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Unbelieving preachers get help to 'come out' as open atheists
Minister-turned-atheist Jerry DeWitt speaks at ReasonFest in Kansas earlier this year.
June 13th, 2012
10:47 AM ET

Unbelieving preachers get help to 'come out' as open atheists

By Dan Merica, CNN

(CNN) - Jerry DeWitt entered the ministry when he was 17, launching a 25-year career as a Pentecostal preacher. He traveled all around his home state of Louisiana, preaching and ministering wherever he could.

All these years later, DeWitt, 42, is still on the road, and now takes his message all over the United States. But the nature of that message, along with his audience, has changed dramatically.

DeWitt is now an avowed atheist, and his audiences are made up of religious “nones,” the growing number of Americans who are atheist, agnostic, humanist or just plain disinterested in identifying with a religion. Today, DeWitt preaches a gospel of disbelief.

During his speeches, he talks about the process of leaving his preacher job. “If you don’t believe, then you will be like me - you’ll suddenly find yourself where you only have two choices,” DeWitt told a group in Johnson County, Kansas, earlier this year.

“You can either be honest that you don’t believe ... or you can pretend that you do,” he said. “Which is what so many people are doing and that is called faith.”

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The transition from preacher to outspoken atheist has not been easy, and DeWitt is trying to smooth the way for other former believers. He is executive director of Recovering from Religion, an organization founded in 2009. Its slogan: “Thousands of organizations will help you get INTO religion, but we’re the only one helping you OUT.”

But a relatively new effort goes a step further than his own group by focusing on helping clergy in particular. In March 2011, a coalition that includes national groups such as American Atheists, the Freedom From Religion Foundation and the Richard Dawkins Foundation helped launch the Clergy Project, which is aimed at giving doubting and atheist preachers a community in which they can talk about their disbelief.

The program's ultimate goal: to help unbelieving preachers to “come out” in real life.

A safe online community

The Clergy Project’s key component is a private online community of active and former pastors discussing their conversions to lives of active disbelief. It lets congregational leaders come out anonymously, using an alias.

“It is important to focus on any group of people who are in a lot of pain,” said Linda LaScola, a co-founder of the Clergy Project. “That is why the Clergy Project exists, and it wouldn’t be growing if there wasn’t a need for it.”

When it launched last year, 52 clergy signed up for the online community, according to LaScola. A little more than a year later, 270 members are contributing to the message boards and connecting anonymously with one another.

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According to LaScola, the community includes some rabbis, imams and Catholic priests, but the majority are Protestants.

Members are barred from disclosing what is discussed on the boards, but DeWitt said it’s a blend of humor, advice and encouragement. DeWitt, who left his congregation just over a year ago, is considered the group’s first graduate.

“It gave me confidence to come out,” DeWitt said of the Clergy Project. “Knowing that I was not alone, that I was not a fluke, that I was not a freak of religious nature, but that this is a process; it most definitely gave me confidence and a purpose.”

Jerry DeWitt, far right, in his days as a minister.

DeWitt said that after connecting with people on the message boards, he realized he faced fewer obstacles than some others who are trying to leave the ministry. For example, DeWitt's wife and son already knew about his disbelief, while other questioning preachers had not yet told their families.

“I think it is important when you are struggling that you talk it out, that you write about it, that you find support,” said Teresa MacBain, acting executive director of the Clergy Project. “I still try to reach out to people who are questioning, who are doubting, clergy people and laypeople alike, and let them know they are not alone, that there are people who care.”

How does he feed his family?

For 44 years, MacBain was involved in some sort of ministry, from organizing worship music to being a senior pastor at a Methodist church in Florida.

At a recent American Atheists convention in North Bethesda, Maryland, MacBain first publicly announced her atheism, inspiring a roaring round of applause. American Atheists President David Silverman walked onstage and hugged her as MacBain began to cry.

