start from a sympathetic understanding of human nature and accept that there’s a responsibility that each individual has to work out the values they live by and especially to recognize that the best of our good lives revolve around having good relationships with people.” 

Humanists rely on human reason as an alternative to religion or belief in God in attempting to find meaning and purpose in life.

Determined to make his material accessible, Grayling arranged his nearly 600-page "Good Book" much like the Bible, with double columns, chapters (the first is even called Genesis) and short verses. And much like the best-selling King James Bible, which is celebrating its 400th year, his book is written in a type of English that transcends time.

Like the Bible, "The Good Book," opens with a garden scene. But instead of Adam and Eve, Grayling's Genesis invokes Isaac Newton, the British scientist who pioneered the study of gravity.

"It was from the fall of fruit from such a tree that new inspiration came for inquiry into the nature of things," reads a verse from "The Good Book's" first chapter.

"When Newton sat in his garden, and saw what no one had seen before: that an apple draws the earth to itself, and the earth the apple," the verse continues, "Through a mutual force of nature that holds all things, from the planets to the stars, in unifying embrace."

The book's final chapter features a secular humanist version of the Ten Commandments: "Love well, seek the good in all things, harm no others, think for yourself, take responsibility, respect nature, do your utmost, be informed, be kind, be courageous: at least, sincerely try."

Grayling, reached Friday at a New York hotel just as he began his U.S. book tour, has been dubbed by some a “velvet atheist” or an “acceptable face of atheism,” he says, in contrast to more stridently anti-religious writers like Christopher Hitchens and Richard Dawkins, both of whom he counts as friends.

In other contexts, Grayling - who will soon take over as president of the British Humanist Association - admits he’s written critically about religion. But not in "The Good Book."

“It’s not part of a quarrel,” he says of his latest work. “It’s a modest offering… another contribution to the conversation that mankind must have with itself,” and one he says he wrote for everyone, Bible lovers included.

Given where society is today, inviting that conversation is all the more important, he says.

More than 16% of Americans say they are unaffiliated religiously, according to the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life. Even so, Grayling says the hunger for a spiritual connection continues. That yearning, he argues , can be satisfied for many by taking a walk in the country, curling up with a beautiful book of poetry or even in falling in love.

“In all different ways, we can celebrate the good in the world,” he says.

While many intellectual traditions – religious and otherwise – teach that there’s “one right way to live,” Grayling says he hopes “The Good Book” will encourage people to “go beyond your teachers, your text” to understand that “we have to respect and relate to one another.”

Early sales indicate that people are open to what this new "Bible" teaches. On Monday, Grayling’s book was number 41 on Amazon’s UK bestseller list and number 1 in the philosophy and spirituality categories.

- CNN Writer/Producer

Filed under: Atheism • Bible • Books • Culture & Science • Ethics

soundoff (3,021 Responses)
  1. JD Pruitt

    LOL I love the comments here! It's the year 2011 and people still believe in an imaginary man in the sky. Wow!

    April 11, 2011 at 12:46 pm |
  2. Truth

    If Hitler and Mussolini were "Christians" then what they did contradicted the teachings of Christ. So, don't blame "religion" for thier acts. Blame their own lusts for power and rage.
    Atheists, please answer me this. By saying "be ethical and treat people kindly" you are making a moral statement. Atheist is an amoral belief structure since every man/woman is left to decide their own path in the absence of an absolute path.
    Under Atheism, Charles Manson is fully justified in his actions. Who is to say otherwise, any why? On what grounds? It seemed right to him.

    April 11, 2011 at 12:46 pm |
    • KingOfErehwon

      No, Truth, atheism is not an amoral belief system. It is simply not accepting the idea of a god any more than the idea of a tooth fairy. You still need to have a moral system, and that is what the author is trying to explain in his book. In fact, that is what philosophers have been doing for ages.

      April 11, 2011 at 1:03 pm |
    • Jdh

      King's got it right. I keep seeing "Atheists are amoral." No..... Atheists just possibly don't subscribe to YOUR morality. Atheism has nothing to do with morality. Atheist just means that they do not believe in a god. Morality and Beilef in a God are two separate things. There are plenty of people who believe in God and have good morals (by which I means a system of morals that benefits themselves as well as the rest of our species.) Plenty of people believe in God and DON'T have good morals. Plenty of people don't beleive in God and still have good morals. So I am so confused as to how suddenly Atheism = no morals because everyone can do what they want? Where does Atheism say "people can do whatever they want, at the expense of everyone else??"

