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Bill Nye slams creationism
August 27th, 2012
11:31 AM ET

Bill Nye slams creationism

By Eric Marrapodi, CNN Belief Blog Co-Editor

(CNN)–Famed TV scientist Bill Nye is slamming creationism in a new online video for Big Think titled "Creationism Is Not Appropriate For Children."

"Denial of evolution is unique to the United States," Nye begins in a YouTube video posted on Thursday.  The video quickly picked up steam over the weekend and as of Monday morning had been viewed more than 1,100,000 times.

Nye - a mechanical engineer and television personality best known for his program, "Bill Nye the Science Guy" - said the United States has great capital in scientific knowledge and "when you have a portion of the population that doesn't believe in it, it holds everyone back."

"Your world becomes fantastically complicated if you don't believe in evolution," Nye said in the Web video.

Creationists are a vast and varied group in the United States.  Most creationists believe in the account of the origins of the world as told in the Book of Genesis, the first book of the Bible.

CNN’s Belief Blog: The faith angles behind the biggest stories

In the creation account, God creates Adam and Eve, the world, and everything in it in six days.

For Christians who read the Genesis account literally, or authoritatively as they would say, the six days in the account are literal 24-hour periods and leave no room for evolution.  Young Earth creationists use this construct and biblical genealogies to determine the age of the Earth, and typically come up with 6,000 to 10,000 years.

Your Take: 5 reactions to Bill Nye's creationism critique

The Gallup Poll has been tracking Americans' views on creation and evolution for the past 30 years.  In June it released its latest findings, which showed 46% of Americans believed in creationism, 32% believed in evolution guided by God, and 15% believed in atheistic evolution.

During the 30 years Gallup has conducted the survey, creationism has remained far and away the most popular answer, with 40% to 47% of Americans surveyed saying they believed that God created humans in their present form at one point within the past 10,000 years.

Survey: Nearly half of Americans subscribe to creationist view of human origins

"The idea of deep time of billions of years explains so much of the world around us. If you try to ignore that, your worldview becomes crazy, untenable, itself inconsistent," Nye said in the video.

"I say to the grownups, if you want to deny evolution and live in your world, that's completely inconsistent with the world we observe, that's fine.  But don't make your kids do it.  Because we need them.  We need scientifically literate voters and taxpayers for the future.  We need engineers that can build stuff and solve problems," he said.

Creationists' beliefs about the origins of the Earth are often a narrow focus, based in large part on religious beliefs, and while they reject evolution as "just one theory," they often embrace other fields of science and technology.

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In "The Genesis Flood," the 1961 book that in many ways help launch the Young Earth creationism movement in the United States, the authors write: “Our conclusions must unavoidably be colored by our Biblical presuppositions, and this we plainly acknowledge."  Their goal for the book was to harmonize the scientific evidence with the accounts in Genesis of creation and the flood.

The idea of creationism has been scorned by the mainstream scientific community since shortly after Darwin introduced "The Origin of Species" in 1859.  By 1880, The American Naturalists, a science journal, reported nearly every major university in America was teaching evolution.

"In another couple centuries I'm sure that worldview won't even exist.  There's no evidence for it. So..." Nye ends his video.

- CNN Belief Blog Co-Editor

Filed under: Creationism • Science

soundoff (14,640 Responses)
  1. Spencer

    I can't believe 46% of Americans still believe the universe suddendly appeared out of nowhere. This is complete ignorance of facts. This doesn't mean God didn't create everything, just that he didn't do it 10,000 years ago and we were NOT the center of the creation.

    August 27, 2012 at 7:14 pm |
    • Spencer

      I must correct my first statement. I can't believe 46% of Americans believe the Earth* appeared out of nowhere.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:16 pm |
    • Cq

      You can personally believe that God had a hand in it, but can you at least acknowledge that there isn't a shred of evidence to support that belief?

      August 27, 2012 at 7:18 pm |
    • Dawson

      Those who support the theory of evolution and the big bang theory also believe the world/universe 'appeared out of nowhere'...

