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December 16th, 2011
01:23 PM ET

'Tebowing' leads to teens' suspension

(CNN) - Four student athletes were suspended after encouraging several others to do the 'Tebow' prayer pose, blocking a hallway in school.

Read more of our coverage of the prayer pose here: 'Tebowing' prayer stirs debate, but quarterback is OK with it

- CNN Belief Blog

Filed under: Belief • Christianity • Schools • TV

soundoff (108 Responses)
  1. Steve

    Very simple concept. If you want to follow a specific religion, do so. But also follow some very basic rules in concert with your religion. First, your religion may or may not be mine. Don't assume it is the same and don't push your beliefs on me unless you want me to push mine on you. Practice your religion on your time. Don't take school time from other students who are there to learn. Don't impede others as they try to move from class to class. Don't idolize sports stars (I would think the most devout would understand the concept of not praying to false idols). If you can't respect everyone's religion and their own personal beliefs, don't expect anyone to respect your beliefs.

    January 9, 2012 at 3:43 pm |
    • Hou323

      Not to be rude, but you're taking this far too seriously. This is hilarious, and them getting suspended for it is even better. Cool youth + trendy meme = winning.

      January 10, 2012 at 1:25 am |
  2. Joshua

    I can't help but to think that if more young men and women had Tebowed in the schools across the country like these brave young men, representing all that Tebow stands for, that the Broncos would have won this past weekend. I blame the loss on all of the so called christian cowards that didn't do it and the nonchristians. May God have mercy on all of their souls.

    December 20, 2011 at 6:15 pm |
    • Cynthia C

      I'm pretty sure the students are mocking. Not showing strength and pride in a faith. Just saying.

      January 9, 2012 at 5:14 pm |
    • sarahfalin

      Oh please!

      January 11, 2012 at 1:32 pm |
  3. David Johnson

    A tornado races through a trailer park, destroying everything in its path. One man and his trailer are untouched. It is a miracle!

    No it isn't. It's random chance. Rewind everything and send the tornado back through the park. This time the fellow and his trailer will be toast. Someone else may well survive.

    Miracles consist of coincidence and random chance. No god required.

    Cheers!

    December 20, 2011 at 12:52 pm |
    • Hou323

      Or the man was tebowing on top of his trailer... That's the more likely scenario here, c'mon, you know it.

      January 10, 2012 at 1:28 am |
  4. derp

    The cheerleading team should start Teblowing

    December 19, 2011 at 4:25 pm |
  5. TheRationale

    Why is this on the news? There's nothing interesting here. High school kids being disruptive get suspended, what a revelation. No, it has nothing to do with religion, please.

    December 19, 2011 at 12:25 pm |
  6. Lucifer's Evil Twin

    Jesus apparently likes Brady more

    December 19, 2011 at 9:14 am |
    • derp

      No kidding, he has three superbowl rings and Giselle Bundchen. I think he likes Brady more than anyone alive.

      December 19, 2011 at 4:26 pm |
  7. Bob

    Ha ha ha Tebow and his team just lost, big time.

    What now, is the mean old Christian sky fairy testing Tebow, or did Tebow just not do his daily goat burning that his Christian sky fairy so explicitly demands?

    December 19, 2011 at 8:57 am |
  8. Portland tony

    There's probably nothing wrong with kids being kids. Showing off and doing "outrageous" stuff is part of growing up. Too justify blocking a hallway because you are praying is a pretty lame excuse but there are people who would blog it's OK for them to do.......Holy Tebow Batman, we can pretend we're Muslims and get away with doing this kneeling crap 7 times a day!

    December 18, 2011 at 8:56 am |
    • Crap your hands!

      If your muslim and you know it, crap your hands!

      December 18, 2011 at 11:30 pm |
  9. David Johnson

    Jesus speaking:

    "If you believe, you will receive whatever you ask for in prayer." –Matthew 21:22 (NIV)

    "I tell you the truth, if you have faith as small as a mustard seed, you can say to this mountain, 'Move from here to there' and it will move. Nothing will be impossible for you." –Matthew 17:20 (NIV)

    "Ask and it will be given to you.... For everyone who asks receives." –Luke 11:9-10 (NIV)

    "Again, I tell you that if two of you on earth agree about anything you ask for, it will be done for you by my Father in heaven." –Matthew 18:19 (NIV)

    James 5:15 – And the prayer offered in faith will make the sick person well; the Lord will raise them up. If they have sinned, they will be forgiven.

    Let's be honest. Don't be afraid to use critical thinking. Jesus said the above, about prayer. Is it true? Can you post back to me and claim what Jesus said is true?

    Why has there never been a doc_umented case of an amputated limb being restored? Do you think an amputee never prayed or had faith?

    Double blind experiments, have all shown that prayer has no effect on illness.

