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July 18th, 2012
03:24 PM ET

Olympian counts God as coach

By Alicia Tarancon, CNN

(CNN)–
Ryan Hall is the fastest American distance runner competing in the London Olympics and he says he owes it all to his omnipresent coach who has been there with him every step of the way.

“I’ll just be straight forward, my coach is God,” the 29-year-old Hall told CNN.

Last year, after finishing second in the 2011 United States half-marathon Championship, Hall was told to do a routine drug test. The form with the test had a space to fill in the name of the runner's coach.

"I saw the line, it said coach, it was blank, and I said, 'Well you know I have to be honest,' " Hall said, "So I put 'God' down and it turned into a big controversial thing."

"Now whenever I see that line I just leave it blank. I'll just let it slide by," he added.

Hall calls his method of training “faith-based coaching.”  In London, he'll be putting his training to the test in the men's marathon.

Instead of running with a trainer, he runs alone. While he runs, he prays. On some days Hall says he will ask God, “How far do you want me to run today?”

CNN's Belief Blog: The faith angles behind the big stories

“I’m still figuring this thing out myself,” Hall told CNN's Kyra Phillips.

Hall counts himself a Christian and attends Bethel Church in Redding, California, a non-denominational evangelical church with roots in the Assemblies of God denomination.

For now Hall's faith based coaching seems to be working. Hall is the No. 1 ranked distance runner in the United States and says he doesn't see the need to add a professional running coach.

“I’m just doing what I feel like God’s telling me to do," he said.

The 2011 Boston Marathon was his personal best with a soaring time of 2 hours 4 minutes and 58 seconds. Hall said with God on his side, he is hoping to to take home the gold in the London Olympics.

He knows with just nine days until the start of the Olympics, he may run into skeptics of his "faith based coaching" on his way to the competition.

“I love the skeptic and God loves the skeptics-– it's OK for people to disagree,” Hall said.

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He doesn’t  pay  much attention to the reactions from his peers. He says he is able to stay focused and motivated on what he’s doing.

For Hall, running is more about the experience of peace and joy he gets from training. At times he says he does feel down and in said in the past he blamed God  for not doing his best in a race, but now he said that has changed.

“I don’t think God causes me to fail in races," he said.

If he doesn’t get the results he hopes in the 2012 Olympics, Hall said he won't blame God this time around.

“Medals are things I would love to achieve, but it's all icing on the cake,” says Hall.

- CNN Belief Blog

Filed under: Belief

soundoff (262 Responses)
  1. Voice of Reason

    So, Ryan? You have been chosen by your god to be personally coached by him? Do they check for psychedelics?

    July 18, 2012 at 7:44 pm |
  2. brenda

    Thank you for standing up and giving glory to God. He talks to all.The question is for all that question..are you listening? My family will be praying for God Will in your race. Win or lose this race doesn't really matter,on Judgement day just that you give Him the Glory, in all things. To all who doubt ...God loves you anyway. God bless.

    July 18, 2012 at 7:23 pm |
    • Athena AKA Sam yaza
      July 18, 2012 at 7:31 pm |
    • DREAM15X

      Nice write up, Brenda and I agree completely with you! Not the race be won or lost, we all win in the bigger picture with God and Paradise.

      July 18, 2012 at 7:33 pm |
    • Voice of Reason

      Vomit Alert!

      July 18, 2012 at 7:41 pm |
  3. Bob

    So when you succeed, it's God, but when you fail, it's not. Makes sense. As long as you don't rely on that whole logic thing.

    July 18, 2012 at 7:00 pm |
    • Bible Bob, Knight of Infallibillibabbity

      Religion: the less you think about it, the more sense it makes!

      July 18, 2012 at 7:27 pm |
    • DREAM15X

      Either way he sets a good example for followers, such as myself.

