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Jews reclaim Jesus as one of their own
Some Jewish leaders are encouraging Jews to see Jesus as one of their own.
April 5th, 2012
02:36 PM ET

Jews reclaim Jesus as one of their own

By Richard Allen Greene, CNN

(CNN) - The relationship between Jews and Jesus has traditionally been a complicated one, to say the least.

As his followers' message swept the ancient world, Jews who did not accept Jesus as the Messiah found themselves in the uncomfortable, and sometimes dangerous, position of being blamed for his death.

Mainstream Christian theology's position held that Judaism had been supplanted, the Jewish covenant with the divine no longer valid, because of the incarnation of God as Jesus and his sacrifice on the cross.

Jews, for their part, tended largely to ignore Jesus.

That's changing now.

In the past year, a spate of Jewish authors, from the popular to the rabbinic to the scholarly, have wrestled with what Jews should think about Jesus.

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And overwhelmingly, they are coming up with positive answers, urging their fellow Jews to learn about Jesus, understand him and claim him as one of their own.

"Jesus is a Jew. He spent his life talking to other Jews," said Amy-Jill Levine, co-editor of the recently released "Jewish Annotated New Testament."

"In reading the New Testament, I am often inspired, I am intrigued. I actually find myself becoming a better Jew because I become better informed about my own history," she said.

Rabbi Shmuley Boteach, a media personality who recently launched a bid for a U.S. House seat, argues in his own new book, "Kosher Jesus," that "Jews have much to learn from Jesus - and from Christianity as a whole - without accepting Jesus' divinity. There are many reasons for accepting Jesus as a man of great wisdom, beautiful ethical teachings, and profound Jewish patriotism."

And Benyamin Cohen, an Orthodox Jew who spent a recent year going to church, admitted that he's jealous that Christians have Jesus.

"He's a tangible icon that everybody can latch on to. Judaism doesn't have a superhero like that," said Cohen, the author of the 2009 book "My Jesus Year."

 

"I'm not advocating for Moses dolls," he said, but he argued that "it's hard to believe in a God you can't see. I'm jealous of Christians in that regard, that they have this physical manifestation of the divine that they can pray to.

"There could be more devout Jews than me who don't need that, but to a young Jew living in the 21st century, I wish we had something more tangible," he said.

The flurry of recent Jewish books on Jesus - including this month's publication of "The Jewish Gospels: The Story of the Jewish Christ" by Daniel Boyarin - is part of a trend of Jews taking pride in Jesus, interfaith expert Edward Kessler said.

"In the 1970s and 1980s, Christian New Testament scholars rediscovered the Jewish Jesus. They reminded all New Testament students that Jesus was Jewish," said Kessler, the director of the Woolf Institute in Cambridge, England, which focuses on relations between Jews, Christians and Muslims.

A generation later, that scholarship has percolated into Jewish thought, he said, welcoming the trend: "It's not a threat to Jews and it's not a threat to Christians."

For Jews in particular, he said, "It's not so threatening as it was even 30 years ago. There is almost a pride that Jesus was a Jew rather than an embarrassment about it."

Boteach agrees, writing in "Kosher Jesus" that "Jews will gain much from re-embracing him as a hero."

"The truth is important," Boteach writes. "A patriot of our people has been lost. Worse still, he's been painted as the father of a long and murderous tradition of anti-Semitism."

Boteach aims to claim, or reclaim, Jesus as a political rebel against Rome and to exonerate the Jews of his death. But Boteach's book has attracted plenty of criticism, for instance for blaming the Apostle Paul for everything he doesn't like about Christianity, such as hailing Jesus as divine and cutting his ties to Judaism.

"Paul never met Jesus, and Jesus certainly never would have sanctioned Paul's actions and embellishments," Boteach argues about the apostle who wrote much of the New Testament. "Jesus ... would have been appalled at how his followers would later define him."

"Jews will never accept his divinity. Nor should they," Boteach writes, in one of many instances of presuming to know what Jesus really thought and meant. "The belief that any man is God is an abomination to Judaism, a position that Jesus himself would maintain."

He cherry-picks the Gospels to to suit his arguments, writes in casual modern idioms (calling Pontius Pilate a "sadistic mass murderer" and comparing him to Hitler), and gets wrong the most basic details of the Passion story, such as the amount of money Judas took to betray Jesus.

