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Jewish school to give up shot at state championship to observe Sabbath
February 29th, 2012
03:50 PM ET

Jewish school to give up shot at state championship to observe Sabbath

By Eric Marrapodi, CNN Belief Blog Co-Editor

(CNN) - With a shot at high school state championship glory on the line, a Jewish basketball team in Texas is opting for the sidelines, aiming for something a little higher.

The Robert M. Beren Academy in Houston will forfeit its semifinal playoff spot in the Class 2A basketball championships this weekend because the game falls on a Friday night, the start of the Jewish Sabbath.

The private Orthodox Jewish school observes the weekly Jewish day of rest, called Shabbat, from sundown Friday to sundown Saturday.

"You get put in adversity and the way you handle things says a lot about your character. So this is an opportunity to show our character," Chris Cole, coach of the Beren Stars, told CNN Houston affiliate KPRC.

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The playoffs for the Texas Association of Private and Parochial Schools (TAPPS) are set for this weekend. Beren Academy's semifinal game and the championship game are both scheduled during the Sabbath observance.

"If we give up this opportunity for our religion it just shows how much we deeply care for it," Isaac Buchine, a player on the Beren Stars, told KPRC.

"We are hopeful that the TAPPS league will move the games a few hours so that we can compete," the school said in a statement posted on its website.

"This is a testament to our school and to Coach Cole for his support and dedication, that, independent of the desire to compete, is the desire to uphold our Jewish values,” the statement continued. “We are proud of who we are, and have the courage to act accordingly."

By Wednesday, more than 5,000 people had signed an online petition, supported by the school, to move the Beren Stars’ semifinal game to Friday morning.

Over the weekend, school officials appealed to the league to find another time for the game, but the league said in a statement Wednesday the appeal was unanimously voted down by the league's nine-member board.

Cole is holding out hope that the TAPPS board will change its mind and reschedule the Stars’ games.

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The Jewish observance of the Sabbath comes from the book of Genesis. In the week-long creation story, God creates the world, and all that is in it, in six days. After seeing that it is "very good," God rests on the seventh day.

How Jews practice that rest varies, but in Orthodox sects, it often means no working, driving or cooking. Many observant Jews also attend religious services on Shabbat.

Observance of the Sabbath can pose a challenge for observant Jews living in a culture on a different timetable.

Yuri Foreman , a champion boxer and rabbi in training, postponed a major fight in 2010 because it fell on a Saturday night. He took the ring once the sun went down.

U.S. Sen. Joe Lieberman, a Connecticut independent, has been known to walk miles to his Washington home when votes on the Senate floor run into Friday night.

Lieberman wrote a book about Shabbat and told CNN's Belief Blog last year the stringent rules around the observation serve an important part in preservation of the Jewish faith.

Founded in the late 1970s, the TAPPS league is made up of 220 schools. In a statement posted on its website by the TAPPS executive board, the league said at the time of its organization, no member schools observed the Sabbath on Saturday. At the same time, the bylaws forbid games on Sunday, a nod to Christian Sabbath observance.

The league statement also said Beren Academy first met with league officials in June 2009 to discuss joining TAPPS.

"At that time, the Board pointed out that TAPPS schedules its team sports championship on Fridays and Saturdays, which would conflict with Beren’s observation of their Sabbath,” the statement said. “The Board pointed out that the posted schedule for the state tournament would be followed and no changes made, unless weather related or similar conditions existed."

The league also pointed out another rule in its bylaws stipulating that if a team cannot follow the playoff schedule, it is up to the school to remove itself from the playoffs.

Our Lady of the Hills School in Kerrville, Texas, will take Beren Academy's spot in the playoffs Friday night, the league said.

- CNN Belief Blog Co-Editor

Filed under: Judaism • Texas

soundoff (946 Responses)
  1. Jason

    If this league has the audacity to prohibit games on Sundays but not respect the Jewish Sabbath by rescheduling, they should get as much bad press as humanly possible. What a bunch of hypocrites!