      July 18, 2012 at 7:31 pm |
  4. Chad

    “I’ll just be straight forward, my coach is God,” the 29-year-old Hall told CNN.... Instead of running with a trainer, he runs alone. While he runs, he prays. On some days Hall says he will ask God, “How far do you want me to run today?”... “I’m just doing what I feel like God’s telling me to do," he said.... “I love the skeptic and God loves the skeptics-– it's OK for people to disagree,” Hall said. .... “I don’t think God causes me to fail in races," he said. If he doesn’t get the results he hopes in the 2012 Olympics, Hall said he won't blame God this time around. “Medals are things I would love to achieve, but it's all icing on the cake,” says Hall."

    just-simply-awesome!!

    Go Ryan Go!

    July 18, 2012 at 6:47 pm |
    • GodFreeNow

      Agree. At least he's using god as his excuse to run instead of killing people, which is usually what god's name is used for. I'm sure there are many Muslims who will be participating in the Olympics asking Allah for help. Likely there will be some Chinese and Asians there asking for Buddha's help. Maybe we should just tally the gold medals and settle once and for all which god is most powerful (or maybe which god cares most about the Olympics).

      July 18, 2012 at 6:53 pm |
    • I'm not a GOPer, nor do I play one on TV

      @GFN,

      funny. Ask all the atheletes for their religious affiliation and run a medal count by religion instead of by nation state. That would be hilarious.

      I know Jesus is going to be busy at Jet's camp getting Timmy ready for NY.

      July 18, 2012 at 7:12 pm |
    • Chad

      "God wants me to win"

      It's quite interesting that atheists love that particular strawman..

      Why? Dont you see that as a particularly obvious logical fallacy? When does Ryan (or for that matter, any Christian athlete), say that "God wants me to win".

      A straw man is a type of argument and is an informal fallacy based on misrepresentation of an opponent's position.[1] To "attack a straw man" is to create the illusion of having refuted a proposition by replacing it with a superficially similar yet unequivalent proposition (the "straw man"), and refuting it, without ever having actually refuted the original position.

      July 18, 2012 at 7:21 pm |
    • Athena AKA Sam yaza

      that's my half brother,..no! the other, not! that one, the other one,....Herc loves the Olympics after all he created them so if you want any gods favor in the Olympics you should probably pray to him

      praying to the Abrahamic God at the Olympics is kinda like coming to Shabbat wearing an SS uniform to meet you Jewish girlfriends parents for the first time, and saying a prayer to Hitler before you eat,.....

      -shalom

      does any one realize how insensitive this is to Pagans

      July 18, 2012 at 7:23 pm |
    • GodFreeNow

      @Chad, Correction: atheists are not saying "god wants me to win." That's another level of silly that I don't even think Christians believe. We point out how religious people believe they can do better with their deity's help. Please show me how this is a straw man argument or if it is false.

      July 18, 2012 at 7:29 pm |
    • I'm not a GOPer, nor do I play one on TV

      @Chad,

      Ummm, exactly which of us atheists have built a strawman around "God wants me to win"? I must have missed it.

      Seems to me that you are now inventing discussion points out of thin air.

      If you want to talk about all those athletes who 'thank Jesus' after every game or touchdown or whatever, that's another matter, but I don't think anyone has brought it up, and certainly not such that it can be quoted. Go ahead search for that string here.

      July 18, 2012 at 7:33 pm |
    • Chad

      @GodFreeNow "Maybe we should just tally the gold medals and settle once and for all which god is most powerful (or maybe which god cares most about the Olympics)"

      @GOPer "Ask all the athletes for their religious affiliation and run a medal count by religion instead of by nation state. That would be hilarious. I know Jesus is going to be busy at Jet's camp getting Timmy ready for NY."

      GodFreeNow "Correction: atheists are not saying "god wants me to win."

      @Chad "hmmm..
      if you arent saying that, why say things like "Jesus is going to be busy at Jet's camp" and "tally the gold medals and settle once and for all which god is most powerful (or maybe which god cares most about the Olympics)"

      ?

      July 18, 2012 at 7:40 pm |
    • I'm not a GOPer, nor do I play one on TV

      @Chad,

      Perhaps you are struggling to recognize sarcasm. I know it is difficult for some.

      A religious medal tally is a funny idea. It has nothing to do with presenting a strawman on "God wants me to win". It implies a proxy compet.tion for the "true" God which, while laughable in any case is not about a single God.

