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My Faith: Returning to church, despite my doubts
Andrea Palpant Dilley as a child with her missionary family Kenya.
May 5th, 2012
10:00 PM ET

My Faith: Returning to church, despite my doubts

Editor's note: Andrea Palpant Dilley is the author of “Faith and Other Flat Tires.”

By Andrea Palpant Dilley, Special to CNN

During my junior year in college, I took a butter knife from my mother’s kitchen  and scraped the Christian fish decal off the back bumper of the Plymouth hatchback I’d inherited from my older brother. Stripping off that sticker foreshadowed the day, a few years later, that I would walk out of church.

The reasons for my discontent were complicated. By most standards, I had a healthy childhood.  I grew up the daughter of Quaker missionaries in a rural Kenyan community that laid the foundation for my faith. I spent the rest of my childhood in the Pacific Northwest, raised in a stable Presbyterian church that gave me hymns and mission trips and potluck dinners.

I was surrounded by smart, conscientious Christians, the kind of people who read 19th century Russian novels and took meatloaf to firefighters when much of eastern Washington state went up in flames in the fall of 1991.

When I started into my skeptic phase, my Christian community gave me space to struggle. They listened to my doubts about faith. They took my questions seriously.

And yet when I turned 23 I left the church.

Listening to a sermon at my older brother’s church one Sunday, I stood up, leaned over to my father and said, “This is bulls**t.” I made my way to the end of the pew and marched out of the sanctuary. The sermon didn’t sit right with me. The pastor was preaching about Psalm 91, saying in so many words that a person just needed to pray and have faith in order to be protected from suffering.

More than just that sermon, I was sick of church. I was sick, too, of all the spiritual questions plaguing me: Why does the church seem so culturally insulated and dysfunctional? Why does God seem distant and uninvolved? And most of all, why does God allow suffering?

These questions didn’t come out of nowhere. I’d spent time in high school volunteering in refugee camps in Kenya and in college working with families on welfare in central Washington. I saw hungry babies. I walked into homes that were piled with garbage and dirty laundry.

In an orphanage in the slums of Nairobi, I held AIDS babies and worked with disabled kids who’d been left at the front gates of the orphanage by parents who couldn’t afford to feed them. I saw things that I couldn’t make sense of as a Christian.

Walking out of church was a way of saying “To hell with it; I’m done.”

For two years, I skipped church. My Bible gathered dust on the shelf. The local bars became my temples. I indulged in the cliché rebellions of a Christian girl, smoking cigarettes and drinking hard alcohol. I got involved with men twice my age without thinking twice about it.  I wanted a break from being “good.”

And then, strangely, I woke up one morning at age 25, climbed into my car, and drove downtown to attend a 10 a.m. church service. I won’t relate here the whole story of how I came back to the church. But if I had to follow the standard testimonial narrative for Christians, the script for my life story would go something like this:

Step 1: Grow up in a Christian church.

Step 2: Go off to college away from said church.

Step 3: Be exposed to the enticements of secular life.

Step 4: Try drugs and cigarettes and Pearl Jam.

Step 5: Leave the church because of aforementioned enticements.

Step 6: Experience epiphany; realize vapidness of secular enticements.

Step 7: Return to church with penitent heart.

Step 8: Reestablish faith, discover good living.

In reality, I left the church more because of my own internal discontent than the lure of so-called secular life. When I came back, I still carried that same discontent. I was confused, and still bothered by questions and doubts. I stayed in the back row and didn’t sing or pray. I wasn’t really sure I wanted to be there.

And yet I sat there, Sunday after Sunday, listening to the pastor and the organ pipes and trying to figure out what was going on in my dark, conflicted heart.

Although I never experienced that dramatic reconversion moment, I did come to peace with two slow-growing realizations.

First: My doubt belonged in church.

People who know my story ask what I would have changed about my spiritual journey. Nothing. I had to leave the church to find the church. And when I came back, the return wasn’t clean or conclusive. Since then, I’ve come to believe that my doubts belong inside the space of the sanctuary. My questions belong on the altar as my only offering to God.