      April 11, 2011 at 1:15 pm |
    • Evy

      Contrary to your narrow minded beliefs, we do not NEED the bible to guide human beings morally. That what "man" has ingrained in society! Most of us know that killing is wrong...most of us are born with an innate sense of right and wrong and those feelings are further molded by our parents...(note religion isn't needed here). To say that atheism is immoral is further proving how judgemental, backwards, and ignorant religious people usually are. I don't fit into either category becuase i am not religious but i am also not an atheist. Personally, i believe that human beings can absolutely guide themselves in this world without some worthless man-made book supposedly "guiding them". THere is not ABSOLUTE path...that's something i would understand if it came out of a cave man's mouth. We are in 2011, it's time to put the bible down and recognize it for what it truly is...a deceptive piece of garbaged used to control people...that's all it is!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

      April 11, 2011 at 2:58 pm |
  3. Enoch

    I am tired of the closed minded atheists who call anyone who believes in god fools. I'm even more tired of the christians who call all atheists fools. Be open minded and listen to others beliefs before being harsh about it and I'm talking about fellow atheists as well.

    April 11, 2011 at 12:45 pm |
    • Denizen Kate

      Where's the "Like" button when I need it? Well said.

      April 11, 2011 at 12:58 pm |
    • BradLW

      There is a vast difference between labeling others as "fools" as opposed to labeling their unprovable ideas as "foolish".

      April 11, 2011 at 2:23 pm |
    • Raider

      Well said Brad.

      April 12, 2011 at 12:57 am |
    • ammofreak

      I am sorry Enoch but to be open minded to people that believe in things contrary to scientific investigation is like saying Charles Manson is sane. Read my lips: NEVER GOING TO HAPPEN!

      April 24, 2011 at 2:43 pm |
  4. sean

    Will this book be banned in public schools like the Bible? Or, will the minister in Florida burn it. Both options wouldbe unacceptable as is banning the Bible from Public Schools.

    April 11, 2011 at 12:43 pm |
    • BradLW

      The xtian bible HAS NOT been banned from public schools.

      Not allowing any local, state, or federal organization to demand the use of the xtian bible (and any and all others btw), or any of its resulting dogma or doctrine, is simply what is legally required by the best interpretation of the 1stA; both historically and presently.

      April 11, 2011 at 2:16 pm |
  5. Sid

    I'll buy this book.

    The question that we should be debating is not "Which moral system it correct?", rather "What is the ultimate source of morality?".

    For theists, morality is obedience to god's will. They may claim that respect for their fellow humans is fundamental to their system, but that's only true insofar as they interpret god's will to include that respect. Ultimately, doing god's will is "The Good", even if it, as it often has, means killing. And violating god's will is "The Evil", even if it means treating people the respect that they deserve. Morality is a top-down proposition for theists, that is enforced upon us from above with threats of punishment and promises of rewards.

    For atheists, a different source of morality must be found. And we find it here on Earth, not up in heaven. FOr the atheist, there is ONLY humans...no gods. Hence the source of our morality must come from within, not from without. For us, respect for our fellow humans is the source of our secular moral system. The Golden Rule is a good start, from our POV. My morality requires me to treat others as I would have them treat me. There is much more that needs to be said about this system, but it's a good beginning.

    I hope this new book emphasizes this point.

    Sid

    April 11, 2011 at 12:42 pm |
    • sean

      How do atthiest then justify abortion?

      April 11, 2011 at 12:44 pm |
    • Denizen Kate

      @Sean, why do atheists need to justify abortion? It isn't a matter of theist or atheist, but a matter of individual choice. Each woman, whether she believes in god or not, must make that choice. Do you believe that most women who have abortions are atheists? I doubt that. Do you believe that most of the doctors who perform abortions are atheists? I doubt that, too. As an atheist myself, even if I don't think abortion is the best option, I would never presume to make that choice for another woman. Why do Christians feel that they have the right to make that choice for all women?

      April 11, 2011 at 12:57 pm |
    • KingOfErehwon

      Well put, Sid.