Other experts in the field label Boteach's book "sensationalistic," and call him a "popularizer," but Kessler sees "Kosher Jesus" as part of the trend of Judaizing Jesus. Cohen, the "My Jesus Year" author, offered some support for Boteach even as he expressed doubts about the book.

"I understand what Shmuley is trying to get at there," he said, but added: "I don't think anyone has the right to say 'This is the definition of Jesus,' especially a rabbi. He's not ours to claim."

Levine, who teaches New Testament and Jewish studies at Vanderbilt University Divinity School, also framed Jewish efforts to study Jesus in terms of mutual respect.

"Speaking personally as a Jew, if I want my neighbors to respect Judaism, which means knowing something about Jewish history, scripture and tradition, I owe my Christian neighbors the same courtesy. It's a matter of respect," she said.

She urged Jews to "become familiar with the material and make up their own mind as to how they understand Jesus."

Ironically, she added, Jews can understand their own history more thoroughly through studying the life of Jesus.

"The best source on the period for Jewish history other than (the first-century historian) Josephus is the New Testament," she said.

"It's one of those ironies of history that the only Pharisee writing in the Second Temple period from whom we have records is Paul of Tarsus," she said. " 'The Jewish Annotated New Testament' is designed in part to help Jews recover their own history."

But she also wants Christians to use it to understand Judaism more deeply, she said. While many Christian leaders acknowledge that Jesus was a Jew, she said, not many know much about what that means.

"Many Christian ministers and educators have no training in what early Judaism was like," she said. "Not to take seriously first-century Judaism seems to dismiss part of the message of the New Testament."

Cohen, the "My Jesus Year" author, found that Christians were very interested in Judaism during the 52 weeks he spent going from church to church.

"Many Christians look on Judaism as version 1.0 of their own religion. Because of that historical relationship, they're interested in a lot of the theology of Judaism," he said.

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For his part, Cohen learned much that surprised him. "I was shocked when I went to church and heard them give sermons about the Old Testament," he said. "I had no idea Christians read the Old Testament."

"One week, I went to church and the pastor gave exactly the same sermon my rabbi did the night before about Moses and the burning bush, and the pastor did it much better," he continued.

Cohen came away from his Jesus year with a clear understanding of what he believes.

"People ask me all the time if I believe in Jesus. Do I believe he exists? Sure. Do I believe he's your God? Sure, I have no problem with that," he said he tells Christians who ask.

"I understand Christians' love for Jesus and I respect that," he said. "If anything, I learned a lot from them and did become a more engaged Jew, a better Jew, and I appreciate my Judaism more because I hung out with Jesus."

- Newsdesk editor, The CNN Wire

Filed under: Jesus • Judaism

soundoff (2,641 Responses)
  1. nestor

    The lord Yeshua said to the Pharisees: hypocrites well did ISaiah prophesy of you, and the Lord said: Hypocrisy of this people .Forasmuch as this people draw near, and with their mouth and with their lips do honour Me, but have remove their heart far from Me, and their fear of Me is a commanment of men learned by rote. i am very happy some jews start to know something about my Lord Jesus the Jew.

    April 5, 2012 at 8:03 pm |
    • bill

      Israel should honor Jesus as the greatest Jew that ever lived. They do not have to beleive in his faith, but for the contribution of faith to the world.

      April 5, 2012 at 8:13 pm |
  2. Gordon Friedman

    Stop stereotyping people. Not all Christians want to push their faith on you. Not all secular, non religious, people want to tear down Christianity or any other religion. There are small portions of people on both sides of the argument pushing their Authoritarian ideology on the masses. Just stop stereotyping.

    April 5, 2012 at 8:03 pm |
  3. Mitzy

    When Jesus claimed that "no one comes to the Father but through me," he ceased being a Jew and became just another incarnation of the Golden Calf. God's Covenant with the Jews, as delivered to them on Mt. Sinai, is that there are NO interlocutors between God and His people. Jews communicate directly with God. Jesus was and still is a Jewish heretic, a deluded throwback to polytheism.

    April 5, 2012 at 8:02 pm |
    • a person of the Name

      Your picking and chosing from verses. Need to reread and see who He was talking to. He also said the old way is still valid but for us (the gentals) we have no way to God but though Jesus.

