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Alaska Airlines ends prayer cards on flights
Alaska Airlines distributed prayer cards like these on flights for more than 30 years.
January 26th, 2012
04:21 PM ET

Alaska Airlines ends prayer cards on flights

By Aaron Cooper, CNN

(CNN) - Passengers on Alaska Airlines will no longer get a free Psalm with their meal.

On Wednesday, the airline announced it is ending its more than 30-year tradition of including printed cards with short Bible verses during meal service.

“I will be glad and rejoice in you; I will sing praise to your name O most high,” was written on one card, over an image of foggy blue mountains. Another card featured these words over a beach at sunset: "Give thanks to the Lord, for He is good; His love endures forever.”

The cards have been distributed on trays with Alaska Airlines meals since the 1970s, according to airline spokeswoman Bobbie Egan. Since 2006, only passengers in First Class on longer Alaska Airlines flights have been served meals, so only a small percent of passengers received a card.

“This difficult decision was not made lightly,” the airline’s top executives said an email to frequent passengers. “We believe it's the right thing to do in order to respect the diverse religious beliefs and cultural attitudes of all our customers and employees.”

“We also know some of you consider the cards to be a tradition that reflects your own spiritual beliefs,” the email said. “At the same time, we've heard from many of you who believe religion is inappropriate on an airplane, and some are offended when we hand out the cards.”

Kathy Hosford, of Dyea, Alaska told CNN Affiliate that ““I take the time to read them. It really tells me the airline cares about the people sitting there.”

Others disagree. “Religious attitudes do vary,” Egan says, and “a large percent of residents in markets that we do serve on the West Coast say religion is not important to them.”

“We have been keeping track over the recent years and we are receiving more complaints than compliments” says Egan. Between 1998 and 2002 they received 242 complaints and 141 compliments about the cards.

The idea to distribute the cards in the first place came from a marketing executive who borrowed the idea from another carrier as a way to differentiate Alaska’s service, according to the airline’s statement.

But that view has now changed. “A business that aspires to be diverse and inclusive shouldn't have a religious agenda. Religious beliefs are deeply personal and vary greatly among our customers” Egan said in an emailed statement.

The decision to eliminate the cards was made last fall, she says, and takes effect on February 1. No decision yet about what to do with the leftovers.

- CNN Belief Blog

Filed under: Alaska • Prayer

soundoff (2,364 Responses)
  1. ghintpa

    I wonder how the religious bozos who support these cards would feel if the cards were printed celebrating muslim, wicca, scientology, etc and then distributed randomly to the passengers???? I bet THEN they would be incensed since they wouldn't be guaranteed a passage with the "true" religion featured. what a bunch of dolts.

    January 26, 2012 at 6:37 pm |
    • Beth

      You are right but none posting would admit that they would be offended or upset by being treated the same way.

      January 26, 2012 at 6:52 pm |
  2. JJ

    There's still an airline with a meal service!?!

    January 26, 2012 at 6:35 pm |
  3. RS

    Most folks don't say anything unless it's a complaint. They should look at their total number of customers and count the "no comments" as a "keep" vote.

    January 26, 2012 at 6:34 pm |
    • Greg

      I think they still could do it if they had cards from various faiths. They could ask each passenger if they want a card, and if they say yes, they could ask which faith card they want. I wouldn't mind possibly saying yes to a card, and asking for a random one.

      January 26, 2012 at 6:39 pm |
  4. JMonty

    Prayer cards with airliner food? Did they read, "Bless this mess"? At least that would be truth in advertising. What does it say on the oxygen masks that drop from the ceiling in an emergency? "If you can read this you're screwed?"

    January 26, 2012 at 6:32 pm |
  5. If horses had Gods ...

    I'm sure none of you would be offended if my airline gave out cards that pointed out that there is/are no God(s)?! I thought so.

    January 26, 2012 at 6:31 pm |
    • booboo

      if they had always done it for years then whats the problem? id be upset if they did that and decided to stop.. i just wouldnt fly with them. and neither would 99 percent of other people.. hence no cards like that.

      January 26, 2012 at 6:32 pm |
    • Uncouth Swain

      Not offended at all...knock yourself out.

