home
RSS
Can 'true Catholics' support same-sex marriage?
Ex-priest Jim Smith, opponent of Minnesota's ballot to ban same-sex marriages, says these are difficult days to be Catholic.
June 20th, 2012
09:35 AM ET

Can 'true Catholics' support same-sex marriage?

By Chris Welch, CNN

Minneapolis (CNN) - Jim Smith is a former Roman Catholic priest who left his post with the church 10 years ago. He's an ex-priest for several reasons, he says, but one of his main concerns was the church's stance against same-sex marriage and other LGBT issues.

But Smith remains a Catholic - though he says being a Catholic who actively campaigns for legalized same-sex marriages can be difficult these days.

"I'd much rather this wasn't happening," Smith says of the division that the issue has created among Minnesota  Catholics. "But it does provide some real opportunities because it challenges us to talk to each other, Catholics talking to other Catholics."

Minnesota has become the newest epicenter in the same-sex marriage fight. This November, voters will decide whether they want an amendment added to the state's constitution that would ban marriage between members of the same sex.

Smith will be voting "no." And he has helped spearhead efforts in the state to persuade other Catholics to do the same.

A group he helped form,  Catholics for Marriage Equality-Minnesota, aims "to encourage Catholics to consider the profound sacredness of same-gender relationships and to defeat this marriage amendment," Smith says.

Vatican edicts against same-sex marriage often give Catholic same-sex marriage supporters the impression they're in the minority.

Related story: Same-sex marriage by the numbers 

But a recent poll by the Public Religion Research Institute (PRRI) suggests 59% of American Catholics support rights allowing gay and lesbian couples to legally marry. One reason behind that statistic - says PRRI CEO Robert P. Jones - is because U.S. Catholics "overwhelmingly reject the idea that sexual orientation can be changed." A PRRI poll bears that out – with 69% of Catholics nationwide saying a person's sexual orientation cannot be changed.

In the Midwest alone, Catholics are evenly divided on the issue of same-sex marriage -– with 46% in favor, 47% against.

Opinion: GOP support for same-sex marriage growing

Related story: Both sides re-energized for upcoming same-sex marriage fight

Like Jim Smith, Michelle LaFrance is a Catholic who has also taken the bold step against the church in support of marriage equality.

"I remember thinking 'wow, maybe I shouldn't [remain a Catholic],' " LaFrance said. Ultimately they've remained with the Catholic faith, citing its many positive aspects including going to church. It's an important weekly ritual for LaFrance, her husband and their three kids.

"The Catholic Church, despite the media [attention] it typically gets, does a lot of great things, a lot of great social justice," LaFrance said. She noted the church "feeds the poor, houses the homeless, takes care of the abused."

The LaFrance family belongs to the Church of St. Margaret Mary in the Minneapolis suburb of Golden Valley, a congregation which LaFrance describes as fairly progressive. She says the majority of her fellow parishioners agree with her stance on same-sex marriage.

But when LaFrance hears the archdiocese telling people how they should think about it, she can't help but sometimes feel like less of a Catholic.

"I don't think anybody - whatever their religious denomination - whole-heartedly follows every single rule down to the letter."

Related story: U.S. history of same-sex marriage

On the other side of the debate stands Dave Deavel.

Although he agrees with LaFrance to an extent, he says he believes there are certain pillars of the Catholic faith that people should follow. One of those is the church stance that marriage should remain between one man and one woman.

"The whole point of what the church teaches is to form people's consciences," Deavel says.

For Deavel, his wife and their five children, attending church is so important they strive to go multiple times a week.

He's active with Minnesota for Marriage, which supports of the same-sex-marriage ban, and has written various blog posts on the topic for the Minnesota Catholic Conference.

Asked whether he believes a person can be "less of a Catholic" for disagreeing with the church, Deavel says the Vatican "doesn't really have a certain category for 'less of a Catholic.' "

"But they certainly don't represent what the church teaches," he said. "Is it a spiritual problem? I think yes."

Opinion: The secret gay agenda

In a written statement the MCC said groups such as Catholics for Marriage Equality "do not have any right to call their organizations 'Catholic.'"

In the past, the conference has issued statements accusing Catholics for Marriage Equality of trying "to confuse Catholics and the public about authentic church teaching" on marriage.