      April 5, 2012 at 8:12 pm |
  4. Da'Silva

    Jews are always the scheming people, they got Our Lord jesus killed. And still after 2000 years they are scheming US into warring for their pesky Israel. Jews wants us to kill others for their own benefit. They haven't changed.

    April 5, 2012 at 8:01 pm |
    • Steven Brooks

      No, Jesus got Himself killed, at the demand of His Father.

      Did you read your Bible?

      April 5, 2012 at 8:09 pm |
    • Jacqui

      Do you think YOUR God would want you to be full of hatred and resentment? Especially to the people he came from? How does that make sense?
      If you claim to be a Christian you need to examine your beliefs and your thoughts!
      Even if the Jews were implicated in Jesus' crucifixion, what about Jesus and his disciples? They were all Jews. How am I and my children guilty of that? Think of that!

      April 5, 2012 at 8:19 pm |
  5. Joe

    " in one of many instances of presuming to know what Jesus really thought and meant. "..........REALLY? Are you really going to criticize R. Boteach for this? I would like you to go into every single Church in America and tell them the same thing.

    April 5, 2012 at 8:01 pm |
  6. Peikovianyi

    I doubt very much that Jesus intended to found a new religion. He was working within the religion he had. The Gospel writers take great pains to detail his Davidic family origins. Those foreigners who were converted while there was still time (Matthew 24:34 This generation...) have found themselves interpreting a new religion.

    April 5, 2012 at 7:58 pm |
  7. One one

    Story translation: let's form an alliance. That will strengthen our position facing the tilde wave of people leaving religion. But to work, some compromises will have to be made. Christians will have to get rid of "the Jews killed Jesus" bit. Jews will have to accept Jesus as their Mariah. It might work, at least for a while.

    April 5, 2012 at 7:50 pm |
    • Peter

      I pray that the Love of God will shine in your life. God Bless.

      April 5, 2012 at 8:34 pm |
  8. Nah

    thecollegead: "the ONLY reason I speak about religion is that many Christians are now wanting to impose their beliefs on the general population of this country."

    Ah, yes, of course. And therefore you, instead, may impose your beliefs onto them.

    How logical.

    "impose their beliefs"

    You do realize that anyone who advocates for some position or policy to become law wants to impose their beliefs onto others, right? Otherwise why would they want their beliefs to "be" law?

    "Christianity has been the most destructive religion the world has ever known and someone must protect this country from the radicals who wish to impose their will on all of us."

    Lol. Your bigotry is cute.

    April 5, 2012 at 7:48 pm |
    • thecollegeadmissionsguru

      You are a TROLL, I will not reply to you again. Good day. You have not offered a single sensible statement yet, but thank you for playing..

      April 5, 2012 at 7:54 pm |
    • Nah

      theadmission: "You have not offered a single sensible statement yet, but thank you for playing.."

      Oh. Dear me. I didn't realize that showing you how and why your beliefs are contradictory (you can prohibit Christians from imposing their views onto others by imposing your views onto them) was not "sensible".

      April 5, 2012 at 7:56 pm |
    • Certain

      @Nah, imposing religious law on others is wrong. Advocating civil liberties and freedom is about as opposite of imposing religious law as you can get. To equate the two is ignorant beyond words.

      April 5, 2012 at 8:02 pm |
    • Gordon Friedman

      Stop stereotyping people. Not all Christians want to push their faith on you. Not all secular, non religious, people want to tear down Christianity or any other religion. There are small portions of people on both sides of the argument pushing their Authoritarian ideology on the masses. Just stop hating.

      April 5, 2012 at 8:02 pm |
    • Gordon Friedman

      Stop stereotyping people. Not all Christians want to push their faith on you. Not all secular, non religious, people want to tear down Christianity or any other religion. There are small portions of people on both sides of the argument pushing their Authoritarian ideology on the masses. Just stop stereotyping.

      April 5, 2012 at 8:03 pm |
    • Nah

      certain: "@Nah, imposing religious law on others is wrong. Advocating civil liberties and freedom is about as opposite of imposing religious law as you can get. To equate the two is ignorant beyond words."

      You do realize that what you've said is meaningless, right?

      If you're pretending that "civil liberties and freedom" includes your right to prevent other people from practicing their religion, then you invocation of freedom is empty and hollow.