      August 27, 2012 at 7:21 pm |
    • Spencer

      I'm not saying God does exist or doesn't, just that those people that do believe should use the intelligence he gave them to adapt their view to proven facts. Personally I'm up in the air about whether or not there is a God, but i'm still going to live my life by a set of values that I would want my children to follow. If you can't realize a theory/story/whatever is flawed, and refuse to change your mind about that theory/story/whatever, you are spitting in gods face because he gave you the ability to do so, and your refusing.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:27 pm |
    • Spencer

      I corrected myself and said Earth. But as far as the big bang theory goes, when new evidence disproves it, I will have to change my mind about what MAY be correct. Its about the journey, not the past.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:29 pm |
    • Bmd

      For evidence, a creationist will say the Bible is all the evidence necessary. If this were a court case, the Bible would be akin to hearsay or "he said, she said". The Bible says a lot of things, some are good lessons for humanity, but some aren't. Lines about submissive wives and slavery are regarded as barbaric. The Bible isn't meant to be taken literally. There's a level of gullibility or ignorance when someone takes any book literally, The Bible included.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:35 pm |
    • sybaris

      I can't believe 56% of Americans believe the universe was "poofed" into existence by some god.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:37 pm |
  2. Tony Montana

    Einstein wasn't an atheist. Science is simply an observation of god's creation.

    August 27, 2012 at 7:13 pm |
    • Observer

      Tony,

      “It was, of course, a lie what you read about my religious convictions, a lie which is being systematically repeated. I do not believe in a personal God and I have never denied this but have expressed it clearly. If something is in me which can be called religious then it is the unbounded admiration for the structure of the world so far as our science can reveal it.”
      - Albert Einstein, letter to J. Dispentiere, 3/24/1954

      August 27, 2012 at 7:15 pm |
    • Moby Schtick

      Einstein did not believe in a personal god. He doesn't help your case.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:15 pm |
    • I'm not a GOPer, nor do I play one on TV

      People who haven't really studied what Einstein said about his beliefs need to stop quoting him.

      He was not an atheist. Nor did he believe in an Abrahamic God (despite being raised as a Jew).

      I believe in Spinoza's God, Who reveals Himself in the lawful harmony of the world, not in a God Who concerns Himself with the fate and the doings of mankind. – Albert Einstein

      He was a deist. Go read up on Spinoza's God if you want to understand more.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:19 pm |
    • Nietodarwin

      I was going to dig up the same quote as the observer did Tony, but there it is. Are you confused by Einstein's "god doesn't play dice with the universe" quote? Well, look it up, instead of posting BS on here.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:20 pm |
    • therealpeace2all

      @Tony Montana

      I think Einstein was a believer in the 'God of Spinoza.,' expressed in the process of life. Not the God of the Bible.

      Peace...

      August 27, 2012 at 7:20 pm |
    • I'm not a GOPer, nor do I play one on TV

      @Observer,

      Sorry @Observer, I wasn't trying to pick on you, but your quote required an understanding of what he meant by "personal God" – like the "Jesus is my personal lord and saviour" nonsense and the notion of anthropomorphic gods.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:21 pm |
    • I'm not a GOPer, nor do I play one on TV

      As befits a man of such complex thoughts, he is a man of complex philosophy. He saw the universe as wondrous and mysterious. He is not on one side or the other regarding Abrahamic religions and atheism. Neither "side" can claim him as their own.

      I'm not an atheist and I don't think I can call myself a pantheist. We are in the position of a little child entering a huge library filled with books in many different languages. The child knows someone must have written those books. It does not know how. The child dimly suspects a mysterious order in the arrangement of the books but doesn't know what it is. That, it seems to me, is the att'tude of even the most intelligent human being toward God. – Albert Einstein

      August 27, 2012 at 7:28 pm |
    • Scimajor

      Sorry Bill, you're talking to a wall man. History has proven that people will believe anything the want to believe despite the absence of one single shred of evidence to support their belief.

      You're right though, if we could stop the brainwashing early on in life then that would certainly help.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:29 pm |
    • sybaris

      Funny how christards try to kidnap notables to try and give some integrity to their fairy tales.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:39 pm |
    • donna

      He wasn't a deist. But what he believed wayyyy back then is irrelevant.

      August 27, 2012 at 8:29 pm |
  3. TheCrux

    "The Gallup Poll has been tracking Americans' views on creation and evolution for the past 30 years. In June it released its latest findings, which showed 46% of Americans believed in creationism, 32% believed in evolution guided by God, and 15% believed in atheistic evolution."

    It really is a nation of idiots isn't it?