"Catholics for Marriage Equality MN attempts to convince Catholics that they can be in good standing with the church and oppose church teaching about human sexuality and marriage, which centers on the complementarity of the sexes and the mutual self-gift of loving spouses in marital union," said an MCC statement.

The Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis declined CNN's request for an interview, but it agreed with sentiments expressed by the Minnesota Catholic Conference.

Does church doctrine make it impossible for same-sex marriage supporters to be true Catholics?

"There is no judgment intended about an individual's 'Catholicity' or 'Catholic-ness,' " says MCC spokeswoman Jessica Zittlow.

Minnesota's November ballot proposal to ban same-sex marriage isn't an amendment against LGBT individuals, say the MCC and the St. Paul and Minneapolis Archdiocese. Instead, they say it should strictly be viewed as an amendment supporting traditional marriage.

For ex-priest Jim Smith, grappling with the issue has been difficult - a personal struggle that extends to the heart of his faith.

The inner conflict between what Smith believes is right and his love for the church has pushed him to consider leaving the Catholic religion altogether.

In the end, Smith vows he will stay. "It's in my bones."

- CNN Belief Blog

Filed under: 2012 Election • Catholic Church • Christianity • Faith • Minnesota • Politics • Polls • Same-sex marriage

soundoff (2,849 Responses)
  1. A dose of reality

    1. You believe that the pope has personal conversations with God (that nobody else ever hears) and is infallible when speaking on matters of Church doctrine. You then wistfully ignore the fact that Church doctrine changes and that former popes therefore could not possibly have been “infallible”. Limbo, for example, was touted by pope after pope as a place where un-baptized babies who die go, until Pope Benedict XVI just eradicated it (or, more accurately, so watered it down as effectively eradicate it in a face saving way). Seems all those earlier “infallible” Popes were wrong – as they were on Adam and Eve v. evolution, heliocentricity v. egocentricity, and a host of other issues that required an amendment of official Church doctrine. You also ignore the innumerable murders, rampant corruption and other crimes committed over the centuries by your “infallible”, god-conversing popes.
    2. You reject the existence of thousands of gods claimed by other religions, but feel outraged when someone denies the existence of yours. You are blissfully (or intentionally) blind to the fact, that had you been born in another part of the World, you would be defending the local god(s) and disdaining the incorrectness of Catholic beliefs.
    3. You begrudgingly accept evolution (about a century after Darwin proved it and after accepting Genesis as literally true for about 2,000 years) and that Adam and Eve was totally made up, but then conveniently ignore that fact that your justification for Jesus dying on the cross (to save us from Original Sin) has therefore been eviscerated. Official Church literature still dictates a belief in this nonsense.
    4. You disdain native beliefs as “polytheist” and somehow “inferior” but cannot explain (i) why being polytheistic is any sillier than being monotheistic. Once you make the quantum leap into Wonderland by believing in sky-fairies, what difference does if make if you believe in one or many?; nor (ii) why Christians believe they are monotheistic, given that they believe in god, the devil, guardian angels, the holy spirit, Jesus, many demons in hell, the Virgin Mary, the angel Gabriel, thousands of saints, all of whom apparently make Earthly appearances periodically, and all of whom inhabit their life-after-death lands with magic-sacred powers of some kind.
    5. You bemoan the "atrocities" attributed to Allah, but you don`t even flinch when hearing about how God/Jehovah slaughtered all the babies of Egypt in "Exodus" and ordered the elimination of entire ethnic groups in "Joshua" including women, children, and trees or the 3,000 Israelites killed by Moses for worshipping the golden calf (or the dozen or so other slaughters condoned by the bible). You also like to look to god to for guidance in raising your children, ignoring the fact that he drowned his own – according to your Bible.
    6. You laugh at Hindu beliefs that deify humans, and Greek claims about gods sleeping with women, but you have no problem believing that God impregnated Mary with himself, to give birth to himself, so he could sacrifice himself to himself to “forgive” an ”Original Sin” that we now all know never happened.
    7. You disdain gays as sinners, but have no problem when Lot got drunk and committed father-daughter in.cest (twice) or offered his daughters to a mob to be gang ra.ped, or when Moses, time and again, offered his wife up for the “pleasures” of the Egyptians to save his own skin.
    8. You believe that your god will cause anyone who does not accept your Bronze Age stories to suffer a penalty an infinite times worse than the death penalty (burning forever in excruciating torture) simply because of their healthy skepticism, yet maintain that god “loves them”.
    9. You will totally reject any scientific breakthrough that is inconsistent with your established doctrine, unless and until it is so generally accepted as to back you into a corner. While modern science, history, geology, biology, and physics have failed to convince you of the deep inanity of your silly faith, some priest doing magic hand signals over bread and wine is enough to convince you it is thereby transformed into the flesh and blood of Jesus because of the priest’s magic powers (or “sacred powers” to the extent you see a difference).
    10. You define 0.01% as a "high success rate" when it comes to Lourdes, Fátima and other magic places and prayers in general. You consider that to be evidence that prayer works. The remaining 99.99% failure was simply “god moving in mysterious ways”. The fact that, if you ask for something repeatedly, over and over, year after year, sooner or later that thing is bound to happen anyway, has not even occurred to you. A stopped clock is right twice a day.
    11. You accept the stories in the Bible without question, despite not having the slightest idea of who actually wrote them, how credible these people were or how long the stories were written after the alleged events they record occurred. For example, it is impossible for Moses to have written the first five books of the Old Testament, as Catholics believe. For one, they record his death and events after his death. In fact, the chance of the Bible being historically accurate in any but the broadest terms is vanishingly small.
    Heavens, I could not fit them into ten. Maybe, if they pray hard enough to their sky-fairy, the Catholics can turn them into 10