    Because people have believed the promises of the bible, they have withheld medical care for their children. They prayed instead. Evidently, god was not moved by their faith. Their children died. Modern medicine could have saved them. OOoopsie!

    Why aren't Jesus' words true? Can you think of any possibilities? If Jesus' words aren't true about prayer, then how can we depend on anything else Jesus said? Maybe if we could "test" the afterlife claims, they would be no more real than the claims about prayer.

    A fundie once told me, that god always answers prayers in one of three ways:
    1) God says, "yes". You get what you asked for immediately.
    2) God says, "to wait". You will get what you asked for at some future date.
    3) God says, "no". You will not get what you asked for.

    Hmmm.... But I can get the same success from the carton of milk I have sitting on the breakfast table.

    1) If I pray to my magic carton, some things will come true immediately, just by chance and coincidence.
    2) Some things will come true at some future date, for the same reasons.
    3) If I don't get what I want, then my magic carton said, "no".

    I think there is a problem, when there is no difference between praying to a god and praying to a milk carton.

    Having a prayer answered, appears to require only 3 things:
    1. Belief
    2. Faith
    3. And to be totally sure, you need others who agree with what you are asking for, to pray with you.

    Hmm...

    Remember the Gulf oil spill?
    Remember how a ton of people prayed for god to stop the gushing?
    I was spellbound! I watched the real time video of the oil spill. I expected to see it stop. It did not. Human technology eventually capped the well.

    Remember when Rick issued a proclamation, that for 72 hours, the citizens of Texas would all pray for rain. I thought, surely god would hear their prayers and open the windows of Heaven!
    The "days of prayer" ended Sunday, April 24, 2011.
    As of Dec 7, 2011 ... Most of Central Texas and the Colorado River basin remain in the grips of an extreme drought.

    Studies have shown prayer does not work. Any miracles or answered prayers are the result of random chance, coincidence, selective observation or fraud. Believers tend to remember the perceived positive outcome of prayers and forget the failed. Because believers rely on faith, they are easily deceived by unscrupulous people.

    Christians MUST contest this. They must rent their clothes and Shout: "Do not put the lord your god to the test!" LOL!

    God, either does not care or does not exist. Personally, I'm checking the second box. LOL.

    Cheers!

    December 17, 2011 at 2:22 pm |
    • Cher

      Crazy much?

      December 18, 2011 at 1:31 am |
    • exterminator

      Someone call for an exterminator? Sh it house rat nearby? Oh, there it is, goes by the name Johnson.

      December 18, 2011 at 3:41 pm |
    • David Johnson

      @Cher
      @exterminator

      The Christian god is very unlikely to exist. Calling me names, won't bring Him to life. Instead, offer evidence that the Christian god does indeed exist.

      Do either of you believe in Isis? Or Zeus? Or Allah? No? Then you are crazy and rats. For verily I say unto you, there is just as much evidence for these "gods" as there is for the Christian god.

      Cheers!

      December 19, 2011 at 10:52 am |
    • derp

      I prayed to god for years and nada.

      Then one time I prayed to my di ck.

      It worked.

      Now I always pray to my di ck.

      December 19, 2011 at 4:29 pm |
    • David Johnson

      @derp

      A wise choice!

      Cheers!

      December 19, 2011 at 6:10 pm |
    • cbonner

      "You shall not put the Lord, your God, to the test" (Dt 6:16)

      That is why experiments can not prove the power of prayer or of faith. God does not submit himself to our science.

      "For my thoughts are not your thoughts, nor are your ways my ways—oracle of the LORD. For as the heavens are higher than the earth, so are my ways higher than your ways." (Is 55:8-9)

      We tend to see death as the ultimate evil thing that can happen and any death as the failure of God to preserve life. Yet death is not the end, and therefore it is not a failure. This is part of how God sees and thinks, part of the human blindness we must learn to overcome.

      And God does not rescue us from the temporal consequences of our own mistakes. If we mess up the ecology of the Gulf of Mexico, we must deal with it. Don't blame God for treating us as adults who must clean up our own messes.

      December 19, 2011 at 6:58 pm |
    • exterminator

      I see a 93 year old man, servant of God walk out of the hospital. I see a 62 year old man,devotes his life and throat to blaspheming God, die with a throat cancer. Connect the dots. I do not expect Johnson to be sane enough to even know what the question is.

      December 19, 2011 at 9:02 pm |
    • HotAirAce

      Connecting your two dots and many others, the resulting picture is – nothing! There are no gods – no even just one, no ghosts or goblins, no angels, leprechauns or unicorns...

      December 19, 2011 at 9:07 pm |
    • captain america

      canadian qu eer atheists screwed up canada, their opinions are neither needed or wanted here .One nation under God. Go screw yourself canadian. There's your sign

      December 19, 2011 at 9:12 pm |
    • exterminator

      Had not thought about it, but you are right cap,t. canadian ain't bright enough to be able to connect dots.