With all its faults, I still associate the church with the pursuit of truth and justice, with community and shared humanity. It’s a place to ask the unanswerable questions and a place to be on sojourn. No other institution has given me what the church has: a space to search for God.

Second: My doubt is actually part of my faith.

In Mark 9:24, a man says to Jesus, “I believe, help my unbelief.” The Catholic writer Flannery O’Connor called this the foundation prayer of faith. I pray that prayer often and believe that God honors my honesty.

I also believe God honors my longing. The writer and theologian Frederick Buechner said “Faith is homesickness.” C.S. Lewis called it “Sehnsucht,” a longing for a far-off country. I feel that sense of unshakable yearning. It comes from the deepest part of my heart, a spiritual desire that’s strangely, mysteriously connected to my doubt.

Sitting in church every Sunday, my doubt is my desire – to touch the untouchable, to possess the presence of God.

The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of Andrea Palpant Dilley.

- CNN Belief Blog

Filed under: Christianity • Church • Opinion

soundoff (3,753 Responses)
  1. Tim

    If you left a faith to try cigarettes and Pearl Jam you're a shallow person to begin with returning because you go tired of them only reinforces that.

    I am not a religious person but my beliefs are more solidly grounded than yours. What will be the next reason you abandon your new founded faith, a resurgence in disco?

    May 6, 2012 at 3:03 pm |
    • Nestor Makhno

      Tim, she is backing and filling her way towards secular humanism. That is what critical thinking does. She is already an agnostic, even though she doesn't know it yet. Please don't drive her back the other way.

      Remember, religions fail when subjected to intelligent critical thinking, which she has already started doing. She will never be able to listen to the usual blind fail nonsense again without something in her cringing.

      Religion will never satisfy her again, and she got there on her own, with no atheists leading her "astray." She saw religion for what is was.

      May 6, 2012 at 3:16 pm |
    • PRISM 1234

      If religion is all she had, without the life of Christ in her spirit, then she wouldn't' have nothing to come back to. But if she had Christ Jesus in her heart, and Christ, our Shepperd went after his wandering sheep to bring her back to His fold, then her faith and stand in Him will be strengthened through this trial.
      Nester, you are not able to understand the way God deals with His people. To you everything that sound as a religion is in the same category. You confuse religion with knowing God. Those are two quite different things!

      May 6, 2012 at 3:48 pm |
  2. Christianity is the only truly religion

    Wow it seems like there are many nonbelievers out there that will go to hell.... but 99% of them will convert seconds before death

    May 6, 2012 at 3:02 pm |
    • sybaris

      Evidence?

      May 6, 2012 at 3:03 pm |
    • momoya

      I'm surprised you can believe in a god who allows so much confusion over his attributes and will.. After all, all god believers use the same math and chemistry, and you'd a.ssume that if god can make numbers and molecules obvious he could do the same for himself–but he never does.. Stupid god.

      May 6, 2012 at 3:05 pm |
    • If horses had Gods .. their Gods would be horses

      People on their deathbed don't want Gods, they want their families. Since perpetuation of the species is the ultimate God and the only way we live on beyond our time.

      May 6, 2012 at 3:05 pm |
    • Something To Consider

      You are very correct in that Christianity IS the only true religion! I commend you for saying that. No other religion can ever claim with great authority, except Christianity, that the Son of God, Jesus, can give Salvation to those who want to save their soul before they enter eternity. I know atheists and other non-Believers hate to hear the word of God especially through Scripture. That is precisely why I need to show them this Scripture that succinctly and authoritatively speaks to this point. "He that believeth on Him is not condemned but he that believeth not is condemned already, because he hath not believed in the name of the ONLY begotten Son of God." - JOHN 3:18 (KJV) Again, The Son of God makes reference to Jesus Christ. People are certainly free to believe as they choose however, there are consequences in not adhering to this one Scripture. Why? Because God said it, that's why and who could know better what will happen to the non-Believer when he or she passes on not Saved! That's why many non-Believers and atheists *convert* at the very last minute. They are afraid that what if, just what if there really is a God and they will spend Eternity in a void, dark place. If they convert before their death, they will be saved. But if they don't, then they will simply have to find out what's next for them at the moment of their death, and according to God it will be a very unpleasant and horrible finding.