    June 20, 2012 at 2:45 pm |
    • chris5930

      Wow thats the biggest post I have seen to date!!

      June 20, 2012 at 2:52 pm |
    • cnnmembuh

      How many times are you going to cut and paste this in the daily CNN Catholic bashing forum?

      June 20, 2012 at 3:10 pm |
    • Colin

      You forgot the first line "Ten ways you know you are a Catholic" Spacing between paragraphs helps, too

      June 20, 2012 at 3:12 pm |
    • ajk68

      I only read the first paragraph of your tome. You were incorrect. Limbo has never been catholic doctrine. It was considered a plausible idea in theology, but was never doctrine – even if Sister So-and-so in grade school thought it and taught it as if it were.

      Also Catholics do not believe the pope converses with God. Matters of doctrine are decided based on the Bible and Tradition (from traditio – which means handing on – that which has been handed on from generation to generation since the Apostles). The Holy Spirit guarantees that solemnly defined dogmas (limited to matters of faith and morals) will be free of error; this is infallibility. It does not extend to all ordinary teachings of the pope. Infallibility does extend to the pope's personal decisions or to his decisions of governance in the Church. It especially does not mean the pope is impeccable, that is, free of sin.

      June 20, 2012 at 5:23 pm |
  2. jbrown

    Father Jim was the best priest ever!

    June 20, 2012 at 2:45 pm |
  3. james - St. Paul, MN

    It is supremely ironic that a religion which has predominately gay leadership is leading the fight against allowing any two human beings from committing to a lifetime together. More than anything else, this is a sad commentary on the self-hate manifest by these gay Catholic leaders. Frankly, they need therapy-– and a course to help them develop their own self-awareness. Sad, sad, sad....

    June 20, 2012 at 2:45 pm |
    • chris5930

      Unfortunately the media seams to think that Catholicism is the religion of choice for believers! There are many evangelical groups fighting this battle. AFA, AFR, Winning at home, Focus on the family etc. The fact that it says Catholics in the head lines just means they "CNN" are just trying to get us going!

      June 20, 2012 at 2:57 pm |
    • Primewonk

      "There are many HATE GROUPS groups fighting this battle. AFA, AFR, Winning at home, Focus on the family etc."

      There. Fixed your mistake for you.

      June 20, 2012 at 3:14 pm |
  4. Katz

    No, and they shouldn't be forced to. That's my right and I expect everyone to respect my rights like you do the minorities, women, gays etc. If you don't like the rules in the Catholic Church get out and stay out.

    June 20, 2012 at 2:45 pm |
    • MK

      Definitely. Get out and stay out. It's the best thing you can do for yourself.

      June 20, 2012 at 2:46 pm |
  5. Bayousara

    Gay marriage and abortions affect a tiny tiny percentage of the American population. So apparently the government (which is actually all of us) thinks these issues are more important for less than one percent of the population than all the other problems we have in the US that could actually make us a third world country! Gosh only knows what the even younger leaders of our country will consider important. But then, most of them can't read or write.