      As for Tim Tebow jokes. Really??? You construe this as an actual strawman for "God wants me to win" argument?? Ludicrous! You are grasping at straws to score points with people who truly don't care what you believe.

      Perhaps Tim Tebow truly believes God wants him to win. I wouldn't know. It's going to be a three-ring media circus if he loses or if he wins. The NY sports press is brutal.

      July 18, 2012 at 7:58 pm |
    • GodFreeNow

      @Chad, you're just misunderstanding or misinterpreting my statement. If god helps one win, then the most powerful god would presumably help the most people to win the most. This argument is based on biblical references.

      John 14:13-14
      "13. And whatsoever ye shall ask in my name, that will I do, that the Father may be glorified in the Son. 14. If ye shall ask any thing in my name, I will do it. "

      Understand?

      July 18, 2012 at 8:00 pm |
    • Chad

      @GOPer "Perhaps you are struggling to recognize sarcasm"

      sarcasm ridicule or mockery is used harshly, often crudely and contemptuously, for destructive purposes. It may be used in an indirect manner, and have the form of irony, as in "What a fine musician you turned out to be!", "It's like you're a whole different person now...", and "Oh... Well then thanks for all the first aid over the years!" or it may be used in the form of a direct statement, "You couldn't play one piece correctly if you had two assistants." The distinctive quality of sarcasm is present in the spoken word and manifested chiefly by vocal intonation

      also known as the "art of saying what you mean by saying the exact opposite", such as "My, how attractive you are!"

      so you are saying that what you said was actually the opposite of what you believe.. help me out then.. You dont believe that God cares about who wins a sporting event?

      ============
      @GOPer "A religious medal tally is a funny idea. It has nothing to do with presenting a strawman on "God wants me to win""
      @Chad "it is if you are saying that the medal tally determines which of the athletes who believe that God wants them to win was actually right.
      correct?"

      ======
      @GOPer "It implies a proxy compet.tion for the "true" God which, while laughable in any case is not about a single God."
      @Chad "hmmm.. so:"
      @GOPer " know Jesus is going to be busy at Jet's camp getting Timmy ready for NY."
      @Chad "implies a proxy... what? exactly?

      =====
      suggestion: be man enough to stand behind what you say 🙂

      July 18, 2012 at 10:41 pm |
    • Chad

      @GodFreeNow "you're just misunderstanding or misinterpreting my statement. If god helps one win, then the most powerful god would presumably help the most people to win the most."
      @Chad "right.. I got that.. you mocking the belief that God wants some people to win, that's what I said. It's a strawman, virtually no Christian that I know of says that..
      right?

      strawman.

      July 18, 2012 at 10:44 pm |
    • GodFreeNow

      @Chad, then your use of Straw Man argument is incorrect. To use your definition you posted:
      A straw man is a type of argument and is an informal fallacy based on misrepresentation of an opponent's position.[1] To "attack a straw man" is to create the illusion of having refuted a proposition by replacing it with a superficially similar yet unequivalent proposition (the "straw man"), and refuting it, without ever having actually refuted the original position.

      My example actually comes from the bible, and people actually believe it is true. There's nothing straw man about this. I'm literally pointing at the absurdity of the belief.

      July 18, 2012 at 11:39 pm |
    • Chad

      @GodFreeNow: "Maybe we should just tally the gold medals and settle once and for all which god is most powerful (or maybe which god cares most about the Olympics)."

      =>that comes from the bible? Where?

      July 19, 2012 at 10:52 am |
  5. Sam Yaza (AKA) Athena

    OK its on fist Olympian to say Zeus is one of there couches will win every gold even if they don't compete no you know what I'm going to go get my half brother Hercules to kick his face in for disgracing the Olympics by using the name of the God who killed our father, that Herc founded in the name our his father

    PS please stop using all the plat gold silver and bronzes us the real thing and can you please put the games back in my city, your destroying native cultures, and put back in the Gladiator Arena
    i would vary much appreciate if you remove the CEO or any one who is christian in the higher ups,.. as one of the last remaining Olympic Gods that would be great

    July 18, 2012 at 6:30 pm |
    • Sam Yaza (AKA) Athena

      you know maybe i should just take my state and leave America

      July 18, 2012 at 6:36 pm |
  6. Tantric

    It is very nice of God to help this man win over all the other athletes. He must pray better.