      April 11, 2011 at 12:57 pm |
    • Jdh

      Fabulous Sid!!! You have summed it up PERFECTLY.

      April 11, 2011 at 1:12 pm |
    • BradLW

      Personally, as an atheist, I have had a huge problem with the so called "golden rule".

      I try not to presume that anyone else wants to be treated the way I want to be treated. So long as it is possible within my set of moral/ethical standards, I try to find out how others really want to be treated, not how I think they should be treated.

      April 11, 2011 at 2:06 pm |
  6. EDGY

    I believe religion, a belief that requires faith was invented by man because man didn't have faith in himself that without some sort of external control mechanism, he would not act in a manner that allowed all men to have the best most satisfying life possible, which can only be obtained by all men by treating our fellow men with respect and understanding. I stopped believing in a god many years ago, and it has not caused me to turn to the darkside, quite the contrary. My actions now are more thought out as to the effect they will have on others than when I belived in a god. This is self control, not being controlled by fear of eternal damnation.

    April 11, 2011 at 12:41 pm |
  7. Don't think so

    Sorry, Grayling, your book won't anymore become the basis for morality than did Mill's. First, you'd have to explain why anyone should follow YOUR notions of what is 'good'. Second, the notion that "...the best of our good lives revolve around having good relationships with people" is only true to a small degree for atheism. As long as an atheist has a stable group in which he or she feels comfortable and 'good', there is no reason to consider the well-being of those outside that group (especially if those outside that group tend to have goals that conflict). Third, atheists must deal with the consequences of the fact that there is no ultimate judge who sees things done in private or done with ulterior motives to hold anyone accountable to any moral system. This is just another unsuccessful attempt by atheists to find that ever elusive thing called morality in the absense of an all-knowing, all-judging God.

    Finally, hey Grayling, are ya gonna give your book away to people like religions give away their holy books, or are you just in it for the money?! I bet I know.... ROTFL!!!! I don't see a desire to help the world, I merely see the 'selfish gene' at work.

    April 11, 2011 at 12:41 pm |
    • KingOfErehwon

      Well, dts, you sure got some rather mixed-up ideas about atheism. Consider reading the book being discussed here. You will find that it isn't at all what you are saying.

      April 11, 2011 at 12:56 pm |
    • BradLW

      Ditto what koe said.

      Your three points are simply the regurgitation of good ole "believer" boiler plate. Really rather tiresome.

      April 11, 2011 at 1:41 pm |
    • Don't think so

      These points are quite tiresome to me as well because they must be repeated ad naseum to atheists who don't get them and who always seem to think their individual brand of morality is somehow better than the morality of religious people, when in fact it is worse. The subject of morality is one about which atheists suffer severe cognitive dissonance. Down deep, they know there can be no overarching morality without an all-knowing, all-judging God, but they want it so bad that they wish morality into existence and ignore reality. I love it when atheists say that they are "just good for the sake of good". Baloney! You do things you, individually, believe to be 'good' because it makes you feel good. At the heart of every human action is seflishness, some atheists just refuse to acknowledge that fact.

      April 11, 2011 at 7:04 pm |
  8. G

    I think this is a neat idea, but "the reflections of Confucius" are considered a religious text by many. I thought this was ironic to include in that case.

    April 11, 2011 at 12:40 pm |
  9. Thor

    Funny how the animals don't commit "sin". Yet, they are considered "God's innocent creatures". ... and we all know they live by their bible; that's why they are so good.

    April 11, 2011 at 12:40 pm |
    • BradLW

      Like serpents and bears?

      April 11, 2011 at 1:32 pm |
  10. Johnny 5

    This is fantastic! Finally a book for the logical thinker. Well done Mr. Grayling.

    April 11, 2011 at 12:38 pm |
  11. Jdh

    I think this book sounds rather interesting. I am someone who has never been able to embrace religion, as it just doesn't make any sort of logical sense to me. However, I have never been completely on the atheist end either, as I feel like we can't necessarily prove there's NOT an existence of some sort of divinity I think both sides are just too extreme for me. I feel like we have no real way of knowing either way. So until that happens, I have to trust what I can see and experience in the world.

