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October 18th, 2011
08:54 AM ET

The liberal church of Herman Cain

By Eric Marrapodi and John Blake, CNN

Editor’s note: CNN’s John Blake was formerly a member of Antioch Baptist Church North. He left 13 years ago.

Atlanta (CNN) -  Herman Cain has vaulted to the top of the polls as a Republican presidential candidate, but there’s one audience that may prove tougher for him to win over: his hometown church.

Cain, a conservative who recently said African-Americans were “brainwashed” into voting Democratic, is an associate minister at an Atlanta megachurch that has been a stronghold of liberal activism and is led by a pastor who cites Malcolm X as one of his influences.

Cain is a longtime member of Antioch Baptist Church North, which sits near the former college and home of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.

The church, founded by freed slaves 134 years ago, boasts 14,000 members and an operating budget of more than $5 million. For years Antioch has hosted a “who’s who” of civil rights activists as guest speakers, including Jesse Jackson and Andrew Young.

Antioch’s powerful senior pastor, the Rev. C.M. Alexander, doesn’t share Cain’s political philosophy, Atlanta clergy say. But Cain and Alexander are so close that Cain sang “The Impossible Dream” for the pastor’s 50th anniversary celebration. The Atlanta businessman-turned-presidential hopeful is well liked by many members of his church, though some disagree with his politics, Antioch pastors say.

Cain’s piety may be just as fascinating as his politics, interviews suggest.

“He’s a real person who is more complicated than the sound bite you may have heard from him,” says the Rev. Fredrick Robinson, a friend of Cain’s who was an associate minister at Antioch before leaving to form his own church.

At Antioch, Cain has had to share the pews with fiery critics of the Republican Party like Joe Beasley, a man born to sharecroppers who once said he’s been called the “N-word” more times than he can count.

Read about Cain's stint as an Atlanta radio talk show host

Beasley is a deacon at Antioch and serves as Southern regional director for Jesse Jackson’s Rainbow PUSH Coalition. He also knows Cain and has no problem with his presence at Antioch.

“We’re good friends. He’s a great speaker and a great singer. He has a great love for the church,” Beasley says.

Beasley says he doesn’t talk politics with Cain, though.

“I respect him – and I want to keep my respect for him,” Beasley says.

Beasley, who worked with Cain on his unsuccessful 2004 run for one of Georgia’s U.S. Senate seats, says Antioch’s acceptance of the former Godfather’s Pizza CEO is not unusual. It’s an attitude, he says, that starts at the top with Alexander.

“The reverend’s position is when we open the door, whosoever comes, let them come,” Beasley says.

Alexander did not return calls seeking comment. Cain also was not available to comment for this article.

‘He’s family’

The black church has long been a paradox. It is one of the most politically liberal but theologically conservative institutions in the black community. Cain’s house of worship embodies some of these contradictions.

Antioch is a member of the National Baptist Convention USA Inc., a denomination in which some churches do not ordain women. The denomination’s leadership publicly broke with King over his civil rights activism.

But like many black Baptist churches, Antioch has developed a strong social justice component to its ministry over the years. It offers ministries for people suffering from drug addition and those infected with HIV/AIDS, and it has been a Sunday stopover for black politicians running for office.

Cain and his family blossomed in this world, according to some people who’ve known them at Antioch.

Robinson, the former Antioch minister, says Cain’s parents were pillars of the church. Cain graduated from Morehouse College, King’s alma mater, and went away to make his fortune. He returned to Antioch amid “great fanfare,” Robinson says.

Cain eventually became a fixture in the church’s deacon’s corner, a row of seats near the pulpit. On any Sunday, Cain could be seen sitting with the other deacons in his favorite light-blue dress shirt shouting, “Preach Rev!” or “Say it,” as the minister preached, Robinson says.

In 2002, Cain became a licensed minister at Antioch, he told Christianity Today.

Antioch members accept Cain because “he’s family,” Robinson says.

“If Herman Cain was one of those real uppity ‘I’m too good for regular blacks folks’ kind of person, he wouldn’t have mingled with us like he did,” Robinson says.

