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Unbelieving preachers get help to 'come out' as open atheists
Minister-turned-atheist Jerry DeWitt speaks at ReasonFest in Kansas earlier this year.
June 13th, 2012
10:47 AM ET

Unbelieving preachers get help to 'come out' as open atheists

By Dan Merica, CNN

(CNN) - Jerry DeWitt entered the ministry when he was 17, launching a 25-year career as a Pentecostal preacher. He traveled all around his home state of Louisiana, preaching and ministering wherever he could.

All these years later, DeWitt, 42, is still on the road, and now takes his message all over the United States. But the nature of that message, along with his audience, has changed dramatically.

DeWitt is now an avowed atheist, and his audiences are made up of religious “nones,” the growing number of Americans who are atheist, agnostic, humanist or just plain disinterested in identifying with a religion. Today, DeWitt preaches a gospel of disbelief.

During his speeches, he talks about the process of leaving his preacher job. “If you don’t believe, then you will be like me - you’ll suddenly find yourself where you only have two choices,” DeWitt told a group in Johnson County, Kansas, earlier this year.

“You can either be honest that you don’t believe ... or you can pretend that you do,” he said. “Which is what so many people are doing and that is called faith.”

CNN’s Belief Blog: The faith angles behind the biggest stories

The transition from preacher to outspoken atheist has not been easy, and DeWitt is trying to smooth the way for other former believers. He is executive director of Recovering from Religion, an organization founded in 2009. Its slogan: “Thousands of organizations will help you get INTO religion, but we’re the only one helping you OUT.”

But a relatively new effort goes a step further than his own group by focusing on helping clergy in particular. In March 2011, a coalition that includes national groups such as American Atheists, the Freedom From Religion Foundation and the Richard Dawkins Foundation helped launch the Clergy Project, which is aimed at giving doubting and atheist preachers a community in which they can talk about their disbelief.

The program's ultimate goal: to help unbelieving preachers to “come out” in real life.

A safe online community

The Clergy Project’s key component is a private online community of active and former pastors discussing their conversions to lives of active disbelief. It lets congregational leaders come out anonymously, using an alias.

“It is important to focus on any group of people who are in a lot of pain,” said Linda LaScola, a co-founder of the Clergy Project. “That is why the Clergy Project exists, and it wouldn’t be growing if there wasn’t a need for it.”

When it launched last year, 52 clergy signed up for the online community, according to LaScola. A little more than a year later, 270 members are contributing to the message boards and connecting anonymously with one another.

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According to LaScola, the community includes some rabbis, imams and Catholic priests, but the majority are Protestants.

Members are barred from disclosing what is discussed on the boards, but DeWitt said it’s a blend of humor, advice and encouragement. DeWitt, who left his congregation just over a year ago, is considered the group’s first graduate.

“It gave me confidence to come out,” DeWitt said of the Clergy Project. “Knowing that I was not alone, that I was not a fluke, that I was not a freak of religious nature, but that this is a process; it most definitely gave me confidence and a purpose.”

Jerry DeWitt, far right, in his days as a minister.

DeWitt said that after connecting with people on the message boards, he realized he faced fewer obstacles than some others who are trying to leave the ministry. For example, DeWitt's wife and son already knew about his disbelief, while other questioning preachers had not yet told their families.

“I think it is important when you are struggling that you talk it out, that you write about it, that you find support,” said Teresa MacBain, acting executive director of the Clergy Project. “I still try to reach out to people who are questioning, who are doubting, clergy people and laypeople alike, and let them know they are not alone, that there are people who care.”

How does he feed his family?

For 44 years, MacBain was involved in some sort of ministry, from organizing worship music to being a senior pastor at a Methodist church in Florida.

At a recent American Atheists convention in North Bethesda, Maryland, MacBain first publicly announced her atheism, inspiring a roaring round of applause. American Atheists President David Silverman walked onstage and hugged her as MacBain began to cry.

"I was the one on the right track, and you were the ones that were going to burn in hell," MacBain told the crowd. "And I'm happy to say as I stand before you right now, I'm going to burn with you."

