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Survey: U.S. Mormons feel discrimination, hope
The Mormon temple at church headquarters in Salt Lake City, Utah.
January 12th, 2012
12:01 AM ET

Survey: U.S. Mormons feel discrimination, hope

By Dan Gilgoff, CNN.com Religion Editor

(CNN) – Nearly half of American Mormons say they face a lot of discrimination in the United States, though most also say that acceptance of their religion is on the rise, according to a major survey released Thursday.

The survey also found that a large majority of American Mormons think their countrymen are uninformed about their religion and don’t see Mormons as part of mainstream society, even as most Mormons also say the country is ready for a Mormon president.

“The survey creates a mixed picture for how Mormons see themselves,” said Greg Smith, senior researcher with the Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life, which conducted the study. “On the one hand, many tell us they’re misunderstood and often discriminated against, recognizing the challenges of acceptance.

“But Mormons also seem to think that things are changing, that more Americans are coming to see Mormonism as mainstream,” he said.

The survey comes amid what has been called a “Mormon moment.”

Two of the Republican presidential candidates – Mitt Romney and Jon Huntsman – attend the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. The religion has also cropped up in big ways in popular culture, from the hit Broadway play “Book of Mormon” to the recent HBO series “Big Love,” about a fundamentalist Mormon family.

Mormons constitute about 2% of the American population.

The Pew survey found that 46% of American Mormons say they face a lot of discrimination in the U.S. today, while six in 10 say their fellow Americans as a whole are uninformed about the LDS Church.

Two-thirds of Mormons say their fellow citizens do not view Mormonism as part of mainstream American society.

At the same time, 63% of Mormons say Americans are “becoming more likely to see Mormonism as part of mainstream society,” in the words of the survey report, while 56% say the country is ready for a Mormon president.

There are some surprising parallels between how Mormons feel about their place in American society and how Muslims do, according to an earlier Pew survey.

"We do see a remarkable degree of similarity about what it's like to be a minority in society," Smith said. "They are under no illusions" about how the broader public currently feels about them, and know their religions are not widely understood, but they remain optimistic at heart, he said.

They recognize the challenges, "but both groups are relentlessly positive about their future in the United States," said Luis Lugo, the director of the Pew Forum.

As Romney’s and Huntsman’s ability to win evangelical votes in the approaching South Carolina presidential primary has become a major question in the presidential campaign, the Pew survey finds that half of Mormons believe that evangelical Christians are unfriendly toward them.

In fact, Mormon and evangelical political opinions match closely on almost everything except immigration, the survey found. (Mormons are much more likely than evangelicals or the U.S. population overall to see immigrants as making a positive contribution to society, said David Campbell of the University of Notre Dame, who helped advise the Pew Forum on the survey.)

Mormons also subscribe to key tenets of mainstream Christianity, despite the sense many evangelicals have that Mormons are not Christians. Previous Pew surveys show that about half of white evangelicals say Mormonism is not a Christian faith.

"Nearly all Mormons say they believe Jesus rose from the dead and that Mormonism is a Christian religion," Smith said.

But the Mormon-evangelical divide is not simply one of theology, a leading evangelical said.

"Evangelicals are - famously or infamously, depending on your perspective - very evangelistic," said Richard Land  of the Southern Baptist Convention. "And so Mormons are out there going door-to-door trying to convince folks  to become Mormons, and evangelicals are out there going door-to-door trying to convince people to become evangelicals."

By comparison, most Mormons said that Americans who are not religious are either neutral or friendly toward them.

Mormons and evangelicals are politically similar, the survey found, with three-quarters of Mormons saying they identify with or lean toward the Republican Party.

And the survey showed that Mormons are more devout in their faith than evangelicals, who are more devout that the public at large.

Three-quarters of Mormons report attending religious services at least weekly, while eight in 10 pray daily and give 10% of their income to their church.

The Pew Forum says the nationwide survey, conducted in October and November, constitutes the biggest survey of American Mormons conducted by an organization that’s not connected to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

Pew surveyed 1,019 self-identified Mormons for the project.

CNN's Richard Allen Greene and Emma Lacey-Bordeaux contributed to this report.

- CNN Belief Blog Co-Editor

Filed under: Mormonism • Politics • Polls

soundoff (1,639 Responses)
  1. dionysus

    Bite me. You don't get to pick on gays and then get sympathy for being picked on by other Christians.