    June 20, 2012 at 2:44 pm |
    • David L.

      This is a terrible point. You're proposing that it is ok to oppress a minority group's right, because they are a very small minority?

      June 20, 2012 at 2:54 pm |
  6. Doug

    I like how this survey uses 204 responses from Catholics to gneralize the catholic population in America....thats 2.62*10^-6 % or 0.00000262 % of American catholics... Also, this article comes off as nothing but anti-catholic. It has an ex-priest, which atuomatically people think, "oh wow, priests are leaving the church over this. They are soooo out of touch." And the fact that over 2/3 of the article is about how the Church is wrong. Shoddy journalism, absolute bush league.

    June 20, 2012 at 2:44 pm |
    • niknak

      First of all, polls are very expensive to put together. I bet this poll of only 204 people cost upwards of 50k. I used to do polls for medical research and even relatively small ones of less then 1000 people can run into the hundred of thousands of dollars.
      Secondly, this was a poll about religion. You can't expect a poll about a fairy tale to be scientific. At least I can't.
      And the plumeting numbers of westerners who follow catholic mythology bear out that the church is not reaching anyone. That is why the church is expanding to Africa in search of new suckers to buy into their bull and give money to support the archdiocies.

      June 20, 2012 at 3:00 pm |
  7. epluribus

    If you support gay marriage YOU ARE NOT CATHOLIC

    June 20, 2012 at 2:44 pm |
    • Getreal

      But you can support and even hide gay priests raping and molesting boys?... Nice religion you have there.

      June 20, 2012 at 2:49 pm |
    • Catholic

      Amen to that!!!

      June 20, 2012 at 2:50 pm |
    • David L.

      So, you are only Catholic if you believe in everything the Catholic church believes in? Can you be Catholic and not believe certain parts of the Bible?

      June 20, 2012 at 2:55 pm |
    • niknak

      If you support catholisism you are a moron.

      June 20, 2012 at 3:04 pm |
    • Primewonk

      If you support contraception YOU ARE NOT CATHOLIC.

      [98% of all Catholics use or have used contraception.]

      Hmmmmmmmm

      June 20, 2012 at 3:20 pm |
  8. liz

    Polls also show most women who identify as Catholic are have or will use birth control.

    June 20, 2012 at 2:44 pm |
  9. rhavijd

    i'm on the wrong blog, i was looking for those run away nuclear reactors.

    June 20, 2012 at 2:44 pm |
  10. RYEGUY

    Please define "true-Catholic"

    June 20, 2012 at 2:43 pm |
    • nottolate

      In truth, the true Catholic and ALL Catholics for that matter is synonymous with unbeliever.

      June 20, 2012 at 2:46 pm |
  11. AndriconBoy

    How we treat the least of our citizens is indicative of our nations integrity and honor.
    If we can marginalize our own people, we can oppress anyone.

    June 20, 2012 at 2:42 pm |
    • nottolate

      That is a distortion. In the case of the poor yes. For they can be call "the least." But that certainly does not apply to those rebels who sin willfully.

      June 20, 2012 at 2:48 pm |
    • Primewonk

      Being born gay is no more wrong, or immoral, or a sin than being born left-handed. It's simply one more thing that your god got completely wrong.

      June 20, 2012 at 3:41 pm |
  12. Dl

    I think Jesus taught us to hate anyone different from us... at least that seems to be the lesson many Christians have learned.

    June 20, 2012 at 2:41 pm |
    • chris5930

      Love the sinner hate the sin!

      June 20, 2012 at 2:43 pm |
    • MK

      Love the churcher, hate the church.

      June 20, 2012 at 2:44 pm |
    • LOL Religion

      Love the believer, hate their ridiculous bigoted religion.

      June 20, 2012 at 2:45 pm |
    • cham13174

      Yeah! Praise the lord!

      June 20, 2012 at 2:48 pm |
    • Greg

      Jesus never taught us to hate anyone. He gave us all free wills to choose as we want. No matter what your belief on this subject, we all will someday stand in front of Him and explain why we could not obey the few rules he gave us for our gift of living in the world.

      June 20, 2012 at 3:06 pm |
    • Primewonk

      Chris – you wrote, " Love the sinner hate the sin!"

      Can you provide the book, chapter, and verse, where your god says this? I can't seem to find it in my bible.

