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Quake damage to National Cathedral
August 23rd, 2011
06:04 PM ET

Washington National Cathedral sustains 'significant damage' in earthquake

By Dan Gilgoff and Larry Lazo

Washington (CNN) – Washington’s National Cathedral sustained "significant damage" during Tuesday’s 5.8-magnitude earthquake, the church said Wednesday, and will remain closed at least through Saturday, when it had planned to host a dedication event for the capital’s new Martin Luther King Jr. memorial.

Three of the four corner spires on the church’s dramatic central tower lost their ornate capstones, or finials, during the quake, and there are cracks in some of the church’s flying buttresses.

Called the "Gloria in Excelsis,” the cathedral’s central tower is the highest point in the nation’s capital, rising to a greater height than even the Washington Monument.

The cracks in the flying buttresses are around the apse, the area around the altar, though the buttresses supporting the central tower appear to be sound, the church said in a statement.

Though the dedication ceremony for the Martin Luther King Jr. memorial has been moved to a Roman Catholic church in Washington, the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception, National Cathedral officials said they hoped to host services Sunday.

The Rev. Samuel Lloyd, dean of the cathedral, said that there are no indications that the building has sustained serious structural damage but that structural engineers wanted more time to assess the building. “For safety’s sake, we want to be as careful as we can,” he said Wednesday, explaining the decision to keep the church closed.

“The good news is that this was not devastating,” he said. “It was quite serious, and there are some very important things we’re going to have to deal with, but it could have been much worse.”

Lloyd says he’s confident that the cathedral will go forward with three days of events around the 10th anniversary of the September 11 attacks.

"By that point, we will have had the time we need fully to assess what's going on,” he said. “All plans are full steam ahead."

Stonemasons and structural engineers are continuing to assess damage to the cathedral.

“We’ve been crawling all over the building since yesterday afternoon, and it just strikes me the amount of work that’s ahead of us,” the church’s mason foreman, Joe Alonso, said Wednesday. “Again, this is all handmade, this is a handmade building, and I just look at all of these little individual sculptures and works of art.”

“They’re delicate, but they’re still quite large,” he said. “When you look at those pinnacles up close, just knowing what goes into cutting and carving and laying these stones, we’ve got our work cut out for us. But we’re going to do it right.”
The quake struck at 1:51 p.m. Tuesday near the town of Mineral, Virginia, about 40 miles northwest of Richmond. Just 3.7 miles deep, it was felt from Georgia to northern New England.

No major injuries or extensive damage were reported, but the quake prompted evacuations of numerous office buildings – including the U.S. Capitol – and affected operations at a nuclear power plant in Virginia.

An Episcopal church, Washington National Cathedral considers itself a “spiritual home for the nation.” It is the traditional site for official presidential inauguration services and has hosted funeral and memorial services for 10 U.S. presidents.

According to its website, the cathedral was the longest-running project in the history of Washington. Construction began in 1907 and wasn’t completed until 1990.

“The earthquake which struck the East Coast today is a reminder of the continuing evolution of this planet, this fragile Earth, our island home,” said the Episcopal Church’s head, the Most Rev. Katharine Jefferts Schori.

“It is also a reminder of how interconnected we are,” she said in a statement. “The quake damaged Washington National Cathedral and reminded many Episcopalians of the quakes that struck the Christchurch Cathedral in New Zealand during the last year.”

- CNN Belief Blog Co-Editor

Filed under: Church • DC

soundoff (495 Responses)
  1. stevie68a

    People think that because christianity has been around for thousands of years, it makes it valid. Time to realize that people
    were certain that the earth was flat for millions of years, and we know how that worked out.
    We really are in a New Age, and are coming to realize that all the biblical stuff was made up. Religion was created to control
    people. It just isn't true. Whatever good there is in religion, can be had without it. Teach ethics instead.
    Notice that what is invisible, and the non-existent, look very much the same. Mankind must end this divisive delusion.

