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Bill Nye slams creationism
August 27th, 2012
11:31 AM ET

Bill Nye slams creationism

By Eric Marrapodi, CNN Belief Blog Co-Editor

(CNN)–Famed TV scientist Bill Nye is slamming creationism in a new online video for Big Think titled "Creationism Is Not Appropriate For Children."

"Denial of evolution is unique to the United States," Nye begins in a YouTube video posted on Thursday.  The video quickly picked up steam over the weekend and as of Monday morning had been viewed more than 1,100,000 times.

Nye - a mechanical engineer and television personality best known for his program, "Bill Nye the Science Guy" - said the United States has great capital in scientific knowledge and "when you have a portion of the population that doesn't believe in it, it holds everyone back."

"Your world becomes fantastically complicated if you don't believe in evolution," Nye said in the Web video.

Creationists are a vast and varied group in the United States.  Most creationists believe in the account of the origins of the world as told in the Book of Genesis, the first book of the Bible.

CNN’s Belief Blog: The faith angles behind the biggest stories

In the creation account, God creates Adam and Eve, the world, and everything in it in six days.

For Christians who read the Genesis account literally, or authoritatively as they would say, the six days in the account are literal 24-hour periods and leave no room for evolution.  Young Earth creationists use this construct and biblical genealogies to determine the age of the Earth, and typically come up with 6,000 to 10,000 years.

Your Take: 5 reactions to Bill Nye's creationism critique

The Gallup Poll has been tracking Americans' views on creation and evolution for the past 30 years.  In June it released its latest findings, which showed 46% of Americans believed in creationism, 32% believed in evolution guided by God, and 15% believed in atheistic evolution.

During the 30 years Gallup has conducted the survey, creationism has remained far and away the most popular answer, with 40% to 47% of Americans surveyed saying they believed that God created humans in their present form at one point within the past 10,000 years.

Survey: Nearly half of Americans subscribe to creationist view of human origins

"The idea of deep time of billions of years explains so much of the world around us. If you try to ignore that, your worldview becomes crazy, untenable, itself inconsistent," Nye said in the video.

"I say to the grownups, if you want to deny evolution and live in your world, that's completely inconsistent with the world we observe, that's fine.  But don't make your kids do it.  Because we need them.  We need scientifically literate voters and taxpayers for the future.  We need engineers that can build stuff and solve problems," he said.

Creationists' beliefs about the origins of the Earth are often a narrow focus, based in large part on religious beliefs, and while they reject evolution as "just one theory," they often embrace other fields of science and technology.

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In "The Genesis Flood," the 1961 book that in many ways help launch the Young Earth creationism movement in the United States, the authors write: “Our conclusions must unavoidably be colored by our Biblical presuppositions, and this we plainly acknowledge."  Their goal for the book was to harmonize the scientific evidence with the accounts in Genesis of creation and the flood.

The idea of creationism has been scorned by the mainstream scientific community since shortly after Darwin introduced "The Origin of Species" in 1859.  By 1880, The American Naturalists, a science journal, reported nearly every major university in America was teaching evolution.

"In another couple centuries I'm sure that worldview won't even exist.  There's no evidence for it. So..." Nye ends his video.

- CNN Belief Blog Co-Editor

Filed under: Creationism • Science

soundoff (14,640 Responses)
  1. Snap

    Religious people are hypocrites!! Why use modern technology and medicine? Why not just pray? Because you are all phonies. Please stop ruining society.

    August 27, 2012 at 6:13 pm |
  2. JecciBeans

    We need more information about the theory of evolution here. Since there are so many posters here that appear to have a good grasp on what this theory represents – please provide a little more information.

    1. Is evolution the theory based on one species evolving into another separate and distinct species? Or, does evolution focus on adaptation whereby a species remains as it is, but will adapt to environmental factors around it?
    2. Does evolution support that all mankind came from one male and one female or does evolution believe that multiple male and females evolved at the same time, thus producing offspring?
    3. Does evolution address how we started to begin with? It seems to address how we've changed over time, but not how we started.