    February 29, 2012 at 5:15 pm |
    • momoya

      A league is allowed to make rules concerning when they play. If you DECIDE to join the league you are required to follow the policies that they have in place.

      February 29, 2012 at 5:19 pm |
    • David

      they do have games on Sunday twit,. see their website.

      February 29, 2012 at 5:39 pm |
    • Edwin

      David: according to the article, the bylaws of the organization specifically prohibit games on the Christian Sabbath.

      February 29, 2012 at 6:18 pm |
    • Ryan

      "David: according to the article, the bylaws of the organization specifically prohibit games on the Christian Sabbath."

      Yeah, but since when to Christians actually follow the rules they claim to? Zing!

      March 1, 2012 at 9:29 am |
    • UsayWha?

      Jason, if these were Muslims asking the board to change their schedule so they could observe Ramadan would you be saying the board should change the schedule for the school? Most likely you wouldnt. So who would be the hypocrite?

      March 1, 2012 at 11:10 am |
  2. Jewsus

    Save me Jewsus!

    February 29, 2012 at 5:13 pm |
  3. TheRationale

    The League said it plans its championships on Friday and Saturday nights. The school can't say they didn't know that going in.

    It would have saved everyone much trouble if the school just asked to be schedule on Saturday night to begin with. If they can't reschedule it, then who's to blame? Friday morning is during school anyway...

    February 29, 2012 at 5:12 pm |
    • Edwin

      The organization could say any number of things - like prohibiting black players - but that doesn't make it right or acceptable.

      February 29, 2012 at 6:20 pm |
  4. dale.zalewski

    Looks like the TAPP board is little more than a bunch of red-necked, anti-semite texicans.

    February 29, 2012 at 5:10 pm |
    • TheRationale

      What? Did you even read the article?

      You can't just pull the anti-semite card whenever some Jewish person doesn't get their way.

      a) Rescheduling the game could very well inconvenience the other team, whose players and families may not be available then.
      b) If the school knew going in when finals were to be held, they should have talked to the league beforehand about it, not after the fact.

      Now, if the league knew and didn't give them any sort of leeway, that seems to me inconsiderate. But it seems like this school just messed up.

      February 29, 2012 at 5:15 pm |
    • Judge_Incompetent

      Always the victim........always.

      February 29, 2012 at 5:23 pm |
    • David

      Dale, Your invective cracks me up. I grew up in Israel where no games are played on Saturdays but are played on Sundays and Fridays which are Holy days for Israel many Christians and Muslims. The fact is 95% of Jews paly sports on Saturdays all across the US.
      Now do you want to tell me in the US we shoudl have no college, high school or Pro sports on Saturdays if a Jewish player complains?

      February 29, 2012 at 5:43 pm |
    • Edwin

      TheRationale: did YOU read it? The article clearly says the team talked about it when they joined the league. The league organizers, in 2009, explained that they would not modify times.

      How much earlier than 2009 should they have asked about games in 2012?

      February 29, 2012 at 6:22 pm |
  5. Julie Mac

    Good for them. I am not Jewish but I applaud them for standing up for their faith.

    February 29, 2012 at 5:06 pm |
    • YBP

      Faith in what? It's time to stop looking back to the ancient world for traditions and beliefs about the imaginary. The Age of Reason started 400 years ago. We have a lot of catching up to do before we can go forward.

      February 29, 2012 at 5:09 pm |
    • Uncouth Swain

      Lol....so..do not look back maybe 1000 years but it's ok to look back, oh 400. Oy, the insanity.

      February 29, 2012 at 5:11 pm |
    • YBP

      @uncouth. I am saying that many of us (those with too much Heaven on their minds) are already 400 years behind the times, let alone 3000. Sorry if that wasn't clear. I happen to be pretty much up-to-date. Science and reason. Nothing insane about it.

      February 29, 2012 at 5:17 pm |
    • Uncouth Swain

      "Science and reason."

      But I think for most, the topic would be that of spirituality. That didn't stop developing some 3,000 years ago. It continues to develop in Judaism even today.