    January 12, 2012 at 12:12 pm |
    • Dennis

      Yeah, this article mentions persecution from evangelicals, but it certainly fails to point to how Mormons are discriminated against and persecuted by the LGBT community for staying true to their faith and moral teaching. Those who opposed Prop 8 tried to say it was all about hate, but I never saw more hate than that which was spewed by those who opposed Prop 8.

      January 12, 2012 at 12:23 pm |
  2. Quaiana

    They feel bigotry. I guess they have forgotten how they referred to Hispanics, Black People, and Indians as loathsome cursed people. They also believe that Black People are here to represent the devil. Up until 1978 male Black People were not even allowed to hold the priesthood until the government intervened and stated they could not call themselves a church and receive tax dollars until they uplifted the ban. It clearly states in the Book of Mormon how they feel about minorities…

    And [God] had caused the cursing to come upon them, yea, even a sore cursing, because of their iniquity. For behold, they had hardened their hearts against him, that they had become like unto a flint; wherefore, as they were white, and exceedingly fair and delightsome, that they might not be enticing unto my people, the Lord God did cause a skin of blackness to come upon them. And thus saith the Lord God; I will cause that they shall be loathsome unto thy people, save they shall repent of their iniquities." (2 Nephi 5:21)

    I usually don’t judge based on religious but as a Black Woman I am highly offended and would never vote for a Mormon, no matter what poltical party they are.

    January 12, 2012 at 12:12 pm |
  3. abinadi

    God loves you and me and he does not approve of the confusion that exists among the protestant churches of today. He has promised that no prayer of any person who is sincerely seeking the truth shall go unanswered. To those who receive the Book of Mormon and read it sincerely and pray about it, he has said through a prophet, "4 And when ye shall receive these things, I would exhort you that ye would ask God, the Eternal Father, in the name of Christ, if these things are not true; and if ye shall ask with a sincere heart, with real intent, having faith in Christ, he will manifest the truth of it unto you, by the power of the Holy Ghost." You can get a free Book of Mormon from mormon.org and see for yourself. I know it is true!

    5 And by the power of the Holy Ghost ye may aknow the btruth of all things.

    January 12, 2012 at 12:12 pm |
    • Lance

      Something to think about abinadi on the promise. Do you think it's possible that if you wanted such an experience-both because it would comfort you and perhaps mixed with some desire to fit in with kind Mormon friends and family-that it might happen not because of some divine messenger but because of processes going on in the human mind?

      January 12, 2012 at 3:14 pm |
  4. LMB123

    W.G – If you actually read your Bible you would find out that God created everything and everybody, so that must include satan. Or do you think satan created himself?. In the book of Revelations in (in the Bible) it refers to satan as a fallen angel who rebelled against God and was therefore "cast out" or expelled from heaven. He couldn't have been "expelled" from heaven if he had not been there to start with, together with all the sons of God (all of us). By not accepting that satan was also a creation of God you're the one who by default are putting satan on the same level as God (now, that's ridiculous).The truth is God is over all because He created all.

    January 12, 2012 at 12:11 pm |
  5. Vince

    I don't want to hear about Mormons feeling discriminated against. They make the LGBT community feel they same way.

    January 12, 2012 at 12:11 pm |
    • Dennis

      I think Mormons are very kind and respectful to the LGBT community while not abandoning their own religious and moral teachings regarding marriage and morality.

      January 12, 2012 at 12:19 pm |
  6. CarrotCakeMan

    Some of the ill will directed toward Mormons is deserved. In the most notorious anti-gay Hate Vote of all, the 2008 California H8te Vote that actually took away the established right LGBT Californians had to protect each other through legal marriage, we saw that anti-gays cheated to throw the vote. The federal judge who revoked the H8te Vote has in his possession a letter written by Catholic bishops to Mormon leaders in which they both agreed to violate California campaign finance laws to throw the H8te Vote by making secret, illegal cash and in-kind contributions to the H8te Vote. The letter serves as proof positive they knew they were breaking the law; the letter itself is an act of criminal collusion. We know the Mormons made the Hate Videos shown on TV, but they refused to report these in-kind contributions as required by law. We know Mormons operated secret, illegal call centers in Idaho and Utah from which they made deceptive calls, because a million Californians reported these deceptive calls where anti-gays claimed a "yes" vote would support marriage equality. We know Mormons were told by their leaders to make large, secret contributions to the H8te Vote under pain of excommunication, and we know Mormons sent their church members from out of state. Mormon leaders were required by California law to report these contributions, but they refused.