    Thanks

    August 27, 2012 at 6:13 pm |
    • Snap

      I need more info on creationism. Did the talking snake have an accent? Was it hard to create a woman from only a man's rib cage? Did dinosaurs and humans live together like the Flinstones? Do you people have brains?

      August 27, 2012 at 6:15 pm |
    • JecciBeans

      Thank you for your post – it was most helpful. I take it that you have absolutely no idea what the theory of evolution is.

      August 27, 2012 at 6:19 pm |
    • Blessed are the Cheesemakers

      "please provide a little more information."

      How about you do some research yourself? go to the library, google is your friend.

      August 27, 2012 at 6:19 pm |
    • sane

      There's this thing called the internet. Use it. Do some independent study. Don't expect others to do the hard work for you. Or are you just looking for an argument?

      August 27, 2012 at 6:21 pm |
    • Onslow

      To JecciBeans: you ask some very intelligent questions. You will find all the answers in an excellent book by Richard Dawkins – The Greatest Show On Earth. No one with an open mind can doubt evolution after reading this book. Creationists are just blinded to the truth – real truth, not religious beliefs perceived as truths.

      August 27, 2012 at 6:21 pm |
    • JecciBeans

      Cheesmaker – I don't understand. I'm not the one knocking down everyone else's theory. To have an intelligent discussion – why don't share with us what the concepts behind the theory are? Unless you believe in creationism....

      August 27, 2012 at 6:23 pm |
    • JecciBeans

      Snap – I'm not looking for an argument. There are holes in both theories. What is becoming painfully obvious is that very few of the posters here have any clue as to what the theory of evolution really is. It seems that it is just easier to name-call and knock someone else's beliefs down, rather than have your own opinion. If you believe in evolution – why? If you believe in creationism – why?

      August 27, 2012 at 6:28 pm |
    • Blessed are the Cheesemakers

      I am not knocking anyones valid, evidentuary back theory either, but creationism has none of that and is not a "theory".

      You asked three questions that can all be answered easily by doing a littel reseach. If you are not sure where to go, go to Talk Orgins.org is an excellent resource that lays out the scientific basis and definitions for evolution. It also address common creationism arguments.

      http://talkorigins.org/

      August 27, 2012 at 6:32 pm |
    • Andromeda

      1, Evolutionary theory addresses both cases. Darwin and Wallace did as well. Please note: "theory" is being used in the scientific sence as "a scientific understanding" rather than the public meaning implying speculation.
      2. Gender specification for the purpose of exchanging DNA is much older than human beings in our present form. As far as whether it was one woman and man or many, I don't think we have an exact answer yet. You might like the book "The Seven Daughters of Eve" (Bryan Sykes) which traces mitochondrial DNA back to 7 distinct women.
      3. When you say "how we started to begin with", are you asking if Darwin and Wallace addressed the origin of the first life? They did not, they only wrote about their observations of species changing over time. But there are many other scientists working on the origin of life.

      Thanks for listening.

      August 27, 2012 at 6:41 pm |
  3. Robert

    Creationist argue that creationism should be tought in school. So which god or gods are they going to talk about?

    August 27, 2012 at 6:12 pm |
    • t3chn0ph0b3

      Zuul.

      August 27, 2012 at 6:19 pm |
    • Wrenn_NYC

      I'll take that African one where it's all sneezed out as snot.

      August 27, 2012 at 6:36 pm |
  4. SaveFerris

    Although evolution does challenge some statements made by Christianity, its intended purpose is not to destroy or discredit religion. Christians like to insert religion into the argument by asking why we can not claim that both are possible, but they are missing the point. The theory of evolution is not about religion and never was. It is about life; religion has simply imposed itself on it. Which god would you like us to insert into the argument? Your god, or one of the hundreds of others around the world? Evolution attempts to explain how life has gotten from point A to point D, not who permitted it to happen.

    August 27, 2012 at 6:12 pm |
    • Robert

      Exactly!

      August 27, 2012 at 6:15 pm |
  5. Richard Louis Fairchild

    Bill Nye, you've got everyone fooled you believe what you say! Ha! None of them know it's only for the money, and for the pleasure of wearing your bow ties and being seen by many people with them on.