      January 26, 2012 at 6:32 pm |
    • Yep

      You're right, I wouldn't be. And I do believe in a god.

      January 26, 2012 at 6:32 pm |
  6. cheri

    Thank God that they are doing away with the religious flyers.

    January 26, 2012 at 6:30 pm |
  7. Beth

    When I see things like that as a non-Christian I think the person who put it there is, well, frankly, crazy. I think they are brainwashed and I don't see or hear the message. I rather see and hear, 'blah, blah, blah religious crazy person talking.' It isn' the way anyone would reach someone who doesn't already share those beliefs. The people I know who are Christian would not appreciate the cards, either. to me religion and spirituality are deeply personal and not something I want food spilled on in an airplane. (shrug)

    January 26, 2012 at 6:29 pm |
    • turnerem

      I'd appreciate the card.

      January 26, 2012 at 6:37 pm |
    • Shelby

      When my plane goes down, I know where I am going. The rest of you Godless souls; I am willing to be your 'personal beliefs' (euphemism for want to do what I want to do when I want to do it with no consequences or cares) will do a quick 180 if your plane is going down. Funny, everyone wants to deny God until they realize they are screwed. Thank Goodness He will forgive you.

      January 26, 2012 at 6:46 pm |
    • Beth

      I'd rather not go to a place where people lecture me like you, Shelby. Thanks anyway. My god isn't a he. No penis on god.

      January 26, 2012 at 6:50 pm |
  8. Jesus H. Christ

    They should use quotes from the Quran and show pictures of Muslim scenes. Let's see how many people including Jesus Freaks freak out.

    January 26, 2012 at 6:29 pm |
    • IceT

      or atheist quotes about inner beauty, self reliance, psychological health or simply doing good for it's own sake.

      January 26, 2012 at 6:33 pm |
    • booboo

      ice t, i know a lot of athiests who would laugh you off the planet for the idea that something can be "good". so your quote about "doing good" is just another branch of athiesm that other athiests will fight you tooth and nail about.. see what i mean?

      January 26, 2012 at 6:38 pm |
  9. shut_up

    not a special airline anymore, just one that caves to political correctness gone awry. looks like while you are in the air you would want GOD to protect you, not stay away?? I choose GOD you may have the world.

    January 26, 2012 at 6:29 pm |
    • northern light

      "looks like while you are in the air you would want GOD to protect you, not stay away??"

      Where was this god guy on 9/11......do you think he knew about Auschwitz .....or where is he when a young black man is shot in a ghetto ...??

      January 26, 2012 at 6:37 pm |
    • Ginny For Neutrality

      I'm always amused when christians talk about "God's protection". You mean "God" has to have little prayer cards on your plate before he will protect you? Many do not believe in ANY "god", and thus do not want or need any 'protection'. Call it political correctness all you want to, but millions of us don't believe in fairy tales anymore. We left Santa, the Tooth fairy, and the 'Jesus watching over me' characters behind now that we are adults . Congratulations to Alaska Airlines for waking up.

      January 26, 2012 at 6:47 pm |
  10. Rob

    I personally fly Alaska whenever possible and as a Chrstian I appreciate the cards. These are not prayer cards as some here are claiming. They are scripture versus. For those that find writings from one of most respected / read pieces of literature of all time offensive I say it is your loss. And by the way, for those that would have nothing to do with statements of faith I would gladly accept from them their "In God we trust" money.

    January 26, 2012 at 6:28 pm |
  11. Frances

    How I wish I had someone hand me a prayer Card on the plane. Thats the best time because in my imganination, I am closer to the heavens when am in the clouds. I know God is omnipresent but hey.... now I am a couple feet closer to the throne. lol. Please hand me a prayer Card ok!

    January 26, 2012 at 6:28 pm |
  12. Darwin>Jesus

    First off, Atheism isn't even a belief system, let alone a religion. If anything, it's a system of non-belief in goatherder myth and lore.
    Atheists prefer evidence based theory as opposed to taking Mom n Dad's word on how the Universe came to be.
    Some comments here are right....we all can't be too sensitive.
    I'd rather see my pilot's training credentials than a prayer card anyways.....