Robinson left Antioch to form his own church in rural Georgia and invited Cain to speak three times. All Robinson could afford to pay Cain was $200. It didn’t matter to Cain, whose speaking fee is usually far more, Robinson says.

Cain accepted the offer and brought a group of worshippers along with him to support Robinson’s small church, the pastor says.

Cain’s views on race aren’t simplistic, Robinson says. Cain says he doesn’t think racism is a huge obstacle for blacks, but Robinson says Cain has privately told him it’s a problem and once even complained about “the good ol’ boy” network in Georgia Republican politics.

“He knows there’s racism in the tea party, but he’ll never say that because they are his supporters. That bothers a lot of people, but he plays to that base not because he’s a sellout but because he’s a politician,” Robinson says.

In one video on his campaign website, “The Official Herman Cain Train Music Video,” Cain poses with young African-American and white supporters at a tea party rally and bellows, "To those who say the tea party is a racist organization, eat your words!"

The Rev. Gerald Durley, senior pastor of Providence Missionary Baptist Church in Atlanta and a longtime activist, recalls when Cain performed the key song from “Man of La Mancha” for Antioch’s pastor.

Cain sang “The Impossible Dream” in his deep baritone and “got a standing ovation,” Durley says. (Cain, who recently released an album of gospel tunes, also belted out the song at a recent campaign stop.)

Cain’s conservative message that blacks should forget about racism and focus on pulling themselves up by their bootstraps doesn’t mesh with his pastor’s philosophy, says Durley, himself a longtime leader among Atlanta clergy.

When the evangelist Billy Graham visited Atlanta in 1994 for a crusade, Alexander demanded that Graham include blacks on the various committees that organized his speaking event at the Georgia Dome, Durley says.

“He’s not going to talk about pulling yourself up by your bootstraps,” Durley says of Antioch’s pastor. “It’s about providing bootstraps.”

Alexander has said pastors should be agents of social change, not “religious pop stars.” He says Malcolm X and Rosa Parks are some of his civil rights influences.

“It’s not enough to talk about what black folks ought to do,” Alexander once said. “We have to also look at what government is not doing to ensure fairness and equal opportunity. God is on the side of the least of these. Jesus said, ‘The first shall become the last and the last shall become the first.’”

But Durley says Alexander can separate Cain’s political and religious beliefs.

“(Alexander) has respect for him,” Durley says. “Cain has been there for years. I would imagine that Alexander would say, ‘I can separate his spiritual soul and salvation from his political dogma.’”

‘Very clear … faith walk’

Ken Blackwell - former Cincinnati mayor, former Ohio secretary of state and fellow African-American Republican - first worked with Cain on an economic growth and tax reform commission in the mid-1990s.

“(Cain) is a person who tries to live his faith in the way he conducts himself in public and private life,” Blackwell says. “He doesn’t just talk the talk. He actually lives what he says and believes in.

“We have prayed with and for one another,” Blackwell says.

Both Cain and Blackwell are cancer survivors, and the two men leaned on each other during their health struggles. Blackwell beat prostate cancer in 2000 and Cain was diagnosed with stage four cancer in 2006. Cain has said his faith, coupled with the right medical treatment, was a major reason he was able to fight and beat the disease.

“I was able to see he has a very clear and discernible faith walk he was very comfortable with and very dependent on as he met his challenges,” Blackwell says.

Ralph Reed, head of the Faith and Freedom Coalition and former Christian Coalition leader, says the time Cain spent behind the podium at Antioch has helped him connect with voters on the campaign trail.

“Herman Cain can hold his own with Mike Huckabee in terms of his ability to connect with and really develop a rapport with voters of faith,” Reed says. Cain heads back to Iowa next week to speak at a Faith and Freedom event with Reed.

“He shares their faith, he shares their values and he’s extremely good at being able to communicate his views,” Reed says. “I think someone who is comfortable with the lexicon of evangelicals is clearly going to over-perform in the early primaries.”

But while voters have welcomed Cain and helped rocket him to the top of polls, there are some fellow African-American clergy who are not as accepting.

The Rev. Artis Johnson, an Atlanta pastor, wrote an open letter to Cain in a local online newspaper, the Cascade Patch, after Cain said last month that blacks were brainwashed into voting Democratic.

