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May 16th, 2012
04:27 AM ET

Belief Blog's Morning Speed Read for Wednesday, May 16

By Laura Koran, CNN

Here's the Belief Blog’s morning rundown of the top faith-angle stories from around the United States and around the world. Click the headlines for the full stories.

From the Blog:

CNN: Catholic Archdiocese of Washington rebukes Georgetown on Sebelius speech
The Archdiocese of Washington, the Catholic Church’s authority in the nation’s capital, is rebuking another Catholic icon, Georgetown University, the oldest Catholic college in the United States. The conflict is over the university’s Public Policy Institute’s invitation to Kathleen Sebelius, the U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services, to be its 2012 award ceremony speaker this weekend.

President Barack Obama at an Easter prayer breakfast this year.

CNN: In face of faith-based attacks, Obama campaign hires faith outreach director
Just as it confronts fallout with some religious communities over President Barack Obama’s newly expressed support for same-sex marriage, the Obama re-election campaign is hiring a religious outreach director, it confirmed Tuesday. Michael Wear, who currently serves as executive assistant to the executive director of the White House Office of Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships, will join the Obama campaign in Chicago as faith vote coordinator, a campaign official said.

Tweet of the Day:

Enlightening Reads:

Haaretz: Court rules Judaism, not place of birth, is grounds for Israeli citizenship
The Haifa District Court on Tuesday rejected an appeal submitted by Professor Uzzi Ornan, who sought to compel Israel's Interior Ministry to recognize his citizenship based on the fact that he was born in Israel, rather than on the grounds that he was Jewish.

Religion News Service: Vatican settles with Benetton over pope-kissing ad
The Vatican announced on Tuesday (May 15) it had settled a lawsuit against Italian clothing group Benetton for using an image of Pope Benedict XVI in one of its advertisement campaigns. The image had been modified to show Benedict kissing Sheikh Ahmed Mohamed El-Tayeb, imam of Cairo's renowned al-Azhar Mosque.

The Washington Post: Most popular baby names have biblical origins
The list of the country’s most popular baby names for 2011, released Tuesday by the Social Security Administration, revealed that for new parents, God is in. Among the top 10 names for baby boys, four are biblical. For girls, variations on biblical names were also popular, with Isabella (the Spanish version of Elizabeth, John the Baptist’s mother) Ava (a variation on Eve) and Abigail (an Old Testament character) making the top 10.

Quote of the Day:

When I was standing there on that corner, I didn't have no idea that anything like this would have happened, but I still had a smile to give. I still had this god-given golden voice. You know? I had those things, and I never let–lost hope with having them, so I prayed about it. Every day the prayers got more and more abundant. And then eventually, the stealing became less. The crack smoking became less. As I was standing there, I was used to smoking $250 a day worth of crack. I could make that money instantly. But god said you stand on that corner and you give me reverence right there [….] So every day is a challenge. Keep the faith. Keep the hope and keep the initiative to do better.

Ted Williams, author of “A Golden Voice: How Faith, Hard Work, and Humility Brought Me From The Streets To Salvation," in an interview with CNN’s Piers Morgan. Williams, who struggled with drug addiction, was homeless when a passerby captured his smooth radio-announcer voice in a camera-phone video that soon went viral on YouTube. Read more here.

Opinion of the Day:

CNN: My Take: What the Bible really says about homosexuality
Daniel A. Helminiak who was ordained a priest in Rome, is a theologian, psychotherapist and author of “What the Bible Really Says about homosexuality" and books on contemporary spirituality. He is a professor of psychology at the University of West Georgia.

Lynette (Felicity Huffman), Gaby (Eva Longoria), Susan (Teri Hatcher) and Bree (Marcia Cross) tried to be good neighbors.

CNN: My Take: 'Desperate Housewives' wrestled with big Christian issues
Danielle Elizabeth Tumminio is an ordained Episcopal Church priest and author of "God and Harry Potter at Yale: Teaching Faith and Fantasy Fiction in an Ivy League Classroom."

Join the conversation…

CNN: Evangelical leader Tony Perkins knocks Rand Paul's 'gay' remark
You may disagree with it, but you shouldn’t make fun of it. That’s what conservative Family Research Council president Tony Perkins told CBS’s "Face the Nation" on Sunday about U.S. Sen. Rand Paul’s arguably derogatory use of the term “gay.”

- CNN's Laura Koran

Filed under: Uncategorized

soundoff (20 Responses)
  1. Red Krause

    I think,we need not to change what we believe,cause, others believe God views have changed! God is the God of both testiments!Remember,why God flooded the earth,in Noahs day?

    May 19, 2012 at 12:15 pm |
  2. Atheism is not healthy for children and other living things

    Prayer changes things,
    Proven

    May 18, 2012 at 3:33 pm |
    • Jesus

      You're a proven liar over and over again. Prayer doesn’t not; you are such a LIAR. You have NO proof it changes anything! A great example of prayer proven not to work is the Christians in jail because prayer didn't work and their children died. For example: Susan Grady, who relied on prayer to heal her son. Nine-year-old Aaron Grady died and Susan Grady was arrested.

      An article in the Journal of Pediatrics examined the deaths of 172 children from families who relied upon faith healing from 1975 to 1995. They concluded that four out of five ill children, who died under the care of faith healers or being left to prayer only, would most likely have survived if they had received medical care.