    August 26, 2011 at 8:15 am |
  2. GeoCPU

    Lots and lots of G.W. Bush type "certainty" on both sides of a discussion that seems to be rather far from the subject of the article.
    Why would anyone wish to attack the faith of another? The desire to share one's faith with another is admirable, even if it contradicts the faith of the other. To attack faith makes no sense to me.
    My religious beliefs are important to me and I freely share them when I feel it appropriate. I am often interested in the thoughtfully expressed religious beliefs of others.
    I also happen to be a scientist. It makes me very unhappy when I see, or read, people pretending that science can be their religion. Too many that think themselves scientists are too willing to make what are actually sweeping statements of faith that don't stand up to the rigors of the scientific method. They have deluded themselves into thinking that their science has given them absolute truth instead of increased understanding.
    Science and religion only "conflict" when two people (one claiming to be in each area) are both too certain of that which isn't really known or understood.
    God has not revealed everything to us and neither has science. Within that massive universe of what is unknown, unrevealed, or misunderstood is where the imprudent most often end up contending.

    August 25, 2011 at 7:38 pm |
  3. Daniel

    That is superficial damage. Look at photos of Haiti to see what significant damage looks like.

    August 25, 2011 at 1:13 am |
    • Naomi

      It's well-built. So is the American Christian discipline.

      August 25, 2011 at 1:53 am |
    • sam russell

      no moron; this is very serious damage. it will cost millions to repair and is a very unsafe area at the moment. and why compare to haiti? apples and oranges

      August 27, 2011 at 11:51 am |
  4. bindy

    No matter what your belief system is, all persons can worship and rejoice together. That is the WHY of the National Cathedral, and with it the joy of the Episcopal Church in providing and welcoming all to the worship space of the Cathedral.

    August 24, 2011 at 11:00 pm |
    • Naomi

      That sounds Episcopal. But totally anti-Biblical. God has set a narrow, specific yet plain way of salvation(faith in Jesus alone) so only honest humans who honor God can make it to Him. Episcopals put humans first and it is abhorrent to God. I don't think their ministers read the entire Bible even once or remember the content.

      August 25, 2011 at 1:51 am |
  5. Smite-me

    I read that in the dictionary Shrike (remember Naomi, its the big blue book). Thanks

    August 24, 2011 at 4:44 pm |
  6. Smite-me

    To Naomi, I've never said this to anyone before, but, may fleas infest your rectum... Oh, and smite me...

    August 24, 2011 at 4:15 pm |
    • Naomi

      @Smite-, your name means being struck by a true friend for discipline is far better than enemy's deceitful comforts. Know that. At the end truth is what you need. Read Psalm 141.

      August 24, 2011 at 4:27 pm |
    • SHRIKE

      @Naomi – LIAR

      transitive verb
      1: to strike sharply or heavily especially with the hand or an implement held in the hand
      2a : to kill or severely injure by smiting b : to attack or afflict suddenly and injuriously
      3: to cause to strike
      4: to affect as if by striking
      5: captivate, take

      August 24, 2011 at 4:38 pm |
    • Smite-me

      Apparently you've never used a dictionary, which doesn't surprise me. It's the big blue book with WEBSTER written on the front. They also have these tubes filled with information called the internet and you can also use that to look up words.

      August 24, 2011 at 4:42 pm |
    • Naomi

      @Smite-, I thought you quoted the Scriptures for your name. Why do you want others to "smite" you? Are you in trouble?

      August 24, 2011 at 4:50 pm |
  7. Naomi

    @DamianKnight, do you get it how the society shi-fts or the natural human nature works? Of course my ob-ser-vations are far from per-fect or com-plete but there are evil ten-den-cies and pit-falls even in the good manners and we need to be aware of them. The Holy Spirit helps us. We don't need mo-de-rating phrases in declaring God's Truth.

    August 24, 2011 at 4:07 pm |
    • Anti Christian Taliban Schizophrenics

      Nothing wrong with that but that is a personal matter and remains this.