“We are not circus animals or attendees of hypnotism shows that cannot make the reasonable and right decisions about who our greatest political enemies are, ” Johnson wrote.

In his letter, Johnson asked Cain why blacks would vote Republican when the party desires to disenfranchise blacks at the voting booth, denies the power of racism and believes the free market is going to address the needs of the poor and elderly.

“In my heart,” Johnson wrote, “I was hoping that you would represent a politician that did more than appeal to the worst in the electorate.”

- CNN Belief Blog Co-Editor

Filed under: Baptist • Belief • Christianity • Herman Cain • Politics

soundoff (1,058 Responses)
  1. cola

    Look...Herman Cain is a good man – no question. He is well accomplished and has made some significant contributions to society. Unfortunately for him, this does not qualify him for the position of President.

    His 9-9-9 plan is far from being clear, and the reason why it is not clear is because his plan is an experiment that has yet to be tested to see if it will actually work.

    And worst of all, he has held no political office. He has no political experience. If Cain were elected President, Congress wouldn't have to buy lunch anymore because they would just have him! Cain wouldn't be able to get anything done because Congress would be too busy chewing him up and ripping his ideas to shreads!

    And he needs to learn how to answer questions without blinking his eyes so much – a clear indication that he is having to think too hard to formulate a response.

    October 19, 2011 at 2:06 pm |
    • brett

      nicely said
      he would also need to not make off handed comments then call them jokes as his way to slide by. he's not presidential quality.

      October 19, 2011 at 2:19 pm |
  2. hippypoet

    in my day a frigate was when you just don't give a damn

    October 19, 2011 at 1:40 pm |
    • Rick

      Marty Crane said that on Frasier

      October 19, 2011 at 1:56 pm |
    • hippypoet

      obsuce referrences are my favorite... thank you for playing the guess this line game.

      October 19, 2011 at 2:25 pm |
  3. Charmaine

    THIS WHOLE HERMAN CAIN THING IS REALLY DISILLUSIONAL! I SAY EVERYDAY THAT I CANNOT BELEIVE PEOPLE ARE GIVING HIM THE THE TIME OF DAY FOR THE REPUBLICAN PARTY1IT IS A MEDIA CIRCUS! A WASTE OF TIME! IT IS BEYOND ME OF HOW HE GOT THIS FAR TO DEBATE WITH OTHER CANIDATES! AND PEOPLE ARE LAPPING IT UP AND BELEIVING EVERYTHING HE SAYS!THE 999 TAX PLAN IS STUPID1IT WILL NOT HELP ANYONE WHAT SO EVER!IT SURELY WILL NOT GET MORE JOBS FOR THE UNEMPLOYED.HE DOES NOT KNOW MUCH TO EVEN HAVE INFORMATION ON HOW IT WORKS. BECAUSE IT WILL NOT WORK!THE POOR WORKING CLASS,THE MIDDLE,UPPER CLASS DO NOT NEED THIS TAX.IT DOES NOT MAKE SENSE!I WILL BE GLAD WHEN HERMIN CAIN GOES AWAY FROM THIS ILLUSIONAL THINKING HE CAN BE PRESIDENT OF THE U.S! HOW ABSURD TO HAVE PEOPLE DEBATING AND EMBARRISSING THEMSELVES TO DEATH!THEN IT IS ON NATIONAL T.V TO WHOEVER WANT TO SEE AND HEAR THIS GUY TALK.I CANNOT DEAL WITH THIS.THIS IS SHOWING THAT THERE ARE NOT TO MANY DECENT PRESIDENTIAL HOPEFULS UP FOR THE JOB.THIS IS REDICULOUS AND A BIG JOKE!!WE CANNOT JUST ELECT ANYBODY FOR THE TOP OFFICE AS IF "ANYBODY" OUT THERE THINK AND WANT TO BE PRESIDENT OF THE U.S!EVERYBODY IS JUST NOT CUT OUT FOR IT.HE SURE IS NOT.HE IS IN A DREAM WORLD.PLEASE STOP GIVING THE GUY THE MIC AND MEDIA TIME.HE IS NOW GOING TO BE ON PIERS MORGAN SHOW ON CNN.I WONDER WHY?I HOPE PIERS PUT HIM ON THE SPOT SO HE CANNOT AVOID ANSWERING QUESTIONS LIKE HE ALWAYS DO! HE TALKS DOUBLE TALK AND A SLICKSTER TO PAST OFF TO BE SO INTELLIGENT! HOW I LIKE TO KNOW HOW MANY PIZZA STORES ARE OPEN AND HOW MUCH HE "REALLY" MAKES AND IS WORTH. I AM DONE.