      If you're pretending that "civil liberties and freedom" means a religious person cannot vote or advocate for laws based on their religious moral predilections - but you can advocate for laws based on secular moral predilections - then your argument is unsupportably absurd.

      "imposing religious law"

      In the U.S. so long as a law is consti.tutional and violates no one's rights, it doesn't matter what the source of that law is. It doesn't matter if a religious person wants to prohibit murder because they believe murder is a sin (and therefore wrong), or if an atheist wants to prohibit murder because it causes a harm (and is therefore wrong).

      April 5, 2012 at 8:07 pm |
    • lol

      liar liar, nah.. you were caught lying in the other thread as well.. every post you make is an attack on the poster and have absolutely nothing of substance to add to the argument.. and then you decide yourself as a winner? really? what are you a sixth grader?

      April 5, 2012 at 8:09 pm |
    • Apatheist

      You said it yourself... Christians are imposing their belief upon others. We are not imposing on their belief by asking them to stop. Idiot....

      April 5, 2012 at 8:09 pm |
    • Nah

      certain: "imposing religious law as you can get."

      To clarify, since you seem to be confused about the law, the government cannot establish a religion that everyone must follow. They cannot make religion itself law.

      The government can, however, make laws under its general police powers. It doesn't matter if that law has a religious source or not. What matters is that the government have the power to prohibit the thing in the first place.

      Hence, pretending that religious people should be disabled from making or advocating for laws is absurd. In fact, it flies in the face of freedom itself.

      April 5, 2012 at 8:09 pm |
    • Nah

      apatheist: "You said it yourself... Christians are imposing their belief upon others. We are not imposing on their belief by asking them to stop. Idiot...."

      Nice Orwellian double speak.

      Your argument runs like this:

      1) A religious person is advocating for a law.

      2) That religious person advocates for that law because they want to impose their beliefs onto others.

      3) Therefore atheists can, instead, pass laws that prevent religious people from doing so.

      4) Atheists are, therefore, by necessity imposing their own beliefs onto others. Namely, the belief that religious people shouldn't be allowed to participate in politics.

      The question isn't whether or not a religious person wants to do something, or whether or not they want to do something because of their moral beliefs. The question is whether or not the law itself can be passed in the first place.

      April 5, 2012 at 8:13 pm |
    • reason

      @Nah, who is advocating the elimination of religious freedom?

      Taking away others' freedoms based on religious views is morally wrong.

      April 5, 2012 at 8:14 pm |
    • Nah

      apatheist: "You said it yourself... Christians are imposing their belief upon others."

      Nah. You're confusing "imposing your beliefs" with "imposing your religion".

      Christians - just like atheists - are trying to impose their beliefs onto others. Why? Because they want their beliefs to become law, and, hence, coerce others to follow them.

      There's a difference, however, in forcing others to follow a religion or a religious practice, and merely supporting a law because you have religious moral feelings about it.

      After all, why is it that a religious person's moral feelings about a law make his support/opposition of the law impermissible, but an atheist's own moral feelings about the law are vindicated entirely?

      April 5, 2012 at 8:15 pm |
    • Snow

      The road goes both ways, nah.. to call an atheist who opposes a law pushed by a religious person as ignorant and be called on to stop is as wrong as what you said.. why the difference than? is it because you somehow think the law pushed by a religious person is more important because he takes his inspiration from a holy book? That, as you say, truly flies in the face of freedom and the const.itution of this country

      April 5, 2012 at 8:17 pm |
    • Nah

      reason: "@Nah, who is advocating the elimination of religious freedom?"

      Never said anyone was. Which is why I asked "collegeadmissions" to clarify what he was saying.

      "Taking away others' freedoms based on religious views is morally wrong."

      You're almost right. Taking away anyone's freedoms is morally wrong.

      Hence the two questions we must ask are:

      1) Is X a freedom?

      2) Can it be taken away?

      You can't point to the fact that someone who is religious wants to take X away, or that their opposition to X is founded on religious principles. The only question is about the state's actual power.

      April 5, 2012 at 8:18 pm |
    • Snow

      "Christians – just like atheists – are trying to impose their beliefs onto others" Ok I am going to call you on that.. How many atheist missionaries do you see around? how many people visit you on a sunday morning to "spread the word" and "save the soul"? who is imposing their view on who?

      evidence, unfortunately (for you) speaks for itself, my friend..