"I was the one on the right track, and you were the ones that were going to burn in hell," MacBain told the crowd. "And I'm happy to say as I stand before you right now, I'm going to burn with you."

She said she sees plenty of growth potential in the Clergy Project. In the near future, she said she hopes to incorporate it as a nonprofit and begin raising funds for clergy who have decided to leave ministry jobs. She also wants to compile a group of employment recruiters to help former clergy find new jobs.

DeWitt, for his part, is struggling financially and said his house could be foreclosed on in the next few months.

For former preachers in search of work, their old skills can be hard to translate into new fields. What references do former ministers use if they have disappointed their congregants by leaving the pulpit?

MacBain said that some “formers,” as she calls ex-clergy, have left their hometowns for new jobs in fields ranging from radio to counseling.

To aid those transitions, Recovering from Religion has started the Clergy Professional Relief Fund, dedicated to “helping ex-ministers have a soft landing after coming out of the ministry.” Though little money has been collected so far, the hope is to help former ministers with job training and relocation expenses.

“Even if you have a degree in divinity, that doesn’t really mean anything,” DeWitt said. “That is the biggest fear that a nonbelieving clergy member has. How does he feed his family?”

Losing faith, losing friends

As a young fresh-faced minister, DeWitt was first confronted with his disbelief when he “became the person who got the burden of preaching about hell,” he said. “I really loved the people I preached to, I loved them like family. So imagine preaching that if you don’t do this, you are going to burn in hell. That wasn’t easy for me.”

After doubt about hell, DeWitt began to research other schools of thought about God and belief. He began to develop other doubts, about certain biblical translations and about healing.

“The next big issue was the failure of prayer,” DeWitt said. “People are passing away, whenever we pray for them to live. People aren’t getting jobs, whenever we pray for them to have jobs.

“The harder we tried to alleviate suffering within our church, it seemed like the worse things got,” he said. “It didn’t seem like prayer made any difference. It just continually crushed my heart.”

When DeWitt decided to come out as an atheist, some in his congregation appeared shocked.

“I was very heartbroken actually because his family means so much to me; they are actually like family,” said Natosha Davis, 30, who attended DeWitt’s church for four years. “I was very heartbroken for him that he had to go through that and struggle.”

Many congregants were less charitable. “Some people where he lives just totally turned their backs on him,” Davis said. “He was ostracized, excommunicated. It is like he has a disease, but he doesn’t.”

When DeWitt runs into people he used to preach to, he still averts his eyes. Going to the post office and to Walmart, he said, can be stressful because of the possibility of running into a former congregant.

“It is because places in which you were once admired now you are suddenly scorned or pitied,” DeWitt said, who admits not having many friends anymore. “It makes for an extremely uncomfortable life.”

And yet DeWitt said his atheist life mirrors his old religious one in some key respects. In some ways, he said, he’s still a minister.

“The origin of the symmetry is me, is my personality, my love for people, my love for ministering,” DeWitt said. “What I have always tried to do is to minster from where I personally am at.

“When I was 17, I preached what I believed was best for people at the time; when I was 20, it was a little different; at 25 it was different, too,” he said. “And now at 42, I am still the same guy preaching what I see is best for people.”

- Dan Merica

Filed under: Atheism • Christianity

soundoff (5,298 Responses)
  1. akismet-cdd717537cb1e97907e8354bd2681436

    News flash: he's always been an atheist. Just took him 25 years to "come out". Too bad this isn't as revolutionary as CNN thought it would be- the Bible actually talks about people like him in Jude, Peter, Matthew, Mark, Luke, John, Hebrews...nothing new to see here, back to your work ladies and gentlemen

    June 13, 2012 at 2:09 pm |
    • Humanist11

      It seems to me he is a man of high personal integrity. I respect people who are true to themselves even if they do not believe what I believe. Your answer is the standard evangelical response to people who change their minds and simply does not make sense. Why would he choose to spend over 20 years preaching the word of god if he did not believe it to begin with? He did believe it with all of his heart and proved it every day. He is an intelligent person (just like you I bet) and he was able to see the obvious fallacies in the bible and his religion. He chose to maintain his personal integrity and I respect that of anybody.

