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Bachmann urges Christians not to 'settle'
Michelle Bachman addressed students at Liberty University on Wednesday.
September 28th, 2011
08:20 PM ET

Bachmann urges Christians not to 'settle'

By Ashley Killough, CNN

(CNN) – Minessota Rep. Michele Bachmann gave one piece of advice to students at the country's largest Christian university: "Don't settle."

It's a line she's recently pushed to Republican voters, urging the GOP not to "settle" on leading GOP presidential candidates.

But on Wednesday she turned the phrase into one laced with heavy spiritual themes.

"Don't settle for anything less than what this great and almighty God has planned for you," Bachmann said in a speech at Liberty University in Lynchburg, Virginia.

The White House hopeful described her experience becoming a Christian as a 16-year-old, when she said she walked into a church one day with some friends and felt called to the altar.

Read the full story here from CNN's Political Ticker
- CNN Belief Blog

Filed under: Belief • Christianity • Faith Now

Patriotism and the 'God gap'
Surveys suggest a 'God gap' in views on American patriotism.
September 28th, 2011
07:19 PM ET

Patriotism and the 'God gap'

By Dave Schechter, CNN

(CNN)– “And may God bless the United States of America” is a popular closing line in speeches by presidents and presidential hopefuls.

Does a higher power, if one exists, “shed his grace on thee,” as the lyrics of “America the Beautiful” proclaim?

And if so, does this make the United States of America the greatest country in the world?

FULL POST

- CNN Belief Blog

Filed under: Belief • Church and state • Courts • Faith Now

In Brooklyn, a Hasidic walking tour opens ultra-Orthodox Jewish life to outsiders
A walking tour in Crown Heights opens the door to the ultra-Orthodox Jewish community.
September 28th, 2011
11:58 AM ET

In Brooklyn, a Hasidic walking tour opens ultra-Orthodox Jewish life to outsiders

By Philip Rosenbaum, CNN, and Ryan P. Casey, Special to CNN

New York (CNN) – When he was 18 and still living in his hometown of Chattanooga, Tennessee, Beryl Epstein received a call from his older brother, Mordechai, who was about to join the Israel Defense Forces.

Mordechai urged his younger brother to come to Crown Heights, a largely ultra-Orthodox Jewish neighborhood in Brooklyn, New York, where he was studying before heading to Israel.

“I knew there must be more – something I was missing,” recalls Epstein, 53, who grew up in a secular Jewish home.

His visit to Crown Heights the following year, 1977, inspired him to move there and to join the Chabad Lubavitch, a Hasidic Jewish sect predominant in the neighborhood. Inside his new community, Epstein noticed there was a misconception among outsiders that Lubavitcher Jews – who are distinguished by dark clothing, frequent use of Yiddish and what they say is an unyielding focus on devotion to God – shun the outside world.

FULL POST

- CNN Belief Blog

Filed under: Faith Now • Judaism • New York

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About this blog

The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke and Eric Marrapodi with daily contributions from CNN's worldwide newsgathering team.

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