    This book sounds fabulous for someone like me. I love the idea of these words and thoughts put down in this format. Morality is not necessarily determined by a belief in a god. Many people have a moral system based off of more secular ideas. For me in particular, I feel that there is a certain morality that comes from having to be a human being who coexists with other human beings. I want to do this in the best and most peaceful way, that ensures the most happiness for the most people. I have seen that some standard morals, like generosity, compassion, treating others the way you want to be treated, tend to benefit people in various ways that have nothing to do with religion. These things all help the human species keep going and thriving.

    April 11, 2011 at 12:36 pm |
    • Denizen Kate

      Thank you. Well said. I don't need a white bearded man in the sky to threaten me with eternal burning in order to treat my fellow human beings with kindness and courtesy.

      April 11, 2011 at 12:51 pm |
  12. Andre

    If I should "think for myself", according to that humanist commandment, then why should I accept anything read in this book? I can think for myself and determine that the book is a bunch of rubbish, and supposedly that would be fine with this author.

    April 11, 2011 at 12:36 pm |
    • MichaelK

      But you would have to read the book with an open mind to make that determination. THAT is humanism.

      Do your utmost and be sincere

      April 11, 2011 at 12:47 pm |
    • KingOfErehwon

      No Andre, you still need to have an ethical system. The author is trying to show that you can have an ethical system that makes sense without having to stick a god into the middle of it.

      April 11, 2011 at 12:48 pm |
    • gs

      i don't think any humanist would argue with your right to disagree with them

      April 11, 2011 at 12:53 pm |
    • 666

      Not a big thinker are you, Andre?

      April 11, 2011 at 1:20 pm |
    • ammofreak

      ..then read the book....exercise your grey matter...( a canuck speaking from his igloo)

      April 24, 2011 at 3:16 pm |
  13. wssguru

    He sounds like Ms. Doubtfire

    April 11, 2011 at 12:35 pm |
  14. Charles Darwin

    You can't have a "10 commandments" in a humanist bible. Who are you to try to push your idea of morality on me? If I think it's ok to kill my enemies and to screw people over every chance I get, who are you to say it's wrong – in fact there is no right and wrong, only your opinion and my opinion, and mine is just as valid as yours.

    April 11, 2011 at 12:35 pm |
    • KingOfErehwon

      CD, it is clear you need to take a good course in ethics.

      April 11, 2011 at 12:46 pm |
    • Ken

      Bingo!!

      April 11, 2011 at 12:46 pm |
  15. SadieSadie

    Out of all the millions of words in the English language he had to call his book a bible and 'the good book'? Truly pathetic and not original. For a supposed free thinker he seems unable to create a book without borrowing from God.
    The statement that he is an atheist is redundant.

    April 11, 2011 at 12:35 pm |
    • KingOfErehwon

      SadieSadie, I think the author is using the words "Good Book" in order to make it clear that you can indeed have a good ethical system without a god. I helps make it more palatable to the religious.

      April 11, 2011 at 12:50 pm |
    • sean

      @Sadie. His tactic seems to be from the old worn out idea that the only way to make a point is to insult the oposition. If his book has any merrit, it would sell without the need to provocate.

      April 11, 2011 at 12:52 pm |
    • BradLW

      Ever hear the term "marketing"?

      From first returns on sales, it doesn't seem that "Truly pathetic" will be a very accurate description.

      April 11, 2011 at 1:12 pm |
  16. Harry

    It is structured like a bible? Well if it reads anything like a bible I can tell you right now its going to be a real snore fest! Nothing can put you to sleep faster than reading the bible! ZzzZZzZzzzzzz....

    April 11, 2011 at 12:34 pm |
  17. Phil

    I think we should all stop arguing and just let Jesus settle the matter for us... ... ... He should be here any minute now... ... ... Aaaany minute... ... ...

    April 11, 2011 at 12:34 pm |
    • sean

      @Phil. The argument can be made that the Bible is written as an allagory. "Any minute now" could have many different meanings. Much of the Bible is metaphorical. The parables are meant to teach. I find it ironic that the ancient scholars often agree with biblical teaching, but the Church gets no credit for that.

      April 11, 2011 at 12:50 pm |
  18. Kate

    Um, I can't think of a single atheist that doesn't know quite well that a god didn't write your bible.

    April 11, 2011 at 12:34 pm |
    • sean

      The Church doesn't make any claim that the Bible was written by God. The Church cleary states tha the Bible was inspired by the Holy Spirit. Furthermore, the Church states that we humans are by nature flawed and anything we produce is not without question.