      However, in my bible, your god commands you folks to kill gay folks. I have a hard time seeing the love.

      June 20, 2012 at 3:44 pm |
  13. James Reese

    Welcome to the Epicopal Church.

    June 20, 2012 at 2:40 pm |
  14. Matt

    My thoughts on this one day non-issue in America.....http://www.old67.com/the-twisted-passions-of-dr-mark-harris/

    June 20, 2012 at 2:40 pm |
  15. Johnjon

    I'm 50 years old. I was raised Catholic............. Irish – Italian family. I know, I know............. lots of screaming and drinking. My partner and I have been together 22 years. I feel somewhat abandoned by my religion, but I still have my faith. Since I came to the realization about myself in my very early twenties, I was disappointed about what the church was telling me. I knew I hadn't changed at all. After some soul searching I realized that God still loved me, and I was all right with that. Everyone else who told me I was such an awful person could go to hell, and I think perhaps that's where they've always been anyway. I'd like a nice church wedding, but the court house would be just fine.

    June 20, 2012 at 2:40 pm |
    • Lisa

      God does still love you. He loves us all. He does not love all that we do.

      June 20, 2012 at 2:46 pm |
    • fred

      The church believes it is a sin. They have forgoten Jesus's words. "Let those among you who are without sin cast the first stone". As that I consider myself to be a true catholic, I can not condemn your life choices.

      June 20, 2012 at 2:49 pm |
    • nottolate

      "After some soul searching I realized that God still loved me, and I was all right with that. Everyone else who told me I was such an awful person could go to hell, and I think perhaps that's where they've always been anyway."

      If God still loved you, then why has he declared you reprobate? You are deceiving your own self just to gratify your own sin desires. Go doesn't just look the other way you know.

      June 20, 2012 at 2:52 pm |
    • niknak

      No Lisa, not true.
      god told me yesterday that he does not love you.
      Sorry,

      June 20, 2012 at 3:07 pm |
  16. Chris

    I have a better question. Why is CNN.com headlining with TOP STORY BILLING two separate stories in two successive days targeting the Catholic Church? Are you kidding me? I don't see them going after Baptists, Mormons, Muslims or any other religion like they do Catholics. Try showing some BALANCE, people!

    June 20, 2012 at 2:40 pm |
    • MK

      Maybe if the catholic church showed a little tolerance...

      June 20, 2012 at 2:45 pm |
    • David L.

      Because Catholics have been at the center of much controversy lately, and people are more likely to click on an article about Catholics than they are other religions.

      June 20, 2012 at 2:46 pm |
    • howard

      Because you have about 4 or 5 people behind the CNN belief blog that hate catholics. You also have a lot of people commenting on here that are so left wing. I almost think people are paid to monitor these boards with different screen names slamming anyone that doesnt share the same left wind opinions

      June 20, 2012 at 2:47 pm |
    • howard

      Catholics have been at the center of much controversy lately because of left wing hate media groups like this one. The percentage of priest that abuse kids are probably the same as the percentage of gays in america.

      June 20, 2012 at 2:50 pm |
    • Chris

      I'm starting to believe that, Howard.

      Catholics are so controversial, eh? Well, you've got a guy running for president right now who believes that if he's good and faithful to his religion, he will become a god! I still think he'd be a better president than Obama, but if you want to focus on religion, there ya go!

      June 20, 2012 at 2:52 pm |
    • tommy

      Howard, they are approximately 31 million gays in America. You may want to reconsider that analogy.

      June 20, 2012 at 2:57 pm |
    • David L.

      I'm not talking about priests and molesting children, although that is one example. I'm talking about their fight against new healthcare laws, and the information leaks inside the Vatican.

      June 20, 2012 at 2:57 pm |
    • OncoMom

      Thank you for posting that. I was beginning to wonder if they were just on an Anti-catholic streak or what!!! Let's read some stories about other religions views on this subject as well. Fair Reporting....CNN???? Yeah....right!

      June 20, 2012 at 3:10 pm |
  17. Nathan

    68% of all statistics/polls are made up on the spot.

    June 20, 2012 at 2:39 pm |
    • LOL Religion

      95% of all people who say statistics are made up don't understand statistics 😛

      June 20, 2012 at 2:41 pm |
    • Getreal

      I though it was 74.7%

      June 20, 2012 at 2:42 pm |
    • ME II

      Every statistic comes with a margin of error.