    October 19, 2011 at 1:30 pm |
    • Tom

      Char: You don't need to yell, OK?

      October 19, 2011 at 1:41 pm |
    • Ogre

      Charmaine,

      Oy, is this that pundit-touted "wisdom of the voters" ... ?! IQ TESTS!!!

      October 19, 2011 at 1:45 pm |
    • RichXX

      Take a deep breath, exhale and relax. Now turn your caps off. doesn't that feel better(G). Leave your caps off and repost and I will read your comments. As much as we each dislike a number of things, getting upset doesn't change them.

      October 19, 2011 at 1:58 pm |
    • shawn

      you can always tell the over 60 crowd...with their ALL CAPS emails and posts!

      October 19, 2011 at 2:03 pm |
  4. nativegirl

    I do not think we can take you seriously, when you decided not to "vet" the current president while he was running. Start with him and then we will talk!

    October 19, 2011 at 1:28 pm |
    • rep

      Holy short memories, Batman!

      October 19, 2011 at 1:36 pm |
  5. notaloser

    a mama grizzly is called a sow. just sayin

    October 19, 2011 at 1:20 pm |
  6. B4Cons

    Calling a Republican the "L" word is like calling a women the "C" word.

    October 19, 2011 at 12:49 pm |
    • Colin

      Christian?

      October 19, 2011 at 1:24 pm |
    • Sylar75

      I think our country would benefit from either a Liberal Republican or a Conservative Demacrat. Someone more in the middle then to the extreme. Id vote for them.

      October 19, 2011 at 1:33 pm |
  7. KC

    Hmmm.....
    Obama had Reverand Wright... NON-Issue
    Cain has a liberal church ... Issue

    Liberals sure are hypocrites

    October 19, 2011 at 12:44 pm |
    • sharoom

      Huh? Reverend Wright WAS an issue for Obama, but as I recall Obama confronted the American people about it.

      October 19, 2011 at 12:58 pm |
    • chris

      KC, is there some new rule among republican that they have to put the "hypocrisy" in every single comment??

      Republicans are the most hypocritical people in known history. Maybe that's why you guys like the word so much.

      Tard.

      October 19, 2011 at 12:59 pm |
    • Denise

      Um, who has the issue? The article merely points out the difference between Cain's political views and those shared by most of his church, It's an interesting examination, and one I find to be slightly in favor of Cain by painting him in a more complex and compelling way.

      And how short your memory must be if you think the President's association with Jeremiah Wright - whom sadly too few people had heard of before the 2008 race - was a "non-issue." It was such a huge issue in act that Obama dedicated a singular campaign speech to address it. No one was willing to let him off the hook, especially not his Democratic challenger.

      October 19, 2011 at 1:06 pm |
    • Vivian Mac

      Issues? This is a freaking news article. You right wing folks are getting sensitive, eh? How about a heaping truckload of scorched earth hatred? That's what your posse throws our way EVERY STEP OF THE WAY!

      October 19, 2011 at 1:20 pm |
    • BOEHNERSUX

      KC, your memory must have failed you or else you're very young. The Rev Wright was a very big issue in the 98 Obama campaign, he left that church over the controversy . You need to try to be honest when you enter such trash as this, you don't fool anyone except maybe yourself.

      October 19, 2011 at 1:23 pm |
    • arkboy

      how in the world can you say rev. wright was not an issue. every min. fox news was showing him. really short memory.