      February 29, 2012 at 5:50 pm |
  6. Jon in Balto.

    If I ever needed a reminder of the place of religious tolerance and of the status of Jews in the USA, the comments on this board gave me a dose of reality. I have never read such intolerance, such vehement hatred and scorn in recent history. This team is an inspiration to all, like Sandy Koufax who refused to pitch on a Jewish holiday. These kids have put their faith and religion above the game of basketball...showing the world what true values are. The comments are a sorry commentary of the United States in 2102 – I thought antisemitism was on a decline – obviously those who have commented on this article have proven me wrong.

    Intolerance, I may remind you, is not a Christian ideal – Jesus would not have approved your comments – I understand he stood for love and tolerance.

    February 29, 2012 at 5:06 pm |
    • Bob

      What made you think these comments are from christians and not from atheists/ others?

      February 29, 2012 at 5:10 pm |
    • YBP

      You need to be reminded that America still belongs exclusively to straight white (cave)men?

      February 29, 2012 at 5:11 pm |
    • Jon in Balto.

      Bob: You are correct. However, the atheists seem only too proud to declare themselves as such. I am left to assume, based on demography that the rest are Christians, unfortunately it is only logical.

      February 29, 2012 at 5:13 pm |
    • evarocky

      There seems to be a disconnect for many (not all) Christians in this country, where they interpret religious freedom as religious rights, practices, and special treatment are applicable only to them. It's easy for them to forget that Judaism predates Christianity, and that Atheism and Agnostic beliefs are quickly gaining favor among the mass.

      February 29, 2012 at 5:16 pm |
    • Bob

      Jon-What demography are you talking about. Hope you understand that most posters here are atheists and there are people of other faith other than christians who post regularly. So, don't assume it is christians.

      February 29, 2012 at 5:24 pm |
    • Edwin

      Jon: in hard economic times, racism and prejudice always increase. Anti-semitism is most definitely on the rise - not as fast as anti-muslim sentiments, of course - because a very vocal subgroup of christians feel that their definition of America (as a strictly christian nation) is under attack.

      They are upset that religious tolerance means that people no longer have to respect the christian sabbath - you can buy beer on Sundays, now, even go to the bank. They are upset that the youth of America is fleeing their religion by droves. And when a judge in some small town rules that conditions of parole can include forced attendance at church, they scream that the sentence is overturned. Basically, they were okay with tolerance - as long as everyone knew christian was still the dominant religion and dominant order in the country. When that started being called into question, they got mean.

      February 29, 2012 at 6:29 pm |
    • jerry5555

      What in God's name are you talking about? On a Jewish website, Jewishvirtuallibrary.org, it says that there are approximately 5 million jews in America. That's less than 2% of the nation, and they absolutely dominate the nation. 3 Supreme court justices (out of 9) are jews, congress is full of jews, Obama Admin full of jews, hollywood – OWNED by jews. And, look at hollywood, not one big middle eastern actor in it. Why? Because the jews won't let it happen. (I guess there aren't any talented middle eastern actors or singer...) Furthermore, with over 2 hundred million americans identifying themselves as Christians, compared to the 5 million jews, Jews still get their menorah everywhere you see a Christmas tree. So, please do not say jews don't get there way or that Christian don't sympothize with Jews beliefs. Why do you think people like Whoopie Goldberg pick jewish names - it's because jews run this country to begin with.

      March 1, 2012 at 2:21 am |
  7. Ron Z

    1. In Texas there are NO games/playoffs/meets/etc. in any sport on Sunday. You know that is religion-based. We should not be biased towards one religion over another – rather we should be supporting inclusion. If it is possible to move these games, why wouldn't we?

    February 29, 2012 at 5:05 pm |
    • Dan, TX

      There are many tournaments and sporting events on Sunday. At least all the gynastics and volleyball meets I've had to go to on Sundays. You may be right about school sports, but there are many sports outside of school that meet on Sundays in Texas all the time.

      February 29, 2012 at 11:34 pm |
  8. Ian

    Shomer f#$%ing shabbos

    February 29, 2012 at 5:00 pm |
    • Mike

      Deep thoughts from your simple mind....