      May 6, 2012 at 4:12 pm |
  3. IN GOD WE TRUST (Look at your money)

    LOL atheists are psyco that's the reason they have no faith the satanics

    May 6, 2012 at 2:59 pm |
    • n8263

      [youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-j8ZMMuu7MU&w=640&h=390]

      May 6, 2012 at 3:06 pm |
    • Henry

      That phrase was laced on money during the cold war for purely political reasons.

      May 6, 2012 at 3:06 pm |
    • sybaris

      Actually it's just the opposite.

      You are born agnostic and it's through brainwashing that you believe in gods and fairy tales.

      May 6, 2012 at 3:07 pm |
    • Righteo

      I wish the narrator pronounced Theresa correctly.

      May 6, 2012 at 3:22 pm |
  4. get off

    after reading the article.. I want to go back to volcano worshiping, like my ancestors. Same primitive ancestors the christians came out of. volcanoes/christian/muslim, all the same.

    May 6, 2012 at 2:59 pm |
    • Their Problem

      The problem with atheists and other non-Believers is that they obviously believe that they are self-created. If they don't believe that, then they believe they were born from a rock, a plant, or a tree. Absent that, they have to sooner or later come to the realization that there is a higher power called God who created them, their parents, and those before them.

      May 6, 2012 at 3:47 pm |
  5. Josie

    I too walked out of the church I was raised in at the age of 19. Only a few years ago did I ever go back to it willingly, but not as a fully practicing member. I lived and worked with a couple, and one of the rules was to go to church (she needed a little physical help at the time due to surgery) and so she made an agreement with me. I got to practice Paganism in her home (she got me some alter supplies) and I would go to church with her. It wasn't bad, she asked me questions and I answered and in the end she realized what I followed was not evil or going to send me to hell. Many who walk away from Christianity do not end up being Atheist, there are so many other religious faiths out there other then the monotheistic that are amazing! I too get tired of Atheists that attack others on their belief of something...sorry I don't care if you don't believe in God, but in science...but leave me and the others that do out of it. I base a lot of what I know off of science, and so does my own dad...who is also very strongly Christian.

    May 6, 2012 at 2:58 pm |
    • momoya

      @Josie

      I have noticed that the same believers who mock and deride the religious beliefs of others think it's inappropriate for atheists to mock and deride the believers of any gods.. Why do you suppose believers don't consider it wrong to attack the logic of other god beliefs, but don't think atheists should do it too?

      May 6, 2012 at 3:02 pm |
  6. Dan

    You took your head out of the sand. Now you put it back in.

    May 6, 2012 at 2:57 pm |
  7. tony

    Religion is a group think excuse for not obeying your conscience, and not using your mind to figure out why you have doubts. And if you believe god gave you both, then you really are hiding your head in the sand.

    May 6, 2012 at 2:56 pm |
  8. If horses had Gods .. their Gods would be horses

    Humans asign God(s) as the answer to all that we don't yet know or understand. Which pretty much makes God(s) the anthropomorphised sum total of all human ignorance.

    May 6, 2012 at 2:55 pm |
    • tony

      And trying to expand the number of our species who have that ignorance is what makes atheists rightfully angry.

      May 6, 2012 at 2:58 pm |
    • Truth7

      God is sovereign. Man is not. Go read about Noah and Lot and then keep them in mind as things start to unravel before your very eyes. Then recognize that He told you the Truth about what is coming...again.

      God is "the same yesterdsy, today, and tomorrow"

      "There is nothing new under the sun".

      His measure of time is not our own.

      He is raising up those who seek Him.

      May 6, 2012 at 3:05 pm |
    • sybaris

      Oh that's a good on Truth7, your god tried to kill off the alleged evil in the world, even evil birdies................... and failed.

      shouldn't your omniscient sky daddy have known that it would fail?

