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May 29th, 2012
04:51 AM ET

Belief Blog's Morning Speed Read for Tuesday, May 29

By Laura Koran, CNN

Here's the Belief Blog’s morning rundown of the top faith-angle stories from around the United States and around the world. Click the headlines for the full stories.

From the Blog:

CNN: Conservative leader agrees to visit home of married gay couple for first time
A conservative Christian leader who opposes same-sex marriage has agreed to the idea of dining at the home of a married gay couple, after saying he had never done so in an interview with CNN. Tony Perkins, who heads the Family Research Council in Washington, received the invitation after telling CNN’s Brooke Baldwin on Thursday that he’d never been to the home of a married same-sex couple.

CNN: No cardinal suspected of pope papers leak, Vatican insists
Pope Benedict XVI's spokesman denied Monday that a cardinal or a woman were being investigated alongside the pope's butler on suspicion of leaking confidential documents. "I firmly deny the reports of a cardinal being also involved in the investigations, as well as the reports of a woman allegedly also involved," the Rev. Federico Lombardi told CNN.

CNN: Pastor's comments about gays draw protesters
Hundreds of protesters gathered this weekend in Maiden, North Carolina, to voice their displeasure with a pastor's statement that gays and lesbians should be rounded up behind electric fences. Sheriff Coy Reid estimated between 1,500 and 2,000 protestors came to the Catawba County Justice Center for a peaceful protest on Sunday. He said only two citations for noise violations were issued and there were no arrests.

CNN: Pope's butler arrested over Vatican documents leak
Pope Benedict's butler has been arrested on suspicion of leaking confidential documents to an Italian journalist, the Vatican said Saturday. Paolo Gabriele, 46, was arrested Wednesday for illegal possession of confidential documents, found in his apartment in Vatican territory, the Vatican said in a statement issued three days later.

Belief on TV:

Enlightening Reads:

Reuters: Vatican says trust in Church hurt by scandal
The Vatican, engulfed in the worst crisis in Pope Benedict's papacy, on Monday denied Italian media reports that cardinals were suspects in an investigation into leaks of sensitive documents that led to the arrest of the pope's butler. But while denying the reports, which said the butler was merely a courier in a behind-the-scenes struggle for power in the Holy See, the Vatican acknowledged that the often sordid affair would test the faith of Catholics in their Church.

Religion News Service: Survey: Most Southern Baptist pastors favor black denominational leader
A majority of Southern Baptist pastors surveyed said they think it would be good for the nation’s largest Protestant denomination to have an African-American leader. Six in 10 of pastors responding to a LifeWay Research survey said they agree with the statement, “Without regard to any individual, I think it would be a good thing to have an African-American as president of the Southern Baptist Convention.”

Jewish Telegraphic Agency: Cannes cancels anti-Semitic film screening
The Cannes film festival screening of "The Anti-Semite," a film by a French comic with a history of anti-Semitism, was cancelled. The film by and starring Dieudonne M’Bala M’Bala, was produced by the Iranian Documentary and Experimental Film Center. It reportedly pokes fun at the Nazi concentration camp Auschwitz, where an estimated 1.5 million Jews were killed during the Holocaust, and features Dieudonne as a violent and alcoholic character dressed as a Nazi officer for a fancy dress party. Robert Faurisson, a convicted Holocaust denier, also makes a cameo appearance in the film. The film reportedly will be sold over the Internet.

Quote of the Day:

"Apologetics is very important. Without it many of our youngsters will fall away as soon as they get to university and we will not be able to win undergraduates for Christ at that critical stage of their lives. The media and universities are hotbeds of anti-Christian influence."

Church leader Michael Green said this past weekend when he opened Premier Christian Radio’s ‘Unbelievable Conference.’ The conference’s stated purpose is to provide evangelical Christians with information to defend their faith against skeptics. Read more here.

Opinion of the Day:

CNN: My Take: The 5 key American statements on war
Stephen Prothero, a Boston University religion scholar and author of "The American Bible: How Our Words Unite, Divide, and Define a Nation," explores five texts that have served as “scripture” of sorts in American public life, each of which contemplate the meaning and ends of war

Join the conversation…

Army chaplain Darren Turner, left, wound up quitting the Army for a spell after returning home from Iraq.

CNN: Battlefield chaplain’s war unfolded on many fronts
Darren Turner insisted on going to war, even though the Army usually reserves desk jobs at home for new chaplains like him. Turner was young and green, enthusiastic about taking God to the battlefield. The Army captain had learned that people in pain are often wide-open to inviting God into their lives. Jesus always ran to crises. Turner was going to do the same.