She said she sees plenty of growth potential in the Clergy Project. In the near future, she said she hopes to incorporate it as a nonprofit and begin raising funds for clergy who have decided to leave ministry jobs. She also wants to compile a group of employment recruiters to help former clergy find new jobs.

DeWitt, for his part, is struggling financially and said his house could be foreclosed on in the next few months.

For former preachers in search of work, their old skills can be hard to translate into new fields. What references do former ministers use if they have disappointed their congregants by leaving the pulpit?

MacBain said that some “formers,” as she calls ex-clergy, have left their hometowns for new jobs in fields ranging from radio to counseling.

To aid those transitions, Recovering from Religion has started the Clergy Professional Relief Fund, dedicated to “helping ex-ministers have a soft landing after coming out of the ministry.” Though little money has been collected so far, the hope is to help former ministers with job training and relocation expenses.

“Even if you have a degree in divinity, that doesn’t really mean anything,” DeWitt said. “That is the biggest fear that a nonbelieving clergy member has. How does he feed his family?”

Losing faith, losing friends

As a young fresh-faced minister, DeWitt was first confronted with his disbelief when he “became the person who got the burden of preaching about hell,” he said. “I really loved the people I preached to, I loved them like family. So imagine preaching that if you don’t do this, you are going to burn in hell. That wasn’t easy for me.”

After doubt about hell, DeWitt began to research other schools of thought about God and belief. He began to develop other doubts, about certain biblical translations and about healing.

“The next big issue was the failure of prayer,” DeWitt said. “People are passing away, whenever we pray for them to live. People aren’t getting jobs, whenever we pray for them to have jobs.

“The harder we tried to alleviate suffering within our church, it seemed like the worse things got,” he said. “It didn’t seem like prayer made any difference. It just continually crushed my heart.”

When DeWitt decided to come out as an atheist, some in his congregation appeared shocked.

“I was very heartbroken actually because his family means so much to me; they are actually like family,” said Natosha Davis, 30, who attended DeWitt’s church for four years. “I was very heartbroken for him that he had to go through that and struggle.”

Many congregants were less charitable. “Some people where he lives just totally turned their backs on him,” Davis said. “He was ostracized, excommunicated. It is like he has a disease, but he doesn’t.”

When DeWitt runs into people he used to preach to, he still averts his eyes. Going to the post office and to Walmart, he said, can be stressful because of the possibility of running into a former congregant.

“It is because places in which you were once admired now you are suddenly scorned or pitied,” DeWitt said, who admits not having many friends anymore. “It makes for an extremely uncomfortable life.”

And yet DeWitt said his atheist life mirrors his old religious one in some key respects. In some ways, he said, he’s still a minister.

“The origin of the symmetry is me, is my personality, my love for people, my love for ministering,” DeWitt said. “What I have always tried to do is to minster from where I personally am at.

“When I was 17, I preached what I believed was best for people at the time; when I was 20, it was a little different; at 25 it was different, too,” he said. “And now at 42, I am still the same guy preaching what I see is best for people.”

- Dan Merica

Filed under: Atheism • Christianity

soundoff (5,298 Responses)
  1. mcbutter

    What ? What?? Stupid criptic crap like that is why no one believes! And i think you stole that line from the marines!

    June 13, 2012 at 4:34 pm |
  2. Peikovianyi

    The generation that heard Jesus' voice died prior to 100 A.D. They wrote or dictated their eyewitness testimonies to a credulous flock of neighborhood pagans, who believed THE END was near. And so they waited. And civilizations rose and fell. And languages died out. And continents were discovered. And the internet was developed. And nothing predicted in Matthew 24:34 has since been fulfilled in its entirety, and the world goes on.

    June 13, 2012 at 4:34 pm |
    • Bootyfunk

      all cult leaders make such claims - jesus was no different.

      June 13, 2012 at 4:35 pm |
    • Peikovianyi

      This is an election year. Candidates enter caucuses and primaries. They do and say what candidates must do and say. No different when campaigning for God's Annointed. No doubt Theudas and Judas of Galilee (Judas of Gamala) also did some miracle-working acts before they were executed.

      June 13, 2012 at 4:39 pm |
    • Russ

      @ Peikovianyi: it's easier to follow a conversation if you continue to respond to the same thread.