    July 18, 2012 at 6:07 pm |
  7. llɐq ʎʞɔnq

    If he looses, will he say "god made me loose" ?

    July 18, 2012 at 5:39 pm |
    • Ed.

      bucky,

      Have you been reading too much HeavenSent?

      lose = fail to win (or to fail to keep something in one's possession)
      loose = not snug (or, as a verb, to let something go free)

      July 18, 2012 at 6:06 pm |
    • llɐq ʎʞɔnq

      Yeah, I noticed that too late. I have a new Dell, and there are some big things I don't like.

      July 18, 2012 at 6:22 pm |
    • Jezebel

      God made me loose.

      July 18, 2012 at 6:38 pm |
    • GodFreeNow

      @llɐq ʎʞɔnq, My Mac does the same thing.

      July 18, 2012 at 6:47 pm |
    • I'm not a GOPer, nor do I play one on TV

      @Jezebel,

      I'm sure ChristianMingle can hook you up.

      July 18, 2012 at 6:56 pm |
  8. llɐq ʎʞɔnq

    So, since he can run, it makes him a theologian. Not.

    July 18, 2012 at 5:38 pm |
  9. Tim

    The only reason he is getting grief from Bigots here is because he is white.

    July 18, 2012 at 5:22 pm |
    • Who invited me?

      yeah...that's the ONLY reason....
      what irony

      July 18, 2012 at 5:23 pm |
    • Tim

      Then what?

      July 18, 2012 at 5:26 pm |
    • just sayin

      Yep, he is a white christian thats why.

      July 18, 2012 at 5:27 pm |
    • Chariot of Fire

      You don't think it's anything to do with hearing voices that hone his performances.

      July 18, 2012 at 5:54 pm |
  10. ME II

    How about a 4 minute marathon, now that would be some miraculous coaching. Just sayin....

    July 18, 2012 at 4:54 pm |
    • Chariot of Fire

      That'll be a good test of this coach except we'll get the "moves in mysterious ways" response

      July 18, 2012 at 5:22 pm |
  11. larry5

    Running a marathon, 26.21875 miles (26 miles plus 385 yards) in 2 hours, 4 minutes and 58 seconds at a pace of about 4:46 per mile is mind boggling. That would be equal to a shade over 71 seconds a lap on a quarter mile track for just under 105 laps. That's quite a performance. The average teenager might be able to run one lap in 71 seconds with a track season of training including diet and exercise supervised by a coach but would not be able to continue on and run a second lap at that pace, not even close. This guy lives in a world of aerobic performance shared by only a very small percentage of the population.

    July 18, 2012 at 4:32 pm |
    • larry5

      In summary, Olympians are really, really good athletes. In case you weren't aware.

      July 18, 2012 at 4:47 pm |
    • larry5

      They are, for example, better at their chosen sport than an average teenager. Are you dazzled by my intellect yet?

      July 18, 2012 at 4:47 pm |
    • just sayin

      And the other Olympians just s u c k. He is so awsome, which means there must be a God. *rolling eyes*

      July 18, 2012 at 4:49 pm |
    • larry5

      No, the other Olympians are good too. Much better than the average teenager, that's for sure!

      July 18, 2012 at 4:50 pm |
    • Who invited me?

      but a HUGE number of Olympians are teenagers...look at womens gymnastics, they are old at 18

      July 18, 2012 at 4:51 pm |
    • Who invited me?

      OK now stop looking at womens gymnastics...didn't you hear me, they aren't even 18...perv.

      July 18, 2012 at 4:52 pm |
    • just sayin

      I wonder what the average intelligence of a marathon runner is? Okay will power and training muscles and lungs...and they need to be able to negotiate things like variations in the suface they run on and have a sense of balance. AWSOME HUMAN BEINGS that reward our society and world so much.