      February 29, 2012 at 5:06 pm |
    • Joshua

      I don't roll on Shabbas!!!

      February 29, 2012 at 5:23 pm |
    • Devon

      MIKE YOU'RE OUT OF YOUR ELEMENT!

      February 29, 2012 at 6:07 pm |
  9. Andrew

    Seems easy enough to change time, but whatever...it is just a game. God comes first.

    February 29, 2012 at 4:59 pm |
  10. JayB12

    Keep showing your character. Too bad the kids have to suffer.

    February 29, 2012 at 4:58 pm |
    • Joe

      suffering builds character

      February 29, 2012 at 5:27 pm |
  11. William Marlowe

    Lets be honest here. What is the chance that a Jewish High School had a reasonable chance of winning the state basketball championship even if they played? Really?

    February 29, 2012 at 4:58 pm |
    • Jon in Balto.

      What does it matter? They have won the right to compete!

      February 29, 2012 at 5:07 pm |
    • Susan

      They got to the state championships, didn't they? Bigot

      February 29, 2012 at 5:12 pm |
    • YBP

      No, but one day one of these kids may own a team! (That's an old not-so-funny joke, usually it's about a baseball team.)

      February 29, 2012 at 5:13 pm |
    • stercus tauri

      Yeah, right! I seem to remember the towelheads saying something along the same line just befor the 1967, 7 day, war.

      February 29, 2012 at 5:43 pm |
  12. Donna Moles

    How DARE they not change the date. Absolutely disgusting!

    February 29, 2012 at 4:56 pm |
    • Uncouth Swain

      I have a sneaky feeling that they will if the press gets too bad.

      February 29, 2012 at 5:00 pm |
    • Edwin

      They won't change it. They'll hide behind rules and the "inconvenience" excuse. They'll say the time for an appeal was 6 months ago, even though the article clearly states the team tried to talk about it years ago when they joined but were rebuffed.

      Forget that the real reason is that the board which organizes this doesn't consider judaism a valid religion. They will say they are a private organization and can do what they want.

      February 29, 2012 at 6:32 pm |
  13. jimtanker

    I really feel sorry for these kids that these terrible adults are making this decision that will possibly affect these kids for the rest of their lives.

    February 29, 2012 at 4:49 pm |
    • The Central Srutinizer

      I hope it does affect them for the rest of their lives, in a good way. Hopefully they will see how foolish religion is.

      February 29, 2012 at 4:53 pm |
    • Uncouth Swain

      Unless I missed it..it never said what any of the kids thought. They might have a say in it and decided not to play.

      And effect them for the rest of their lives? Perhaps it will, in that one should be dedicated in what they hold to be important. It's called dedication.

      February 29, 2012 at 4:59 pm |
    • nimesh

      Yes, yet another encroachment of religion in the public sphere. Should government business be moved in order to accommodate the sabbath.
      Will troops be allowed to stop fighting over the weekend?
      There is a clear separation between church and state, that's the 'religion' which needs enforcement!

      February 29, 2012 at 5:00 pm |
    • Wow

      This isnt the Texas HS championships anyway. Rules are rules and this school has had the schedule changed due to thier beliefs before, it is just this time, they wanted to move two of thier games which would have meant moving many other games since the host site was hosting a tournament. I don't know why it is such a big deal. These kids parents choose to send them to a school based on religion and which most likely has a 100% graduation and college rates. They signed on to this association knowing full well that this could happen to the kids. It's just a game. These rich kids will recover. Like feeling bad for Jeremy Lin sleeping on his brother's couch before he got his break...what? He was making League minimum $600K and graduated from Harvard...hard to feel bad for him even if he never made it in the NBA.

      February 29, 2012 at 5:01 pm |
    • Uncouth Swain

      @nimesh- what does basketball have to do with getting an education? Separation of schools and sports. Schools are for education.
      Or is this going to far?