      December 19, 2011 at 9:14 pm |
    • David Johnson

      @cbonner

      You said: "You shall not put the Lord, your God, to the test" (Dt 6:16)
      That is why experiments can not prove the power of prayer or of faith. God does not submit himself to our science."

      This would be a valid argument, if prayer worked everywhere, except when subjected to scientific study. Of all the people without limbs, not one has EVER received a replacement. Outside Lourdes, there is a huge pile of wheelchairs. But, not one wooden leg. Odd, huh? Do you think amputees are hard for god, sort of like iron chariots? If prayer worked, as Jesus said it would, science would not be testing if it is really effective. It would be obvious to all.

      Let me tell you a true story of a disaster:

      Sit back and let uncle Dave tell you a true story of faith and the Sago Coal Mine Disaster.

      13 men were buried deep in the W. Va coal mine. A frantic effort was made to save the men.

      The families of the trapped miners gathered in the local Baptist church. Waiting and praying. Always praying.

      A message came up from the rescue team. The trapped miners had been found. They were all alive!

      The Baptist preacher announced, "There was indeed a god in West Virginia!" Tears welled up in his eyes.

      The people in the church began to weep and speak in tongues, praising god. More people came to the little church, waiting on the saved miners. Food was appearing on tables arranged along the walls. Rumor had it, the saved miners were starving!

      Someone voiced the opinion that the floor of the church might not hold up, to all the weight of the people.

      The people rejected the danger. If god could save the miners, from the bowels of the mountain, He could hold up the floor with his mighty hand.

      And then another message came up from the rescue team. There had been a mistake. Of the 13 miners, only 1 was alive, and he would not be taking part in the banquet.

      The people now sheepish, moved off the overloaded floor. The preacher stood silently. Tears had been streaming down his face, praising the god, who had heard their prayers. What should he say? That men just couldn't understand the mind and ways of god? That the dead were with Jesus now? Little comfort to the grieving friends and family.

      A few of the people gave up on religion. Some tried to find a miracle in the fact one man had survived. Had their god not saved him? Couldn't a miracle be pulled from this sadness? God's mighty hand delivered him, because He had a plan for this man.

      The doctors pointed out, that the man who lived was young. The other men were well over 40. The younger man's heart was just stronger. No miracle could be claimed.

      The moral: Prayer doesn't work.

      Cheers

      December 20, 2011 at 12:50 pm |
    • cbonner

      "Uncle Dave,"

      Let's compare ID cards and see who's old enough to be uncle to whom ;-}

      You responded to the my first quote from the Bible, but not to the second. But the second is far more important, and it includes important lessons for the faithful but misguided Christians who proclaimed a miracle at Sago.

      "For my thoughts are not your thoughts, nor are your ways my ways" (Is 55:8)

      You say prayer doesn't work. Define "work."

      God is not Santa Claus giving us everything we ask for. No, prayer does not work in that sense.

      If we try to see things as God sees them, we can never truly succeed, but we can grow ever closer to the understanding that God gives us what we truly need and not what we think we need.

      Consider this: Jesus Himself did not get what he prayed for.

      In the Agony in the Garden, Jesus offers a complex prayer. If we look at it in simple terms, Jesus prayed that he could be spared from the cross. He didn't get what he asked for.

      But His prayer included the clause, "yet, not as I will, but as you will." (Mt. 26:39). This part was indeed granted.

      See as God sees.

      December 20, 2011 at 7:37 pm |
    • The Bobinator

      > In the Agony in the Garden, Jesus offers a complex prayer. If we look at it in simple terms, Jesus prayed that he could be spared from the cross. He didn't get what he asked for.

      So, Jesus wasn't God? If Jesus isn't God, why should we trust anything he says.

      December 21, 2011 at 9:08 am |
    • cbonner

      Bobinator

      Yes, Jesus is God. But he is not the Father. God is a Trinity – three Persons in one God. Jesus addresses the Father in the second person (You) and refers to Him in the third person (He), but Father, Son, and Holy Spirit are one God.

      And Jesus prayed to the Father many, many times.

      December 21, 2011 at 7:39 pm |
    • tbonher

      cbonner, so your proof for your three-ply god is what exa-ctly? Does it abso-rb more moi-sture that way? And how come Jesus needed to pray? No telepa-thy between your holy ghosties?

      December 21, 2011 at 7:53 pm |
    • Dude in Colorado

      Wow! A Magic Milk Carton... I get the same results from my bottle of Mrs. Buttersworth, though I have noticed I get more positive results praying to a half full bottle than I do with one that's half empty!

      January 9, 2012 at 10:26 pm |
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The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.