    August 27, 2012 at 7:13 pm |
    • JG

      It's all a theory... no one was around when time and space was created. Science is based off of theories that people believe, religion is based off of belief. We dont have the knowledge to disqualify any idea or theory out there, so what people should really be doing is learning to accept that every different walk of life has the priviledge and freedom to believe whatever they chose. We're all just here for the ride buddy!

      August 27, 2012 at 7:21 pm |
    • RichardSRussell

      JG opines: "We dont have the knowledge to disqualify any idea or theory out there,"
       
      Really? So if I were to advance the hypothesis that water flows uphill, you'd be completely stumped for how to put it to the test and find out whether I was right or wrong? And therefore you'd be perfectly willing to believe it, because, hey, who can say for sure, right?

      August 27, 2012 at 7:31 pm |
    • Athy

      Well, 15% is disappointing. Perhaps more important is the trend, which appears to favor the truth over the bullshit creation fairy tale.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:35 pm |
    • mmaxum2002

      I agree. There aren't many deep thinkers out there. Ignorance prevails. Disregard for scientific fact will not last.

      August 27, 2012 at 8:19 pm |
  4. No God

    First prove god exists then we can talk other Christian myths like creationism.

    August 27, 2012 at 7:12 pm |
    • JG

      Prove he doesn't.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:16 pm |
    • hawaiiguest

      @JG

      Prove all the myriad of other gods made up over the years. Your shifting of the burden of proof is dishonest, and moronic.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:18 pm |
    • Josh

      @ JG. Prove that the Flying Spaghetti Monster doesn't exist.

      If you're going to make a claim that an omnipotent being created the entire world in 6 days, than the burden of proof remains with those that make that claim, not with those who dispute it.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:21 pm |
    • Inglourious

      @JG: The burden of proof is on the people who claim an all-powerful, invisible magic man exists. Ask him to perform a magic trick to prove his existence.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:23 pm |
    • JG

      How so? It was a simple request. I don't find my shifting to be moronic or dishonest because I didn't make a statement disqualify this person beliefs... that would be moronic, wouldn't you say?

      I just simply asked for proof that this idea is false.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:26 pm |
    • RichardSRussell

      If God really DID exist, wouldn't it be completely obvious to everyone? I mean, even blind people can tell when the Sun is out. If God is as awesome as his PR department claims, why is there even a question about it?

      August 27, 2012 at 7:28 pm |
    • Moby Schtick

      The problem, JG, is that if your question is valid, then you find yourself in the unfortunate position of having to disprove the 2,000+ gods humanity has believed in at one time or other. hmmm.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:29 pm |
    • JG

      @ You Guys

      I can't prove that, I'm not an expert on the spaghetti monster. I'm sure you very knowledgable gentleman realize that I didn't insert an idea to my beliefs, so what it seems like is you guys are on a witch hunt to find anyone who remotely believes in the idea of a higher being. Using the old GWB statement of "if you aren't with us... you must be against us". I would recommend staying away from jumping to conclusions as you see they have trapped the both of you into a box i like to call "Close Minded".

      August 27, 2012 at 7:30 pm |
    • hawaiiguest

      Do you not understand the burden of proof? Do you not know logic? When a person asserts that something exist (theist asserting that god exists), then they have the burden to provide evidence for their assertion. If there is not suficient evidence, then there is no reason to believe that claim.
      Saying that the person saying "I don't believe you where's your evidence" to prove their assertion is false, is completely dishonest and moronic. It demonstrates that you don't understand the burden of proof, logic, and it also demonstrates that you are unwilling or unable to provide anything to validate the claim.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:30 pm |
    • JG

      @Moby

      I hear you bud! Such a burden it can be.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:33 pm |
    • K Kim

      That is exactly what Christians ought to do. In fact, Jesus said "you will be my witnesses" (Acts 1:8) to his disciples who had first hand knowledge of Jesus and his deeds. Their testimony would have been admissible in Court as evidence that God came to earth in His Son Jesus. Many atheists may reject the proof as insufficent in their minds (just as a jury would be free to weigh and ultimately reject evidence that was admitted) but can it really be said that there is no proof at all or is it matter of not having definitive scientific proof? Again, as is often the case in trials, not every fact can be proven absolutely or scientifically.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:36 pm |
    • JG

      @ Hawaii 5-0

      You would be correct if I had asserted that I believe...anything for that matter... but I did't. I was simply an observer asking you for proof that this isn't a possible answer to the creation of all! You typed a lot of stuff for no reason honestly, I only read the first 2 sentences.