      If anything they are a fine example of a mindless human completely wasting their time. Hey that explains God being involved. lol

      July 18, 2012 at 4:52 pm |
    • just sayin

      Who invited me?

      but a HUGE number of Olympians are teenagers...look at womens gymnastics, they are old at 18

      .........
      WHOA dude......really? how much do you look at the teenagers in the gymnastics.....creeeeeeeepy dude

      July 18, 2012 at 4:55 pm |
  12. Rynomite

    I can understand why he prays while he runs. I usually watch TV, or play video games while on my elliptical. Doing something completely mindless takes your concentration off of the pain, boredom, and exhaustion of workin gout. And to be honest, I can't think of anything MORE mindless than praying. I may give it a try!

    July 18, 2012 at 4:29 pm |
  13. Brother Maynard

    "For Hall, running is more about the experience of peace and joy he gets from training."
    Running is the same for me ... No god needed.
    Additionally, if it IS about peace and joy, why compete?

    July 18, 2012 at 4:26 pm |
    • rAmen

      I pray to Gandalf when I run

      July 18, 2012 at 4:28 pm |
    • Who invited me?

      yeah...those endorphines kick in and it is pretty peaceful and joyful
      There's a reason they call it a runners high.
      endorphines kick in wether you pray or not.

      July 18, 2012 at 4:29 pm |
    • just sayin

      Because he is lying through his teeth. If he is running for God then I assume he will donate all of his proceeds.

      July 18, 2012 at 4:31 pm |
    • Brother Maynard

      "...yeah...those endorphines kick in..."
      Seriously ... that is no joke. I've had occasions when I am running so fast I cannot believe it. No pain at all. Those su.ckers mask alot of it. Although ...about 3 -4 hours after I'm done ... my knees do begin to feel the pain. Getting old stincts

      July 18, 2012 at 4:42 pm |
    • Who invited me?

      I wasn't joking about it.
      Been doing endurance sports my whole life.
      First you get the burn, then you get through that to the settling in phase, then the endorphines kick in and you just cruise...

      July 18, 2012 at 4:47 pm |
    • just sayin

      "Getting old stincts"
      .
      Yeah if you cant hold your gas and you $ h ! t all over yourself.. Old people are completely disgusting. Soylent Green I say!!!!!!

      July 18, 2012 at 4:47 pm |
    • Lewis Keseberg

      @just sayin, you want to eat people that shit all over themselves? I prefer a higher grade of meat, thank you very much. I'd rather eat someone who was vastly under nourished than eat shit.

      July 18, 2012 at 4:49 pm |
    • Brother Maynard

      Oh yea... for the record ... I run BECAUSE I'm an atheist. Because this is the only life I will EVER have ... I run to keep my heart / muscles/ mind/ blood cholesterol all healthy so that I will live as long as possible.
      Believers are the ones that should smoke / drink/ be overweight ... that way they can enjoy the grace of god and walk with the lord in heaven

      July 18, 2012 at 6:04 pm |
  14. Barry Lottagreed, Ryan's agent

    I shouldn't tell you this, but I am so proud of my strategy that I just have to tell somebody. You see, Ryan and I realized that the big money goes to the gold medalists – the endorsements and commercials and appearances – and Ryan and I both know he won't even hit the medal stand.

    So we realized there was no way to cash in by the usual means, so we came up with an alternative. Claim God is Ryan's coach! Ryan can now come in dead last behind the lopsided midget marathoner from Albania and still have stunning earning potential from the book that is already mostly ghost-written, and the speaking tours, and the Christian products endorsements . . . the possibilities are endless!

    And we saved a fortune on real coaches. Only had to buy Ryan a pair of shoes.

    I'm getting 50% of the take. It's usually 15%, but when you believe that there is an all-powerful invisible buddy in the sky, you can also believe that 50% is the going rate.

    July 18, 2012 at 4:17 pm |
    • *facepalm*

      Are you Tebow's agent as well? Nah, can't be. Taking relatively mediocre talent and using a very public, outspoken belief to drive autobiography sales before hitting the quarter century mark isn't really his style.