      June 13, 2012 at 2:50 pm |
  2. zap

    This guy is dangerous and anti-establishment. Seems to me to be a "thinker". Horrors. Actually, one of the best attempts for CNN to drag themselves out of the cellar. More of this, please. It will boost yer hits.

    June 13, 2012 at 2:08 pm |
  3. Scott Petersen

    I'm glad this man has the integrity to voice that he is no longer a believer. I hope that he applies the same criteria to his new set of beliefs as he did to his Christian faith. If he does, he'll see the inherent weakness of atheism.

    June 13, 2012 at 2:07 pm |
    • Breck

      And what in your opinion is the inherent weakness of being an athiest?

      June 13, 2012 at 2:16 pm |
    • WhatWhatWhat?

      Spoken like a true religious delusionist, so deluded that you believe that even logic and reason will point you back to Jebus. Wow, that's really bad. You ought to go see a doctor and have that looked at.

      June 13, 2012 at 2:20 pm |
    • mickey1313

      There is only weakness in Faith without reason. Belief in god has no reason what do ever. It is the easy way out

      June 13, 2012 at 2:20 pm |
    • Humanist11

      Scott,

      If you are so sure about your faith then you would probably encourage questions that challenge it. It would serve to strengthen your belief in Jesus Christ. If this is true, google Skeptic Annotated Bible and do some reading and see how you can debunk what they have pointed out in the bible. If you are right about your god then it should not be a problem.

      An intelligent, educated person would not say atheism has inherent weakness compared to religion. There is no evidence what so ever to support the existence of a supernatural being, while there is quite a bit to support the opposite. Simple logic really.

      June 13, 2012 at 3:04 pm |
  4. popseal

    People that "try the ministry" as a career are a sad lot. Ignorant of the Gospel, following sentimentalism and the priorities of the unrepentant, they lead many into the ditch. Faith in Christ is to take Him at His word. The result is a spiritual regeneration that lifts one out of the mud. " It's a narrow path and few there are that find it....Wide is the path to ruin and many go down it." said Jesus.

    June 13, 2012 at 2:07 pm |
    • Gecul

      Of course the quote is totally hearsay. There is no record of anyone who actually heard jc speak. He might well have been describing the path through the woods to his favorite bordello!

      June 13, 2012 at 2:15 pm |
    • Bayousara

      NO ONE knows what Jesus said. I have studied the history of the days just following Jesus' supposed death, and nothing was coherent or put together. There have been any bibles compiled over centuries and they have changed and changed depending on what the compiler wanted expressed. We all need to take care of Earth, live the best we can, let others live, and be the humans that we are. We were all born and we will all die. All the rest is fluff.

      June 13, 2012 at 2:15 pm |
    • Which God??

      Jebus never said anything. It was made up for this character.

      June 13, 2012 at 2:54 pm |
    • Recovering From Religion

      Devoting 25 years of your life as a full time minister isn't "giving it a try" LOL

      June 14, 2012 at 12:29 am |
  5. WhatWhatWhat?

    Let's face it, religion is a self-serving mental delusion, a medical illness that causes good people to act like complete ignoramuses.

    June 13, 2012 at 2:06 pm |
    • popseal

      43 years ago I was an angry drunk who was told by friends that he needed God in his life. After a ten month long argument I realized they were right. Faith in Christ brought about a spiritual regeneration that has changed my anger into tolerance. As I stumble foirward, things take on higher purposes than my immediate disappointmnets. At 67 years old, I can only thank God for His grace and mercy to me, and pray that others might know the same.

      June 13, 2012 at 2:12 pm |
    • WhatWhatWhat?