      Read the rest of Matthew. It's clear the author intended for his audience to understand Jesus' prophecy came true. You don't have to believe it to understand the author's intent (Mt.27:51-53).

      And, even if you still disagree, it gives much more credence to your argument not to exaggerate. Jesus opening line of the chapter is that 'all these stones will be thrown down' – which is exactly what happened in AD 70 when Rome destroyed the temple. Even if you are an atheist who believes Matthew was written by a later author, you can see the intent of the prophecy on Jesus' lips.

      Point being: in context, even if just as a piece of literature, Matthew shows the fulfillment of Jesus' prophecy (Mt.24:34) within his own writing (Mt.27-28). Or for a more cynical take: he is re-narrating history after the fact (about the events of AD 70). Either way, you've missed the literary intent of the statement.

      June 13, 2012 at 4:41 pm |
    • Peikovianyi

      Clearly in the passage prior to Matthew 24:34 the Book of Matthew descibes apocalyptic struggles that did not occur prior to 100 A.D. These events have not happened in the two millenia since. If literal, it's a prophecy failure, but if we choose to interpret all sacred literature as symbolic, then okay, it's a game of jokers are wild, and for all you know I'm god incarnate.

      June 13, 2012 at 4:49 pm |
    • Answer

      Another day goes on and yet another mouth piece spewing the end times. Good times and good laughter.

      June 13, 2012 at 4:54 pm |
  3. halfbakedlunatic

    'god' is an idiotic idea promoted by immoral people to control and pacify the weak minded. I applaud those who finally open their eyes to the truth!

    June 13, 2012 at 4:34 pm |
    • Semper Solicium Fiderre

      Whenever the belief of something, the belief of nothing, or any combination of beliefs come in contact with another each party states with head strong determination that they are right, when there is not any support to either side. It is this insistence that someone has to be right when two opposing cases are presented that cause conflict. Easy answer let others, ALL OTHERS believe as they want, because maybe their opinion is right. Your opinion might say they are wrong but what proof do you have? There really is no proof when it comes to religion ether way.

      June 13, 2012 at 5:10 pm |
  4. Atheist Hunter

    http://www.newgeology.us/presentation32.html

    June 13, 2012 at 4:33 pm |
  5. Insert screen name here

    Seriously, they allow "Booty Funk" as a screen name? Can you really post a serious comment with a screen name like that?

    June 13, 2012 at 4:32 pm |
    • Bootyfunk

      serious as a heart attack, sucka!

      June 13, 2012 at 4:34 pm |
    • Jean Malloy

      Given that often comments "stink", BF may be a proper screen-name for many who post comments. 😀

      June 13, 2012 at 4:36 pm |
    • Bootyfunk

      they can only imitate. 🙂

      June 13, 2012 at 4:38 pm |
  6. Atheists get out

    We need to round up all atheists and give them a choice to convert or get out!

    June 13, 2012 at 4:32 pm |
    • William Demuth

      You wont be the first Christian that has tried.

      We nailed your bogus God up and left him to die, and I have no issues doing it again, to either him, or you.

      Lets see how tough you talk when you are crucified.

      June 13, 2012 at 4:35 pm |
    • David

      Why can't we have a Don't Ask, Don't Tell for Christians?

      June 13, 2012 at 4:38 pm |
    • Loathstheright

      We need to round of Christians and tell them to quit believing in faerie tales or get out.

      June 13, 2012 at 4:39 pm |
    • Atheists get out

      "mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord ...."

      June 13, 2012 at 4:39 pm |
    • Answer

      The weak minded people want to use force on the strong minded.. that will be a slaughter fest. The world over would crush every religion if force was used. Verily if you religious fools want to start it – let's begin.

      June 13, 2012 at 4:41 pm |
    • mrTestosteroni

      I have a better idea. Let's round up all the Christians and teach them to STFU.

      June 13, 2012 at 4:43 pm |
    • PulTab

      Stand nose to nose with me and see who gets out!

      June 13, 2012 at 4:46 pm |
    • just sayin

      Loathstheright

      We need to round of Christians and tell them to quit believing in faerie tales or get out.
      --–

      Nah we need to bring back the lions. Give them the opportunity to express the power of prayer before a lion. Let us see if their God will spare them? Let the ground flow red with the power of their God. Let us not forget to include the Muslims as well. Call it Faith Games.