      February 29, 2012 at 5:05 pm |
    • jrod

      @Nimesh...how does separation of church and state come into play. It CLEARLY said TAPPS (Texas Association of PRIVATE and PAROCHIAL Schools). Read much?

      February 29, 2012 at 5:06 pm |
    • Susan

      It will affect them – it will reinforce their faith and desire to pass it on, as well as learning that in order to maintain your values, sometimes you have to give up things that you want. Those are great lessons.

      February 29, 2012 at 5:13 pm |
    • MYisraela

      Did you even read the article????? Did you all seriously miss the quote . . . ""If we give up this opportunity for our religion it just shows how much we deeply care for it," Isaac Buchine, ***a player on the Beren Stars***, told KPRC"????

      February 29, 2012 at 6:52 pm |
  14. Hal

    I live in Denver, and I have no personal connection to any of this. Nonetheless, I called the TAPPS offices in order to express my disappointment with all of this. I reached Bryan Bunselmeyer – who was cordial enough to speak with me, to his credit. He informed me that the Board had met that morning and were sticking by their decision. I encourage people to look up the Board members on the TAPPS website and call to express disappointment in their decision. Although I am Jewish, I think it is safe to ask WWJD in this situation? Force these young people to forfeit as opposed to scheduling the game several hours earlier this Friday? What a sad, wrong decision here.

    February 29, 2012 at 4:40 pm |
    • jimtanker

      WWJD? Probably shoot 3 pointers all night long.

      February 29, 2012 at 4:48 pm |
    • momoya

      At what number did you reach Bunselmeyer? I would like to call him and express my appreciation for the boards decision. A religious few shouldn't even try to force a league to change their entire operation according to their private concerns.

      February 29, 2012 at 4:50 pm |
    • The Central Srutinizer

      I also applaud the decision.

      February 29, 2012 at 4:54 pm |
    • JayB12

      The kids weren't forced to forfeit the game. The adults forced them not to play. I'm sure it hurts the kids more than the adults but what do you care? Your religion is more important so they'll just have to live with their parents decision. They'll just have to learn that sometimes life isn't always fair.

      February 29, 2012 at 5:09 pm |
    • Wow

      It's a RELIGIOUS LEAGUE...operated by a non-public school board. The rules are meant to be followed. What's next, don't count all of the fouls on one team because they don't believe in violence? Give the Jewish team 3 foul shots instead of two because they are nice people? The only reason it is a story at all is that the Religious Right has put a wedge between everything religious and everything secular. This has nothing to do with religion. It is about having an organization with rules and to be part of that organization, you have to follow the rules in place. They joined knowing that this might happen someday.

      February 29, 2012 at 5:09 pm |
    • Hal

      Momoya, I looked up the number on the TAPPS website – pretty simple

      February 29, 2012 at 5:26 pm |
    • Judge_Incompetent

      The sad part is that God doesn't care if they play on the Sabbath......only humans do.

      February 29, 2012 at 5:27 pm |
    • Hal

      And Momoya, to your second point about a religious few: the reasons that I even decided to express an opinion on this were a.) the other team expressed a desire to move the game in order to accommodate the Jewish school (GOOD FOR THEM) and b.) if no games are scheduled on Sunday, then it's clear that decisions are made with religious considerations in mind. Since it is a private, parochial league – I have no problem with that. But what ever happened to flexibility – this can be worked out, and everybody (except the Board, apparently) knows it.

      February 29, 2012 at 5:30 pm |
    • MYisraela

      It may be a league for religious schools, but it's not a CHRISTIAN league and it's wrong for them to forbid games on the Sabbath of one religion, but not be willing to move a game that conflicts with another religion's Sabbath.