      So you needed to believe in a fairy tale so you could get through some hard times, there you go. It's a mental delusion no matter how you doll it up there, pops. Someone should have straightened you out earlier and you wouldn't have wasted so much of your life on a delusion, sorry.

      June 13, 2012 at 2:24 pm |
    • Stentor

      popseal, that angry drunk is still in there, you just chose to deal with him in a different way. A rational person might choose to get therapy to find out why he's so angry, and resorting to alcohol to self-medicate away his problems. Do you honestly think that "God" is going to give you the answers? No, because it usually takes observations from outside yourself to come to grips with your behaviors & the reasons behind it, that's called enlightenment. When you write a paper, do you proofread it yourself, or do you hand it off to someone else? Most likely someone else will be able to catch your mistakes more easily than you will because you're too close to the subject matter. The same thing applies to problems, & their motivations. Religion's just a crutch to avoid problems. That's why we have so many pedophile priests. Deal with your problems, & take responsibility for them, don't turn to some mythological creature in the sky to help you. Inadvertently true religious saying, "God helps those who help themselves." Mostly because then it's you who did it, not god, he didn't do bupkiss.

      June 13, 2012 at 4:34 pm |
  6. Alex

    The things of the world is common to all. All humans are born equal. Being a Christian will not change anything. Whoever or whatsoever you are. Death, suffering, pain, rejection.....But those who are in Christ have salvation,comfort and everlasting life. Believe and see the difference. Dewitt is surely a nitwit as I can see.

    June 13, 2012 at 2:06 pm |
    • WhatWhatWhat?

      It's called "delusion", and you can't see it because it's a disease and you have it.

      June 13, 2012 at 2:09 pm |
    • A. Lincoln

      So anyone that disagrees with you gets called a name? Wow, what a good Christian YOU are.

      June 13, 2012 at 2:11 pm |
    • limbodog

      That's something I never understood about religion. How do you choose to believe. Seems to me you either do believe or you do not believe. You can choose to act as though you believe, and go through the motions, but what's the point to that?

      June 13, 2012 at 2:26 pm |
    • Which God??

      Pot calling kettle...

      June 13, 2012 at 2:55 pm |
  7. Dev

    What has changed? He still lies for money. Big deal!

    June 13, 2012 at 2:05 pm |
    • A. Lincoln

      Sorry, but your statement implies that one or the other must be true and you don't know which either. Brilliant. Think before you open your pie hole, man.

      June 13, 2012 at 2:13 pm |
  8. Paul Robson

    Bravo Maria!

    The best part about believing is that it enables you to be your higher self.

    June 13, 2012 at 2:05 pm |
    • Tom, Tom, the Piper's Son

      Where is the evidence that believers are the only people who have found "higher selves"? And where the proof that they are more "moral" than non-believers?

      June 13, 2012 at 2:07 pm |
    • ed galbraith

      I should tell you that I am 78. I've been a non-believer for years and the kindest and most thoughtful people I know are non-believers. They have actually thought, seriously, about "religion"...and rejected it. Now THAT'S religion.

      June 13, 2012 at 2:21 pm |
    • Charlie W

      DeWitt once believed in God. Now he believes only himself. Now...who does he turn to when one day he doesn't believe in himself anymore? Christians believe that God chooses you, not that you choose God. And the God of the Holy Bible doesn't force himself on you, you have a choice to answer the call or not. Further proof of a loving God!

      June 13, 2012 at 2:24 pm |
    • limbodog

      Charlie W, he then turns to his friends, family, loved ones and the fellow members of his organization. And the best part is that they really exist, so they can respond to him and help him believe in himself again.

      June 13, 2012 at 2:32 pm |
    • Stentor

      That tired old trope assumes that atheists are somehow more 'immoral' than religious people, but the statistics belie your arguments. Atheists on the whole comprise a smaller percentage of incarcerated inmates on the local, municipal, state & federal levels in all areas of reported crimes. I think you can truly be your higher self, when you don't resort to listening to judgemental organized superstiion rules to live your life by, then you can be empathetic to someone's plight without worrying about if they deserved it because of some sin they've committed. That's the real problem with Christians, especially.