      Just a heads up bud!

      August 27, 2012 at 7:36 pm |
    • Athy

      Shit, there is no need to prove god doesn't exist. Total lack of even a glimmer of proof that he does exist is enough for me..

      August 27, 2012 at 7:41 pm |
    • hawaiiguest

      @JG

      In other words, you're irrelevant since you are merely on the sidelines attempting to shift the burden of proof for someone else. Congrats. Now not only are you dishonest, you are also a douche.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:44 pm |
    • Red Stripe...Yea Beer

      JG

      Prove he doesn't.

      ------------------–

      Thats easy...just look at the current republican party. If god existed he surely would turn them all to salt.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:47 pm |
    • incredulous argument

      It's called proof of a negative, and its impossible. You can't prove something doesn't exist.

      August 29, 2012 at 12:26 pm |
  5. JCH123

    Mr. Nye bases his statements on facts. This means they can be proven without a shadow of a doubt. In addition, it also means there is concrete evidence to back him up. Creationism seems like a lazy way to explain how we got here. Do creationist think we are supposed to just accept what is presented in the Bible and not question it?? Take it on faith and go on being blissfully ignorant? Isn't it in our nature to want to explore, to figure out, to question...oh wait, maybe thats just my sinful nature..smh

    August 27, 2012 at 7:12 pm |
    • Dawson

      Bill Nye bases his statements on facts? No, they are based on theories that have changed over the decades and centuries. Science, however, is simply the observation of nature, which we don't have a full understanding of, thus, the purpose for research. The Bible, however, has not changed. Look up dead sea scrolls. But anyways, l propose each look for the answers themselves and ask, what's so special about this man Jesus? With no education, no property, and no publically held office, this one man has had more impact than any other. I can atleast speak for myself, He's changed my life from being a hateful, suicidal person to a loving and giving one. Pursue truth.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:26 pm |
    • Moby Schtick

      @Dawson

      So the Koran is true because it's never changed? Of course science changes to accept the new information that comes in. That's why it's science.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:31 pm |
    • JCH123

      Jesus – perhaps a fabrication of previous people that have come before him (ex. Mithras).

      With that said, I still admire what "Jesus" represented. A human that was kind, gentle, forgiving, understanding, intelligent, ahead of his time, compassionate..etc..etc... Unfortunately. there are not many Christians (let alone people) I've met with these characteristics. I grew up going to a Nazarene Church surrounded by hypocritical, judgmental, two-faced congregations. Will never do it again. If a person named Jesus did exist, I refuse to believe he was born for the sake of religious belief.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:53 pm |
  6. BK

    Every Knee will bow and every tounge will confess.

    August 27, 2012 at 7:12 pm |
    • Moby Schtick

      ..that it is good and proper to kiss Hank's Azz. http://www.jhuger.com/kisshank.php

      August 27, 2012 at 7:14 pm |
    • Josh

      Sounds like fascism to me.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:22 pm |
    • I'm not a GOPer, nor do I play one on TV

      Sounds like the Spanish Inquisition to me.

      And NOBODY EXPECTS THE ...

      August 27, 2012 at 7:24 pm |
    • RichardSRussell

      Let me guess. "BK" stands for "butt kisser"?

      August 27, 2012 at 7:26 pm |
    • Tim Hiddemen

      what is a tounge?

      August 27, 2012 at 7:29 pm |
  7. Tony

    Admittedly, I would love to belive there is a god, but the inane comments that the religous side consistently write does not help. It is so obvious to me that their fear of death really drives the religion. Of course we want to think there is some place that you are going, and your children and friends and family. The fear of burning in hell and condemnation, etc, the teachings at an early age... especially during our formative years, is very powerful. The premiss if you 'just need to have faith' is kind of silly. If that was the case... there are so many options out their that you could have faith in? Think of it this way... if you were the same person, but raised in a household that passionately belived a different religion... do you really think you would see 'the light' anyway and convert? Or be just as passionate about that religion.