- CNN's Laura Koran

Filed under: Uncategorized

soundoff (17 Responses)
  1. Atheism is not healthy for children and other living things

    Prayer changes things

    June 1, 2012 at 8:07 pm |
  2. Robert Brown

    In reference to their quote of the day here, I agree that apologetics is very important. It is the method that some employ that concerns me. Sharing the good news, explaining our faith, and answering questions are important. Possibly even some respectful debate is helpful, but I don’t see how heated arguments will ever help. Belief is between you and God, not you and me.

    May 29, 2012 at 1:30 pm |
    • lunchbreaker

      I think a bigger problem is lack of knowledge of the otherside. You can not debate evolution if you have only been told dumbed down version Christians use to make it look stupid. "Fish crawling out of water" or "monkeys leaving the forest" only show your lack of understanding of evolution.

      May 29, 2012 at 5:14 pm |
    • Tung Chin Lao

      Apologetics are the lowest form of sc..um ever to exist. There is nothing as disgusting as an apologetic.

      May 29, 2012 at 5:21 pm |
  3. @CNNBeliefBlog

    @LauraKoran If you don't want people posting comments here, why not close the comments altogether?
    I see you have every article by you listed on your CV. Are you taking your job too personally? Better find another job.

    May 29, 2012 at 9:50 am |
  4. Atheism is not healthy for children and other living things

    I need some new knee pads, can anyone recommend a good brand?

    May 29, 2012 at 9:24 am |
    • ןןɐq ʎʞɔnq

      Stay off da knees. You'll have to go to yer favorite Theist Orthopod , ("Denise Hoit" MD). BTW god has a plan. Yer prayers keep screwing it all up.

      May 29, 2012 at 9:32 am |
    • lunchbreaker

      What up(sidedown) bucky ball? Read any good books on particle physics lately?

      May 29, 2012 at 9:50 am |
    • ןןɐq ʎʞɔnq

      Not really. Have you read Krauss' "A Universe From Nothing" ? Or watched the vid ?

      May 29, 2012 at 10:21 am |
    • lunchless in lexington

      what kind of lunch begins this early?

      May 29, 2012 at 10:22 am |
    • lunchbreaker

      The lunch break is more of a state of mind. I'm constantly "out to lunch". BUcky, have not read it, looks interesting though. I like the quote from the review: “Forget Jesus. The stars died so you could be born.”

      May 29, 2012 at 10:48 am |
  5. Laughin MAO

    From the Speed Read: Religion News Service: Survey: Most Southern Baptist pastors favor black denominational leader
    A majority of Southern Baptist pastors surveyed said they think it would be good for the nation’s largest Protestant denomination to have an African-American leader. Six in 10 of pastors responding to a LifeWay Research survey said they agree with the statement, “Without regard to any individual, I think it would be a good thing to have an African-American as president of the Southern Baptist Convention.”

    LOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOL!!!!!!

    "Look at dem liberals! Dey've gots themselves a black man doing stuff! We'd better get ourselfs a black man too! And it doesn't matter who he is as long as he's black!"

    LOLOLOLOLOL!

    May 29, 2012 at 6:42 am |
    • Bo

      I'm wondering if the reporter of this article may be twisting the facts to meet the his/her own opinion? I'd like to see the questions on the survey. However, questions on surveys can be so stated that the poll takers get the answers that are wanted.
      I remember once being sent a survey on some political issues, the questions asked on the survey were so contrived that it left me little recourse but to answer the question the way the pollsters wanted the question answered— if I answered honestly. I could answer: yes, no or no opinion. The problem was that I didn't completely agree with the questions, but I would not have wanted to disagreed with the questions and I certainly was opinionated. In the comments box I wrote: why don't you ask questions that can be honestly answered? I was so disgusted with the questions that I deliberately answered the questions in a contrary manner. It could be the same with this survey.
      I'm not a member of the Southern Baptist Church, but if I were, my opinion would be as to whether a black man should be elected to the presidency is: does he/she have the qualifications: that is the most important question. I belong to a predominately white church, we elect the best qualified for a particular office: we have many black leaders as well as Hispanic, Asian and Orientals.

      May 29, 2012 at 9:33 am |
    • lunchless in lexington

      Yeah, it was probably an innocent question. But that doesn't stop the media from making it sound like a hot job prospect for some empty black suit.

      May 29, 2012 at 10:25 am |
    • Bo

      @ lunchless in lexington: we may never know, not our problem anyway. I think the person who wrote the article was trying to stir up a racist issue: hope who ever it was fails.

      May 29, 2012 at 12:10 pm |
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About this blog

The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.