      April 11, 2011 at 12:47 pm |
  19. IamGOD

    unlike the bible it does not have stupid and unethical laws.. 🙂

    April 11, 2011 at 12:33 pm |
    • JJ

      Unlike the bible, if there is no God, what's the point of being ethical?

      April 11, 2011 at 12:39 pm |
    • Sari in Vegas

      JJ: To not be a jerk to your fellow man, and strengthen the bonds of our species as social creatures.

      April 11, 2011 at 12:43 pm |
    • MichaelK

      If you are only good because God will send you to hell if you are bad, how good can you really be?

      April 11, 2011 at 12:45 pm |
    • Alverant

      JJ if there's a god as described in the christian bible, then where did he get his morality?

      April 11, 2011 at 12:45 pm |
    • IamGOD

      one does not require an invisible sky daddy to behave well. Are you claiming that if scientists could confirm today that there is no god, all of the sudden you would start robbing banks, raping and killing people?

      April 11, 2011 at 12:45 pm |
    • Charles Darwin

      @jj – even more, if there is no god, then the whole concept of "ethical" is every bit as much delusional thinking as atheists say that believing in god is. In the absence of absolutes, every person is free to define right and wrong for him/herself and nobody can impose their idea of right and wrong on anybody else, except through force. That doesn't make them right or wrong, it just makes them stronger. In reality that's how it works. But if you're an athiest, don't try to talk to me about delusional concepts of "right" and "wrong". They're just as non-existent as god.

      April 11, 2011 at 12:45 pm |
    • Joel

      What Biblical laws are "stupid and unethical"? Unless you understand the context of these laws please don't make baseless statements. It makes you look ridiculous and rather brainless.

      April 11, 2011 at 12:47 pm |
    • IamGOD

      @Joel, if you don't know which laws I am talking about then you have not read your old testament..

      April 11, 2011 at 12:49 pm |
    • Wzrd1

      Charles, I disagree. Humans are social animals, hence a common ethical base and communal value system are necessary. If such were absent, humanity would have long gone extinct, as humans ARE the weakest animals on the planet. Humans are only strong enough to survive in the wild in groups.

      April 11, 2011 at 12:50 pm |
    • Joel

      I have read it. I don't see which laws you are talking about. Apart from loving God and loving people which laws are 'stupid and unethical'?

      April 11, 2011 at 12:52 pm |
    • IamGOD

      @Joel, you know all the 623 laws you should obey? or you did not even know that there are so many.. go read your old testament again and then come back and tell me if you don't find any laws to be crazy.

      April 11, 2011 at 12:53 pm |
    • Joel

      @IamGOD You made the statement not me so therefore YOU should back it up with examples. You look rather silly making statements that have no proof. I gather you are one of those people who heard that the laws are stupid and unethical and take that at face value. You are most likely too lazy to do your own leg work and find out for yourself. Prove me wrong.

      April 11, 2011 at 12:57 pm |
    • Bobo

      JJ, try actually reading the article. The point in being ethical is not to receive a reward or avoid punishment from the magical invisible sky-daddy, but to treat a fellow human well out of a rational and empathetic understanding of his/her wants, needs, and desires. I believe the christians call it "the golden rule".

      April 11, 2011 at 12:58 pm |
    • IamGOD

      @Joel, no no no, you are the lazy one.. I BET YOU all my money YOU HAD no idea there are 623 laws in your holy book. You only know of the 10 ones because majority of believers disregard the other 613 because some of them are so ridiculous nobody wants to follow them... SO DO SOME WORK, READ YOUR BIBLE and then come back and tell me how you TURNED atheist... Majority of you Christians have not read the old testament, you only spew nonsense. GOD IS LOVING, KIND, JUST.. yeah if you haven't read the old testament then you got no idea WHAT YOU ARE TALKING ABOUT since your bible describes him as A PSYCHOTIC DICTATOR.

      April 11, 2011 at 1:01 pm |
    • Joel

      @IamGOD And where do the 613 laws come from? They come from the 10 Commandments. The 613 commandments are the interpretations of 10 Commandments given by Jewish rabbis. Now a Christian wouldn't follow the 613 because they aren't Jewish! Do you understand that? As well if you read Matthew 22 Jesus says that to love God with all your heart, soul and mind and to love others as yourself is the most important commandments. All the Law and the Prophets hang on these two commandments. So there, I did my leg work. What commandments are "stupid and unethical"?
      BTW there are 613 commandments not 623. You should do your research.