      August 24, 2011 at 4:09 pm |
  8. john smith

    nave

    August 24, 2011 at 4:05 pm |
    • tallulah13

      Maybe it was very naughty.

      August 25, 2011 at 1:31 am |
  9. Naomi

    @DamianKnight, another point I want you to think about is: True, we all have different worldviews and different belief systems and should exist together. But such co-existence is not the purpose itself. It cannot be. It requires discretion, but Christians always need to strive to educatate mankind into God's path. As you know well, we naturally deteriorate from the rightness and need to be reminded to get back to what is right. This consumes Christians' energy but we must do it. The secular West puts this co-existance as absolute, and that is the problem because they leave evil cultures alone as if the evil practices must be protected.

    August 24, 2011 at 4:00 pm |
    • claybigsby

      "but Christians always need to strive to educatate mankind into God's path."

      AKA indoctrinate mankind into a fear mongering, money making scheme you call christianity.

      August 24, 2011 at 4:03 pm |
    • Anti Christian Taliban Schizophrenics

      Naomi

      @DamianKnight, another point I want you to think about is: True, we all have different worldviews and different belief systems and should exist together. But such co-existence is not the purpose itself. It cannot be. It requires discretion, but Christians always need to strive to educatate mankind into God's path. As you know well, we naturally deteriorate from the rightness and need to be reminded to get back to what is right. This consumes Christians' energy but we must do it. The secular West puts this co-existance as absolute, and that is the problem because they leave evil cultures alone as if the evil practices must be protected.

      -----
      Thank you again. Your perception of sin or evil has no bearing on the rule of law. Your reality or perception does not extend to other people.

      August 24, 2011 at 4:04 pm |
    • Kool Aid

      Wait, what the hell does any of this have to do with the cathedral? You need help...all of you

      August 24, 2011 at 4:36 pm |
  10. SHRIKE

    "[The Bible] has noble poetry in it... and some good morals and a wealth of obscenity, and upwards of a thousand lies." Samuel Clemens

    August 24, 2011 at 3:55 pm |
    • Naomi

      And no one found a single lie in the Bible; it was just an imagination of atheists, as usual.

      August 24, 2011 at 4:10 pm |
    • Anti Christian Taliban Schizophrenics

      Naomi

      And no one found a single lie in the Bible; it was just an imagination of atheists, as usual.

      ----------–
      Lie- a false statement made with deliberate intent to deceive; an intentional untruth; a falsehood. 2. something intended or serving to convey a false impression
      >
      Even I would be hard pressed to call a fable that is accepted as fact a lie. I can see the bible being viewed as misleading based on self serving man writing it.

      August 24, 2011 at 4:14 pm |
    • Anti Christian Taliban Schizophrenics

      Naomi

      And no one found a single lie in the Bible; it was just an imagination of atheists, as usual.

      -------
      And we can talk about the imagination of the christians. Have they proven one miracle or supernatural events as fact and truth?

      August 24, 2011 at 4:16 pm |
    • Naomi

      @Anti-, don't dismiss something you never understood. It's unscientific. Biblical miracles happen still today. For deniers, nothing gets proven.

      August 24, 2011 at 4:20 pm |
    • SHRIKE

      @Naomi – jesus was resurrected after 3 days .. LIE; god made the earth and sky in seven days...LIE; manna rained from heaven...LIE; moses parted the red sea...LIE; the bible is all true because it says so...LIE. I can go on but I doubt your delusions will allow you to read this far.

      August 24, 2011 at 4:23 pm |
    • Anti Christian Taliban Schizophrenics

      Naomi

      @Anti-, don't dismiss something you never understood. It's unscientific. Biblical miracles happen still today. For deniers, nothing gets proven.

      -----------
      Your first part is you assume I don't, however I do. Secondly, please address:
      .
      And we can talk about the imagination of the christians. Have they proven one miracle or supernatural events as fact and truth?

      August 24, 2011 at 4:23 pm |
    • Anti Christian Taliban Schizophrenics

      Adelina I am giving you an opportunity to show some depth to your beliefs. Please answer trhe above question.