      October 19, 2011 at 2:18 pm |
  8. carby

    Cain has NOTHING to say except – 9, 9, 9 – and then he can not answer questions ABOUT 9, 9, 9 because it was written up for him and HE STILL DOES'NT KNOW WHAT ALL IT MEANS!!!! Their writers do all the legwork. But the least he can do is READ IT! NOT REFER PEOPL.E TO HIS WEBSITE WHEN HE CAN NOT ANSWER QUESTIONS ABOUT 9, 9, 9 (because he doesn't know the answer!!!!) GO HOME PIZZA MAKE!!!!!!

    October 19, 2011 at 12:26 pm |
    • KC

      Not as smart as the Teleprompter in chief?

      October 19, 2011 at 12:48 pm |
    • Deepthroat

      You must be a bigot beacuse Cains black and you don't like him.

      October 19, 2011 at 12:57 pm |
    • El Kababa

      I would say that Romney, Huntsman, and Gingrich are Obama's intellectual equals. Perry and Bachman are clearly of average intelligence and Bachman is, or course, insane. Cain, I don't know. Nothing he has said so far is very impressive.

      October 19, 2011 at 12:57 pm |
    • BobRoss

      If 9 9 9 is all you know about Cain, then you obviously have not been listening to him. Try listening to the candidate himself and not just what the media chooses to say about him.

      October 19, 2011 at 12:59 pm |
    • rayy

      Right. He hasn't done the math. Either because he wants to remain ignorant of his own plan, is too lazy, or can't.

      October 19, 2011 at 1:33 pm |
    • Lewis

      He knows plenty about it. He's a long time Fairtax supporter and 9-9-9 is a transition towards Fairtax. He knows what he's talking about.

      October 19, 2011 at 1:34 pm |
    • davidavid

      I was surprised when I looked up Herman Cain on Wikipedia. I always expected that he had a degree in business, finance, or something along those lines. He has an BA in mathematics and an MS in computer science from Purdue.

      October 19, 2011 at 1:41 pm |
    • Norm

      Haven't you heard?
      Cain can't read anything more than three pages long.
      The guy is a joke just like the other candidates in the republican freak show.
      Obama has nothing to worry about.
      And so many repug heads will explode when he gets re-elected, they are going to lose 75% of their voter base for 2016.
      They'll all be hanging from the attic rafters after the election.

      October 19, 2011 at 2:13 pm |
  9. Jordan

    This article is nothing but PR. Sounds like something straight from his campaign office. I have about as much respect for him as I do for Stepnfetchit

    October 19, 2011 at 12:24 pm |
    • Norm

      It was only a matter of time before we heard from our resident racist poster.
      "Stepnfetchit"?
      What century do you live in?

      October 19, 2011 at 2:15 pm |
  10. JD

    This is a NON-STORY. Now, if Cain's pastor preached anti-semite bigotted hate speech and cursed America...now that would be a story...That sounds familiar. Doesn't it B.O?

    October 19, 2011 at 12:22 pm |
    • Nah

      Please don't think liberals would ever be intellectually honest and point their own criticisms at themselves.

      October 19, 2011 at 12:41 pm |
    • Norm

      Only an ugly, racist, hypocritical repuglickn could make this an issue and compare it to Obama and Wright.
      As I recall, you sad lot had the problem with Wright and now it seems you're "inventing" a problem with your own man Cain and spewing your garbage and lies about the democrats.
      Pathetic trash.

      October 19, 2011 at 2:19 pm |
    • Nah

      norm: "As I recall, you sad lot had the problem with Wright and now it seems you're "inventing" a problem with your own man Cain and spewing your garbage and lies about the democrats."

      Hmm..good one?

      The question was why CNN focuses so much on Romney and Perry's religions (and pastors), but never really cared about legitimate racist things coming out of Obama's pastor's mouth.

      Please cry elsewhere.

      October 19, 2011 at 3:44 pm |
  11. dreucalypt

    He's been a member of a liberal church? Oh, the shame! Oh, the humanity!

    October 19, 2011 at 12:14 pm |
  12. wobbles

    Cain is right, but so many black leaders would be out of a job if they ever for a second agreed with him and let blacks leave the ever present excuse of "racism" for failure behind.