    January 26, 2012 at 6:27 pm |
    • booboo

      athiest "i believe there is no god".. a belief..
      groups of athiests gathering in a building, taking collections, renting a plane to fly a banner proclaiming their beliefs over a public park. then going on TV to discuss their beliefs.. sounds pretty religious to me.

      January 26, 2012 at 6:30 pm |
    • Jesus H. Christ

      I like your thinking!

      January 26, 2012 at 6:31 pm |
    • bm

      athiesm,
      I do not believe there is a god.

      Much different than "I believe there is no god"

      January 26, 2012 at 6:33 pm |
    • dvm42

      To me, these prayer cards shouldn't hurt anyone's feelings. They only are saying things that are good and encouraging. Why are you offended? And essentially you are saying you believe in a non-belief system? It's impossible to not believe anything. Everyone believes something, plain and simple. Let's get that across first. Secondly, if the people responsible for putting the cards on the flights think that pulling them is the right thing to do, they aren't true Christians in the first place. The Bible calls Christians to stand up for their faith, not back away and be PC. God doesn't care about politics.

      January 26, 2012 at 6:37 pm |
    • Andrew

      I do not believe unicorns exist because I am unconvinced of the existance of unicorns.
      I do not believe god exists because I am unconvinced of the existance of god.

      That makes me an atheist, in that I do not have a belief in a god, but that's not to say I'll positivly declare no god exists, just that 'there probably is no god, and no point for me to believe in one'.

      January 26, 2012 at 6:38 pm |
    • booboo

      andrew. that makes you an agnostic.. go figure! you learn something new everyday

      January 26, 2012 at 6:48 pm |
    • Andrew

      It makes me an agnostic atheist, yes, as are most atheists I meet. Few atheists I've ever spoken to want to go the full gnostic atheist route and say 'I am certain there is no god'. Atheism is just a statment of belief, thus, I am an agnostic atheist.

      January 26, 2012 at 7:02 pm |
  13. Dan

    Atheism is not a religion. We atheists don't believe religion. Please get this straight.

    re·li·gion/riˈlijən/
    Noun:
    The belief in and worship of a superhuman controlling power, esp. a personal God or gods.

    January 26, 2012 at 6:26 pm |
    • booboo

      as always. athiests having a selective view on life. um, did you miss the OTHER definitions that DIDNT suit your need?

      2.a cause, principle, or system of beliefs held to with ardor and faith

      sorry bubbles.. but athiests are indeed one of the MOST religious groups out there right now..

      January 26, 2012 at 6:29 pm |
    • Yep

      Another definition: A set of beliefs concerning the cause, nature, and purpose of the universe, often containing a moral code governing the conduct of human affairs. -or- A specific fundamental set of beliefs and practices generally agreed upon by a number of persons or sects.

      January 26, 2012 at 6:29 pm |
    • go4it

      Neither of your definitions fit atheism either, if you read them carefully.

      January 26, 2012 at 6:32 pm |
    • sound reason

      agreed with the above. atheists are most delusional in their belief that their view is areligious. their unyielding faith in the complete absence of a designer to life is greater than mine.

      January 26, 2012 at 6:33 pm |
    • booboo

      of course it does.. it fits to a "T".. where in my definition does athiesm not apply?

      January 26, 2012 at 6:33 pm |
    • Yep

      Actually they both do if you think about them. That said, atheists, by definition, do not believe in God. There's no such restriction concerning religion.

      January 26, 2012 at 6:34 pm |
    • booboo

      agreed.. i cannot understand how athiests cannot see that it takes MUCH more faith to operate under the idea that there is no god. sometime i think they are far worse than any of the other religious groups because theirs actually NEEDS the burden of proof. its such a weird and obvious trap

      January 26, 2012 at 6:35 pm |
    • bm

      booboo
      It is not a cuase, a principle or a system of beliefs. It has absolutely no dogma or doctrins. An atheist is open to evidence that there is a god just as you are open to evidence there is a tooth fairy.