      August 24, 2011 at 4:24 pm |
    • Naomi

      @Sh-, you just refuse to believe what God did. God still raise dead people. God created you in a split second. God feed the starving from nowhere, God still make a way in impossible situations. The Bible is true. Billions of humans in thousands of years testify it. It's true especially when it describes atheists. Amazingly accurate.

      August 24, 2011 at 4:47 pm |
    • Anti Christian Taliban Schizophrenics

      Naomi

      @Sh-, you just refuse to believe what God did. God still raise dead people. God created you in a split second. God feed the starving from nowhere, God still make a way in impossible situations. The Bible is true. Billions of humans in thousands of years testify it. It's true especially when it describes atheists. Amazingly accurate.
      -----
      And we can talk about the imagination of the christians. Have they proven one miracle or supernatural events as fact and truth?

      August 24, 2011 at 5:37 pm |
    • i wonder

      Naomi, "Billions of humans in thousands of years testify it."

      Testimony to hearsay is not valid.

      Shall I recount the numerous wild beliefs over the eons regarding the sun's daily behavior in the sky? They insisted that they were correct. The very, very few who proposed a different (ultimately correct) explanation were roundly shouted down... and even imprisoned and killed.

      You are educated enough to know that the 'argumentum populum' is invalid.

      August 24, 2011 at 5:54 pm |
    • @I-Wonder

      @i-wonder, No scientist was killed, not even imprisoned by the Church. It was Bible-reading Christians alone that were massively executed by the wrong religious leaderships and others.

      August 25, 2011 at 3:02 am |
    • Here's one

      Giordano Bruno

      August 25, 2011 at 3:08 am |
    • Info

      Here is an interesting article regarding scientists and the Church:

      "Tycho Brahe, Johannes Kepler and Edmond Halley were pioneers in describing the orbits of comets and planets. The orderly laws of nature they described contradicted the Church's belief that comets were thrown in anger from the right hand of God, or that they portended disaster and war. For over a hundred years the Church argued against them. But Halley secured the final victory by accurately predicting the return of his comet. All three would have been brought before the Inquisition had they not been Protestant

      Isaac Newton kept his true religious beliefs secret, for fear of persecution, until literally his dying day. He privately rejected his native Anglican Church at about age 30, convinced that its teachings about Christ's divinity and the existence of a Trinity were a fraud. Only on his deathbed did he reveal his true beliefs by rejecting the Anglican sacrament.

      Bertrand Russell found that Christian persecution exists even in the 20th century. One of the greatest of modern philosophers, Russell angered many Christians with his essay, Why I am not a Christian. And they exacted their revenge in 1940, when Russell accepted an appointment at the College of the City of New York. The Christian community launched a furious and protracted campaign to prevent the appointment, printing slanderous accusations of ho.mose.xuality, child molestation, public nudity and lechery.

      William Buckland, Charles Lyell, Louis Agassiz, and Adam Sedgewick were all 19th century Christian geologists who originally set out to prove the story of creation and Noah's Flood. But despite their best attempts to reconcile their discoveries with the Bible, their findings kept pointing in the other direction: namely, the earth was several billion years old, not 6,000. One by one, they recanted their belief in the literal interpretation of Genesis and accepted the findings of modern geology. For their intellectual honesty, they came under terrific attack from the Church, which hurled epithets like "infidel," "impugner of the sacred record," and "as.sailant of the volume of God." Their geology was condemned as "a dark art," "dangerous and disreputable," "a forbidden province," "infernal artillery" and "an awful evasion of the testimony of revelation."

      LifeNews.com Editor

      August 25, 2011 at 3:30 am |
    • i wonder

      Naomi,

      I mentioned nothing in my post about the Church, per se. My point was to refute your argument that just because lots of people believe something, that makes it true. It does not.

      August 25, 2011 at 3:40 am |
    • HappyMeal

      Summary: Modern science developed only in Christendom, no where else, since the Bible developed systematic and scientific thinking for common mass. Almost all pioneer scientists were either Christian or theists. Godless secular West pollutes the planet in deadly ways with the technology. It was good that mankind did not have the present technology sooner. Mankind eats its own fruits.