    August 27, 2012 at 7:11 pm |
    • Paul

      First I fear nothing. Death or Hell. My belief distroys that fear. Secondly the bible is full of science. Thousands of years before columbus was even thought about Isaiah chapter 40 verse 22 speak of the circle of the earth but years later we just knew it was flat. There is so much science in there if on would research it that you really begin to see how much we dont know! Man doesnt know how to trust he has to be proven. As for me the debate doesnt mean anything. I have my belief and you have yours and that is what makes this country great. btw If you look closely you will find that Darwin became a christian before he passed and wished he had never wrote the book!

      August 27, 2012 at 7:28 pm |
    • Moby Schtick

      A coin is a circle and flat. If the bible meant "sphere," then it would have used the jewish word for "sphere," unless you think god just wasn't that concerned with getting it right.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:32 pm |
  8. Brenda from Canada

    I have read the bible cover to cover .. my research has shown that it is missing many gospels, likely because of their content .. i.e., the Gospel of Philip. Thebible is full of stories of a God that Iwe are blindly suppose to believe exists .. some of these bible stories are out and out scary. Take for example the story of Noah's Ark – the largest and most thorough act of genocide in history – and this makes for a good children's story? And please explain that if God created Adam and Eve, and they had 2 sons, Cain and Abel and Cain slew Abel – where the heck did the rest of the people come from? Sorry, but the bible is just not scientifically believeable – some stories are good for teaching right from wrong, but just not believable as fact -not in any way, shape or form. And please don't tell me it takes faith .. I put my faith in scientific fact not blindly in theological fairy tales.

    August 27, 2012 at 7:11 pm |
    • I'm not a GOPer, nor do I play one on TV

      @Brenda,

      One presumes there were women "East of Eden". Not sure where they come from exactly ...

      Genesis 4
      13 Cain said to the Lord, “My punishment is more than I can bear.
      14 Today you are driving me from the land, and I will be hidden from your presence; I will be a restless wanderer on the earth, and whoever finds me will kill me.”
      15 But the Lord said to him, “Not so[e]; anyone who kills Cain will suffer vengeance seven times over.” Then the Lord put a mark on Cain so that no one who found him would kill him.
      16 So Cain went out from the Lord’s presence and lived in the land of Nod, east of Eden.
      17 Cain made love to his wife, and she became pregnant and gave birth to Enoch. Cain was then building a city, and he named it after his son Enoch.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:15 pm |
    • mydogbill

      I'll let the Vatican know what you found in your research, thanks Brenda.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:16 pm |
  9. Cherokee

    What hypocrisy to say there is absolutely no scientific evidence to support creationism.....when there is absolutely no fossil record of even one transitional species...and absolutely no evidence of any mutation ever producing a higher form of life. Even if evolution was possible, there would have to be millions of transitional species that surely must have left some fossil record in the supposed billions of years of evolution....and yet there isn't ONE! It takes much more faith (religion) to believe that nothing produced something over billions of years when"scientific evidence" doesn't support it. There are none so blind as those who refuse to see!

    August 27, 2012 at 7:09 pm |
    • obvious troll should give it a rest

      you are not winning, hero

      August 27, 2012 at 7:11 pm |
    • Observer

      Cherokee,

      Sorry that you missed reading about all the fossils that are part-man and part-ape. Study up.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:11 pm |
    • Moby Schtick

      Seriously, do you have even the slightest clue how fvcking imbecilic that statement is? Before mocking the theory, at least understand the 4th grade level of it.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:13 pm |
    • Babs

      Malapa? Really?

      August 27, 2012 at 7:14 pm |
    • donna

      The fossil record 100% supports the Theory of Common Descent.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:15 pm |
    • therealpeace2all

      @Cherokee

      " What hypocrisy to say there is absolutely no scientific evidence to support creationism.....when there is absolutely no fossil record of even one transitional species...and absolutely no evidence of any mutation ever producing a higher form of life. "

      And, so... your "scientific evidence" is...? Just because science hasn't discovered all of the answers... 'yet', doesn't mean...."God did it."

      Your post is attempting to de-bunk evolution. But, you have a faulty *complex equivalency* going.

      Peace...

      August 27, 2012 at 7:16 pm |
    • Babs

      That's the only one I know of. Any others Observer?

      August 27, 2012 at 7:17 pm |
    • Athy

      What do you mean by a "transitional species"? Every living thing represents a transitional species. They are all slowly changing to adapt to their changing environment.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:18 pm |
    • krhodes

      Observer "Sorry that you missed reading about all the fossils that are part-man and part-ape. Study up."