    August 27, 2012 at 6:12 pm |
    • sane

      I think you have Bill confused with the Catholic church.

      August 27, 2012 at 6:23 pm |
  6. Richard Louis Fairchild

    Anyone who does not believe in talking snakes is an idiot!

    August 27, 2012 at 6:11 pm |
    • Richard Louis Fairchild

      thank you so much, false Richard Louis Fairchild. I know my name is beautiful, but please, find your own.

      August 27, 2012 at 6:13 pm |
    • jemzinthekop

      Lies! The talking fiery desert plant told me.

      August 27, 2012 at 6:14 pm |
  7. jemzinthekop

    You believe in the Bible because you were born into a family that lived in a city that lived in a country that believed in the Bible, the same way that people in Iran believe in the Qu'ran or people in Bombay the Bhagavad Gita. It is all geographic based folklore and the ones with the biggest swords eventually won out.

    August 27, 2012 at 6:11 pm |
  8. gager

    The bible says the earth is flat.No discussion.

    August 27, 2012 at 6:10 pm |
    • turner1988

      Where does it say that?

      August 27, 2012 at 6:15 pm |
    • wtlisat

      Um.. actually no. The Bible does NOT say the earth is flat. In fact, Christopher Columbus formed his theory that the earth was a sphere from reading scripture. Isaiah 40:21-22 – "Do you not know? Have you not heard? Has it not been told you from the beginning? Have you not understood since the earth was founded? He sits enthroned above the circle of the earth..."

      August 27, 2012 at 6:27 pm |
    • Wrenn_NYC

      wrong wtlisat. People knew that the world was round BEFORE Columbus.

      In fact, the greeks knew it before the time of Christ.

      Go study some history, please.

      August 27, 2012 at 6:37 pm |
    • Layne

      Try Rev 7:1 or Job 38:13. One refers to the "four corners of the earth", the other to the "ends of the earth". Now in fairness I should say the "ends of the earth" might be a reference to chronological measurement, not geometric measurement. Look it up yourself and read it in context if you're interested. But the one on Revelation, the "four corners" verse, is hard to read any other way than the earth is flat. Again, don't take my word for it and argue with me. Look up the references yourself, then argue with the Bible.

      August 27, 2012 at 6:40 pm |
  9. Richard Louis Fairchild

    Bill Nye! You're such a kidder!

    August 27, 2012 at 6:10 pm |
    • Nill Bye

      Hush up, Dick. Can we call you Dick? I have a feeling you're used to it.

      August 27, 2012 at 6:12 pm |
    • Richard Louis Fairchild

      You too, you're such a kidder. You're all such kidders. I get such a jolt just going on here and looking at all the creative writing! Thank you all! Thankyaverymuchhhhh!

      August 27, 2012 at 6:14 pm |
  10. Tell It Like It Is

    Wrenn_NYC

    Thus showing your lack of science education.

    WHICH missing link?

    There will likely always be gaps in the fossil record, due to the fact that fossils are actually rare occurences. We have been slowly filling in the fossil record over the past 100 years.

    Your 'god of the gaps' idea gets smaller and smaller.

    Learn something. All you've done here is parrot something you were told by some preacher.
    *****
    I am educated. Probably have more in my little pinkie than you do in your whole body. And no, some 'preacher' didn't tell me this. I'm more open and not as narrow minded as some.

    August 27, 2012 at 6:10 pm |
    • Wrenn_NYC

      Your assumption that you know anything about me is laughable.

      And your way of stating so is derisive. So. Does attempting to put people down make you feel big?

      Go back to school.

      August 27, 2012 at 6:22 pm |
    • putty

      Wrenn, I think we can safely assume that you weren't well educated in the biological sciences (although perhaps you were educated in other sciences? Physicists don't necessarily make the best biologists.). That's not a big deal, though, as it puts you in the company of the majority of Americans. I agree that Tell It's putting you down is counterproductive.