      August 25, 2011 at 10:41 am |
  11. SHRIKE

    "I've begun worshipping the sun for a number of reasons. First of all, unlike some other gods I could mention, I can see the sun. It's there for me every day. And the things it brings me are quite apparent all the time: heat, light, food, a lovely day. There's no mystery, no one asks for money, I don't have to dress up, and there's no boring pageantry. And interestingly enough, I have found that the prayers I offer to the sun and the prayers I formerly offered to God are all answered at about the same 50-percent rate." George Carlin

    August 24, 2011 at 3:51 pm |
  12. Naomi

    @DamianKnight, thank you for your letters. I hope you get this message. I still won't use "I think" phrases in expressing objective truth or facts based on the Bible. The "I think" phrases and their likes must not be used in trasmitting the truth from the Word of God. It's not humility or properness but elevation of humans thus should be rejected. God is above humans. The practice made the West relativist and feminized. "Perverts" refers to anyone who practices or supports s-e-x-ual perversion. I read your letters and I'll try my best.

    August 24, 2011 at 3:48 pm |
    • Anti Christian Taliban Schizophrenics

      Naomi

      @DamianKnight, thank you for your letters. I hope you get this message. I still won't use "I think" phrases in expressing objective truth or facts based on the Bible.
      -----–
      Because you refuse to accept the reality of your thinking process does not change the reality of what an opinion is. By your statement you are saying that you are choosing to remain ignorant of what an opinion is verses fact or truth. Self imposed delusional thinking.

      August 24, 2011 at 3:53 pm |
  13. Jim

    "The cathedral’s mason foreman, Joe Alonso...just did a quick walk through the knave". I think he should leave the poor knave alone, and concentrate on the nave.

    August 24, 2011 at 3:46 pm |
    • tallulah13

      I think the knave may have enjoyed it.

      August 25, 2011 at 1:33 am |
  14. Reality

    Recognizing the flaws, follies and frauds in the foundations of Islam, Judaism and Christianity, the "bowers", kneelers" and "pew peasants" are converging these religions into some simple rules of life. No koran, bible, clerics, nuns, monks, imams, evangelicals, ayatollahs, rabbis, professors of religion or priests needed or desired.

    Ditto for houses of "worthless worship" aka mosques, churches, basilicas, cathedrals, temples and synagogues.

    i.e. so let the National Cathedral crumble to the ground. The site should make for a nice pet park!!!

    August 24, 2011 at 3:44 pm |
    • pathetic

      I see you are still trolling any religion article. You really don't have anything better to do.

      August 24, 2011 at 3:48 pm |
    • Ryan in Michigan

      @Reality – We could say the same about Atheists. After all, they have their own houses of worship where no other religion is allowed (public schools), where people teach the religion with no regard for anyone else's thoughts (teachers). There are also places of great significance where items of importance to Atheists are held and people make great pilgrimages across the land to see (museums of biology/natural history), higher-education facilities where people are trained to believe and combat any deferrence to their religion (public colleges), and are taught by the most knowledgeable and revered Atheists (professors). There's even a central figure which all look to for more knowledge and for answers to previously unanswerable questions, the Atheist Pope, Stephen Hawkin. Sounds familiar, doesn't it?

      August 24, 2011 at 4:16 pm |
    • Laughing

      BAHAHAHAHA Ryan

      Thanks for the laugh. Really, that was a good one, Atheist Pope! Did you come up with that yourself?

      You were joking right...... because if you really believe all of what you said, you are beyond help.

      August 24, 2011 at 4:48 pm |
    • Stevie7

      How dare those atheist try and limit actual science to science classes! How dare they not use public funds for the promotion of religion. How dare they have museums and other insti.tutions that can instruct people on matters of science and discovery! After all, we know that science is all a scam. Theories of electromagnetism and quantum mechanics is a sham! Everyone knows that gnomes are the ones that control your computers, that images are displayed on your screen through pixie dust, and that pink unicorns deliver messages over the internet!