    January 12, 2012 at 12:10 pm |
    • Dennis

      Wow, your comment is filled with lies. Sad. Very sad.

      January 12, 2012 at 12:20 pm |
    • Doug

      I'm an active Mormon, and my parents who are Mormon, lived in different locations in California during the time you are talking about. I never made calls, heard about anything you are talking about, or even received any such calls. I would rather believe my own experience than whatever nefarious schemes you have encountered or imagined.

      January 12, 2012 at 12:31 pm |
    • Andy

      Well that's a lie. They made legal in-kind donatinos and the LDS church paid a fine when they missed a disclosure deadline for them. Their in-kind donations totaled around 200k dollars.

      January 12, 2012 at 3:41 pm |
  7. Rob

    I am a Mormon who will likely vote for Obama over Romney. I like Huntsman, and would vote for him, but his chances to get the nomination are next to nothing. I believe that Romney is just another politician whose views change to whatever way he believes will get him the most votes. Mormons are individuals too, and should not be all generalized as having the same ideas. Some have character flaws just like other people.
    As far as discrimination goes, yeah it happens, but its not that bad. Certainly not as bad as in the early days of the church or compared to other current minority groups. The only thing that irks me is when "evangelicals" claim we are not christian, like they get to decide what the definition of the word is or what the requirements are to be Christian. Yes, we don't believe in the 3-in-1 theory of God, and yes we do believe that Christ and Lucifer are spiritual brothers (as are we all). How does that change the fact that we do believe that Jesus Christ is the only way to salvation? Shouldn't the definition of "christian" be someone who believes in and follows Christ? In the end, cult or christian, the words are semantics. I know what I believe.

    January 12, 2012 at 12:09 pm |
    • CarrotCakeMan

      How about you, Rob? Did you commit a criminal act in violation of California campaign finance and disclosure laws in 2008 and make one of those secret, illegal contributions to the anti-gay H8te Vote? If you, as tens of thousands of out of state Mormons did, came to California to volunteer your time to help push the H8te Vote, did you report your out-of-state contribution of time as CA law requires, or did you do what your church leaders said, which was to violate CA laws and do so secretly? Did you participate in any of the out-of-state illegal activities, like the hate videos or the secret call centers calling into CA to tell lies about LGBT Californians? If not you, do you know anyone else who committed these crimes?

      January 12, 2012 at 12:15 pm |
    • Rob

      I did none of the above, and I don't know anyone else who did what you claim. Honestly, I could care less which way California votes regarding gay marriage. I also do not recall any church leaders asking to do anything illegal like what you listed. If your allegation is true (and right now I see it as just an allegation, so excuse me for not simply taking your word for it), then I would it attribute it to over-zealous individuals, not the church. As I wrote above, many mormons (even some mormon leaders) do have character flaws. I am aware that the church was against proposition 8, but I can tell you that it was not a topic that ever came up in any of my meetings.

      January 12, 2012 at 12:45 pm |
  8. anon

    I keep hearing about mormons wearing strange or magical underwear. Please, someone explain, what is the history behind mormon undies?

    January 12, 2012 at 12:08 pm |
    • SeanNJ

      Skid proof.

      January 12, 2012 at 12:10 pm |
    • Doug

      Mormons were special underwear called garments to remind them of covenants they make with God in the temple. Covenants include fidelity to spouse, keeping God's commandments, etc. They are no more weird or "magical" than religious clothing of any other religion. The "magical" part is always amusing to me as if the underwear can somehow pull rabbits out of hats. Mormon-haters use garments as a propaganda tool to slander the church. To non-Mormons I don't see what garments, boxers or briefs matter to anyone.

      January 12, 2012 at 12:15 pm |
    • abinadi

      Several religions have a corrupted form of the garment. The Catholics have their "habits". The Moslims have the hijab. These were adopted from the early church. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (mormon to you) have restored this original practice from the days of the early Christian church.