      June 13, 2012 at 2:38 pm |
  9. JJrhodes

    Both those preachers take pride in saying they will burn in hell together????? Just sayin

    June 13, 2012 at 2:04 pm |
    • midwstrngrl

      just saying there is no such thing as hell...even if you believe in the bible

      June 13, 2012 at 2:14 pm |
    • limbodog

      "irony"

      June 13, 2012 at 2:32 pm |
  10. poochiebaby

    i find believers and atheists to be equally arrogant and condescending. why they care about what the other believes (or doesn't) is beyond me. why not follow your path and leave each other alone?

    June 13, 2012 at 2:03 pm |
    • Tricia

      AMEN! (pun intended)

      June 13, 2012 at 2:08 pm |
    • mickey1313

      Atheists don't say anything if the religious people keep there pie hole shut. But if they start in about in about jebus, then we pipe up.

      June 13, 2012 at 2:08 pm |
    • Ricky L

      Why mickey....what's it to you?

      As long as you're not being forced to pledge allegiance to their gods, why would you possibly care?

      June 13, 2012 at 2:11 pm |
    • MarkinFL

      The atheists weren't bothering anyone, its just the all out attack on our civil liberties that we take affront to. If the fundies stop trying to impose their beliefs on us, they will suddenly find a great peace.

      June 13, 2012 at 2:11 pm |
    • Humanist11

      Because religion hurts society and not believing in the supernatural does not.

      June 13, 2012 at 2:15 pm |
    • Leigh2

      There are religions out there who make religion a money making proposition. That goes for atheism as well.

      June 13, 2012 at 2:16 pm |
  11. Leigh2

    Whatever. He has the free will to chose. It's on him, and no one else.

    June 13, 2012 at 2:03 pm |
  12. Steve

    It amazes me how much this "belief" blog is about the exact opposite. They really should rename it.

    June 13, 2012 at 2:02 pm |
    • RM13

      I think it's just the opposite, is it really belief if you never question? If you don't question what you've been taught, if you don't face the reality that religion is a belief and not a fact, if you don't confront the possibility that the whole thing isn't real, then you really don't believe..you've just been brainwashed. I have always been thankful I was not raised to automatically believe in God, instead I came to my own belief system as an adult. It really bothers me when I see kids who still believe in Santa being taught that a particular religion is THE TRUTH.. how is this not brainwashing?????

      June 13, 2012 at 2:12 pm |
    • Steve

      Who said I never questioned? You seem to assume a lot from a statement which did not say a thing about religion. From the articles I've read on the belief site, it seems to take a very antagonistic tone towards Christians. Perhaps a name such as "Belief?" would be more appropriate, or "Belief or Unbelief".
      Personally, it seems to me to be a way to get clicks from believers and non-believers alike, which I guess is their whole point, but doesn't serve the purpose it seems to advertise.

      June 13, 2012 at 4:42 pm |
  13. return to God

    Allah! There is no god but He,-the Living, the Self-subsisting, Eternal. No slumber can seize Him nor sleep. His are all things in the heavens and on earth. Who is there can intercede in His presence except as He permitteth? He knoweth what (appeareth to His creatures as) before or after or behind them. Nor shall they compass aught of His knowledge except as He willeth. His Throne doth extend over the heavens and the earth, and He feeleth no fatigue in guarding and preserving them for He is the Most High, the Supreme (in glory)
    Quran; Chapter 2 verse 255

    June 13, 2012 at 2:02 pm |
    • Getreal

      And Frodo must return the one ring to Mordor

      June 13, 2012 at 2:12 pm |
    • Doc Vestibule

      @Getreal
      Dwarves are real, therefore LOTR is literally true.