      August 27, 2012 at 6:28 pm |
  11. Bob Christian (aka: Christian Bob)

    WHY BELIEVE IN GOD- Numerous Reasons
    The fact of the matter is that reasons for believing that there’s a God are too numerous, I hardly know where to begin. The first reason I believe in God is that we are totally incapable of rationally explaining the world without a God. Take the universe, for example. Science has successfully demonstrated that the universe had a specific beginning — and that it is now running down due to the lack of available energy. In fact, the universe in which we live is dying of heat loss. Now since our scientific understanding rules out an eternal universe, and since it is totally irrational to believe that the universe sprang from nothing, the only RATIONAL explanation is that a supernatural being created the world in which we live; and that this being is all-powerful, intelligent, moral, and, of course, self-existent.

    WHY BELIEVE IN GOD- Downfalls of Atheism
    The next reason I believe there’s a God is that atheism is incapable of accounting for the vast array of phenomena which we experience every single day. An atheistic world view cannot adequately account for such things as, the universal laws of logic, laws of science, not to mention, standards of morality. In addition, if there is no God, then there is no ultimate meaning or purpose to life — we are little more than animals.

    WHY BELIEVE IN GOD- The Evidence
    But the real reason I believe there’s a God is that He has revealed Himself to me through the person and work of Jesus Christ. Jesus claimed to be God in human flesh (John 8:58). Now this is an astounding claim, but He supported the claim by His matchless personal character, His fulfillment of predictive prophecy, by His influence on human history, but most significantly, by His historical resurrection from the dead. Now, if you are looking for God — you need look no further than Jesus Christ Himself. He was either a liar, a lunatic, a legend, or He was, in fact, Lord. Now I think if you’ll examine the evidence, you’ll agree with me that He was the Lord, the one who spoke and the universe leapt into existence.

    On the question "why believe in God", that’s the CRI Perspective. I’m Hank Hanegraaff.

    SOURCE: http://WWW.EQUIP.ORG

    August 27, 2012 at 6:09 pm |
    • fail

      you are a failure

      August 27, 2012 at 6:13 pm |
    • rebuttal girl

      godisimaginary.com

      August 27, 2012 at 6:14 pm |
    • t3chn0ph0b3

      Faith requires a lack of evidence, twit.

      August 27, 2012 at 6:15 pm |
    • Dan

      In addition, if there is no God, then there is no ultimate meaning or purpose to life — we are little more than animals.

      This is both a crushing and very liberating truth.

      August 27, 2012 at 6:18 pm |
    • Abraham

      That's why I believe in Zeus (and Odin, too, just to hedge my bets). I opened my cranium to Zeus and he crawled right in and then some lesser gods jumped out. If you just let him in you will find the same thing. Glory to Olympus!

      August 27, 2012 at 6:21 pm |
  12. Richard Louis Fairchild

    I'm with the Bill Nye is just upset that he was created with such a funny head guy.

    August 27, 2012 at 6:09 pm |
    • TheVocalAtheist

      Is that how a nice Christian boy talks? Shame on you making fun of someone. Isn't that a sin or something?

      August 27, 2012 at 6:16 pm |
    • Russell's Teapot

      @Richard Lewis Fairchild,
      Better watch out when making fun of someones cranial features... Need I remind you of 2Kings 2:23-24?

      August 27, 2012 at 10:21 pm |
  13. sheetiron

    With all due respect Bill, I reject your request. My child will be educated to the standards that I choose for him until such a time that he decides for himself.

    August 27, 2012 at 6:09 pm |
    • fableanne

      You have that right.

      August 27, 2012 at 6:11 pm |
    • Dan

      As wrong as you are, it's a parent's right to teach their children whatever they want. The risk of morons like you indoctrinating their children with inaccurate information, or at worst with racist, hateful, etc. is acceptable because America is a land of freedom.

      August 27, 2012 at 6:15 pm |
    • Rev. Joseph Reeder

      Does that imply Dan that you would rather America not be a land of freedom so that morons like myself would be prevented from contaminating the rest of society with our... "indoctrination" as you put it? Just curious.