      Actually the fossils you are talking about are either ape or human...there are no transitional forms.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:19 pm |
    • Observer

      Babs,

      If you have never read the world's best selling Bible, you probably shouldn't make comments about "the Bible". Geometry might be another area to avoid.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:20 pm |
    • mydogbill

      George Costanza gives a perfect example of evolution when he was pretending to be a marine biologist to impress Marisa Tomia on Seinfeld.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:20 pm |
    • uhhhhhh

      humans ARE apes........

      August 27, 2012 at 7:22 pm |
    • Moby Schtick

      @krhodes

      No, just no. Stop being a moron and learn something.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:23 pm |
    • RichardSRussell

      This is preposterous. Every fossil ever discovered — indeed, every living being on the face of the Earth today — is a transitional species.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:24 pm |
    • DrTom

      There are plenty of transitional fossils. Where did you get that information? In fact, most old fossils are transitional. If you are saying that there are some expected fossils that seem to be missing or that certain areas of the globe have been less conducive to fossil preservation than others, that is correct. Just because we don't have all the scientific answers, doesn't mean we have to make something up. (eg., blast from the past: Why does the Sun rise and set every day? – must be because a giant turtle is walking across the sky with a ball of fire on its back.)

      August 27, 2012 at 7:24 pm |
    • Cheesus Chrust Pizza Shop

      In 1859, when Charles Darwin's On the Origin of Species was first published, the fossil record was poorly known. Darwin described the perceived lack of transitional fossils as "the most obvious and gravest objection which can be urged against my theory", but explained it by relating it to the extreme imperfection of the geological record.[2] He noted the limited collections available at that time, but described the available information as showing patterns that followed from his theory of descent with modification through natural selection.[3] Indeed, Archaeopteryx was discovered just two years later, in 1861, and represents a classic transitional form between dinosaurs and birds. Many more transitional fossils have been discovered since then, and there is now considered to be abundant evidence of how all classes of vertebrates are related, much of it in the form of transitional fossils.[4] Specific examples include humans and other primates, tetrapods and fish, and birds and dinosaurs.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:26 pm |
    • krhodes

      RichardSRussell

      "This is preposterous. Every fossil ever discovered — indeed, every living being on the face of the Earth today — is a transitional species."

      That is a heck of a statement to make...i suppose you have proof of that claim (of course you mean we will eventually evolve into a completely different species)? I can't believe i stated that...is that the type of ignorance humanity has come to...to believe in such nonsense with out a shred of evidence.

      August 27, 2012 at 8:15 pm |
    • Tom, Tom, the Piper's Son

      krhodes, what makes you think we won't evolve into something completely unlike our current selves? Why is that so "preposterous"?

      Do you have a crystal ball? Can you see millions of years into the future?

      August 27, 2012 at 11:12 pm |
  10. the other guy

    Theistic evolution would only be relevant to the person that is willing to accept the premiss of a god, no god or deity, no theism or theistic evolution but in the minds of the believers.

    August 27, 2012 at 7:09 pm |
    • Religious scientist

      That would describe about 32% of the U.S. population, according to the poll described in this article.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:11 pm |
  11. HillCountry Dad

    Nye, believe what you want, that is fine, but don't tell me what to teach my children! This issue isn't a deal breaker on eternity. If you have a Bible, read 1 John. May God open your eyes to see your need for salvation and truth 🙂

    August 27, 2012 at 7:08 pm |
    • ArthurP

      Your kids will love their McJobs when the finish school.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:09 pm |
    • RichardSRussell

      He isn't saying what YOU should teach your children. Feed 'em all the malarkey you want. What he's saying is that the SCHOOLS should teach actual science in science classes.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:10 pm |
    • donna

      No one is saying that you need his permission to teach your kids about Santa Claus.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:11 pm |
    • GodFreeNow

      Hillbilly Dad, Sadly you have the right to give your child whatever nonsensical education you want. That's what it means to be in America... On the other hand, it means Bill Nye has the right to suggest you find a better path for your kid's future.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:11 pm |
    • Cq

      His point is that creationism teaches children to throw out results just because you don't like them. That's dishonesty, right? Do you really want to teach your children that dishonesty is OK?