      April 5, 2012 at 8:19 pm |
    • Nah

      snow: ""Christians – just like atheists – are trying to impose their beliefs onto others" Ok I am going to call you on that.. How many atheist missionaries do you see around? how many people visit you on a sunday morning to "spread the word" and "save the soul"? who is imposing their view on who?"

      Please don't distort the context of the comments.

      First, the question wasn't whether there are religious or atheist "missionaries".

      Second, the issue was legislation.

      Third, consequently, the question was why religious people "forcing their views onto others" was prohibited when atheists, political parties, unions, lobbyists, etc. all try to do the same.

      In fact, there is no qualitative difference between an atheist trying to get his views to become law and a religious person doing the same. The only question - for both of them - is whether or not their views can become law in the first place.

      But that requires an analysis of the state's power, not an analysis of the religion of the person proposing the law.

      April 5, 2012 at 8:24 pm |
    • Snow

      there is a "qualitative difference" between the two and you are very valiantly trying to miss it here.. you say, "Third, consequently, the question was why religious people "forcing their views onto others" was prohibited when atheists, political parties, unions, lobbyists, etc. all try to do the same."

      you want const.itutional changes based on religious views.. you want god's prayer in classroom... you want Intellegent design to be taught while evolution be banned.. you want "god" on money.. you want abortion banned because god says so..

      atheist call bull on that and resist.. is that resistance the "imposition of his viewpoint" you refer to? who is imposing on who.. and how can you say they are the same in any sense of saying? Show me an instance of atheist imposing his view point on religious?

      April 5, 2012 at 8:41 pm |
    • fred

      Atheists are in court all day long and have forced secular creationism upon innocent children. Anytime evolution is taught with the slant man came from slime a footnote should say "godless atheist believe man is an evolved organic chemical blob. People of faith including scientists and biologists that understand the process of evolution and biology believe man was created by God. The nature of God or the existence or non existence of God is neither expressed or implied by evolution."

      April 5, 2012 at 9:02 pm |
  9. thecollegeadmissionsguru

    NahApr 5, 7:42 pm

    thecollege: "I am an atheist. I was born in the State of South Carolina, in the Bible Belt. I was indoctrinated into the Christian Church for many years."

    Aw, so this is why you feel an obsessive need to respond derogatorily to any religious article.

    You poor thing. Embarrassed about your past religious life.

    "I do NOT hate Christ, I simply do not believe in him. It is hard to hate something that never existed."

    Ooh, more fallacies. You can hate things that do not exist. All it takes is intense dislike for some object, real or not.

    Not to mention, your anger seems to be directed at Christians as a whole.

    I LOVE the way you build up strawmen and then tear them down. How sweet.

    April 5, 2012 at 7:46 pm |
    • Nah

      Oh, I didn't realize that pointing out the logical deficiencies in your arguments was creating a strawman.

      My apologies for invoking logic to show you why you were wrong.

      April 5, 2012 at 7:48 pm |
      • thecollegeadmissionsguru

        LOGIC? There is NO logic in what you said. Stating that I am somehow ashamed of my upbringing, is building a strawman, you DO NOT KNOW ME... you are making assumptions. So far you have offered NOTHING to the debate but adhom attacks. I will respond to you no more, thank you..

        April 5, 2012 at 7:52 pm |
    • Nah

      thecollege: "Stating that I am somehow ashamed of my upbringing, is building a strawman, you DO NOT KNOW ME... you are making assumptions."

      You're right. That was merely an insult. But picking it out as somehow representative of the criticisms of the absurd things you've said is, itself, a strawman.

      Ironic, right?

      "So far you have offered NOTHING to the debate but adhom attacks. I will respond to you no more, thank you.."

      Why are you so angry?

      April 5, 2012 at 7:54 pm |
    • Nah

      thecollege: "I do not debate with idiots and fools, of which you fit both categories. I do not need to debate someone who, so far, has managed to do little more than attack personally, and offer NOTHING of interest to the conversation."

      I'm sorry you feel that way. If you actually read anything I wrote, you'd have seen that I responded to specific arguments you made and showed why they were wrong.

      Your responses so far have been, well, to not respond at all.