      January 26, 2012 at 6:36 pm |
    • Andrew

      Umm, but I don't have faith in a lack of god, no moreso than I have faith in a lack of unicorns. I am unconvinced of a god, as I am unconvinced of unicorns. I do not hold onto the lack of god as a major component in my epistiomogy, my epistimology makes no comment on the existance of god period. I take 3 things on faith, the universe exists, it is in some way consistant, and my senses are in some sense an accurate reflection of the universe. That's it. God is simply an unnecessary extra clause, to say that atheists are religious because we are unconvinced of the existance of god is kinda strange.

      January 26, 2012 at 6:36 pm |
    • booboo

      oh, see now the different denominations of athiesm are showing up. because i know a lot of athiests who would strongly disagree with a lot of your statements. i think you are actually an agnostic and are confused.

      January 26, 2012 at 6:40 pm |
    • booboo

      by the way, this comment "I take 3 things on faith" would get you laughed out of the room. MANY athiests do not adhere to ANY notion of faith.. AT ALL.. so there you go..

      January 26, 2012 at 6:41 pm |
    • Yep

      Let me spell it out for you. Atheists believe that the universe was caused by a scientific theory known as the Big Bang, they attempt to explain the nature of the universe throught scientific theories and laws, and believe there to be no purpose behind the universe. This is a specific set of beliefs generally agreed upon by a number of persons and sects (atheists and scientists).

      January 26, 2012 at 6:43 pm |
    • Andrew

      Agnostic and atheist are different ideas, one can easily be both, as I am. Most atheists I've ever spoken to tend to be agnostic atheists, as in, 'I do not believe in a god, but admit that a god is possible'.

      Gnosticism and agnosticism are positions of knowledge, claiming certainty. Agnosticism is the intellectually honest position, stating "I do not know for sure if there is a god or not", and atheism versus theism is a statment on belief, "I do not believe there is a god" or "I believe there is a god". They state two different things. An agnostic theist says "I do not know if there is a god or not, but I believe in one". A gnostic atheist states "I know there is no god" and a gnostic theist states "I know there is a god".

      Got your terminology straight yet?

      January 26, 2012 at 6:43 pm |
    • sound reason

      andrew. your faith comes in the lack of effort you put forth in knowing what exists past your senses. you are simple to assume the 'science' you believe now will be the same in the future. atheists live life with incredible faith in really knowing nothing, and being comfortable with it.

      January 26, 2012 at 6:45 pm |
    • bm

      I think the atheist/agnostic definition is a bit in limbo. They say an agnostic is someone who will not make a commitment either way. That leaves a huge grey area in between. Most people who say they do not believe there is a god would probably declair themselves an atheist.

      January 26, 2012 at 6:46 pm |
    • Andrew

      booboo, in principle, EVERYONE takes those three things on faith if they wish to have a coherent epistimology.

      Otherwise, you do not accept the universe exists, which doesn't give you very much room to make any more conclusions, you don't believe in induction, that is to say, you don't expect the sun to rise tomorrow, and you don't believe your senses, meaning you don't even believe you're reading the words on your screen.

      I doubt many people, atheist, theist, etc, would have a problem basing an epistimology on my three -ssumptions, that is, unless you're a pyrrhonian, but a pyrrhonian epistimology is just esentially stating 'well, we don't need the word knowledge anyway'.

      January 26, 2012 at 6:47 pm |
    • go4it

      sound reason,
      What you just said makes no sense.

      January 26, 2012 at 6:49 pm |
    • Andrew

      sound reason, umm, I don't assume the science true today will be true in the future. I'm a physics major, I've studied science far too much to ever believe it won't change.

      That said, my epistimology is prettttyyy hard to argue with, because frankly, if you deny any of my assumptions there's rather little room for you to go. The skeptical hypothesis can be applied near universally, at some level you need to either decide 'I don't like the word knowledge' and go the pyrrhonian route and disavow all knowledge entirely, or you make some basic epistimological leaps and you build a worldview from that.

      I make only the leaps I need to in order to still claim knowledge is possible. I believe in the universe, induction, and that what I sense is actually a real reflection of a consistant universe. Even if you believe in a god, you still are more or less forced to assume the same.