      May 6, 2012 at 3:09 pm |
    • If horses had Gods .. their Gods would be horses

      Truth ... you reference Noah (who was not his fathers son) and Lot who's own daughters seduced him eventhough they were saved from Sodam's destruction because they were truly righteous?! You must be joking!!

      May 6, 2012 at 3:11 pm |
  9. Matt

    ReadyO – No problem. it was my pleasure.

    May 6, 2012 at 2:47 pm |
  10. NarratedByJrMartinez

    She's returning to the dark side!

    May 6, 2012 at 2:45 pm |
  11. Finally!

    I am out of toilet paper at home and its Sunday so the religious controlled stores will not be open....what do I do?
    Help!!!!
    Oh wait, I found a Book of Moron, a Koran and a Bible!!!!!
    I'll be okay now!!!!!!!!!!

    May 6, 2012 at 2:42 pm |
    • Yeah!!!

      FINALLY SOMEONE SANE!

      May 6, 2012 at 2:45 pm |
    • Atomico

      @Finally!: I'm sure their teachings made you s#!tless. You better get some Pepto Bismol when the stores open tomorrow.

      May 6, 2012 at 2:47 pm |
    • Stev-O

      Perhaps use the Koran as toilet paper, and once done, go read the bible.

      May 6, 2012 at 2:51 pm |
    • get off

      christian/muslim, all the same. No difference. (Except we tamed the christians in the free world. Need to do the same with muslims)

      May 6, 2012 at 2:53 pm |
    • Atomico

      @get off: Your controlling desire amuses me. Christianity tamed Western "free society" from turning into a corrupt one. Your desire to tame Islam sounds like a wishful thinking.

      May 6, 2012 at 3:03 pm |
  12. Sheila

    i just went back to church after a 6 month hiatus. I have had years in my life allied with a church, and years of not attending at others. I've attended churches of numerous denominations – that's not the most important thing to me. Different churches meet my needs at different times. I'm better with it than without it. I don't think everyone has to be Christian, or go to church, or do the same things I do. I do think we need to have something bigger than ourselves to aspire to – if we're all there is, we're in deep trouble

    May 6, 2012 at 2:36 pm |
    • UGH

      Wow you are boring!!!!!!

      May 6, 2012 at 2:43 pm |
    • edwardo

      Sounds like church is a support group for you. That's fine. Please don't take on their known hatreds of gays, athiests, abortion, intolerance of other religions. And if one of your kids shows signs of being gay, please.. Don't punch them.

      May 6, 2012 at 2:43 pm |
    • sybaris

      Sheila said: "if we're all there is, we're in deep trouble"

      Hence your addiction to religion.

      May 6, 2012 at 2:52 pm |
  13. Dood

    I was raised Catholic and like this woman, I go through doubting phases. Then I read the vile, acid, vulgar comments of "Atheists" here and think that I sure don't want to be a part of that crowd. I'm not THAT unhappy.

    May 6, 2012 at 2:34 pm |
    • JT

      Right, you're better off staying in your pedophile infested church.

      May 6, 2012 at 2:39 pm |
    • Vile comments...?

      Fuk you boy lover!

      May 6, 2012 at 2:46 pm |
    • edwardo

      REality is not a good place for the feeble minded.

      May 6, 2012 at 2:47 pm |
    • kevin

      You don't need a crowd to be an atheist. That's the point. Just stop wasting your time trying to conform to a set of beliefs that make no sense at all. Trust yourself to make good decisions and lead a good life.

      May 6, 2012 at 2:55 pm |
    • chris hogan

      I"m not sure what you mean by "vile, vulgar athiests" but would it surprise you to learn that 92% of prison inmates believe in God? Religion has done good, except when it hasn't-wars, genecide, the crusades, subjugation of women, torture and murder of jews, gays, and the systematic screwing of children by the Catholic Church hierachy. And there is nothing good that religious groups provide that can not be provided by secular means. And before anyone attacks me, I will say that I AM A CHRISTIAN myself.

      May 6, 2012 at 2:58 pm |
    • Dan

      There are a lot of great people that do not believe in that nonsense.