      Take your discussion of Christianity being the most vile plague to ever exist in the world. You said, quite explicitly, that "someone" must stop it from taking over the United States. But what, pray tell, does that involve? Prohibiting Christianity? Making sure it has no place in the public eye? Making sure that you whittle away religious freedoms to such an extent that no one can practice religion and, therefore, become religious?

      What's your solution?

      April 5, 2012 at 7:59 pm |
  10. Jesus

    Jesus is Jewish and we Americans know that. We worship the true god Jesus Christ who came through the Jews to us Gentiles but the time is coming when the full number of Gentiles is up and when the Jews accept their original savior then gods plan will be fulfilled and the earth will be ripe for judgement and god will punish all non believers to eternal hell in fire.

    April 5, 2012 at 7:45 pm |
    • pockets

      "Worship nothing and no one fool"

      April 5, 2012 at 7:55 pm |
  11. Rambo

    Jesus was a Jew. so thats why Jews KILLED him?

    April 5, 2012 at 7:43 pm |
    • Certain

      Maybe it was self defense.

      April 5, 2012 at 7:50 pm |
    • pockets

      The new testament was written to nail together the jesus story. The bible is 66 stories written by about 40 writers and over 1500 years. It was translated from Hebrew to Aramaic to Greek to English, now go figure that mess out. Its best to view this book as nonsense, with talking snakes and a psychotic sky diety, who wiped out the people he supposedly created because he was " p i s s e d ' at them for minor offenses. Hitch you were right, RIP. You are truly missed.

      April 5, 2012 at 7:53 pm |
    • Rambo

      yea. everthin jews do is self defense

      April 5, 2012 at 7:54 pm |
    • Rebel4Christ

      The Bible calls the people who dont believe in God fools

      April 5, 2012 at 8:36 pm |
    • Gon

      I think many of those who hope you get well soon don't understand the nartue of your illness, others just don't know what else to say. It is like saying you'll get over it when a loved one dies. It isn't something you get over; you must work through it, and, sometimes, it is a long journey.I pray everyday that God gives you and Betty the strength and support you need to get through what both of you are dealing with.Thank you for such a wonderful blog.

      November 8, 2012 at 2:21 am |
  12. PraiseTheLard

    Jesus, if he existed at all, was nothing more than a snake-oil salesman... fully worthy of the respect most Americans give used car salesmen...

    April 5, 2012 at 7:41 pm |
  13. Rick7777

    Salvation is of the Jews. Yeshua messiah is salvation

    April 5, 2012 at 7:38 pm |
  14. Andrea Messina

    The Truth is: Jesus was not a Jew. He was a Judean – or more precisely – an Iudean, of the tribe of Judah. He came "out of Judea," and was not "of the Jews." Take a very close look at the translations from the Greek (New Testament) and from the Hebrew (Old Testament) and you'll find the Truth. There are a mountain of errors in the modern translations of the scriptures. Jesus was the Son of God, He was/is God (Emmanuel – God with us) and God is not Jewish! God is the Creator of all, not just some. He loves everyone the same and plays no favorites. Human beings, on the other hand, do play favorites. His ways are higher than our ways. He says so Himself. He didn't "come to change the Law (the Ten Commandments) but to fulfill them" (He was the walking, talking Ten Commandments!). Instead, He came to change hearts – one heart at a time. Look at how silly and arrogant humans behave regarding, to say the least, issues of race, politics, class status, and religion. Jesus was no "political opponent" to anyone. He was a pacifist and never killed anyone, nor did He call on anyone to kill for Him. He said to "Love your enemies and to do good to those that hate you" (yes, I know, hard for us humans to do, but necessary). He went around healing people of their diverse diseases and casting out demons. The Ten Commandments still do govern the whole universe and everything in it whether people want to believe it or not, and whether people follow them or not. God doesn't make Laws and then break them Himself. All "man-made" governments and man-made religions will come to an end. It's only a matter of time and that's God's plan. I am not an anarchist, I am a pacifist, just like Christ. When will everyone realize that they don't work, have no power, and only cause terrible conflict and divisiveness? He wants to have a close, personal relationship with everyone, not a religion with their powerless rituals. Do you want a close, personal relationship with the smartest being in the universe? Well, ask for it everyday and it will be so. God will "show you great and mighty things that you do not know." Everything – good and bad – going on in the world is most definitely for purposes of demonstration. We are being shown what not to do and how not to behave by all the events taking place in the world, past and present. No one gets away with anything and everyone will reap what they have sown. It's not about punishment, it's about remediation – to turn us toward doing the right thing (righteousness) because it's the right thing to do. I encourage everyone reading this to take a look at the amazing wisdom coming through a beautiful woman who goes by the name of Dr. Lorraine Day at GoodNewsAboutGod.com. She is speaking Truth without compromise, something in very short supply these days. She reminds us that fervent, diligent daily prayer and bible study "will make one wise." Just watch out for all the errors, deliberate or otherwise, in translation. Good health to all of you and God Bless!