      January 26, 2012 at 6:51 pm |
    • sound reason

      andrew. does not your belief that the universe is consistant require faith? all science will do is show, in a unit of time, measures that do not change or do so in a predicted fashion. but this does not infact prove it is consistant, or why it is so.

      go4i. contribute to the conversation or leave.

      January 26, 2012 at 7:00 pm |
    • Andrew

      sound reason yes it requires faith. It requires a lot of faith because it is unjustifiable, but it is a necessary assumption for anyone to make if they want to claim 'knowledge' is even possible in the first place. I like the word, so I will make the assumptions. Otherwise, claiming induction doesn't work, is kinda like saying 'well, there's no reason to not believe that tomorrow the sun will suddenly vanish if I don't go singing I'm in Love with my Car naked in the rain tongiht'.

      It's a distinct possibility that will happen, but I assume it won't. I take that on faith, but anyone who doesn't has one hell of a weird epistimology... or they simply disavow all possible knowledge period, making the word 'knowledge' somewhat useless. However, I make as few faith based leaps as possible, I cannot make any fewer than those three or else I cannot claim to know anything at all, and making any more than those three would be more unjustifiable assumptions I'd prefer not to make because I like sticking as close to as few assumptions as is humanly possible for a coherent epistimology.

      I don't see what's so weird about that. Are you telling me that you deny any of those three things? Do you have no use for the word knowledge in your vocabulary?

      January 26, 2012 at 7:07 pm |
    • sound reason

      sorry. misposted.

      andrew. the extension of my question (as you already stated you take it on faith), is why faith in this? what makes the constancy of the universe more believable than, say, a God who has revealed Himself in a written Word? what compelling proof exists for you in the one over the other?

      January 26, 2012 at 7:08 pm |
    • sound reason

      andrew. i gotta run. you are obviously well read, and i appreciate your dialogue. my last comment is that i would agree with your statement that "anyone who doesn't has one hell of a weird epistimology... or they simply disavow all possible knowledge period, making the word 'knowledge' somewha...t".

      to me knowledge is something granted/bestowed. i only know because i am given somethign to be known. i feel the Bible clearly reveals wisdom to be God-given, and, insofar, it can be removed/changed. our knowledge of the universe is temporal. time stood still in the OT and NT, a flaw in the workings of the universe. i actually do believe that everything we know/take for granted today can disintegrate tomorrow. we can simply fall apart. every foce governign nature can simply cease. why? because a God who has revealed Himself to that which He created has said so. my proof exists in a Word which has affected societal change for 2000+ years and continues to uphold change to the physical and metaphysical world.

      i will pray you find the Truth as you hold onto your beliefs.

      i have a weird

      January 26, 2012 at 7:21 pm |
    • Andrew

      sound reason that's an excellent question that... really should be fairly easy to figure out given what I have said.

      Consider the statment "a God who has revealed Himself in a written Word". Νow, if this is true, then the written word must exist, and it must be reflective of said god. You're assuming that the universe is consistant in that what was written in the bible yesterday is what was written in the bible today. The paper that it exists on will exist tomorrow as it does today. Even if it's a game of telephone, where the stories told yesterday might get slightly changed, they are in some way consistant and reflect the 'word of god' if you will.

      If the universe wasn't consistant, there is NO reason why anything written in the bible should reflect anything about a god, why would it, there's no casation to link the bible of yesterday to today, and no causation to even link the bible to god period, because the universe could operate on fundamentally different rules at any given moment.

      Therefore, with or without "a God who has revealed Himself in a written Word", you're still implicitly assuming that the universe is consistant.

      The reason then I don't make that extra faith based leap is that it is unnecessary for a coherent epistimology. I define a statment necessary for a coherent epistimology as one whose denial will prevent the very foundation of knowledge. Assuming the universe doesn't exist, for example, we're brains in a vat, doesn't leave any room for us to form statments on the nature of this universe... because it doesn't exist. Assuming the universe isn't consistant doesn't leave any room for us to believe anything we've ever viewed has any baring on the future, or anything in the past has any baring on the present. It'd be like watching a video of a shooting then denying that gunshot wounds cause death, causality itself couldn't be treated as existing.