      June 13, 2012 at 2:16 pm |
    • Stentor

      May you be forever touched by his noodly appendage.

      June 13, 2012 at 4:57 pm |
    • bembol

      return to god, please return to being sane

      June 14, 2012 at 12:09 am |
  14. Bryan

    Atheists do not exist, and this article supports my view. There is no such thing. Instead, what you have are ex-christians that no longer believe in the christian god. But since they are still christians by upbringing and conditioning, their world is very black and white. Ergo, since the christian god doesn't exist, no god exists. It never occurs to them that the christian point of view is in error, but instead that there simply is no god. One extreme to the other.

    June 13, 2012 at 2:01 pm |
    • *facepalm*

      Who's seeing the world in black and white now?

      You act as if ex-christian atheists never bothered to consider other religions or even deism. That's certainly not my case nor is that accurate for most, if not all atheists that I know. You're simply exposing your own bias.

      Consider this – before becoming an atheist, these people were already rejecting the existence of thousands of gods. Why do you think they would accept a god they already didn't believe in? What is so unreasonable about simply rejecting all of them?

      June 13, 2012 at 2:07 pm |
    • return to God

      You are 100% right Bryan. Thousands of nations have come and gone and this world still exist with it is balance and beauty. Who created this balance and beauty? if u ask them who created the sun, moon, the universe, the animals, humans? their answer is simply evolution, but yet Evolution does not explain this Selective/ magnificant process of creation. Only a supreme , ultimate God can do all of this.

      June 13, 2012 at 2:07 pm |
    • ME II

      Many atheists don't see any evidence for anything supernatural at all. It's often a lack of belief in any god or gods, not just the Christian one.

      June 13, 2012 at 2:14 pm |
    • Getreal

      Actually the term "atheist "comes from the latin meaning godless. Since there are no gods, everyone is an atheist.

      June 13, 2012 at 2:14 pm |
    • Jean

      There is a difference between questioning the teachings of a specific religion and questioning the existence of any sort of higher being. Atheists, right or wrong, believe that the evidence indicates there is no spiritual being that is involved and interfering in our world. To say that atheists don't exist is to demonstrate that you don't understand the term.

      June 13, 2012 at 2:15 pm |
    • Alyssa

      "Atheists do not exist, and this article supports my view. There is no such thing. Instead, what you have are ex-christians that no longer believe in the christian god."

      Bryan, this is ridiculous. First of all, the article says the organization has rabbis, priests, etc... there are people of all faiths trying to escape the confines of religion. And to propose that atheists do not exist is moronic. My mother considers herself to be an atheist and we were raised to learn about question all religions. I will teach my children the same. Sounds like atheism to me.

      June 13, 2012 at 2:17 pm |
    • MarkinFL

      Fallacy #1, you assume that all atheists are ex-Christians.....an utterly, demonstrably false statement.
      Fallacy #2, you create a novel definition of the atheist that has no real world value.

      June 13, 2012 at 2:25 pm |
    • QS

      LMFAO!

      June 13, 2012 at 2:26 pm |
    • bembol

      Your first sentence is convincing evidence that you are thinking through your anus.

      June 14, 2012 at 12:13 am |
  15. YOURMOM

    Its funny how the atheists attack so easily. Relax you have April 1st as your special day.

    June 13, 2012 at 2:01 pm |
    • Mary

      April 1 for Atheist, see everyone gets their 15 minutes!

      June 13, 2012 at 2:06 pm |
    • Gina

      That's so funny. And so kind of you to give one day when you and yours have all the rest to be fools.

      June 13, 2012 at 2:12 pm |
    • tnfreethinker

      It's funny how Christians think opposition to their opinion is an attack. Question everything.

      June 13, 2012 at 2:15 pm |
    • Humanist11

      Your comment sounds like a 5th grade response on the playground.