      January 12, 2012 at 12:19 pm |
    • Rob

      Those Mormons that strive to live the precepts of our faith sufficently to enter into a temple, make certain sacred covenants with God. This usually happens in early adulthood for those raised in the church or at anytime after for those that are converts. One of these covenants is to wear a garment, that you refer to as the special underwear. There is nothing "magic" about it. The garments in one fashion, represent or symbolize the coats of skins given to Adam and Eve as they were expelled from the Garden of Eden. I can tell you that these garments are highly modest and are reminders to us of our convenants with God. We believe that God will offer us certain blessings or protections (many that are spiritual and not necessarily physical) for fulling our side of the covenants, but we don't believe that the garments are going to save your life if you are in a car accident or anything like that.

      January 12, 2012 at 12:23 pm |
    • LMB123

      In addition to what has already been said about under garments. The Bible is full of examples of religious clothing, which are symbolic of promises made to God. Examples include; the head covering for Jews as well as the prayer shaul, the turban for Muslams, the white collar for Catholic Priests, etc, etc.. Why under garments instead of something more visible.? They represent "PRIVATE" promises made to God. They are not to be used as an advertisement for the "world". As for calling them "magic", that is just plain stupid.

      January 12, 2012 at 12:27 pm |
    • Andy

      "Several religions have a corrupted form of the garment. "

      Can you stop being bigoted for just one minute? Even as an ex-mormon I find you to be doing a disservice to the LDS church.

      January 12, 2012 at 3:43 pm |
  9. nondescript

    It's humans who created the notion of majority and minority and it's humans who will fall victim of discrimination as a result of it. You might belong to a majority in one place but when you move to another you might belong to the minority....and minority will always be the victim of some sort of discrimination, judgement from majority. So, its a fruit of our human intellect and we are living with it.

    January 12, 2012 at 12:07 pm |
  10. Mike

    As the years go by, Mormons will be just like all of the other sects of Christianity. There are so many because various people along the way decided to interpret the bible slightly different than the guy before him did. Though I am not an expert on Mormons, I can't imagine what they believe to be any crazier than an elderly guy getting 2 of every species of creature in the world onto a boat that survives a world-wide flood.

    January 12, 2012 at 12:07 pm |
  11. Lucy

    Christianity is a cult that is making money by exploiting anyone they can.

    January 12, 2012 at 12:06 pm |
  12. Doug

    I'm glad the point was finally made publically why evangelicals are so opposed to Mormonism. People on the sidelines probably wonder how Mormons and non-Mormons can be so close in their opinions and yet there is so much slander against Mormonism. It comes down to growth. Evangelicals see the growing Mormon church as a threat to their base of potential coverts. The more they sling insults about Mormonism as a cult, not Christian, whatever, the more they can disuade potential coverts from becoming Mormon, thus increasing the chance of getting them into an evangelical congregation with (ironically) it's own cult-like following. Mega-churches come to mind. So, instead of banding together as GOPers or people of like "Christian" values evangelicals go on the attack. I'm just glad that Mormons don't respond in kind to the mudslinging they receive.

    January 12, 2012 at 12:06 pm |
    • CarrotCakeMan

      Considering the illegal activities Mormons committed in California in 2008 in order to throw an election, I'd say the Mormons are doing much worse than "slinging mud."

      January 12, 2012 at 12:18 pm |
    • Andy

      LDS members comprise 1% of the population of the evangelical stronghold states and are only holding steady at 1.4% of the US population despite their higher than average birth rates... LDS members are not a threat to the flocks of other churches.

      January 12, 2012 at 3:45 pm |
  13. Anna

    Try growing up in Utah as a non Mormon. Try THAT for discrimination.

    January 12, 2012 at 12:06 pm |
    • james

      My point exactly. Living in Utah as a nonmormon is quite difficult, especially if the rest of your family is mormon.

      January 12, 2012 at 12:11 pm |
    • Dennis

      I'm a Mormon who lived in Utah for one year and was treated like an outsider because I was from California. The problem in Utah has nothing to do with religion – it's just people who have a hard time accepting anyone perceived as an "outsider" into their clique. You have the same problems everywhere else in the country.