      July 18, 2012 at 4:26 pm |
  15. Bill Deacon

    Rock on Ryan! Whether your Olympic hopes are achieved or not, you have accomplished more than all the bloggers on this board just by getting there. It truly is icing on the cake and your faith is a pearl of great price, no matter the outcome. For all those posting glib negative comments, I recommend reading "Unbroken" It is the true story of the fastest collegiate runner in history named Louis Zamperini who served as a bombadier during WW11 after racing in the Berlin Olympics. His plane went down and he spent 2 years as a POW. His story of faith and resilience is the stuff of true American exceptionalism.

    July 18, 2012 at 4:10 pm |
    • Who invited me?

      Bill
      Which comments are negative?
      Justbecause some jokes are being made does not mean they are negative,
      Maybe you need to restore your faith in Zeus

      July 18, 2012 at 4:13 pm |
    • rAmen

      because no other country in the world has self proclaimed exceptionalism, EVER

      July 18, 2012 at 4:16 pm |
    • Answer

      I bet it's not the reality of training that helps you win...

      July 18, 2012 at 4:19 pm |
    • I'm not a GOPer, nor do I play one on TV

      @Bill,

      Doubtless Louis Zamperini's life story is interesting and inspiring, but the notion of American Exceptionalism is that we're all special because God has ordained this country to be so.

      Don't you think that's a bit like handing out trophies to all the little leaguers on every team, just for showing up. I don't have a problem with boosting the self-esteem of 6-year-olds, but isn't it a bit delusional as adults to think we're all special just because we're here?

      July 18, 2012 at 4:26 pm |
    • Chariot of Fire

      WW eleven! Is there something you're not telling us?

      July 18, 2012 at 4:35 pm |
    • derp

      "fastest collegiate runner in history"

      You obviously don't know a bloody thing about track and field.

      Zamperini was not the fastest runner in collegiate history.

      He briefly held the NCAA mile record at 4:08+.

      That's it.

      He would be an average D1 runner today. My son went to a D1 school on an athletic scholarship (track). He ran the mile faster than Zamperini did in college, and he ran the 5K faster than Zamperini did in the Olympics.

      Zamperini's is a great story. But let's not overdo it. He ran in the Olympics, but did not even medal.

      July 18, 2012 at 4:35 pm |
    • just sayin

      "He ran in the Olympics, but did not even medal."
      .
      He should have prayed harder while he ran?

      July 18, 2012 at 4:39 pm |
    • Bill Deacon

      Fastest college miler in history at that time. It was widely believed he would break the four minute mile barrier before Cunningham. Advances in training, equipment, tracks etc. have enabled runners to go faster at this point. I am not a running fan true. It probably wasn't his prayer life that kept him from the medal in Berlin, He was only 17 at the time an Jesse Owens was on his team. His plan was to race in the 1940 Olympics scheduled for Tokyo, later moved to Finland and ultimately cancelled. 2 years as POW wrecked his physical abilities and left him an alcoholic after the war. His spiritual life didn't really begin until about 1950. In 1984 He carried the Olympic torch past the prison camp he inhabited 40 years earlier and sought out the commanding officer of that camp to offer Christian forgiveness (this was on 60 minutes). If that's not exceptional I don't know what is regardless of the country he calls home.

      July 18, 2012 at 4:53 pm |
    • derp

      "Fastest college miler in history at that time"

      Fastest AMERICAN college miler at that time. And remember, college track was not where the fastest runner were. They were professional.

      " It was widely believed he would break the four minute mile barrier before Cunningham"

      Widely believed by who?

      Zamperini had one race where he went 4:08. He never went faster than that again. Cunningham had gone 4:06 TWO YEARS before that, and had been consistently faster than Zamperini at every point in their careers.

      If anyone was going to get to 3:59 before Bannister, it would have been Andersson or Hagg. Both went 4:01 ten years before bannister went 3:59.

      Zamperini's is a good story that gets better with each passing year.

