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June 13th, 2011
11:17 PM ET

At debate, Republican candidates spar over Islam

By Dan Gilgoff, CNN.com Religion Editor

(CNN) - There weren’t too many sharp differences among the Republican presidential candidates in Monday night’s New Hampshire debate, but a crack did emerge over how Islam and Muslims ought to be treated in the United States.

The CNN debate opened with discussions on economic issues, but later veered toward faith-based matters like the role of religion in candidates’ decision making, abortion, gay marriage – and how the United States ought to treat Muslims living within its borders.

The exchange on that issue opened with a question to former Godfather’s Pizza CEO Herman Cain, who had said previously that he wouldn’t feel comfortable appointing a Muslim to his presidential Cabinet.

“I would not be comfortable because you have peaceful Muslims and then you have militant Muslims – those that are trying to kill us,” Cain said at Monday night’s debate. “And so when I said I wouldn’t be comfortable, I was thinking about the ones who are trying to kill us.”

FULL POST

- CNN Belief Blog Co-Editor

Filed under: Faith Now • Herman Cain • Islam • Mitt Romney • Newt Gingrich • Politics

June 13th, 2011
04:41 PM ET

Leader of May 21 doomsday movement suffers stroke

By Dan Gilgoff, CNN.com Religion Editor

(CNN) - Harold Camping, the leader of the apocalyptic movement that predicted the end of the world would begin on May 21, has suffered a stroke, according to a statement on his ministry's web site on Tuesday.

Camping suffered a "mild stroke" last Thursday, according to the statement posted on the website of Family Radio, Camping's California-based broadcast ministry.

"Mr. Camping is receiving excellent care, and the doctors treating him are encouraged with the progress he is making," the statement said. "Mr. Camping's family appreciates everyone's thoughts and prayers."

FULL POST

- CNN Belief Blog Co-Editor

Filed under: End times • Faith Now

June 13th, 2011
03:01 PM ET

Time: Is San Francisco's circumcision ban an attack on religious freedom?

By Adam Cohen, TIME

In the 1960s and '70s, the San Francisco Bay Area was where the counterculture really started — the Free Speech Movement in Berkeley, the Summer of Love in Haight-Ashbury, gay rights in the Castro. Today, the Bay Area is challenging the larger culture in a new and controversial way: there will be a referendum on the ballot in November that would make it the first major city in the U.S. to outlaw circumcision.

The San Francisco debate over circumcision initially centered on the value of the procedure itself — opponents call it barbaric, supporters point to its long tradition and say it prevents disease. But increasingly the debate is becoming one about religion, in which critics accuse backers of the referendum of bigotry and insist a ban would violate the First Amendment's religious freedoms.

Read the full story on San Francisco's circumcision ban
- CNN Belief Blog

Filed under: California • Islam • Judaism

June 13th, 2011
02:45 PM ET

The Book of Mormon wins big at Tony Awards

The stars of Broadway talk about performing on stage in front of live audiences day in and day out.

- CNN Belief Blog

Filed under: Culture & Science • Faith Now • Mormonism • Theater

Texas governor's modest Christian giving raises eyebrows
June 13th, 2011
02:14 PM ET

Texas governor's modest Christian giving raises eyebrows

By Dan Gilgoff, CNN.com Religion Editor

(CNN) – Texas Gov. Rick Perry, who recently attracted national attention for publicly mixing Christianity and politics, is putting some of his money where his mouth is – but not, critics say, very much.

According to an analysis of his tax returns by the San Antonio Express-News, the Republican Perry has given half a percent of the $2.68 million he earned as governor to churches and religious organizations.

Here's the Express-News:

By comparison, Americans averaged gifts of nearly 1.2 percent of their income to churches and religious groups from 2004 to 2008, according to Empty Tomb Inc., an Illinois-based research firm specializing in U.S. church-giving trends.

FULL POST

- CNN Belief Blog Co-Editor

Filed under: Christianity • Evangelical • Faith Now • Money & Faith • Politics • Texas

June 13th, 2011
09:26 AM ET

Site of Republican debate is college run by world’s oldest religion order

Editor's Note: CNN hosts the first New Hampshire Republican presidential debate tonight from Manchester at 8 p.m. ET. Follow all the issues and campaign news about the debate on CNNPolitics.com and @cnnpolitics on Twitter. Watch the debate on CNN TV , CNN.com and mobile devices . And participate with your questions on the live blog at cnn.com/ticker.

By Jeremy Moorhead, CNN

Manchester, New Hampshire (CNN) - The staging ground for Monday night’s Republican presidential debate – the first of 2012 presidential cycle in the critical early voting state of New Hampshire - is connected to a history so deep that it predates American politics by a millennium.

Saint Anselm College, in Manchester, New Hampshire, was founded and is run by the Benedictines, a Catholic order founded in the 6th century. It claims to be the world’s oldest religious order.

The school has hosted Republican and Democratic presidential debates in previous election cycles, sometimes drawing criticism for appearing to get involved in partisan politics.

FULL POST

- CNN Belief Blog

Filed under: Catholic Church • Faith Now • New Hampshire • Politics

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About this blog

The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke and Eric Marrapodi with daily contributions from CNN's worldwide newsgathering team.

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