      January 12, 2012 at 12:30 pm |
    • Blah123

      As bad as you might have had it in Utah growing up as a non-mormon, what you had didn't even compare to what I dealt with growing up as a mormon in TX. Try being forced to ride in the front of the bus (actually as of a few years ago they completely refused to let them ride the bus period), being asked to stand up in front of class and told you had to defend your faith, being cursed at, spit on, having to sit in the front of the class so your teacher can reach you with his foam bat if he feels like hitting you just because your religion annoys him, not able to go on many trips because parents complain, not being able to go to anyones house (something that I KNOW that you went through) and having all of your friends stop talking to you because some idiot pastor told them that if they talked to a mormon that they would go to hell. And all of this while you weren't allowed to speak out or tell anyone about it because everyone would turn against you and make you look like you made the whole thing up. You have no idea what that is like. This wasn't 30 years ago, it was in the 90's-00's. It still goes on and we do our best to just live with it.
      I agree that Utah Mormons are much different because they are very ignorant in many of the same ways that people outside of utah are, and that is no excuse, but the reality is that (with the exception of the Straight Edgers) the persecution you received was more of being distanced from the rest of their society, not targeted. Plus the government in UT is so overly cautious to never do anything that would ostracize the rest of the non lds population or step on toes its ridiculous

      January 12, 2012 at 12:56 pm |
  14. james

    Living in Utah as a nonmormon, I feel discriminated against. Mormons who are spread out are good because they aren't pushers. Mormons in big clumps stink because they dram out when anyone isn't mormon

    January 12, 2012 at 12:06 pm |
  15. Colin

    The belief that an infitely old, all-knowing sky-god, powerful enough to create the entire Universe and its billions of galaxies, will cause people to survive their own phsical deaths and live happily ever after in heaven, if they follow some random laws laid down in Bronze Age Palestine = Judaism.

    Judaism + a belief that the same god impregnated a virgin with himself to give birth to himself, so he could sacrifice himself to himself to negate a rule he himself made = Christianity.

    Christianity + a belief that aliens from other planets mated with humans who will one day be gods, that Jesus and Satan were brothers, that the Israelis colonized America and that magic underwear will protect you = mormonism.

    Mormonism is widely regarded as the silliest of the above 3 superst.itions because it (i) builds on the other two and adds its own nonsense to them; and (ii) was developed at a time when we really should know better as a species. Bronze Age Middle Eastern goat herders believing in a mind-reading sky-fairy (or "a god who hears your prayers", if one sees any difference) is one thing. Modern Americans with the benefits of science and education we have is quite another.

    January 12, 2012 at 12:05 pm |
    • Jacqueline R.

      Very well put, Colin... You summed it up perfectly without insulting or flinging mud.

      January 12, 2012 at 12:25 pm |
  16. Dave in Florida

    I have been a Mormon for more than 40 years, having joined when I was 18. I spent four years in the Army, including a tour in Vietnam, and for the past 33 years have practiced law in Florida. While I don't wear "I am a Mormon" sticker on my coat, I do not hide my faith either. Contrary to the poll's results, I have never seen or felt any overt "bigotry" from the people I associate with. Some have been skeptical of what I believe, but they have respected my beliefs. Others seem curious or pleased that I have faith. But, prejudice towards me or my family because of my faith, never.

    January 12, 2012 at 12:04 pm |
    • CarrotCakeMan

      How about you, Dave? Did you answer your church leaders' calls and make a secret, illegal contribution to the 2008 California anti-gay H8te Vote in which it has been proven your leaders agreed to violate California laws in order to throw that election?

      January 12, 2012 at 12:21 pm |
    • Dave in Florida

      No church leader or non leader for that matter that I know ever asked for any contributions

      January 12, 2012 at 3:16 pm |
  17. Jason

    Three-quarters of Mormons report attending religious services at least weekly, while eight in 10 pray daily and give 10% of their income to their church.--I bet they love getting that 10% of people's income.

    January 12, 2012 at 12:03 pm |
    • Jacqueline R.

      Well, no one's putting a gun to their head and forcing them to give. If they give it's because they want to.

      January 12, 2012 at 12:26 pm |
  18. Jason

    They are a cult that is making money by exploiting Christianity.

    January 12, 2012 at 12:02 pm |
    • Blah123

      If you think that us attributing 10% of our money to God is because the church is exploiting us or profiting from evangelicals you are seriously misinformed. For one, that money does not go back to leaders to go buy expensive cars, big homes, etc. like many of the evangelical pastors. They don't send out a collection plate during services where there is social pressure to contribute to the pot while your peers and the pastor are watching. Nobody ever goes over your finances to ensure that what you paid was the correct amount. There aren't fees to get into the church, have the best seat or get preferred perks (*cough* Joel Olsteen). Everyone in the church works as a volunteer.