      The fact is that religious folks spend their lives setting the groundwork for their life in heaven, while atheists spend their lives living in the present. I truly feel sorry for people who spend their lives preparing for something that will never happen. What a waste.

      June 13, 2012 at 2:24 pm |
  16. Ricky L

    Arrogance is the same......no matter what adjective is used to tailor the word to a critic's preference.

    Christian arrogance and atheist arrogance are but two sides of the same coin.

    June 13, 2012 at 2:00 pm |
    • MarkinFL

      However, I do not wish to force religious people to live by a set of rules incompatible with their religion. ( insofar as it does not include abusing other people's rights).
      Yet the same cannot be said for a about 100,000,000 Christians who wish to enforce their arcane rules on to me.

      June 13, 2012 at 2:29 pm |
  17. SlackMeyer

    C'mon, people... If people want to worship the god of their choice, let them. As long as they're not harming anyone, they should be left alone. Christianity and Judaism... Harmless.

    If you want to mock a dangerous religion that's responsible for more deaths than any other religion in history, then mock Environmentalism. THAT'S a dangerous sect if ever there was one.

    June 13, 2012 at 2:00 pm |
    • Ricky L

      The seas are not rising?

      June 13, 2012 at 2:02 pm |
    • Matt

      Christianity is NOT harmless if people use it as a rationale for oppressing others or formulating laws of conduct. Sure, believe what you want, as long as you don't vote to control the lives of others who may not share your delusion.

      June 13, 2012 at 2:05 pm |
    • SlackMeyer

      I thought Obama was going to sop that... Obama said his election would "slow the rise of the oceans, and our planet began to heal."

      I live on the east coast within view of a jetty. I've been looking at that jetty for almost fifty years. I see no change. Are they rising?

      June 13, 2012 at 2:09 pm |
    • sybaris

      Religion harmless?

      Until you get someone like Bush with his hands on the button and believed that invading Iraq was approved by his god.

      June 13, 2012 at 2:11 pm |
    • SlackMeyer

      Hey, Matt. Liberals/Progressives constantly go after Christianity and Judaism because they know that they're not going get a bomb shoved up the caboose when they write articles like these. You know what that makes them? Cowards. GUTLESS cowards.

      How 'bout writing an article on the dangers that Islam poses to the world?

      June 13, 2012 at 2:14 pm |
    • Ricky L

      It's the same ocean, Slack, that's flooding Virgina coastal areas.....and forcing the Navy to build higher piers around the world.

      June 13, 2012 at 2:15 pm |
    • RM13

      Yes protecting the environment is very very dangerous...idiot

      June 13, 2012 at 2:16 pm |
  18. TruthShines

    The guy is doing true christians a favor helping get the hyprocrites out.

    June 13, 2012 at 2:00 pm |
    • *facepalm*

      If you were to eliminate all hypocrites from the party you'd end up with a pretty empty room.

      June 13, 2012 at 2:10 pm |
  19. hwatt

    well, I've never heard of a preacher focused on 'preaching about hell' and what not to do. I guess sure if that's your focus then no wonder he dropped off. The Christian preachers I listen to all the time preach about inclusion, loving all people, and what we should be doing. total opposite

    June 13, 2012 at 2:00 pm |
  20. lmc2

    What a crock of a report. Someone changed their mind...horrors. Believe what you believe. Change your mind if you want to. Doesn't make you right or wrong. Just don't bother me with it.

    June 13, 2012 at 1:59 pm |
    • WhatWhatWhat?

      You won't be saying "Believe what you believe" when they kick down your door and kill you as part of their stupid Rapture. In the US, there are two visions of the future, one in which we go to Mars and explore the Solar System, and one where a guy riding a horse in the clouds pulling a sword out of his mouth comes down and kills everyone he doesn't like. It's our responsibility to the future to ridicule this nonsense out of existence.

      June 13, 2012 at 2:14 pm |
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The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.