      Finally, assuming my senses are in some way accurate is done just because I cannot even have this discussion if I don't believe the words I'm reading on my screen are actually there. Without those three asumptions, I cannot have a coherent epistimology, I cannot talk about the universe, I cannot talk about my own existance, I cannot claim knowledge exists in any way because I'm denying any foundational basis for knowledge.

      Then we come to "a God who has revealed Himself in a written Word". That's certainly possible, but isn't necessary for me to believe to discuss knowledge, or reality. If god doesn't exist, my claim 'I know I have an empty yogurt cup in front of me' stands just as strong as if god does exist who has 'reveled himself in written word'.

      It's not that I have proof for either, I don't, I take my first three assumptions on faith, but so would ANYONE else if they want a coherent epistimology, even if they don't realize they're making the assumptions in the first place. If you want the word 'knowledge' to mean anything, you need to make my assumptions. The 'god exists' one is a step beyond that which could be true, or false, and still not impact the coherency of my epistimology.

      I can't make it any plainer than that. "I make no more assumptions than are absolutly necessary to believe knowledge is even possible. God does not qualify as necessary."

      January 26, 2012 at 7:22 pm |
    • Andrew

      sound reason I'd hope you'd also be able to sit back and realize that you're making the same assumptions I am, plus the extra 'the bible is real'. Without beliving in a 1) universe, 2) consistant universe 3) semi-accurate senses, you couldn't believe the words you're reading in the bible in any way reflect anything about the universe in the first place. It's not possible to first accept the bible as true without beliving the bible even exists, which requires assuming the same things I do.

      January 26, 2012 at 7:25 pm |
  14. BrewtownPsych

    Dear Christian who thinks it's appropriate to hand out such a thing on the airline; what would you think if someobdy gave you a muslim prayer card? That's what i thought. Religion, religion, religion, just keep it to yourselves and there is no problem, ever. Yup, that simple.

    January 26, 2012 at 6:26 pm |
    • 3N1Amen

      If I was on a plane owned and operated by Muslims, then I would not be surprised by anything they handed out. This was a company that HAD apparently Christians who came up with the card idea anyway. But have reformed to this world. It's sad...and tragic to see just how many God haters there really are in this world

      Heaven or hell? Turn or burn.

      January 26, 2012 at 6:36 pm |
    • Beth

      AM3m1–non-Christian is not the same as 'god hater'. Just because we don't want YOUR religion pushed on us doesn't mean we 'hate god'. I don't know anyone who 'hates god'. I know people who don't believe in god or who have a different concept of god than you do but zero who 'hate god'. The thing is, you would not feel this way if you were of a minority religion. America was founded on religious freedom meaning that minority religions were to be respected. The Pilgrims were a religious minority fleeing persecution because of their difference. Our country was founded also on protection of the minority from the 'tyranny of the majority' (perhaps you have heard that famous phrase?) Just because most people in America are Christian doesn't mean you have the right to shove your religion down other people's throats.

      January 26, 2012 at 6:43 pm |
  15. sound reason

    private enterprise can do what they want – they will live or die by consumer choice. but in the public sector, freedom of religion has been falsely equated to freedom from religion. a society of 'no religion' actually has one, that is, intolerance of all. our societal morality is now decaying, and the level to which we fall is slowly, subtly going deeper. i could care less who wants to put a bible verse on a plane; the tragedy lies in what is happening to our everyday lives' in our proclamation of 'no religion' for all.

    January 26, 2012 at 6:25 pm |
    • ol cranky

      the public sphere is funded by taxpayer dollars. . . decrying the establishment or advancement of religion in general on the taxpayer dime is not intolerance, intolerance is demanding that I pay for the government to make religious commentary when that is not the role of a non theocratic government

      January 26, 2012 at 6:43 pm |
  16. Esther

    I always enjoyed them! I will miss them. Sorry to see them go.

    January 26, 2012 at 6:24 pm |
    • NorthropP61

      1. Take a bible with you.
      2. Don't push it on other people.
      Problem solved.

      January 26, 2012 at 6:27 pm |
  17. Toni

    Wow. Such anger toward a simple card. There is so much garbage in the world. I would think that there would be more complaints about the magazines and newspapers left on planes and in airports with negative news and silly gossip. To look outside when flying to see a beautiful world and look down and see "Give Thanks to the Lord for He is Good, His love endures forever" is uplifting. I can understand Alaska's decision to discontinue distributing...I just so sad to see such anger toward God. He is good.