      August 24, 2011 at 4:51 pm |
    • i wonder

      Ryan,

      Yes, you are a hoot. You know, aleprechaunists and aunicornists enjoy those same benefits. Go get 'em, tiger.

      August 24, 2011 at 4:58 pm |
    • Reality

      Operation Awareness:

      Reiteration is important to education.

      • There was no Abraham i.e. the foundations of Judaism, Christianity and Islam are non-existent.

      • There was no Moses i.e the pillars of Judaism, Christianity and Islam have no strength of purpose.

      • There was no Gabriel i.e. Islam fails as a religion. Christianity partially fails.

      • There was no Easter i.e. Christianity completely fails as a religion.

      • There was no Moroni i.e. Mormonism is nothing more than a business cult.

      • Sacred/revered cows, monkey gods, castes, reincarnations and therefore Hinduism fails as a religion.

      • Fat Buddhas here, skinny Buddhas there, reincarnated Buddhas everywhere makes for a no on Buddhism.

      August 24, 2011 at 6:41 pm |
    • MaryContrary

      Dear Reality; Speaking as one who has had many, many clergy serving the needs of many people over a century I must take issue with you on your "no clerics, no nuns, no bibles" etc. You are taking a giant, indiscriminate swipe at something that you think that you understand–and may have personal issues with-in an emotion driven tirade. Now, these religious persons, places, and things have their imperfections because they are human. But unless you have had a priest sit at your hospital bedside for nearly thirty hours, or known an evangelist who travelled at his own expense to preach to a church having a revival, or–and nun from India who spent her life loving and caring for people whom the world had thrown away, please do not denounce religion outright. You are a good person I percieve.....and I imagine that you have been a source of comfort to people as well. That is all that religions at their best are doing.

      August 25, 2011 at 8:28 pm |
    • Reality

      MaryContrary,

      The issue lies within the flaws and frauds in the theology and history of the religions that these charitable people, Christian and non-Christian follow:

      To wit:

      A synopsis:

      1. origin: http://query.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=F20E1EFE35540C7A8CDDAA0894DA404482

      “New Torah For Modern Minds

      Abraham, the Jewish patriarch, probably never existed. Nor did Moses. The entire Exodus story as recounted in the Bible probably never occurred. The same is true of the tumbling of the walls of Jericho. And David, far from being the fearless king who built Jerusalem into a mighty capital, was more likely a provincial leader whose reputation was later magnified to provide a rallying point for a fledgling nation.

      Such startling propositions – the product of findings by archaeologists digging in Israel and its environs over the last 25 years – have gained wide acceptance among non-Orthodox rabbis. But there has been no attempt to disseminate these ideas or to discuss them with the laity – until now.

      The United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism, which represents the 1.5 million Conservative Jews in the United States, has just issued a new Torah and commentary, the first for Conservatives in more than 60 years. Called "Etz Hayim" ("Tree of Life" in Hebrew), it offers an interpretation that incorporates the latest findings from archaeology, philology, anthropology and the study of ancient cultures. To the editors who worked on the book, it represents one of the boldest efforts ever to introduce into the religious mainstream a view of the Bible as a human rather than divine docu-ment. “

      2. Jesus was an illiterate Jewish peasant/carpenter/simple preacher man who suffered from hallucinations (or “mythicizing” from P, M, M, L and J) and who has been characterized anywhere from the Messiah from Nazareth to a mythical character from mythical Nazareth to a ma-mzer from Nazareth (Professor Bruce Chilton, in his book Rabbi Jesus). An-alyses of Jesus’ life by many contemporary NT scholars (e.g. Professors Ludemann, Crossan, Borg and Fredriksen, ) via the NT and related doc-uments have concluded that only about 30% of Jesus' sayings and ways noted in the NT were authentic. The rest being embellishments (e.g. miracles)/hallucinations made/had by the NT authors to impress various Christian, Jewish and Pagan sects.