    April 5, 2012 at 7:38 pm |
    • studdmuffins

      That explains why he worshipped in the Jewish temples of the day.

      Good attempt at rewriting history, though.

      April 5, 2012 at 7:45 pm |
    • Jesus

      Girl your theology is all backwards, you better read your bible more cuz Jesus was jewish, was not a pacifist, and the 10 commandments do not govern the universe silly. Jesus fulfilled the law and it's purpose so stop distorting people with false teachings. The righteous shall live by faith!

      April 5, 2012 at 7:55 pm |
    • pockets

      And those that believe in the 'good' book , actually vote and have children. Frightening.

      April 5, 2012 at 8:01 pm |
  15. Rick7777

    Salvation of of the Jews. Yeshua messiah is salvation

    April 5, 2012 at 7:37 pm |
  16. RTI

    Again the zionist media defending Jews' crimes. Jews killed Jesus, Our Lord, they are dragging US into endless wars and hate 90 percent of the world and all we hear his praises for killer Jews

    April 5, 2012 at 7:35 pm |
    • $12 bagel

      Finally a sensible commenter on here! I couldn't agree with you more. First they kill our Christ, then they act like he's "one of them" (while at the same time constantly defaming him in the media). I'm sick of these rats!!

      April 5, 2012 at 7:41 pm |
    • Peikovianyi

      Too bad this isn't the Philippines, where you could be crucified and feel good about yourself.

      April 5, 2012 at 7:44 pm |
    • Peikovianyi

      Although some Abu Sayyaf lunatics behead Philippinos for not being Muslim. That your kind of Christianity too?

      April 5, 2012 at 7:47 pm |
    • studdmuffins

      Q: What would Jesus be doing this Saturday if he were still walking the earth?
      A: He'd be in synagogue praying with the rest of the Jewish faithful.

      He was Jewish and merely attempted to reform the faith back to it's prayerful roots.

      Now, what difference does it make whether the Jews of today want to "reclaim" him? Good for them.

      April 5, 2012 at 7:47 pm |
    • Nah

      1/10.

      Troll harder?

      April 5, 2012 at 7:49 pm |
  17. reason

    Great video on the objective history of god:

    [youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MlnnWbkMlbg&w=640&h=390]

    April 5, 2012 at 7:35 pm |
  18. Peikovianyi

    Like Brits who call a vistor from Texas a "Yank", people have almost-the-right-idea about 1st Century Judeans, who were ruled by a Idumean-convert aristocracy on behalf of pagan Rome. A Sanhedrin court owed allegiance to that regime. Galilee was part of a different territory, among Samaritans, and anyone from there was a "Jew" in one sense but not another. In Judea, Sadducees, Pharisees, Zealots, Essenes all claimed religious-political "truth". Early Jewish-Christians like the Nazarenes and Ebionites were isolated and dismissed. A very complicated time and place, like our own.

    April 5, 2012 at 7:33 pm |
  19. Chad

    "In the past year, a spate of Jewish authors, from the popular to the rabbinic to the scholarly, have wrestled with what Jews should think about Jesus.
    And overwhelmingly, they are coming up with positive answers, urging their fellow Jews to learn about Jesus, understand him and claim him as one of their own."

    that is simply AWESOME!!

    April 5, 2012 at 7:31 pm |
  20. AngryJew

    a ha ha ha, I thought the Jews for Jesus were already accepting the savior.

    April 5, 2012 at 7:31 pm |
    • greg

      No these Jews are just studying him, They dont accept him as divine.

      April 5, 2012 at 8:16 pm |
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About this blog

The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.