    January 26, 2012 at 6:21 pm |
    • ALR

      Well stated, Toni. I completely agree. God *is* good.

      January 26, 2012 at 6:23 pm |
    • bm

      Who are these people that are angry towards god? Please point them out?

      January 26, 2012 at 6:23 pm |
    • NorthropP61

      The anger is not directed to God, but to the holier-than-thou wackos who demand that everyone see things their way.

      January 26, 2012 at 6:25 pm |
    • djwazu

      There's no anger. I don't see it, if you believe in God(s) good for you keep it to yourself or deal with it in your churches, I will do the same. But keep it out of my face and out of politics.

      January 26, 2012 at 6:27 pm |
    • catholic engineer

      Hi, Toni. Mules I am told are very skiddish animals. People put blinders on them so that if a gum wrapper blows by the animal doesn't go berserk. It was cheaper to pull the cards than provide blinders for unstable passengers.

      January 26, 2012 at 6:27 pm |
    • gangstagangsta@gmailll.com

      he maybe good but not great.

      What if they gave out cards about muslim and hindu faith?

      January 26, 2012 at 6:29 pm |
    • A. Wolf

      Who says anyone is angry against god? Just because someone doesn't share your religious views doesn't mean they hate your god. I don't think passing out bible verses to passengers is a wise marketing strategy by Alaska Air, and that's all this is about.

      January 26, 2012 at 6:30 pm |
    • fx61

      How would you feel if they'd serve you a verse from Quran?

      January 26, 2012 at 6:31 pm |
    • Andrew

      I'm told god is good quite often but even from a cursory understanding of the bible... I just don't buy it, even as a fictional character. I mean, he commits mass genocide, wiped out the entire world's population, and also condoned mass genocide (I mean Numbers is esentially the census of a genocide)

      He requires praise above all else, because regardless of how good a human being you are, faith in jesus is apparently the only way to salvation, so without sycophantic praise, people are given eternal torture? You might consider this a good character, but normally when I read a book, someone like that is the villian to me. Satan seems responsible for fewer deaths in the bible than god himself is.

      Not that I'm angry at god any more than I'm angry at voldemort. It's just I don't consider voldemort to be a 'good guy'. Mostly I'm just tired of Christians wanting special privilage for their religious beliefs, like preventing legal gay marriage because 'god says its bad'.

      January 26, 2012 at 6:33 pm |
    • KASUMU

      Since the cards were quoting the bible and only 1/3 of the world is Christian...It's probably the arrogance of those Christians that raises the objections...why not quote Confucius? The Koran...wouldn't that go over like a lead zeppelin...LOL

      January 26, 2012 at 6:38 pm |
  18. UhYeaOk

    Anyone that complains about one of those cards needs to get a life. If you don't like the card, don't read it, pretty simple.

    January 26, 2012 at 6:21 pm |
    • Uhhh yeah...

      You're forced to read it simply by looking to see what it says, you F'ing idiot.

      January 26, 2012 at 6:27 pm |
    • Uncouth Swain

      That's the same mentality that the far right uses when talking about tv; you will see it when you see what's there. You aren't much better than Glenn Beck.

      January 26, 2012 at 6:29 pm |
    • NorthropP61

      When – or if – I want a Bible verse, I can get one for myself.
      Any airline that thinks I need a prayer or scripture to board their flight may know more about the condition of their planes or the skills of their pilots than they think I should know.

      January 26, 2012 at 6:30 pm |
  19. Beth

    I would guess the Christians who think these cards are not a big deal would not like having a Muslim prayer to Allah handed to them on flights. That might even seem offensive and as though it was "pushing religion" onto people. hmmmmm.

    January 26, 2012 at 6:21 pm |
    • UhYeaOk

      Whine on little girl, whine on....

      January 26, 2012 at 6:21 pm |
    • Beth

      Maybe I'm a big, old man. :P

      January 26, 2012 at 6:25 pm |
    • VR

      Absolutely agree with Beth. Let an airline give a card that's not from Christian faith and we will see how much religious tolerance this country has.