      The 30% of the NT that is "authentic Jesus" like everything in life was borrowed/plagiarized and/or improved from those who came before. In Jesus' case, it was the ways and sayings of the Babylonians, Greeks, Persians, Egyptians, Hitt-ites, Canaanites, OT, John the Baptizer and possibly the ways and sayings of traveling Greek Cynics.

      earlychristianwritings.com/theories.html

      For added "pizzazz", Catholic theologians divided god the singularity into three persons and invented atonement as an added guilt trip for the "pew people" to go along with this trinity of overseers. By doing so, they made god the padre into god the "filicider".

      Current RCC problems:

      Pedophiliac priests, an all-male, mostly white hierarchy, atonement theology and original sin!!!!

      3., Luther, Calvin, Joe Smith, Henry VIII, Wesley, Roger Williams, the Great “Babs” et al, founders of Christian-based religions or combination religions also suffered from the belief in/hallucinations of "pretty wingie thingie" visits and "prophecies" for profits analogous to the myths of Catholicism (resurrections, apparitions, ascensions and immacu-late co-nceptions).

      Current problems:
      Adulterous preachers, pedophiliac clerics, "propheteering/ profiteering" evangelicals and atonement theology,

      3. Mohammed was an illiterate, womanizing, lust and greed-driven, warmongering, hallucinating Arab, who also had embellishing/hallucinating/plagiarizing scribal biographers who not only added "angels" and flying chariots to the koran but also a militaristic agenda to support the plundering and looting of the lands of non-believers.

      This agenda continues as shown by the ma-ssacre in Mumbai, the as-sas-sinations of Bhutto and Theo Van Gogh, the conduct of the seven Muslim doctors in the UK, the 9/11 terrorists, the 24/7 Sunni suicide/roadside/market/mosque bombers, the 24/7 Shiite suicide/roadside/market/mosque bombers, the Islamic bombers of the trains in the UK and Spain, the Bali crazies, the Kenya crazies, the Pakistani “koranics”, the Palestine suicide bombers/rocketeers, the Lebanese nutcases, the Taliban nut jobs, the Ft. Hood follower of the koran, and the Filipino “koranics”.

      And who funds this muck and stench of terror? The warmongering, Islamic, Shiite terror and torture theocracy of Iran aka the Third Axis of Evil and also the Sunni "Wannabees" of Saudi Arabia.

      Current crises:

      The Sunni-Shiite blood feud and the warmongering, womanizing (11 wives), hallucinating founder.

      5. Hinduism (from an online Hindu site) – "Hinduism cannot be described as an organized religion. It is not founded by any individual. Hinduism is God centered and therefore one can call Hinduism as founded by God, because the answer to the question ‘Who is behind the eternal principles and who makes them work?’ will have to be ‘Cosmic power, Divine power, God’."

      The caste/laborer system, reincarnation and cow worship/reverence are problems when saying a fair and rational God founded Hinduism."

      Current crises:

      The caste system and cow worship/reverence.

      6. Buddhism- "Buddhism began in India about 500 years before the birth of Christ. The people living at that time had become disillusioned with certain beliefs of Hinduism including the caste system, which had grown extremely complex. The number of outcasts (those who did not belong to any particular caste) was continuing to grow."

      "However, in Buddhism, like so many other religions, fanciful stories arose concerning events in the life of the founder, Siddhartha Gautama (fifth century B.C.):"

      Archaeological discoveries have proved, beyond a doubt, his historical character, but apart from the legends we know very little about the circu-mstances of his life. e.g. Buddha by one legend was supposedly talking when he came out of his mother's womb.

      Bottom line: There are many good ways of living but be aware of the hallucinations, embellishments, lies, and myths surrounding the founders and foundations of said rules of life.

      Then, apply the Five F rule: "First Find the Flaws, then Fix the Foundations". And finally there will be religious peace and religious awareness in the world!!!!!