      June 13, 2012 at 4:47 pm |
    • sam stone

      come and get us, big mouth

      June 13, 2012 at 4:55 pm |
    • just sayin

      The day they get rid of the non-believers is the day we start down the path of the Middle East.

      June 13, 2012 at 5:05 pm |
    • just sayin

      However Christianity is already dying from within. I suspect at some point all we will have left is slobbering drippy droolie slack jawed people in the South holding on FOR GOD! The youth are getting smarter earlier and earlier with each generation.

      June 13, 2012 at 5:07 pm |
  7. blahblahblah

    In a way this movement is a blessing. There will just be fewer nominal "Christians," or people who profess Christ but don't really believe in Him. In other words, there will be fewer surprises when Jesus says, "I never knew you; depart from me, you workers of lawlessness." People will get what they've wanted their whole lives: complete separation from God.

    June 13, 2012 at 4:32 pm |
    • Clara

      Why would Christians have children if life is a test and if you fail it you will spend eternity in Hell? By having children, you are rolling the dice. Your child or all of your children could end up in Hell and you are partially to blame.

      June 13, 2012 at 4:39 pm |
  8. Loathstheright

    Reason set in and they faced the reality that there never was a god and never will be.

    June 13, 2012 at 4:32 pm |
  9. Adam DeRidder

    Editor / Dan Merica : Do you have a link to the "Clergy Professional Relief Fund" to include in the article?

    Thanks for publishing this article. Surprising to see in the 'religion' section of cnn.com, but well-written, balanced and interesting. (and of course controversial – sure to generate plenty of hot-headed comments from both sides as people try to argue a non-logic based topic with logic or more commonly with very little logic and an abundance of emotion).

    June 13, 2012 at 4:30 pm |
  10. Roy

    it is just interesting to see how western world is turning into Atheism. churches spend significant amount of money and time in converting Asians and on other side they are loosing their own people. Christianity is just killing itself.

    June 13, 2012 at 4:29 pm |
    • Sheryl

      We've had a good look at the insanity of religion in the Middle East in the past 10 years. We are now reviewing the silliness of our own religion.

      June 13, 2012 at 4:42 pm |
    • sam stone

      Good. A justifiabe suicide if there ever was one

      June 13, 2012 at 4:57 pm |
  11. JJinCVCA

    For millennia, religious types have wanted people to blieve that god created humanity in his/her image, when in reality, people created god in the image of humanity, wraught with all of humanity's hopes, dreams, fears, and unabashed hatred.

    June 13, 2012 at 4:29 pm |
    • Teddy

      Go to church and learn how to beat down gay people. It's the Christian way.

      June 13, 2012 at 4:44 pm |
  12. Peikovianyi

    Matthew 24:34 "Verily I say unto you, This generation shall not pass, till all these things be fulfilled." Nice try. Really nice try.

    June 13, 2012 at 4:28 pm |
    • Bootyfunk

      yeah, jesus sure was FAIL at prophesying.

      June 13, 2012 at 4:30 pm |
    • Russ

      @ Peikovianyi: so, by your sarcasm, it sounds like you apply Mt.24:34 to the second coming of Christ?
      but Jesus is talking about the destruction of the temple...
      which LITERALLY happened in AD 70 (within a generation)...
      or FIGURATIVELY happened on the cross around AD 30 (within a 3 years of Jesus saying these things, talking about his own body as the temple).

      June 13, 2012 at 4:32 pm |
  13. Henry

    Everybody believes in something...I believe I'll have another beer.

    June 13, 2012 at 4:28 pm |
    • Darw1n

      I would like to join your congregation

      June 13, 2012 at 4:29 pm |
    • Adam DeRidder

      Right on, brother. Let us worship at the church of the Frothy Head.

      June 13, 2012 at 4:32 pm |
    • Canadian Bacon

      Frothy head is better than no head at all!!