      April 11, 2011 at 1:09 pm |
    • IamGOD

      @Joel, no Joel they don't come from the 10 commandments, again, read your bible.. you will find out. LOL 613 + 10 = 623 , you're even bad at math? LOL!

      April 11, 2011 at 1:22 pm |
    • Dave J

      IamGOD, you need to step back and look in a mirror. look close because I don't think you like what you see.

      April 11, 2011 at 1:45 pm |
    • MominMO

      @Joel – The book of Leviticus is also called the "book of law", and has hundreds of laws in it. They are *not* based on the 10 commandments, but are entirely separate laws. If christians are not supposed to follow them, then why is the book part of the christian Bible? There are many other jewish texts that didn't make the cut at Nicea, so logically, this one made it in because christians are supposed to follow these laws.
      Don't get me wrong, I think there's nothing wrong with being christian, but I also think there's nothing wrong with being a humanist. I have a belief system that I am comfortable with, and feel no need to convince others that mine is the only right way.

      April 11, 2011 at 1:48 pm |
    • Joel

      @IamGOD You continue to make yourself look silly! There are 613 commandments not 623. I can see that by your reaction you are a fundamentalist in your beliefs (my apologies if you are not – you act like one). Closed ears and minds. If you did some research, any research in fact, you will find that there are 613 laws which include the 10 commandments. So your mathematical formula is incorrect. It should be, 603 + 10 = 613. So I don't know where my math is incorrect. Also you refuse to answer my original question repeatedly. Why? So again I ask the same question, what commandments are 'stupid and unethical'?
      @MominMO Actually the commandments given in Leviticus are based on the 10 commandments. Its about holy living and worship. Does it still apply to Christians today? In reality, no because this was part of the Mosaic Covenant. Christians are under Jesus' covenant. Although it doesn't apply to us today the book is still filled with wise sayings and instruction still useful today. I like your question though. Its very thought provoking and I will do some more research on it.

      April 11, 2011 at 2:19 pm |
    • YukonPCH

      If you need a book to keep you ethical then thank god for your book. Most people learned this from there parents.

      April 11, 2011 at 3:48 pm |
  20. Robert

    I find it ironic that this is in the religion section of cnn.com. Wouldn't most humanists demand a reclassification?

    April 11, 2011 at 12:31 pm |
    • Christian

      Excellent point

      April 11, 2011 at 12:38 pm |
    • Someone

      It is not the 'religion' section. It is ti.tled, "Belief Blog".

      April 11, 2011 at 12:42 pm |
    • MichaelK

      But he calls it a Bible and it's significance would pale without religion.

      April 11, 2011 at 12:44 pm |
    • Wzrd1

      I'm still trying to get the "Leading atheist" bit conceptualized. Is he the Pope of the atheists? 😉
      Whatever, I'm comfortable with my faith and in reason as well.
      So, if the book shows up at the library, I'll take a look at it. If it's worthwhile, I'll purchase a copy of it and put it on the shelf next to my bible and Quran.

      April 11, 2011 at 12:47 pm |
    • Ken

      Wzrd1 – why shoulkd I give a flip if humans go extinct? The onl;y thing that matters is delaying for as long as possible the moment that I personally go extinct – and getting as much pleasure for myself as I can along the way. Aftewr the worms eat me, ot will matter not a wit to me if I was "ethical" or "bettered humanity." Can I feel your pain if you starve to death? Nope! Not even a tiny little bit. More pain for you might very well mean less pain for me. Screw the Arabs – kill them all and take all their oil. Charlie Sheen has nailed it – it is all about WINNING! That is the only "ethics" that matters.

      April 11, 2011 at 1:00 pm |
    • HeavenSent

      Ken, LOL, you could have just written "Me, Myself, and I" or "it's all about Me, Me, Me". Same ole same ole non-believers moto.

      Amen.

      April 11, 2011 at 3:00 pm |
    • Someone

      Ken,

      Yep. You are one of the ones who should stick with your supersti.tious fantasy book. We sure don't want you in rational society.

      April 11, 2011 at 3:08 pm |
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The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.