      So where does the money go? It goes to fund missionaries around the world, build churches and temples, create videos to help people who don't have a clear understanding about our church understand us a little better, help fund educational expenses for people who cant afford to go to school and fund a TON of humanitarian aid to the world.

      So next time you see your pastor drive up in his $100K mercedes and asks for a collection to go to Gods purposes, and you think to yourself "Man I hate how those darn Mormons are exploiting the evangelicals to get rich", I hope you feel really smart for being so ignorant.

      January 12, 2012 at 12:33 pm |
    • Kurt Kammeyer

      Jason,
      Exactly which part of Christianity are we "exploiting?" There is no paid ministry in the LDS Church (unlike most other churches). All service is donated voluntarily, and all contributions are voluntary, as well. If there happen to be "rich Mormons" out there, it is as a result of their own hard work, not because they received any kind of monetary benefit from the Church. And I should know – I have been a financial clerk for the Church, and I know how the whole system works. It is the most tightly-controlled, fraud-proof financial system in the world. And there is no overhead: ALL donations, 100 percent, go to humanitarian purposes.

      January 12, 2012 at 12:45 pm |
    • Andy

      Blah123... you have to pay 10% or else you don't get into the highest level of the celestial kingdom. You have to pay 10% or else you can't have a temple recommend. You have to pay 10% or else you can't get married with your spouse for eternity.

      I get to throw any amount of money I want into a collection plate (I picked 5 bucks a week or 1% of my income) and nobody cares or even knows how much I put in.

      January 12, 2012 at 3:49 pm |
  19. Jim P.

    The Mormon religion is no sillier than any other religion in general. Once you get past the "magic underwear" and the impossible and factually unsupported histroy (Native Americas as the "lost tribes" of Israel), they are generally good people.

    Sure, up until fairly recently they didn't allow black people into the higher ranks of their church, commited a few massacres of non-Mormons in the 1800's and other eccentricities (amazing how divinely ordainded doctrine can change with threats of federal lawsuits or when you want to become a state) but hey, what religion doesn't do wacky stuff like that? (To be fair, other christians tried to do a number or two on the mormons in the name of the "prince of peace" also.

    January 12, 2012 at 12:01 pm |
  20. NSfromIndiana

    Funny. A church that pumps millions of dollars every year into anti-gay ads and groups feels discriminated against!? It's kind of like the bully picking on others as a way to deal with their own mental issues. The only difference is that these people chose to be Mormon, you do not choose to be gay.

    January 12, 2012 at 12:00 pm |
    • CarrotCakeMan

      You're right. In the most notorious anti-gay Hate Vote of all, the 2008 California H8te Vote that actually took away the established right LGBT Californians had to protect each other through legal marriage, we saw that anti-gays cheated to throw the vote. The federal judge who revoked the H8te Vote has in his possession a letter written by Catholic bishops to Mormon leaders in which they both agreed to violate California campaign finance laws to throw the H8te Vote by making secret, illegal cash and in-kind contributions to the H8te Vote. The letter serves as proof positive they knew they were breaking the law; the letter itself is an act of criminal collusion. We know the Mormons made the Hate Videos shown on TV, but they refused to report these in-kind contributions as required by law. We know Mormons operated secret, illegal call centers in Idaho and Utah from which they made deceptive calls, because a million Californians reported these deceptive calls where anti-gays claimed a "yes" vote would support marriage equality. We know Mormons were told by their leaders to make large, secret contributions to the H8te Vote under pain of excommunication, and we know Mormons sent their church members from out of state. Mormon leaders were required by California law to report these contributions, but they refused.

      January 12, 2012 at 12:08 pm |
    • Kurt Kammeyer

      Carrot,
      "Millions of dollars a year"? Where do you get that? And I challenge you to produce your so-called letter where the Catholics and Mormons supposedly colluded. The fact is, there was a whole lot more support for Proposition 8 from the Catholics, Muslims, and HIspanics than from the Mormons – we were just more visible, for whatever reason. The fact is, the MAJORITY of the voters in California voted in favor of Prop 8. Less than 5 percent of the voters in California are Mormon. Why do you have such a bone to pick (so to speak) with us? Please find someone else to vent your spleen on.

      January 12, 2012 at 12:52 pm |
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The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.