      Doesn't that make 100% of statistics wrong?

      June 20, 2012 at 2:46 pm |
  18. 2011cnn2011

    being gay is a sin just like adultry. But Gay people, just like adulterers in America have rights. gay, ciivil union ,yes. Church marriage no.

    June 20, 2012 at 2:39 pm |
    • Tryclyde

      Yeah, committing adultery is a choice, being gay is not.

      June 20, 2012 at 2:43 pm |
    • Madtown

      2011cnn2011
      being gay is a sin just like adultry.
      -----
      *Facepalm*. Well, God created us all equal in terms of human value, but he certainly didn't gift us all with the same level of cognitive functionality.

      June 20, 2012 at 2:44 pm |
    • Lets Take A Poll

      How about some Catholics answering the question...
      Canj true Catholics support gay marriage?

      June 20, 2012 at 2:44 pm |
    • todd in DC

      Last time I checked, adulterers aren't born adulterers. But adulterers can STILL get married.

      Logic fail

      June 20, 2012 at 2:45 pm |
    • chris5930

      Learned trait!

      June 20, 2012 at 2:49 pm |
    • txpb

      Bring gay is not a sin, acting on it is. Deny yourself for a higher purpose. I am a married man an naturally am attracted to other women, but we are not animals... you don't have to scratch every itch you have.

      June 20, 2012 at 2:58 pm |
    • fred

      I'm sorry,,, That was which commandment?????

      June 20, 2012 at 3:09 pm |
    • niknak

      I don't think being gay is a sin.
      there is no such thing as sin in our culture. There are no laws on the books about sin.
      Your sin is a made up concept by your mythology.
      And you bought into that.

      June 20, 2012 at 3:10 pm |
    • Primewonk

      Chris5930 wrote (regarding hômosèxuality), " Learned trait!"

      Why won't any of you folks post the citations to the peer-reviewed scientific research that supports your contention?

      June 20, 2012 at 3:51 pm |
    • fred

      Primewonk, havent you hears the church does not believe in science. If it were up to the catholic church we would still be in the dark ages. Just look how long it took them to ackknowledge that Galileo was right.

      June 20, 2012 at 4:00 pm |
  19. The Knight of God

    Tolerance is preached by many people but there's a catch. Tolerant of everything except speaking views that are in line with Scripture.

    June 20, 2012 at 2:39 pm |
    • todd in DC

      You are an uppity child. Your parents should have killed you (just like it says in the bible)

      June 20, 2012 at 2:47 pm |
  20. mike

    Gay Marriage? NO – Civil Unions – as seen by the government – YES.

    I believe that Marriage is a religious ceremony. The government should call theirs "Civil Unions". Even when it's men and women – should still be civil union on all government forms.

    No other government form asks you "Are you baptized, bat mitzvah'ed etc". So why do they ask if you have been married by the church?

    June 20, 2012 at 2:38 pm |
    • The Knight of God

      There ya go, I mean I still don't agree but at least churches wouldn't have to compromise their beliefs for the rest of the world.

      June 20, 2012 at 2:41 pm |
    • pk

      Sorry boss.. Religion doesn't own the patent on Marriages.

      June 20, 2012 at 2:41 pm |
    • Stephen

      Wrong Mike, The power to Marry someone rests in the States Authority, The church is strictly ceremonial.

      By the powers invested in me by the State of New York, I now pronounce you Man & Wife.

      June 20, 2012 at 2:44 pm |
    • yeahalright

      You can't even smell the stink of the irony when it's halfway up your nose can you Knight? "At least churches wouldn't have to compromise their beliefs for the rest of the world????"

      Why does the rest of the world have to compromise their beliefs for your church?

      June 20, 2012 at 2:51 pm |
    • HeavenSkunt

      "I believe that Marriage is a religious ceremony"

      Some churches recognize gay marriages. Would you strip them of their right to practice religion as they see fit?

      June 20, 2012 at 2:55 pm |
    • Craig

      Which religions get to define marriage? Do marriages performed in a United Church of Christ or Unitarian-Universalist ceremony not count if the Roman Catholic and Southern Baptist churches don't like them? Where's the freedom of religion in that?

      June 20, 2012 at 3:00 pm |
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31
Advertisement
About this blog

The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.