      February 29, 2012 at 7:10 pm |
  15. CPC

    As a religious Jew, I have to say that while this sucks for the kids, it is a good lesson about the real world. Jews are a minority in a culture which observes Sabbath on a Sunday, if at all. I have often missed out on things because they fall on Shabbat, but such is life. I think it is great that the students have decided to stick to their faith and sit this one out. While right now it just looks like missing a basketball game, it is really a life lesson in setting priorities. To those who are atheist, interpret it as such. Rather than making some crack about the flying spaghetti monster and chalking this behavior up to foolishness, see it as kids learning how to prioritize their values and make sacrifices. Even if these kids ultimately reject leading an observant life as adults, they might be more likely to prioritize important things such as family, friends, and health over work or social commitments. Life is hard and we have to make tough choices. It is rare that society will change its schedule to meet our needs, so good for them for making their own schedule.

    February 29, 2012 at 4:38 pm |
    • The Central Srutinizer

      They only reason these kids have "faith" is because people like you have been shoving it down their throats since the day they were born. Total indoctrination to include school segregation. It is sick. Let these children mature and develop critical thinking skills and then see how much "faith" they have. In fact, about right now I am guessing a few the smarter kids would like to tell you where you can shove your faith.

      Additionally, it is not fair to the other teams. If you are in a league you have responsibility. That's the real world pal. If they can't honor their commitment they should not play the game.

      February 29, 2012 at 4:46 pm |
    • Doesn't matter

      Because sports are the most important thing in the whole wide world – aren't they....aren't they? Come on – life is full of making choices – sometimes you don't like it but it's something you have to do. While playing sports build great character traits, this is not the end of the world. There are children starving around the world, there are people freezing in the cold because they are homeless, but let's hope that all of the kids playing a sport will go pro, make way more money than anybody needs and forget about ideals, morals or character. As someone who didn't have faith shoved down my throat, I have become a person of faith on my own and wish someone had introduced it to me earlier. This is not everybody – I GET THAT – but it's an opinion. An opinion that matters because I'm a human being – this means that even opinions that are contrary to mine matter as well, because they are being made by humans. Let's ALL learn about respect instead of bashing each other for different points of view, which I apparently thought was a right in this country – oops!!

      February 29, 2012 at 4:59 pm |
    • CPC

      I know that a comment on CNN is not about to revolutionize the way you see the world, religion, or those with faith in any number of things. However, I can't help but take this opportunity to share. Not all observant individuals are mindless fundamentalists, brainwashed from childhood. I converted to Judaism between the ages of 16 and 18, I was raised in a Catholic home, and two of my five siblings are devout atheists. As a convert, I avoid cramming faith down throats as a general policy, mostly because it would be hypocritical. Because of my background, I understand how faith-based decisions make people such as yourself wary. Let's reassess. This article is, at its core, about how one school has decided to deal with a conflict. The conflict is between sports and religion. Again, in life, we see conflicts all the time. Go to family event or use those tickets to a football game? Spend more hours at work or go home and have dinner with your spouse? Rather than focus on what you don't like here- which is that the decision involved religion, I hope that you step back and see this as a school and parents trying to teach children how to weight competing interests and make choices. I understand that don't like their ultimate decision (which is fine, it is your right), but try to at least appreciate the process.

      February 29, 2012 at 5:08 pm |
    • Wow

      CPC...while i agree with you main points, you and your brothers were able to make your own decisions based on your beliefs once you were old enough...you are making The Central Srutinizer's point. Your parents let you and your siblings decide once you were old enough...and most of you left the Catholic Church.

      February 29, 2012 at 5:13 pm |
    • Susan

      Well put

      February 29, 2012 at 5:15 pm |
  16. Colin

    What a pity. Some hard-working athletes denied a chance to play in a final becuse their parents and them are so supersti.tious as to think a magic sky-god "rested" on the seventh day after creating the Universe the previous 6.

    By the way, ever wondered why a god got tired and needed to "rest"

    February 29, 2012 at 4:06 pm |
    • just sayin

      The rest is for man.
      Legends are born through integrity, something you will never know.

      February 29, 2012 at 4:08 pm |
    • Colin

      That's right just saying. My not believing in Christianty is clearly a reason to call my personality into question.