      June 13, 2012 at 5:11 pm |
  14. Clinton

    What troubles me is how people with no understanding of the Universe feel that they must attack anyone who believes they do understand it. I'm a Christian, I believe in God. I don't feel the need to run around to Atheists, Jews, Hindus, Muslims, or believers of any other faith and attack that which they believe. Atheists do, Atheists in this very blog, they get very frustrated when i point out how hypocritical it is to attack religion when what they believe in is just as crazy sounding to me as my religion is to them. All i ask for is respect for my religion and I certainly will respect others. Instead, I get insulted by the Atheist crowd because well... Insecurity. People who are insecure in their beliefs feel the need to try and force others to believe what they do... they try to attack others to try and convince themselves that at least the people they're attacking aren't right.... Atheists are often... VERY insecure. I don't know why, perhaps they just don't realize that nobody cares what they believe. We live in a country where everybody can believe in what they want to... I'm not forcing my beliefs on you and i'd appreciate you not attacking my beliefs. How about that?

    June 13, 2012 at 4:27 pm |
    • Ryan

      Christianity is categorized as an evangelical religion. I'm sure you know what that is, it's the act of spreading "the word" to non-believers in hopes of converting them, Islam is the same way. You don't attack anyone you just tell them that what they believe in is wrong and what you believe in is right. Thats what this guy is doing but it takes more guts for him because he is outnumbered by freaks like you, and yeah you can call it an attack for calling you a freak. I have no problem with that.

      June 13, 2012 at 4:30 pm |
    • Janna

      It is elitist to suggest that your religion gives you a full understanding of the universe. Religous folk have some HUGE heads.

      June 13, 2012 at 4:31 pm |
    • Ryan

      nobody is attacking your beliefs, they're just saying they have different beliefs. How can you not see that is no different than an evangelical chrisitan, christ calls for you to do so. Study up on your own religion pal.

      June 13, 2012 at 4:32 pm |
    • Darw1n

      Right on Ryan

      June 13, 2012 at 4:32 pm |
    • William Demuth

      Clinton you are a liar.

      The nature of your cult REQUIRES you to recruit.

      Like any other dealer of poisons to our children, we are merely putting you on warning.

      Mess with our kids, and we carve you up. Its the harsh reality of street justice.

      June 13, 2012 at 4:32 pm |
    • leonid7

      Oh i beg to differ. The Christian lobby since the 80's has been massive, is definitely reflected in policy making. There is no atheist equivalent.

      June 13, 2012 at 4:33 pm |
    • Clinton

      Ryan, I'm here telling you i don't nor have i ever tried to convert somebody to my religion. I personally don't even know anybody in my church that has ever gone to people that don't believe and told them they're wrong and they should believe what we do... I don't know who you speak of, I am not one of them obviously, but my beliefs are still attacked by Atheists, my point is, Atheists have no respect for people that believe differently than they do. On the whole, Atheists attack everybody who isn't them, which is funny because they claim that's what religion does... Hypocrisy at it's finest, as far as you calling me a freak... how bout, who gives a damn what you think of me, you're obviously an idiot anyways.

      June 13, 2012 at 4:34 pm |
    • Loathstheright

      Well, I guess it is you attacking others because you are the insecure one.

      June 13, 2012 at 4:37 pm |
    • Jean Malloy

      Clifton–Well stated.

      June 13, 2012 at 4:39 pm |
    • Answer

      @Clinton

      How does it feel to be the ones on the burning end? I don't feel sorry for you twits.

      June 13, 2012 at 4:44 pm |
    • Adam DeRidder

      Good for you, Clinton. Wish there were more people on both sides that were able to live with people who were different without believing them to be stupid or freaks (BTW – you are not a freak – a freak is a minority population who behaves far outside of acceptable standards for their society – Christians in the US are by definition not freaks since there are so many. Snake handlers are probably candidates – odd behavior compared to the rest of society.)

      I agree: many atheists are as rabid or moreso than many religious folks. Which is odd – they claim to be dedicated to pure reason, but are extremely emotional.

      June 13, 2012 at 4:46 pm |
    • Answer

      @Adam DeRidder

      I love how your kind can never handle your own ridicule and labelling that you pass off onto others. You're fine as long as you aren't being labelled but will whine at every opportunity that you are the one's being persecuted. So hilarious.