      August 27, 2012 at 7:12 pm |
    • NPRJim

      IF you are a Christian and believe in the teachings of Christ then you must automatically understand that Jesus was teaching that you don't have to believe in the old testament to be saved. He called himself "the new covenant". He undestood that much of the old testimant was based on myths and rules that were social but not spiritual. Therefor Nye is right and you are deluding yourself by believing the myth that is Genesis.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:12 pm |
    • Cq

      NPRJim
      If Christians don't need the OT then why all this fuss over the Genesis creation story?

      August 27, 2012 at 7:14 pm |
    • paulbark

      You can teach your children any magical thinking you want to. But, in our public school system, we needs to teach facts, not unsubstantiated theories that have not a shred of evidence. It's okay for your kids to grow up ignorant of facts. Public education owes it to our kids to teach them facts, not your religious thinking.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:17 pm |
    • Ganieda1

      I hope your god opens YOUR eyes, HillCountryDad. America is falling further behind in science because half the country believes this idiotic mythology.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:17 pm |
    • David A

      Yeah, you tell 'em. Next thing you know they'll be teachin' our kids that the earth revolves around the sun and the Bible sez it be tother way round.

      Look, even the Pope has said that the Bible is to tell us how to go to heaven, not how the heavens go. The Bible was written far before anything we know of science exists.

      Darwin speaks of God numerous times in Origin of the Species. Its science. It doesn't refute God.

      Now if you want your kids to be ignorant, I guess that is your business, but why would you want that for your children?

      And what makes this any different than what the church did to Galieo for figuring out the orbits of the solar system. Even the most fundamental Christians don't read the Bible literally on that subject anymore.

      Keep in mind world view. There was no science two thousand years ago when the Bible was written. Science wasn't part of their world view.

      The BIble doesn't talk of atoms, or all kinds of things.

      One example I like is how farmers will say they don't believe in evolution but then they have to keep changing their pesiticides and such because the insects adapt. Imagine that. They evolve.

      Perhaps you have heard of swine flu? It used to not infect humans, only pigs. But it evolved.

      Things evolve. You might consider allowing your mind to do the same.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:27 pm |
    • the other guy

      Quick get one of the kids to close the trailer door, those damn possoms are getting in. Where are those lazy hounddogs?

      August 27, 2012 at 7:27 pm |
  12. uncommonsense

    Thank you Bill. Sagan would be proud.

    August 27, 2012 at 7:06 pm |
    • Brad

      “The fossil evidence could be consistent with the idea of a Great Designer.”— Carl Sagan from his book Cosmos.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:13 pm |
  13. HeavenSent

    So over 4000 athiests are on these blogs today to spew the hatred and lies of God's enemy satan. Haven't I told you that the answers are all in the historically accurate truth from heaven, the Bible? My camel-toe is now responsible for the death of my neighbor. I don't understand why I keep telling you athiests to study the Bible study web sites, but you don't listen.

    Amen.

    August 27, 2012 at 7:06 pm |
    • Religious scientist

      Au contraire. I'd say about 3,000 of the comments are from creationists. You should read a few; most are on the wild side.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:08 pm |
    • therealpeace2all

      @HeavenSent

      " My camel-toe is now responsible for the death of my neighbor. "

      LOL ! 😀

      Peace...

      August 27, 2012 at 7:11 pm |
    • wiredone

      Which bible should I use to think like you?

      August 27, 2012 at 7:13 pm |
  14. Roger

    Why is this video popular?

    August 27, 2012 at 7:06 pm |
    • Mike

      Because people who want their children to grow into intelligence, productive members of society and encouraged by it. Meanwhile Christians are appalled by the attack on their fairy tales. Hence, they have to go to the video and post comments citing pseudoscience and nonsense scripture.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:19 pm |
  15. Wubba

    I can't wrap my head around that people believe that a supreme being that created everything in the universe; every star and planet, every galaxy, not to mention all of the intricacies of Earth alone, think they can understand that being. Religion is just crowd control and something for people who afraid of what happens after death to cling to. Despite all of what I just said, I still believe religion does have its place in some respects. For example, when I have children I will instill the basic principles of the ten commands on them, just because I want them to grow up to be ethical people in my opinion.

    August 27, 2012 at 7:05 pm |
    • DeadGuy

      They're called Commandments, not Commands....