      August 27, 2012 at 6:18 pm |
    • putty

      Rev. JR – my answer to your question is yes. You're only free to do things unless they harm other people. Pretending that facts and evidence do not exist is harmful to progress and to this country's economy. There is a reason why when you walk into any lab in this country, 90% of the scientists are Chinese or Indian. Your children need to be educated as to how the world works so that they can make informed decisions as consumers and voters. We want progress, not to drive the world back into the dark ages.

      That said, there is a role for faith in society. I am also very pro-homeschooling, when it is done correctly and consistently. If you want your child to memorize the Bible, that's fine, as long as they also understand the mass of evidence that we have collected as to how the world works and what the applications of this understanding are (ie. farming, vaccines, MRIs, computers, airplanes, chihuahuas etc etc etc).

      August 27, 2012 at 6:39 pm |
    • putty

      As a reply to sheetiron – your child will NEVER be able to choose for themselves because you have already indoctrinated them. When you raise children to believe grass is purple, when they hit 18 you can tell them it's green until you're blue in the face, but they won't believe you even if the evidence is smack in their face.

      August 27, 2012 at 6:48 pm |
    • Jack Kieser

      Freedom is never, has never been, and never will be absolute; if it was, we'd live not in a democracy, but in anarchy. For instance, you have freedom of speech in the US, but cannot yell "Fire!" in a crowded theater (which means your freedom is restricted). Freedom is not something given: it is earned, and it is when people abuse that freedom that restrictions are placed (much like it wasn't until people started abusing speech that restrictions had to be placed). For instance, I am sure you didn't know that it's actually illegal to be a practicing Snake Charmer in the US, even though it is a religion and we have freedom of religion here; the reason is because it is a danger to the practicer and others, and so after people abused it, it was banned. If theists keep abusing their "freedom" of religion to abuse children, destroy minds, and commit human rights atrocities, then yes, your "freedoms" will be restricted for the good of everyone else.

      August 27, 2012 at 6:52 pm |
    • Russell's Teapot

      @sheetiron,
      Which is to say substandard?

      August 27, 2012 at 10:23 pm |
  14. ToWit

    I am not a follower of organized religion. However, I believe there is a vast void between the belief of the existence of a personal, anthropomorphic God and the belief that no God exists in any ideation of the word. The order of the Universe as revealed through our study of chemistry, astronomy, physics, etc. certainly suggests intelligence, a concept we associate with something alive. And because our physical selves are composed of precisely the same fundamental constituents of matter as the rest of the Cosmos, we can reasonably conclude that the nature of the Cosmos is our nature. Given the astounding progression of intelligence in the evolution of life forms over the past 3.5 billion years on this planet, we can only vaguely imagine how we may perceive the world in just one million years henceforth as humankind continues to evolve. With this perspective, it is not unreasonable to suppose that an answer to our unanswered questions, such as who we are and why are we conscious is waiting in the wings. Perhaps God may turn out to be our collective selves – the Cosmos itself – in our most evolved state of awareness. Listen up religious zealots and atheists alike, only a fool will close the book and claim he or she knows all the answers to life’s enigma.

    August 27, 2012 at 6:08 pm |
  15. Creed

    OK, Richard here is my thought. I always ask the Creationists whether or not Tyrannosaurus Rex, Velociraptors, Pleurocoelus, Brachiosaurs, Anchiceratops and a thousand other dinosaurs lived in the Garden of Eden with Adam. So far, I have never been given any response other than a blank, confused stare followed by unintelligible stammering. We are arguing with folks so frighteningly uninformed that I have had creationists tell me that Boston Terriers, Labrador Retrievers, Dachshunds Great Danes and Poodles all lived in the Garden of Eden. It is an uphill battle to address such extreme ignorance and overwhelming prejudice.

    August 27, 2012 at 6:08 pm |
  16. gager

    The bible says the earth is flat. End of discussion.

    August 27, 2012 at 6:08 pm |
    • Rev. Joseph Reeder

      Apparently you never read the bible or you would obviously believe otherwise seeing how the bible claim that the earth is round. Research is fun.

      August 27, 2012 at 6:11 pm |
    • Adam

      And that is why creationists have nothing to add to the discourse. For they have removed themselves from the conversation.