      January 26, 2012 at 6:27 pm |
    • go4it

      UhYeaOk,
      You sound like a little sister bleeting "na na na-na-na"

      January 26, 2012 at 6:27 pm |
    • Beth

      You know it would bother you to have Islam thrust on you and have Muslim prayers handed out to you on planes, by people coming to your door to try to covert you (I can't count the number of times Christians have come to my door and left prayers and literature to try to convert me, sometimes they put pamphlets on my car window, too!). You aren't able to argue with me so you act like a child. I know I'm right–most of you who think it isn't a big deal wouldn't like to be treated the same way by a religion in which you do not believe so most are hypocrites. Some wouldn't care but most wouldn't like it and would make a much bigger uproar than non-Christians do over this since you are used to being the majority here.

      January 26, 2012 at 6:39 pm |
    • Toni

      Actually, if I were in a Muslim country I would expect Muslim information to be given to me. Or if I go into an establishment where the proprietors are Hindu I am not offended nor do I ask them to take down their religious icons. Ours is a country founded on religious freedom. And our tenants have been and still are Christian. I don't see it as pushy to have a card. No one is forcing anyone to read it. If you don't like it simply turn it over or set it aside. Now if the flight attendant were to come by and turn it over and start preaching to you in the middle of your flight...that would be a problem.

      January 26, 2012 at 6:41 pm |
    • Beth

      The thing is, Toni, this ISN'T a Christian country. We are a country founded on religious freedom. We have separation of church and state. Not everyone is Christain. The card may not seem pushy to you because it is of your religion. It would seem pushy to you if you were a religious minority dealing with people trying to convert you, telling you you are going to 'burn' if you don't believe what they do, have people come knocking on your door to convert you, leave leaflets on your car, etc. It gets old and annoying. I would not pay attention to the card. I would see it, think the person who made it is nuts and probably accidentally spill food all over it. But I can tell you if Muslim prayers or Wiccan prayers, etc were handed out to Christians on airlines in America you would not hear the end of the complaining .

      January 26, 2012 at 6:48 pm |
    • Shelby

      All you atheists do not have children..of this I am sure. Because I am willing to bet when you do your eyes will open, you'll get out of your little box of know-it-all, embrace-it-all, and accept it all. You'll start finding your moral compass, I hope, and realize that you have responsibilities and that when you stand for nothing you fall for everything. Oh yes, stop the garbage about Muslim cards/wicca cards/yadayadayada. That's just an excuse you use to justify your position. This country was founded on God. Get over yourself or don't use the money you earn that says in God we trust. Hypocrite.

      January 26, 2012 at 6:51 pm |
    • FAERIE_TALES

      Bill Gates, Stephen Hawking, Albert Einstein, Thomas Jefferson, John Lennon, Hugh Laurie, and Richard Dawkins all have kids.

      January 26, 2012 at 6:55 pm |
    • Beth

      Shelby, I have a child and I am not an atheist. I'm just not Christian. You may know, there are other religions in America. For the record, Shelby, Muslims believe in God. Jewish people believe in God. Hindu people believe in multiple gods that are all really one, etc. NEWSFLASH–yours is not the only religion. When I say what I said I mean just that. I mean YOU and people like you would not like it one bit to have cards from some other religion given to you on an airline which makes you the hypocrite. Why should non-Christians want a Christian prayer? I'll take one from my own religion and if I choose to investigate another religion that will be MY choice. PUshing prayers on people pushes them away. I would probably not have my back up so much about your religion if so many of your fellow Christians I know in my life had not tried to push the religion on me. I'm not open one little bit to your religion.

      January 26, 2012 at 6:56 pm |
  20. ALR

    How sad. I was unaware of this tradition (never having flown with Alaska Airlines). It's hard to understand why someone would get offended over a Bible verse. If you don't like it, don't read it. There are plenty of people out there who would appreciate reading an encouraging word in a world full of chaos.

    January 26, 2012 at 6:21 pm |
    • KASUMU

      Then they should carry a book of their choosing!

      January 26, 2012 at 6:42 pm |
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The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.