      June 13, 2012 at 4:52 pm |
    • Dyanna

      You seem to be categorizing all atheists into one big group of people spreading their belief (or non belief) and trying to convince the religious to convert. I'm pretty sure that you don't hear from 99% of the atheists you meet on a day to day. I would be willing to bet that this article is one of the few encounters you've had with atheism at all. You really shouldn't speak in absolutes. I can't recall a single instance where an atheist came up to me and handed me a pamphlet telling me there is no heaven. You know how many Christians have handed me pamphlet to let me know I'm going to hell? Or how many have literally knocked on my door to tell me all about their God? Too many.

      June 13, 2012 at 4:53 pm |
    • n473b

      As long as you "Hate the sin, love the sinner". I will hate the belief, love the believer.

      June 13, 2012 at 4:54 pm |
    • Answer

      @Dyanna

      Don't forget that also with every pizza flyer that comes under the door is a flyer to convert you to the nearest doctrineof that neighbourhood.

      June 13, 2012 at 4:56 pm |
    • Just Me

      I totally understand where you're coming from. I'm a Christian (most times) and Spiritualist, and never attack anyone else's believes for or against a Deity, but Non-Believers can be the rudest, harshest critics, always screaming and demanding proof that a God exist. Although I feel like Job these days, that God andr my Guardian Angel have deserted by rear-end, but deep down, I know He exists b/c of some prayers answered (many more prayers not answered) and His visions and whispers to me of things to come and to prepare myself.

      My response to Non-Believers is http://www.near-death.com

      June 13, 2012 at 5:10 pm |
  15. Bootyfunk

    i bet every christian here had a hissy fit when he/she saw this article this morning.

    hahaha!

    June 13, 2012 at 4:27 pm |
    • Clinton

      I'm a Christian and it doesn't bother me, the guy can do whatever he wants in his life. I'm not concerned with the choices he makes in his life. My question is, why did you join the blog? Looking at your posts, it appears you're here mostly to bash other people's beliefs. It's funny since that's a two-way street and i could bash any belief i want to... the reason i don't is, there's no point, so what i wonder is, what do you get out of it?

      June 13, 2012 at 4:29 pm |
    • Bootyfunk

      if you look at my posts, i am 50-50. sometimes i do like to make jokes. i have a sense of humor, what can i say? but i also make very serious points. i love having a rational discussion without ad hominem attacks. but you gotta look at what the christians say too. i've been told i should die, i'm going to hell, i'll burn forever, to kill myself - and all by christians. so it goes both ways.

      have a serious question for me? i'd love to hear it.

      June 13, 2012 at 4:33 pm |
    • Axel

      Thank goodness the gay community grew a backbone in the last 30 years and have stood up to Christianity. Christians want to throw stones at the gay community for generations then cry foul when the feces is thrown right back at them.

      June 13, 2012 at 4:33 pm |
    • Fred Evil

      Retribution for the decades of being 'pitied' and 'scorned.'

      You are the extreme exception, and what sounds like a true Christian, as opposed to 'xtians' who wear their religion on their sleeve, are always trying to sell what they reportedly believe, and pitying and scorning others who believe differently than they do.

      June 13, 2012 at 4:39 pm |
    • wisdom4u2

      Why would you think Christians had 'hissy fits' when they read this article? Unlike the atheists, you can't shake a real 'believers' faith... for we walk by faith and not by sight. Duhhh

      June 13, 2012 at 4:39 pm |
    • Rocketdude

      No, you're wrong...I'm a Christian and I did not have a "hissy fit." In fact, I think this is a sad story.

      June 13, 2012 at 4:49 pm |
  16. Ryan

    In 15 years evolution will be clearly visible and easy for even the smallest of minds to understand. It is how we came about and the phoney religion fables which have similiarities throughout all religions will be fairy tales of the past. Christianity has been shoved down my throat since day one and I'm blessed to have a mind to think on my own and make my own decisions based on research and what I know to be true in this life, not based on faith and scare tactics.

    June 13, 2012 at 4:25 pm |
    • Bootyfunk

      it's clearly visible now, there are mountains of evidence. the public just doesn't educate itself on the facts. and the fundies block it from being taught in our educational system every chance they get. it'll happen. it's gaining speed. the facts are there. the truth comes out eventually. one of the most beautiful things about science is it reveals the world around us.