      August 27, 2012 at 6:11 pm |
    • TheVocalAtheist

      @Rev. Joseph Reeder

      Apparently you never read the theory of evolution or you would obviously believe otherwise. Research is fun.

      August 27, 2012 at 6:13 pm |
    • Steve

      It does, eh? Where?

      August 27, 2012 at 6:15 pm |
    • rcw

      Where?

      August 27, 2012 at 6:17 pm |
    • MP

      Actually it doesn't.

      August 27, 2012 at 6:18 pm |
  17. Kelly Frost

    I think one of the problems in the U.S. is a misunderstanding of what a scientific theory actually entails. Many seem to think it's just an idea, and that Creationism is another one that has equal standing. That's totally wrong. First you have an idea. If you can test that idea, it is now a hypothesis. After you test the hypothesis and it is proven to be true, you take another testable idea and prove it either true or false. Once you have between several and several thousand of these proven hypotheses, you can coalesce them into an overall Theory. So, a scientific theory, like evolution, is the coalesced result of thousands of proven hypotheses. If one of these hypotheses is later proven to be false, we revisit the theory and revise it to fit the known facts. If we cannot do so, the theory as a whole is scrapped. Evolution is a theory, which means that it meets the thousands of known facts that we have in regards to it, is successfully opposed by zero proven facts, and is ambivalent about all the facts that have not yet been proven or disproven.

    Creationism, by its very nature, is not provable, and therefore can never move from idea to hypothesis. It cannot and will not ever be a theory.

    There you have it; a solid explanation for why Creationism is not a competing theory with evolution. It's not a theory at all.

    August 27, 2012 at 6:07 pm |
    • Al

      Thank you, Kelly.

      August 27, 2012 at 6:10 pm |
    • Mr. M

      Oh, the irony. When had evolution ever been tested?

      August 27, 2012 at 6:14 pm |
    • Kelly Frost

      @Mr. M

      I never said evolution had been tested. Just the thousands of hypotheses that support the theory as a whole. Once any of those hypotheses are proven to be incorrect, the theory will be revisited and then revised or scrapped to meet with the new factual evidence. Next time, please read my actual words rather than what you want them to say.

      August 27, 2012 at 6:22 pm |
    • Mr. M

      Actually, I don't think you have it correct. You can't prove something is fact by saying each individual component is provable. Scientific method has to do with what is observable, testable and repeatable. Macro-evolution (evolution including speciation) provides none of these.

      But, you have me interested. What, in your opinion, are some of the most compelling of these 'proven hypothesis'? Just provide the top three and we can look at those.

      August 27, 2012 at 6:32 pm |
    • Kelly Frost

      Here are three proven facts for you:

      Genetic mutation happens.
      Organisms adapt to their environment.
      New species can be created by selective breeding.

      All three of these things that support the theory of evolution have been definitively shown to happen. Now, why don't you give me three actually proven facts that support creationism?

      August 27, 2012 at 6:39 pm |
    • Mr. M

      Thank you Kelly. It is nice to have a somewhat civil discussion. To your points:
      Genetic mutation happens.
      Yes, mutations happen. However, they are just that: Mutations. The DNA found in mutations have never been found to be passed down to offspring.

      Organisms adapt to their environment.
      Yes, organisms adapt. However, adaptation occurs within the genetic code present in the animal (i.e.: finches with longer beaks). No creature ever has been shown to change species based on adaptation.

      New species can be created by selective breeding.
      This one I am not familiar with. I have never heard of a new species that was created from breeding. Could you provide a link or more information?

      As for me providing proof for creationism, I don't have any. In fact, I find both explanations (evolution and creationism) equally troubling. The issue I have is that there are so many problems with origins of life and evolution, that the more I read, the more implausible it sounds. For instance, the process by which blood clots is incredibly complex. Many things have to occur at specific times in order to keep someone from bleeding to death. So, in order to believe that this evolved, I am forced to also accept that the very first organism that had blood (another huge leap due to all the complexities presented there) also, somehow, had the good fortune of blood that clotted upon contact with air. Because, without that, the organism would die with the simplest of cuts.