      May 6, 2012 at 3:00 pm |
    • Marshal

      This person just made it all up, when you spout "vile" and "vulgar" and only apply it to Atheists then you sure have selective reading when it comes to these posts. Scroll up or down and you will see plenty of Religous hate.

      May 6, 2012 at 3:12 pm |
  14. Truth7

    "To fear the LORD is to hate evil: I hate pride and arrogance, evil behavior and perverse speech"

    Proverbs 8:13

    Do you see how evil men have perverted people into what "fear of the LORD" really means? It is to hate evil and depart from it.

    May 6, 2012 at 2:27 pm |
    • sybaris

      Quoting bible verses is only relevant to other bible sheep.

      You would have more progress if you could find other sources that say the same thing and aren't attributed to imaginary beings.

      May 6, 2012 at 2:30 pm |
    • Atomico

      @sybaris:

      Your response seems relevant enough for me. The quotes have their place in this belief blog, and they need not fit into your imaginary hopes.

      May 6, 2012 at 2:34 pm |
    • Nestor Makhno

      That makes no sense at all. You are trying to say that "fear" does not mean fear? God has such a poor vocabulary that he chose a totally inappropriate word?

      People like you run around threatening hell, and then try to say God does not operate on fear? Sorry, but if the Christian God exists, he is a terrorist.

      Good thing he doesn't exist.

      May 6, 2012 at 2:36 pm |
    • Atomico

      @Nestor Makhno: Christianity teaches the same fear - like fear of death - for many generations. You probably misunderstand Christian teachings, because fear has always been taught in the Christian doctrine.

      Believers however, have nothing to fear, because their faith saves them from God's wrath.

      May 6, 2012 at 2:43 pm |
    • Truth7

      Nestor – there ARE consequences for the actions we CHOOSE to take. Are you saying that your own dad or mom doesn't give punishment if you do something wrong? I think not.

      And yes, the words in the Bible ALL have different meanings thsn what you think.

      Horses – power, rulers
      Swords, stones – words
      Labor pains – deceived
      Trees – people, nations
      Crippled – weak spirit
      Blind – without knowledge

      So, when Jesus healed the blind and crippled......you now "hear" the real meaning. The Holy Spirit is to teach us. Many, many people sitting in churches don't even grasp that. This is an entirely spiritual world. We are to overcome it.

      May 6, 2012 at 2:46 pm |
    • Nestor Makhno

      So God spoke in code to ensure that his book was as confusing and deceptive as possible? That certainly fits, bu that is not what a real God would have done.

      The way the Bible is written is proof in itself that it is not the word of some god. It is deceptive, it is confusing, it is contradictory, it is obtuse, it is abstruse, it is everything that God would NOT want his instructions to be.

      God would be clear and conprehensible so that everyone might have an equal chance of understanding what he wants. It would read like stereo instructions, not some bizarre tangled mess.

      Oh, Paul said the Bible is to be interpreted literally, so you are wrong.

      May 6, 2012 at 3:00 pm |
    • Atomico

      @Nestor Makhno: I disagree that the Bible is confusing. The Bible contains Old & New Testaments. The Old is confusing, because it prophecies a Savior. The New reveals the Savior in Jesus Christ. I have yet heard faithful Christians complain that Christ was confusing, unless you even doubt historical facts, in which case I can no longer help you.

      I would admit that the Bible's confusing part happens when you don't have the heart of understanding.

      May 6, 2012 at 3:12 pm |
    • momoya

      Believers who preach that fear is a good thing seem to lose sight of the reality that many other people who believe in different gods have the same moral.. I'm as afraid of the christian god as muslims are, and I'm as afraid of the muslim god as christians are.. Problem solved.