      June 13, 2012 at 4:29 pm |
    • RyanR

      Yes, your incredible, earth-shattering, super-computer level intelligence that can pierce through the cosmos and generate the power equivalent of a 1 million megaton bomb can see it all. You unlock the answer to the Universe's deepest contemplations with just your mind. lol, get outta here. Next...

      June 13, 2012 at 4:54 pm |
    • Rocketdude

      Please provide your evidence...I've yet to see any scientific evidence toward proving evolution that actually sticks. Why 15 years? Scientists have been trying to prove it for hundreds of years, you really think 15 more is going to do the trick? I'm curious to your thoughts on this article http://creation.com/age-of-the-earth

      June 13, 2012 at 4:56 pm |
  17. HeavenSent

    Oh how you unbelievers like to stroke your egos with your foolishness. You hate my words and my wisdom.

    Amen.

    June 13, 2012 at 4:24 pm |
    • Peikovianyi

      Tiest thou thy wrists to thine ankles and await his coming.

      June 13, 2012 at 4:26 pm |
    • cedar rapids

      wisdom? darn, i must have missed those posts, where can i find them?

      June 13, 2012 at 4:27 pm |
    • truth hurts

      In your butt hole

      June 13, 2012 at 4:27 pm |
    • Excitizen

      Thou Shall NOT Judge – you're going to he.ll according to your religion 🙂

      June 13, 2012 at 4:27 pm |
    • William Demuth

      Nah, Its you we hate.

      Stone age idiot filling children with terror.

      You guys have burned us for years, maybe it's time we return the favor.

      Roast you on your own altar of lies and psychosis

      June 13, 2012 at 4:29 pm |
    • QS

      I don't hate your words, I simply mock them because they are extremely far removed from being wise.

      June 13, 2012 at 4:35 pm |
    • Answer

      Like it or not .. religion is for the gullible.

      HeavenSent keep clinging.. no one cares that you cling. In vain or in death it doesn't matter to us atheists. You'll still be dead.

      June 13, 2012 at 4:36 pm |
    • Ma'at

      Ammit is going to devour you after death HeavenSent because your heart is heavier than a feather.

      Get right with Ra.... or else!!!

      June 13, 2012 at 4:38 pm |
    • Fred Evil

      If your words had any wisdom, they would not be so reviled.
      Please, elaborate on what wisdom has been 'hated.'

      June 13, 2012 at 4:40 pm |
    • Madtown

      You hate my words and my wisdom.
      ------
      Nah, no hate here. Your words give us something to laugh at. Your wisdom? I've yet to see any of that from you, so I have no comment.

      June 13, 2012 at 5:13 pm |
  18. Peikovianyi

    Crucifixus est Dei Filius, non pudet, quia pudendum est; et mortuus est Dei Filius, prorsus credibile est, quia ineptum est; et sepultus resurrexit, certum est, quia impossibile. "The Son of God was crucified: there is no shame, because it is shameful. And the Son of God died: it is wholly credible, because it is unsuitable. And, buried, He rose again: it is certain, because impossible." – Tertullian (c. 160 – c. 225 AD). Oh, puh-leeze. Is that all it takes to be a Church Father, a dose of lunacy?

    June 13, 2012 at 4:21 pm |
  19. farty fart

    dudes a poll smoker

    June 13, 2012 at 4:21 pm |
    • What?

      So he smokes 'a sampling or collection of opinions on a subject, taken from either a selected or a random group of persons, as for the purpose of analysis?'

      June 13, 2012 at 4:31 pm |
  20. Believer

    Scripture says, there those who are called that will be deceived. Many are called but few are chosen. "Not all that says, Lord, Lord will enter the kingdom of God." Blessed are those who are chosen to be God's people!

    June 13, 2012 at 4:20 pm |
    • Brian

      Scripture says a lot of nonsense.

      June 13, 2012 at 4:28 pm |
    • darkstar

      Zeus would be proud of you standing up for him like that!

      June 13, 2012 at 4:32 pm |
    • mrTestosteroni

      You made that up yourself didn't you?

      June 13, 2012 at 4:38 pm |
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About this blog

The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.