    October 19, 2011 at 12:11 pm |
    • Not All Docs Play Golf

      So, wobbles, what is YOUR excuse for failure?

      October 19, 2011 at 12:13 pm |
  13. bob

    by the way, those of you that don't believe in the God of the bible and makes slanderous remarks about God and Christians are either sincerely ignorant or conscientiously stupid.

    October 19, 2011 at 12:09 pm |
    • Not All Docs Play Golf

      Oh, that's right, of all the religions in the world, yours is the correct one. Too bad you've never ventured out of your own neighborhood (intellectually and culturally, that is).

      October 19, 2011 at 12:15 pm |
    • Nah

      not: "Oh, that's right, of all the religions in the world, yours is the correct one. Too bad you've never ventured out of your own neighborhood (intellectually and culturally, that is)."

      Oooh, good one. Non-responsive and a total non-sequitur.

      He said nothing about Christianity being right. He was criticizing people making "slanderous" remarks about "God and the bible" when they know nothing about either one, and believe in neither.

      October 19, 2011 at 12:43 pm |
    • Bob

      Sorry Nah, it was obviously implied. Don't be obtuse.

      October 19, 2011 at 12:55 pm |
    • CosmicC

      I'm not sure where slander comes into the picture. I will agree that we should not attack someone based on their beliefs, but I certainly would not withhold my views because they happen to be of a particular faith.
      More to the point, I would not decide whether or not to vote for someone based on what they believe. I would certainly make my decision based on whether or not they would attempt to force their faith on someone else.

      October 19, 2011 at 1:52 pm |
    • Nah

      bob: "Sorry Nah, it was obviously implied. Don't be obtuse."

      Nah. Even if it was implied, it wasn't the substance of his argument.

      October 19, 2011 at 3:45 pm |
  14. maquignon

    Cain did not say that racism does not exist. He said it is not the biggest factor and I absolutely agree with him. I think too many blacks use it as an excuse. It is there and it probably will never go away completely. I am not trying to minimize the problem of racism. No one can deny that it exists, but many people have overcome worse problems and anyone can find a reason not to succeed if they look hard enough and you only cripple and enslave people when you do for them what they are capable of doing for themselves. The democratic party has been telling black people for generations that they can't take care of themselves and they need the government to take care of them.

    October 19, 2011 at 12:06 pm |
    • cellblock131

      thank you!!!!

      October 19, 2011 at 1:05 pm |
    • memphispiano

      You are absolutely right! The message the young African Americans have been hearing for years from the Jesse Jacksons and Al Sharptons is "we can't make it because everything is stacked against us!" And many just quit trying. We need black leaders like Herman Cain to come out and say "you can make it; you can do it; just don't give up!"

      October 19, 2011 at 1:05 pm |
    • leeintulsa

      Bill cosby came out in this manner a few years ago, and it seemed like black people attacked him over it.. If i remember correctly..

      October 19, 2011 at 1:41 pm |
    • rep

      I mostly agree with everything except the last part about the Dems. Yes racism today is nowhere near what it used to be and it can be overcome, but many of the improvements that have been made and seen in equality have been made, in part, because of Democratic policies. Your characterization of that as "telling them they cannot succeed without help" is typical conservative tripe with no basis in reality. It's the kind of thing I think Republicans tell themselves so they can ignore the legacies of racism, blame all the problems on the victim, and then proclaim "mission accomplished" with a clear conscience.

      Here's some food for thought. Stop looking at snapshots and saying how bad things are today and start looking at trend charts showing how bad they were years ago. For example, check poverty by race. From the early 1960's to about 2001 poverty rates dropped by more than half..from about . 55% to about 20%. 20% is still relatively large, but that rate of decrease is far more dramatic than for any other racial group–whose numbers stayed about the same over the same time period. Just FYI...Blacks have been voting democratic in large numbers since the 1960s bacuse of the support for the Civil Rights Movement by DEMs. While far from perfect, and many problems remain (or have arisen) the Dems have been clearly better for Blacks than the GOP–which has even become far more conservative–since that time.