      May 6, 2012 at 3:12 pm |
  15. gpforreal

    I would love to know the age and level of life experience of the angry atheists on these blogs. That and many of you just love to take shots, probably just to get people cranked up. Some things to think about:
    1. What hope do you have to offer humanity besides your own smugness, feeling your intellectual atheism is somehow superior? You present believers as stupid and insult them; sorry it just isn't that simple.
    2. You imply a sharp divide between scientific inquiry and religious faith. They work in largely independent spheres. Religion deals with the spiritual; science with the physical world. Our scientific tools cannot yet measure things spiritual and probably never will. God cannot be proven or disproven scientifically, and scientific tools, powerful as they are, also make a lot of assumptions when trying to answer the big questions. Physicists think all matter and the universe came into being from a 'singularity' in a billionth of a second. Sense check that; sounds like a miracle to me.
    3. Believers, Christians and others, see the value of faith in their families and communities. We see our children growing up as better people; moral formation is provided that gives them much more insight on right and wrong in our culture. Atheism at best can offer 'secular humanism' in guiding our relationships and governance of human beings. It can work in the best of situations, but with humans that are not given proper moral formation, it usually fails.
    4. Christianity has had its failures but at least it keeps trying. Could Christians have resisted Hitler better? Probably not, because of the evil hold he had through misapplying nationalistic values. They tried and many were killed or imprisoned just like the many others. Hitler, Stalin and Mao were all basically or overtly atheists. Deaths in all (no doubt sad) wars due to religious differences, come nowhere near the 150 million and more killed by those 3 alone.
    5. Faith adds value to believers' lives. Sometimes we also are torn and question things. But at 54 years old, if I am lying on my deathbed either one year or 40 years from now, I'll feel my life was well lived. Even if there is no eternal life beyond that, I'll feel at rest with my relationships and hopefully with whatever inspiration and kindness I have tried to pass on to others.
    I think this is really what faith is all about, and I am not alone.

    May 6, 2012 at 2:27 pm |
    • Dood

      That is an excellent post! +1

      May 6, 2012 at 2:35 pm |
    • camp

      I agree it seems their only agruement is to lash out

      May 6, 2012 at 2:38 pm |
    • camp

      There is a Nicole Nordeman song whos lyrics pose the question to the non-believer, asking "but what if you are wrong?" It would be interesting if a brave atheist would listen to that song and perhaps want to refute or respond – any takers?

      May 6, 2012 at 2:46 pm |
    • Colin

      1. What hope do you have to offer humanity besides your own smugness, feeling your intellectual atheism is somehow superior? You present believers as stupid and insult them; sorry it just isn't that simple.

      Simply because a person is an atheist, it does not follow that they have "nothing to offer humanity". I could cite the numerous acheivements and contributions to society of atheists, but I won't. I could also ask, "what has religion (as opposed to charitable acts by religious people) given society, except false hopes for a non-existent after life".

      2. You imply a sharp divide between scientific inquiry and religious faith. They work in largely independent spheres. Religion deals with the spiritual; science with the physical world. Our scientific tools cannot yet measure things spiritual and probably never will. God cannot be proven or disproven scientifically, and scientific tools, powerful as they are, also make a lot of assumptions when trying to answer the big questions. Physicists think all matter and the universe came into being from a 'singularity' in a billionth of a second. Sense check that; sounds like a miracle to me.

      Relgion relies on and rewards blind faith. Science requires intellectual discipline and testing of results. That is why science has given us every luxury we enjoy today whereas religion wallows in the mud of 2,000 year old mythology. The big bang or anything else is not a miracle simply because it is difficult to understand. 500 years ago, comets were miracles.

      3. Believers, Christians and others, see the value of faith in their families and communities. We see our children growing up as better people; moral formation is provided that gives them much more insight on right and wrong in our culture. Atheism at best can offer 'secular humanism' in guiding our relationships and governance of human beings. It can work in the best of situations, but with humans that are not given proper moral formation, it usually fails.

      that is flat silly. There is no inverse correlation between atheism and morality or between atheism and worth and enjoyment of life. If anything atheists and secular humanists live more fulfilling lives than religious people.

      4. Christianity has had its failures but at least it keeps trying. Could Christians have resisted Hitler better? Probably not, because of the evil hold he had through misapplying nationalistic values. They tried and many were killed or imprisoned just like the many others. Hitler, Stalin and Mao were all basically or overtly atheists. Deaths in all (no doubt sad) wars due to religious differences, come nowhere near the 150 million and more killed by those 3 alone.

      Oh dear god man, pick up a history book. Communism was no more an athesit movement than capitalism is a Christian movement. Second, Hitler was a Christian.