      I wish I knew the answer but I don't. And, whether you believe it or not, no one else does either.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:15 pm |
    • putty

      Thanks, Kelly. I love how no one ever feels like arguing with the theory of gravity. Here's another four to add to your list:

      1. We can apply specific selection pressures and accurately predict where mutations are most likely going to occur in the genome in response to the pressure.

      2. Ties in with #1, but we can directly observe evolution happening in real time in organisms with short generation times. Evolution is driven by change in the genome. Now that whole genome sequencing is dirt cheap, especially for organisms with small genomes such as bacteria, yeast and viruses , we can directly sequence the genome of every generation for a hundred generations and watch evolution happen in real time in response to a specific selection pressure.

      3. Our bodies are shoddily designed, the result of which is age, autoimmune disease, cancer, back problems, heart problems, sprains etc etc. This is because our bodies were not, in fact designed. Evolution is constrained by whatever the previous iteration was, it can't create something entirely new (which is why we still have tailbones). In the lab, there are no such constraints. Expect to see a more efficiently designed heart made entirely of the patient's tissue to be published next year or so (although long wait for clinical trials).

      4. All life came from a common ancestor, based on genetic evidence. A useful application of this is that we can study fruitflies and yeast and apply our findings to human disease, since the majority of complex cellular signalling in the nucleus and cytoplasm is virtually identical across all eukaryotes. Studying disease in fruitflies is more useful than studying it in humans due to short generation time. If each organism was separately and independently created, there is no logical reason why all molecular processes would be near identical across species. If there is alien life in space, I guarantee that THAT will have vastly different cellular structure and signalling components. Probably wouldn't even have DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid), it would have another chemical to transmit information from generation to generation.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:25 pm |
    • Mr. M

      Putty – Really? You think macro-evolution is just as provable as the effects of gravity? Hardened scientists everywhere are cringing.

      "You got a question; You ask the 8-ball."

      August 27, 2012 at 7:56 pm |
    • putty

      Mr. M – had a long reply for you – dunno where it went? In short – germline mutations are passed on (mutations in DNA of cells that become egg and sperm). You pass on average 5 new mutations to your son or daughter. Speciation and adaptation are two separate processes driven by germline mutation. Would suggest reading up on them since your reply indicated some confusion on what they are. Selective breeding created animals like dogs, sheep, and cows (ancestors do not look anything like them and are far more wild and dangerous to be around) and all of the crops we eat today, which have been modified to be seedless (long story on how you propagate these) and pretty (ie. red tomatoes) among other things.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:56 pm |
    • putty

      Hi again, Mr. M! The use of the term "theory" in the phases "theory of gravity" and "theory of evolution" are identical. This term means that we have an explanation supported by a VAST amount of data and this explanation can accurately predict new phenomena. Theories can be modified as new data comes in.

      "Theory" in everyday use just means a guess. This is not how we use the term in science.

      August 27, 2012 at 8:03 pm |
    • putty

      Like gravity, evolution is both fact and theory. Things fall. Fact. Organisms change over time. Fact. The theory part explains how it things happen based on known, provable facts and is able to predict future phenomena. How and why do things fall under different conditions? Theory of relativity. How did organisms come to be in their present state and how will they change in the future? Theory of evolution.

      August 27, 2012 at 8:33 pm |
  18. markiejoe

    Good lord. Why do you call the third category "atheistic evolution"?

    How about something more accurate, like "Science-based evolution"?

    August 27, 2012 at 6:07 pm |
  19. just a John

    One more point that you never have the guts to answer, as an atheist I care not what religion, god, deity or creation myth you believe, for I do not believe in any. The christians want to make this into some sort or persecution complex, get over yourselves, it is not all about you but the whole nonsense of religion.

    August 27, 2012 at 6:07 pm |
    • just a John

      Meant for chad der feige.

      August 27, 2012 at 6:08 pm |
  20. Rev. Joseph Reeder

    With all due respect Bill, I reject your request. My child will be educated to the standards that I choose for him until such a time that he decides for himself.

    August 27, 2012 at 6:07 pm |
    • rEvolution

      Amen Reverend!