      The statistical studies from the nineteenth century and the three CCU studies on prayer are quite consistent with the fact that humanity is wasting a huge amount of time on a procedure that simply doesn’t work. Nonetheless, faith in prayer is so pervasive and deeply rooted, you can be sure believers will continue to devise future studies in a desperate effort to confirm their beliefs!*!

      May 18, 2012 at 3:34 pm |
  3. Atheism is not healthy for children and other living things

    Prayer changes
    Proven

    May 18, 2012 at 3:33 pm |
  4. Atheism is not healthy for children and other living things

    Prayer
    Proven

    May 18, 2012 at 3:32 pm |
    • Jesus

      More lies on top of more lies doesn't mean it's true. Prayer doesn’t not; you are such a LIAR. You have NO proof it changes anything! A great example of prayer proven not to work is the Christians in jail because prayer didn't work and their children died. For example: Susan Grady, who relied on prayer to heal her son. Nine-year-old Aaron Grady died and Susan Grady was arrested.

      An article in the Journal of Pediatrics examined the deaths of 172 children from families who relied upon faith healing from 1975 to 1995. They concluded that four out of five ill children, who died under the care of faith healers or being left to prayer only, would most likely have survived if they had received medical care.

      The statistical studies from the nineteenth century and the three CCU studies on prayer are quite consistent with the fact that humanity is wasting a huge amount of time on a procedure that simply doesn’t work. Nonetheless, faith in prayer is so pervasive and deeply rooted, you can be sure believers will continue to devise future studies in a desperate effort to confirm their beliefs!*!

      May 18, 2012 at 3:33 pm |
  5. Atheism is not healthy for children and other living things

    Prayer changes things

    May 17, 2012 at 9:01 pm |
    • Jesus

      Prayer doesn’t not; you are such a LIAR. You have NO proof it changes anything! A great example of prayer proven not to work is the Christians in jail because prayer didn't work and their children died. For example: Susan Grady, who relied on prayer to heal her son. Nine-year-old Aaron Grady died and Susan Grady was arrested.

      An article in the Journal of Pediatrics examined the deaths of 172 children from families who relied upon faith healing from 1975 to 1995. They concluded that four out of five ill children, who died under the care of faith healers or being left to prayer only, would most likely have survived if they had received medical care.

      The statistical studies from the nineteenth century and the three CCU studies on prayer are quite consistent with the fact that humanity is wasting a huge amount of time on a procedure that simply doesn’t work. Nonetheless, faith in prayer is so pervasive and deeply rooted, you can be sure believers will continue to devise future studies in a desperate effort to confirm their beliefs!

      May 18, 2012 at 11:06 am |
  6. critical thinker

    Obama should pass a law requiring Catholic priests to speak only English during church in the U.S.A. That'll get them blathering from the pulpit some more and maybe they'll forget about the contraceptive issue.

    May 16, 2012 at 10:53 pm |
  7. Hypatia

    Ahhh argumentative Xians fighting each other. It's cute until some innocent bystander gets hurt.

    May 16, 2012 at 12:34 pm |
  8. Ken Kesey

    So what is the point of these idiotic "Speed Read" rehashes of yesterday's news? They get the fewest comments by far, and have no interesting information.

    Why does CNN have to pretend they are delivering content when they obviously aren't? Is it to give the illusion of a job to some ne'er-do-well niece who is recovering from a nasty meth addiction or something?

    May 16, 2012 at 11:27 am |
  9. :(

    What happened to the belief blog commentors? My guess is the angry atheists got tired of posting their hypocritical and logically inconsistent tirades to others who thought just like them. Their goal was to ridicule, demean, and get into arguments with believers but since that wasn't happening very frequently they have now all left. Such a shame.....

    May 16, 2012 at 10:12 am |
    • momoya

      How stupid of a guess.. Did you really think that you actually used logical reasoning?!?! hahahahahaaha

      May 16, 2012 at 10:19 am |
    • J.R.

      My guess is your goal is to ridicule, demean, and get into arguments with non-believers. What a hypocrite, such a shame.

      May 16, 2012 at 10:42 am |
    • Mirror mirror

      What a surprise: another angry Christian who thinks the problem is everyone else. Christians are such haters.

      May 16, 2012 at 11:03 am |
    • HS

      Christians are like Nazi's.....the majority blaming the few for all the problems.

      May 16, 2012 at 2:41 pm |
    • HeavenSent

      HS as in the phony heavensent, I would never consider a Christian to be like nazis. Remember this truth ... everything you know is WRONG. Now that knowing what your problem is ...pick up Jesus' wisdom (the Bible) and learn His truth for yourself ... or, are you going to stay lazy listening to other miserable people that teach you falsehoods in life?

      May 16, 2012 at 3:57 pm |
    • Jack

      The only other person I have seen complain so much about name thievery is just sayin. I wonder...

      May 16, 2012 at 4:07 pm |
  10. MASSIVE BALLS

    Wow. The quote of the day is from someone that doesn't bother to concern itself with the basic rules of grammar. Thank you for this award-winning piece, CNN. I'll be sure to thoroughly overhand myself a full release in a public restroom later while I ponder this thought-provoking "quote of the day" from your favorite crackhead.

    May 16, 2012 at 7:04 am |
    • J.R.

      Sooooooo.. we talkin 60 watt light bulb?

      May 16, 2012 at 11:44 am |

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About this blog

The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.