      5. Faith adds value to believers' lives. Sometimes we also are torn and question things. But at 54 years old, if I am lying on my deathbed either one year or 40 years from now, I'll feel my life was well lived. Even if there is no eternal life beyond that, I'll feel at rest with my relationships and hopefully with whatever inspiration and kindness I have tried to pass on to others.

      I don't know why u see belief in a god as a prerequisite to a fulfilling life. I am an atheist and feel very fulfilled.

      I think this is really what faith is all about, and I am not alone.

      May 6, 2012 at 2:51 pm |
    • momoya

      @camp

      It seems that Colin just proved you wrong about atheists having no argument except "lashing out," and simply looking back through this thread will show you many atheists with much better arguments than "lashing out," and if I had to guess, I'd say that christians use "lashing out" far more than atheists do.

      Oh, and Pascal's Wager is sooooo stupid and has many adequate rebuttals.. Look it up.

      May 6, 2012 at 3:10 pm |
  16. Matt

    Tom, Tom – I feel the anger and frustration in you. And for what? All I have done is give honest responses free of profanity and name-calling. And the best you can do is criticize one grammatical error?

    May 6, 2012 at 2:26 pm |
  17. no god

    I wonder how many tricks she turned after she left gawd. I by she took on three dudes at once. No doubt.

    May 6, 2012 at 2:23 pm |
    • Truth7

      Dear "no god", why do you choose to live below what you could be? These type of statements truly reveal what's in your heart – darkness.

      May 6, 2012 at 2:32 pm |
    • no god

      Satan rules!

      May 6, 2012 at 3:03 pm |
  18. Begone O foul stench of religion! Begone, I say!

    Nothing like Stockholm Syndrome to make you return to your mental slavery.
    This woman has been brainwashed and might never escape the horrible trap of delusion and lies she wraps around herself like a ragged who.re.

    May 6, 2012 at 2:22 pm |
    • Atomico

      @ Begone O foul stench of religion! Begone, I say!:

      Otherwise you'd let yourself into slavery of temptation with delusions of a free person.

      May 6, 2012 at 2:27 pm |
    • Truth7

      The atheists are wallowing in darkness. Your speech gives you away everytime. Who rejects God but evil? God and Jesus give you a path out of it.

      May 6, 2012 at 2:36 pm |
    • edwardo

      @Truth7 – I'm hardly wallowing in darkness. I have a great marriage, great career, awesome kids, etc. etc. I'm totally fine. If you think of that as darkness, you are twisted.

      May 6, 2012 at 2:45 pm |
    • Atomico

      @edwardo: In Truth7's defense, Christians may live the same life as you do. The difference is that Christians confess to God for their twisted nature. I have yet seen an Atheist do something like this as pledge to live differently.

      May 6, 2012 at 2:56 pm |
    • Allah

      The problem is that you are obeying the wrong religion.

      I am waiting for you, Christian.

      HA! HA! HA! HA! HA! HA! HA! HA! HA! HA! HA! HA!

      DOOM AWAITS YOU FOR CHOOSING POORLY!!!! HELL AWAITS! Your chocolate chip cookies will be slightly overdone for the rest of eternity! And your cable TV will be a bit staticy!

      May 6, 2012 at 3:04 pm |
  19. JEM

    [youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y7Pw0Gyc9d0&w=640&h=390]

    May 6, 2012 at 2:21 pm |
  20. Zan

    I gotta say, this is a very good article for Christians, but the way its told seems to say to me, "A secular life is one full of bad behavior," which I wholeheartedly disagree with. Don't get me wrong, I know its the woman's opinion, but just once I'd like to see an article on here by an Agnostic, or maybe an Atheist. And that's my opinion just like this article is that woman's.

    May 6, 2012 at 2:21 pm |
    • Voice of Reason

      Do you ever read anything that may be contrary to your opinion and analyze it for rationality?

      May 6, 2012 at 2:33 pm |
    • Dana

      This is not a good article if you can reason.

      May 6, 2012 at 3:03 pm |
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The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.