      August 27, 2012 at 6:08 pm |
    • TheVocalAtheist

      So in other words you are going to indoctrinate your child into the make believe? You go Paw!

      August 27, 2012 at 6:11 pm |
    • Saul the Finance Guy

      Just make sure he knows his math and science or he may end up in the clergy. 🙂

      August 27, 2012 at 6:12 pm |
    • Rev. Joseph Reeder

      Exactly. And as his parent, that is my choice and my right. To those who have serious problems and find themselves pacing back and forth at merely the thought of me raising my child this way, I encourage you to discover the lost art of minding your own business.

      August 27, 2012 at 6:15 pm |
    • TheVocalAtheist

      You're a monster, a child abuser, raping a child's mind and placing supernatural thoughts in the place of reality. You should be ashamed of yourself. And I don't have to mind my own business especially when there are people like you harming individuals with lies and bigotry.

      August 27, 2012 at 6:19 pm |
    • Saul the Finance Guy

      You were the one who posted, so it's everyone's business now, reverend. Perhaps you should keep your thoughts to yourself and others will not react?

      August 27, 2012 at 6:20 pm |
    • Rev. Joseph Reeder

      Oh I don't mind that everyone knows about what I believe/don't believe. I don't even mind if people get upset, angry, disappointed, etc. But at the end of the day I think it is a reasonable for me to expect to know their place when it comes to how I raise my child and how do you say.... deal with it.

      August 27, 2012 at 6:25 pm |
    • Wrenn_NYC

      Remember to teach him the phrase ' would you like fries with that'.

      August 27, 2012 at 6:26 pm |
    • TheVocalAtheist

      @Rev

      This is the stuff you write? If I were your child I would run to the hills!

      "All over the world people are STILL experiencing the miraculous healing power of Jesus Christ. In North and South America reports of cancer and massive tumors are INSTANTLY disappearing when people call upon the name of Jesus. Diabetes, blindness and deafness, arthritis, chronic back problems, cystic fibrosis, etc all going away through the power of Christ. In Africa there are accounts of paralytics and cripples miraculously standing up, walking, then running jumping and dancing before the Lord who healed them. There are also reports that people are being delivered from evil spirits in Africa. Even in China Christs healing power is seen where there have been numerous eye witness accounts of people rising from the dead all by the power of the name of the Risen Lord Jesus Christ the Son of the Living God.

      Jesus can, desires to, and WILL do the same for you TODAY! In John 5 Jesus asks a man who had been paralyzed for almost 40 years what seemed to be a foolish question; “Do you want to get well?” What kind of question was that? The man had been bed ridden for decades! Of course he wanted to be healed. But you see the problem was that this man kept making excuses. After this man went on a rant about how everyone got their blessing before he could, how he cant do anything, and no one would help him Jesus simply looked at him and said, “Stand up and walk.” and thats exactly what he did.

      Jesus wants to heal you right now wherever you are, whatever you need. All you need is the power of a willing healing savior(which you already have)and faith. Jesus often responded to those who were healed, “your faith has healed you”, or “as you believed, so it will be done unto you.” Reach out in faith and receive your healing. Christ commanded his followers to pray for the sick. Thats exactly what I want to do. This blog is created so that you can receive your healing right NOW! Simply type your need as a comment to this post and I will pray for you. WHEN Jesus heals you, please feel free to leave another comment sharing what the Lord has done for you.

      God bless!"

      August 27, 2012 at 6:29 pm |
    • Rev. Joseph Reeder

      .....

      *sigh

      Don't worry Vocal, your going to be okay. It isn't like 46% of the American population believe in this stuff or anything..... oh wait.

      Never mind, your stuck with us.

      August 27, 2012 at 6:35 pm |
    • TheVocalAtheist

      Come on now there Rev, the faith healing claims? Where's the proof? That's some scary stuff. I would imagine if it were true we wouldn't need medicine and science right? All one would have to do is pray and they could rise from the dead, right? No, sorry, I don't think 46% believe this stuff happens, do you?

      August 27, 2012 at 6:41 pm |
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About this blog

The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.