      February 29, 2012 at 4:23 pm |
    • Colin

      Make that Judism or Christianity

      February 29, 2012 at 4:24 pm |
    • just sayin

      Character actually. A series of traits that elevates mankind, sorely missing in the self important atheist. Atheists lack character because they are not limited by truth as honest people are and have no greater authority than their own selfish selves. The first casualty of the atheist is truth.

      February 29, 2012 at 4:29 pm |
    • Uncouth Swain

      Colin..they stood up for what they believe in that didn't hurt anyone other than themselves and that just in the realm of sports. What is so freakin wrong with that? That's pretty admirable I think.

      February 29, 2012 at 4:34 pm |
    • just sayin

      1924 Olympics, chariots of fire.

      February 29, 2012 at 4:37 pm |
    • Really?

      "Atheists lack character because they are not limited by truth as honest people are and have no greater authority than their own selfish selves"

      The most judgmental, intolerant people on the planet are Christians. By the way lying is a sin. Your posts reek of someone who has been brainwashed by their cult.

      February 29, 2012 at 4:56 pm |
    • Colin

      US- it is still a pity. To state the obvious, no god rested on the sabbath after making the Universe in six days. I mean, come on! To deny themselves something based on the residual effects of Iron Age mythology IS a pity. Remarkable, given that it is the 21st Century, and a pity.

      February 29, 2012 at 5:16 pm |
    • Colin

      Just saying- once again, I fail to see the link between a belief in the supernatural and character. The moral outlook of your average atheist is virtually indistinguishable from that of the surrounding believers of a liberal persuaion.

      Atheists obviously reject the childish supernatural elements of a belief, but nevertheless retain almost all of the core morality they were taught as children within their families. To the extent your average Western atheist or secular humanist rejects Christian morality, it is where it is outdated, such as the cruel indifference with which it treats other species, or mean spirited – such as in the way it seeks to curtail freedoms or oppose the rights of $exual minorities.

      I feel no compunction to apologise for either difference. My refusal to subscribe to your supernatural Judeo-Chrisitan beliefs is actually a source of pride, for obvious reason.

      February 29, 2012 at 5:22 pm |
    • Uncouth Swain

      @Colin- To state the obvious, you do not believe that a god rested on the sabbath or any creation story. That is the only thing that is ovious. Plz do not make the mistake of asserting your beliefs as the truth.
      There is nothing residual about a faith that continues to develop. You do not actually think that at 1,000 BCE Judaism suddenly stopped developing did you?

      As for your reference to the 21st century....there is no evidence that the "here and now" is superior to "there and then". It's quite prejudice to think otherwise.

      February 29, 2012 at 5:54 pm |
    • Edwin

      Colin: it sounds like you don't believe in anything - not just religion - otherwise you would understand that sacrifice for a belief is more important than one individual game, even if a championship is on the line.

      It's sad, really - these kids are able to make complex value judgements about what is really important in their lives, and you consider that inferior reasoning. I think you have it completely backwards - they are not the ones with inferior judgement.

      February 29, 2012 at 6:40 pm |
    • Colin

      US. – I am quite sure that the Universe was not created in 6 days. That is as certain as anything can be. Just like I do not believe the Univers came from a snake-god in the Dreamtime (Australian Aboriginal mythology) was created by the Gods Vishu and Shiva (Hindu mythology) or popped out of an ice gaint's armpit (Norse mythology)

      Out of curiostiy, why is it you think that YOUR mythology is true, and all the other thousands of creation fables are false? You must be very lucky.

      Edwin, if the thing for which they sacrificed was worth doing so for, I would admire them. Unfortunately, sacrificing for the putative wishes of a non existant Middle Eastern sky-fairy is both futile and, let's be honest, quite infantile. I pity them for the fact that their parents paased on their hokey, outdated superst.itions to them.

      February 29, 2012 at 10:33 pm |
    • Uncouth Swain

      @Colin- "I am quite sure that the Universe was not created in 6 days."

      ~I am too. See..we agree.

      "Out of curiostiy, why is it you think that YOUR mythology is true, and all the other thousands of creation fables are false?"

      ~Same as you...through study, personal experience and inner reflection.