      July 18, 2012 at 5:49 pm |
  16. Poseidon

    Well, considering that the ancient Greeks invented the Olympics and the ancient Greeks invented marathon running, I'm thinking that he maybe should have chosen Zues or Mercury as running coaches.

    July 18, 2012 at 3:51 pm |
    • Who invited me?

      If you are here Poseidon, then who is making sure the simmers and divers are OK....
      get back to work Aquaman

      July 18, 2012 at 3:54 pm |
    • J.W

      I bet Mercury could run fast.

      July 18, 2012 at 3:55 pm |
    • hawaiiguest

      I think you guys mean Hermes. Mercury is the Roman equivalent.

      July 18, 2012 at 3:57 pm |
    • Who invited me?

      Right ...I always get my mythical superpowers confused
      Hail superman!!!

      July 18, 2012 at 3:58 pm |
    • Poseidon

      Great! Hermes is pissed because turned him into a Roman. You should hear him!

      "Apart from better sanitation and medicine and education and irrigation and public health and roads and a freshwater system and baths and public order... what have the Romans done for us?"

      July 18, 2012 at 4:03 pm |
    • hawaiiguest

      A framework for a good democracy?

      July 18, 2012 at 4:20 pm |
    • Kratos

      POSEIDEN! How do you still live?! WHat's going on here? I destroyed the olympi.. Oh. I see. My bad guys.

      July 18, 2012 at 4:21 pm |
    • Chuckles

      Mercury's a cheat! He had wings on his shoes!

      That and he's a god so.....

      July 18, 2012 at 4:21 pm |
  17. Who invited me?

    Isn't the olympic god Zeus anyway....he's backed the wrong horse

    July 18, 2012 at 3:49 pm |
  18. Google Translator

    “Medals are things I would love to achieve, but it's all icing on the cake,” says Hall.

    Translation: "I know am going to lose, so I add that line so people don't deduce the obvious and say God must not exist."

    July 18, 2012 at 3:48 pm |
    • just sayin

      Um we call that a noce disclaimer so your god will not be accountible

      July 18, 2012 at 3:52 pm |
    • I'm not a GOPer, nor do I play one on TV

      Still not going to stop Kenyans winning the gold and sliver.

      July 18, 2012 at 4:01 pm |
    • just sayin

      oops accountable

      July 18, 2012 at 4:04 pm |
    • derp

      God likes Kenyans better.

      July 18, 2012 at 4:13 pm |
  19. just sayin

    I wonder if he hears God talking back to him? His delusion has carried him this far and apparently he cant function with his delusion. Some people need a delusion to get them through things...he is one of them.

    July 18, 2012 at 3:48 pm |
    • Mickey1313

      I bet tbow giggled with glee when he heard this story.

      July 18, 2012 at 4:10 pm |
    • K-switch

      Awww, you beat me to the Tebow reference. Well hopefully this guy can refrain from crying on national televeision.

      July 18, 2012 at 4:18 pm |
    • just sayin

      If he is anything like the Christians on here..he is going to cry like a little girl

      July 18, 2012 at 4:36 pm |
  20. J.W

    If he wins a gold medal it will prove the existence of God.

    July 18, 2012 at 3:39 pm |
    • Who invited me?

      and so to the guy that loses who also prayed it wll prove that god doesn't exist.
      Damn that pesky faith vs. logic again.

      July 18, 2012 at 3:42 pm |
    • Qwerty Elemeno

      If he doesn't, it will prove that God is a lousy coach.

      July 18, 2012 at 3:43 pm |
    • *facepalm*

      He's an American marathoner. He's going to get crushed.

      July 18, 2012 at 3:43 pm |
    • J.W

      Well when the universe came into being there was no such thing as the olympics. It may be possible that no Olympic athlete has asked God to be their coach, so God does not have much practice with it yet.

      July 18, 2012 at 3:47 pm |
    • I'm not a GOPer, nor do I play one on TV

      God is much better at football and baseball.

      July 18, 2012 at 3:55 pm |
    • HotAirAce

      As in, god is much better at American-only sports.

      July 18, 2012 at 3:57 pm |
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About this blog

The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.