      October 19, 2011 at 1:55 pm |
    • CosmicC

      Obstacles exist for people of color that do not exist for whites.
      Yes, some people use these disadvantages as an excuse not to try. Others try, but cannot overcome the obstacles without some amount of help.
      Liberals are unwilling to sacrifice those who need the help, accepting that some undeserving people will receive benefits.
      Conservatives are willing to sacrifice those in need of help to prevent the undeserving from receiving benefits.

      October 19, 2011 at 2:09 pm |
  15. Reality

    If Cain's 9-9-9 program has any chance of balancing the budget and he gets nominated, I will vote for him. BUT his chances of winning are probably nil unless he can somehow get rid of the "pro-life" label.

    To wit:

    All the conservative votes in the country "ain't" going to help a "pro-life" presidential candidate, i.e Rick Perry, Mitt Romney, Jon Huntsman, Michele Bachmann, Herman Cain, Ron Paul or Rick Santorum, in 2012 as the "Immoral Majority" rules the country and will be doing so for awhile. The "Immoral Majority" you ask?

    The fastest growing USA voting bloc: In 2008, the 70+ million "Roe vs. Wade mothers and fathers" of aborted womb-babies" whose ranks grow by two million per year i.e. 78+ million "IM" voters in 2012.

    2008 Presidential popular vote results:

    69,456,897 for pro-abortion/choice BO, 59,934,814 for "pro-life" JM.

    And all because many women fail to take the Pill once a day or men fail to use a condom even though in most cases these men have them in their pockets. (maybe they should be called the "Stupid Majority"?)
    (The failures of the widely used birth "control" methods i.e. the Pill and male condom have led to the large rate of abortions ( one million/yr) and S-TDs (19 million/yr) in the USA. Men and women must either recognize their responsibilities by using the Pill or condoms properly and/or use other safer birth control methods in order to reduce the epidemics of abortion and S-TDs.)

    Statistical data provided by the CDC and the Guttmacher Inst-itute.
    -------------------------------------------------------

    October 19, 2011 at 12:05 pm |
    • JD

      You're so out of touch. Who is it that said "there should be fewer abortions in America"? That's right, B.O. I'm sure the VAST MAJORITY of Americans don't like abortion. I guess I missed the part where McCain campaigned hard to end ALL abortions. No sane person wants to see more unborn babies aborted. As a percentage of population, more African-American babies are aborted, by far, than any other race in the U.S. How does that help the race? How many Obamas, Cains, or Frederick Douglas' have been killed in their mother's wombs? Sad.

      October 19, 2011 at 12:32 pm |
    • Nah

      reality: "If Cain's 9-9-9 program has any chance of balancing the budget and he gets nominated, I will vote for him. BUT his chances of winning are probably nil unless he can somehow get rid of the "pro-life" label."

      So he should abandon his principles and what he believes is right simply so he can get power?

      Okay.

      October 19, 2011 at 12:45 pm |
    • Reality

      What can BO do to at least lift part of the Immoral Majority leader label?

      He says abortions should be "safe, legal and rare" but says nothing about the basic tenet of proper human conduct i.e. Thou Shalt Not Kill. And where is BO's sense of indignation that abortions are not rare and that these acts of horror demean the Golden Rule considering that he says he is a Christian. And where is his sense of indignation that women who use the Pill do not use it properly resulting in an failure rate of 8.7% as per the Gu-ttmacher Inst-itute statistics. Using these and other Gu-ttmacher Insti-tute data, this failure of women to use the Pill properly results in ~1,000,000 unplanned pregnancies every year. And the annual abortion rate in the USA is?? ~1,000,000 as per the CDC.

      And do males use co-ndoms properly? No, as said failure rate for this birth "control" method is 17.4%!! Again using Gu-ttmacher data, said failure rate results in another ~1,000,000 unplanned pregnancies every year.
      The Gu-ttmacher Insti-tute (same reference) notes also that the perfect use of the pill should result in a 0.3% failure rate (35,000 unplanned pregnancies) and for the male condom, a 2% failure rate (138,000 unplanned pregnancies).

      Bottom line: BO is still not aware of the basics of birth control and still remains the leader of the Immoral Majority and will remain so until he becomes a true Christian and one who respects and protects human life in all its forms and who at least emphasizes the proper use of birth control methods!!!