      August 26, 2011 at 12:37 am |
    • Physics-lite

      Physics-lite
      @ CN77 & Andrew and [ALL ] Atheist
      Andrew’s Quote “It's not all that pointless, see while you would never be convinced that your bronze age mythological beliefs about the creation of the universe are wrong, since I can rebut (with peer reviewed journal articles no less) any claim you make, in rather stunning detail, those who are not so well versed on the subject who read the dialogue could be swayed to the side of science. It's for the benefit of others, not the already horribly misinformed.” End of Quote.
      -------------------------------–
      A genius does what it must, to advance Mankind and
      Talented Intellectuals do just what their discipline allows.
      --------------------------------
      Discipline implies the teaching and enforcing of an acceptable patterns of behavior.
      Andrew; It is all in One’s Description and Everyone Else’s
      Interruptions over the Millennium.

      Here are some peer reviewed “Nobel Prize winners”, no less.
      You pick one or all, Sheldon Glashow, Steven Weinberg, Abdus Salam, Carlo
      Rubbia, Simon van der Meer, and last but not least Richard P. Feynman.

      All of the above “Nobel Winners” describe and illustrate their finding of
      millions of particle collisions in the same way.

      All of the elementary particles divide up into packets of photonic energy
      [light energy ] that Turns [or ferments,] into two or more sub-particles and
      some of the photonic energy [ light energy ] returns [or ferments,] back into
      the original elementary particles. It is called quantum electrodynamics/or QED

      The EM-fields of each particle defines the amount of light particles are in each
      particle or sub-particle. As the EM-fields collapse back. Andrew, you know QED

      “Let there be Light and let the light ferment and the light became fermented”& there was the Heavens and the Earth.

      August 27, 2011 at 1:02 pm |
  15. really?

    a national cathedral that is Episcopalian ? seriously......nearly 100 years to complete? do we taxpayers pay for that? what about us none believers? Can we make a cathedral to "nothing"? Im sure we can find masons.......

    August 24, 2011 at 3:33 pm |
    • Mary

      If you had bothered to look up the information first you would have learned that a 'foundation' has raised the funds to build and maintain this elegant structure. The common 'knee jerk' response...'did taxpayers pay for this'...is just that.

      August 24, 2011 at 3:48 pm |
    • pathetic

      it was built via donations...cry more

      August 24, 2011 at 3:49 pm |
    • SASS

      No, the Episcopal church maintains the Cathedral. It costs taxpayers nothing.

      August 24, 2011 at 3:49 pm |
    • Ryan in Michigan

      Typical overreaction on really?'s part. Also, the National Cathedral doesn't just cater to Episocpalians; on my senior trip to Washington, we attended a Catholic service there (we aren't strictly Catholic, but wanted to see the cathedral and happened to fall on a day when there was a Catholic service, which we thoroughly enjoyed).

      August 24, 2011 at 4:24 pm |
    • EvolvedDNA

      Mary I would think that with churches all donations are tax deductible and the church does not pay taxes... the tax payers have in actual fact still paid for this as they do for all churches. So the religious are getting a free ride on their belief?

      August 24, 2011 at 11:49 pm |
  16. gro...icmc

    I am a Christian but also believe in science. We were not meant to know every thing but we can strive to know and learn as much as we can. I really hate when people do the oh I believe or don't. Either way no one cares. And the only people that argue about it or tell people that there wrong are self absorbed ass holes who think that there always right and your wrong. Your not any more important then any one else. U may make more or do more but it does not mean jack shi*. If u think your more important or better than any one your an ass hole and should be delt so, as such. Instead of arguing all the damn time about who believes in what try working on a way to get along. Every one that just sits there and gets mad about what other people believe is are strait dip shi*s.

    August 24, 2011 at 3:26 pm |
    • gro...icmc

      Yes that's how most feel

      August 24, 2011 at 3:27 pm |
    • really?

      seems like you should do the same.....

      August 24, 2011 at 3:34 pm |
    • SHRIKE

      Are you a Marine?

      August 24, 2011 at 3:45 pm |
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About this blog

The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.