      "Unfortunately, sacrificing for the putative wishes of a non existant Middle Eastern sky-fairy is both futile and, let's be honest, quite infantile. I pity them for the fact that their parents paased on their hokey, outdated superst.itions to them."

      ~See..more of you asserting your beliefs over others. I am sure they probably pity you and you probably do not care anymore than they do for your pity.

      March 1, 2012 at 1:33 pm |
  17. Atheism is not healthy for children and other living things

    Prayer changes things

    February 29, 2012 at 4:05 pm |
    • Jesus

      The statistical studies from the nineteenth century and the three CCU studies on prayer are quite consistent with the fact that humanity is wasting a huge amount of time on a procedure that simply doesn’t work. Nonetheless, faith in prayer is so pervasive and deeply rooted, you can be sure believers will continue to devise future studies in a desperate effort to confirm their beliefs.

      February 29, 2012 at 4:10 pm |
    • just sayin

      No one studies studies,studies are misleading, study God

      February 29, 2012 at 4:36 pm |
    • The Central Srutinizer

      It's Ground Hog Day!

      February 29, 2012 at 4:51 pm |
    • Jesus

      "No one studies studies,studies are misleading, study God"

      Lying is a sin.

      February 29, 2012 at 4:58 pm |
    • Doesn't matter

      Prayer is not so much about changing other people or situations, but changing yourself. And yes, Christians have done some awful things – but so have atheists. The "enlightenment" of atheism doesn't make you evil or mean (or automatically nice for that matter), just a different way of thinking. And hey – atheists think all Christians should change – would that not be considered shoving your doctrine down our thoughts? Just a thought – stop wasting time judging each other – respect all and get along. FYI – I learned that in Kindergarten – reinforced at Church!!

      February 29, 2012 at 5:04 pm |
    • Really?

      "I learned that in Kindergarten – reinforced at Church!!"

      Ok so then allow gays to get married, but I bet you learned your prejudice from the church too.

      February 29, 2012 at 5:26 pm |
  18. momoya

    [youtube=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GPo9OBrIOi4&w=640&h=360]

    February 29, 2012 at 3:55 pm |
    • Jason

      I wish there was a "Like" button for your video post! Classic!

      February 29, 2012 at 5:05 pm |
    • BigNachos

      Came for a reference to this. Leaving happy.

      February 29, 2012 at 5:11 pm |
  19. Wazzat

    Champtionship?

    February 29, 2012 at 3:55 pm |
    • Wazzat

      They fixed it... good.

      February 29, 2012 at 4:33 pm |
  20. William Demuth

    They shall not be missed.

    February 29, 2012 at 3:54 pm |
    • just sayin

      Chariots of fire.
      Legends are born from integrity.

      February 29, 2012 at 4:06 pm |
    • William Demuth

      We have enough legends for an eternity and we don't need these yahoos propogating any more!

      The dream of America is one of a melting pot.

      If you refuse to "melt" we must apply more heat to "persuade" you to conform.

      February 29, 2012 at 4:11 pm |
    • just sayin

      A noble spirit embiggens the smallest man. When one chooses the path of atheism one must give up truth, honor and nobility of spirit. Atheists are sad, pathetic creatures actually.

      February 29, 2012 at 4:32 pm |
    • Uncouth Swain

      Demuth, your thoughts won't be missed by them. They won't even know them.

      February 29, 2012 at 4:37 pm |
    • Uncouth Swain

      "The dream of America is one of a melting pot."

      I always heard that it should be more like a mixed salad. Each group bringing something unique to the mix. Distinct from the others but yet co_mplimenting them.

      February 29, 2012 at 5:03 pm |
    • Enoch

      @ just sayin – that is a sad attempt at logic. Don't worry though, we understand. After all, you are religious and know that logic and religion don't mix.

      February 29, 2012 at 5:10 pm |
    • GodsPeople

      There isn't enough pressure to make me melt. I'd be happy to remove those who attempt to enforce illegal "diversity" however, to protect my own race.

      February 29, 2012 at 10:40 pm |
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About this blog

The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.