      October 19, 2011 at 1:30 pm |
  16. tensor

    There is no such thing as a liberal church. All religions are conservative by nature, among other things. Not a snowball's chance in h*ll I'm voting for a religious crackpot and that's what every presidential GOP candidate is – every one of 'em.

    October 19, 2011 at 12:04 pm |
    • Nah

      tensor: "There is no such thing as a liberal church. All religions are conservative by nature, among other things. Not a snowball's chance in h*ll I'm voting for a religious crackpot and that's what every presidential GOP candidate is – every one of 'em."

      Aww, an anti-religious bigot. How cute 🙂

      October 19, 2011 at 12:46 pm |
    • Tom

      You obviously haven't a clue. I wonder which candidate will pander to the "Clueless Pagan" voters?

      October 19, 2011 at 1:50 pm |
  17. bob

    Why is everyone bashing Obama. The repubicans control the house and are voting against everything he tries to do to help the public.They are trying to get him out of office even at the cost of keeping the economy as it is. They have been spending most of the time bashing him and now that its close to election time the best they have to offer is the 9-9-9 which experts say will do nothing to help the economy. The GOP has a lot of clowns that offer nothing but criticism of Obama and minorities. Maybe they would be satisfied with another Bush Cheney act for eight more years or better yet, how about Paul for president and Cain for vice president. We'd really get alot done. Maybe the Repubicans will vote for all of their bills no matter what the US citizens want.

    October 19, 2011 at 11:57 am |
    • Jerry Smith

      I believe you've been watching too much CNN. Ever hear of Harry Reid? Ask CNN why he is not allowing anything to be done. I bet they won't report it.

      October 19, 2011 at 12:06 pm |
    • Norm

      I don't know if we should take anything you say seriously Jerry.
      You don't even seem to know where you are right now.....

      October 19, 2011 at 2:26 pm |
  18. Honest_Voice

    Wasn't there another guy running for President not long ago but nobody questioned his church??? Why noit?

    October 19, 2011 at 11:54 am |
    • jhutch42

      HAHA, nobody questioned Obama's church? You must be joking.

      October 19, 2011 at 12:05 pm |
    • Fact check

      only Republicans get questioned about religion if you havn't noticed that yet.

      October 19, 2011 at 12:08 pm |
    • Nah

      jhutch: "HAHA, nobody questioned Obama's church? You must be joking."

      *yawn*

      Good job at being pedantic.

      CNN, etc. never questioned Obama's church, his connections to it, or Obama's pastor like they have with Romney or Perry. When they reported on it it always seemed to be merely a platform for having guest speakers explain away the problem for Obama, rather than criticizing him for it.

      October 19, 2011 at 12:48 pm |
    • Norm

      I think he means Bush.
      And no one questioned his church because he's a white multimillionaire from Texas.

      October 19, 2011 at 2:27 pm |
  19. play fair

    hey CNN-why is it that Cain gets a double take for different reasons on the belief blog and yet Romney made it only once?

    October 19, 2011 at 11:52 am |
    • Fact check

      Sadly,Ron Paul has been completely ignored. CNN probably couldn't find an obscure enough silly reason to have him on here.

      October 19, 2011 at 11:58 am |
    • Nonimus

      I don't know if there is a "fairness doctrine" for opinion blogs.

      October 19, 2011 at 5:26 pm |
  20. Marc

    Well...what about Mitt's church? Ricks? Why is it so important to focus on black candidates' churchs'? Kinda silly in that in the past we did not hear nearly as much about George W. Bush's, Bill Clinton's or even Reagan's church.

    October 19, 2011 at 11:45 am |
    • hippypoet

      oh we heard plenty of church strung bs from bush jr. , as far as the others, i'd say no church, they are all godless happy people and better for it.

      October 19, 2011 at 11:48 am |
    • nk

      They are focusing on his church because they refer to themselves as a liberal church, which is somewhat of a paradox no matter what way you look at it.

      October 19, 2011 at 12:50 pm |
    • Norm

      A paradox?
      No more than a black republican....

      October 19, 2011 at 2:29 pm |
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About this blog

The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.