      -Dg

      August 27, 2012 at 7:14 pm |
    • Wubba

      Guess I need to type more slowly.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:25 pm |
    • Born to be Free

      Religion is how you practice your faith. You don't need Religion to have faith and believe in God or Jesus. Your body is the temple. There were no Christian churches when Jesus lived and he only said to follow him – never said you have to spend an hour in church every Sunday. He certainly never said, it's important that you succeed in life so you can donate more to the church. Which seem to be the message at a lot of churches these days.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:28 pm |
    • mercfan

      @TJ, he would need to cut the bible down to 50 pages, otherwise he would burn in hell for fathering children with his slaves.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:35 pm |
  16. Dick Izinya

    The bible is not a textbook, people! It was written by unibrowed cavemen that thought the earth was flat. Grow up, all you religionists!

    August 27, 2012 at 7:04 pm |
  17. TOBYTSC

    I WOULD BE INTERESTED TO HEAR MR NYE'S COMMENTS ON A BOOK WRITTEN BY PHYSICIST AND BIBLICAL SCHOLAR GERALD L. SCHROEDER--"THE SCIENCE OF GOD"--–I BELIEVE MR SCHROEDER HAS IT CORRECT ABOUT THE CONVERGENCE OF SCIENTIFIC AND BIBLICAL WISDOM. IT MIGHT CHANGE HIS AND YOUR PERCEPTION OF CREATIONISM AND EVOLUTION..............................READ IT.

    August 27, 2012 at 7:04 pm |
    • GodFreeNow

      There should be a key on the left side of your keyboard that says, "Caps Lock" or something equivalent.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:08 pm |
    • sbp

      I can't take your post seriously since you can't stop YELLING.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:08 pm |
    • Nietodarwin

      Try again little brain. Read something by an atheist biologist and then get back to this crap you're recommending. KEEPING AMERICAN KIDS LIKE YOU STUPID. is all those books do.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:10 pm |
    • ba-ss-ackwards logic

      ALL THE CAPS IN THE WORLD STILL DON"T MAKE IT TRUE!!!

      August 27, 2012 at 7:13 pm |
    • matt houston

      Of course it would...of course. Because snakes can talk and burning bushes too. And there is a great man like God in the sky that loves to smell the burning odor of sacrificed animals...unless you're a new testament person, then that same guy suddenly doesn't like that anymore because he got the ultimate animal sacrifice, his son, who was actually himself but not...Yeah, that makes complete sense.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:14 pm |
    • wiredone

      Biblical scholar is debatable and an oxmoron.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:15 pm |
    • Sid

      Is the book written all in caps? That would make it awfully difficult and unpleasant.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:20 pm |
  18. William Guthrie

    So? My opinions aren't formed by some statist "scientist" that wears a toupe.

    August 27, 2012 at 7:03 pm |
    • Grant C

      That's right, they're formed by scientifically illiterate religious fundamentalists.

      That's so much better, you should be proud.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:09 pm |
  19. Nietodarwin

    Bill Nye is correct to do this. Stupid religious beliefs are making our test scores lower than other western countries.
    BEING A CREATIONIST IS VERY UNPATRIOTIC. Those of you xstians out there that DO understand that evolution is a fact need to educate these creationist morons. The rest of us are too nauseated by talking to these "creation thumpers."

    August 27, 2012 at 7:03 pm |
    • DeadGuy

      Evolution is a theory, not a fact... That's why it's called the Theory of Evolution.

      -Dg

      August 27, 2012 at 7:16 pm |
    • hawaiiguest

      @DeadGuy

      I guess gravity is unproven as well. Try go fly and tell me how that works out.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:17 pm |
    • Moby Schtick

      You are so ignorant of what "theory" means in scientific terms. You do realize that we know far, far, far more about evolution than we do about gravity?

      August 27, 2012 at 7:18 pm |
    • RichardSRussell

      No, evolution is a FACT — readily and frequently observed. How to explain these observations? That's where the THEORY comes in. A theory is simply a very, very thoroly tested explanation. In this case, the leading theory ABOUT the facts of evolution is natural selection leading to variation in the descendants from common ancestors.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:20 pm |
  20. Religious scientist

    If the creationists can agree to keep their dogma out of science classrooms and textbooks, the rest of us should agree to stop mocking their faith. Science and faith aren't incompatible; they simply operate in different realms - the natural world vs. the supernatural world.

    August 27, 2012 at 7:02 pm |
    • Adam

      Sure.... That which one KNOWS to be true, and That which one WISHES were true.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:03 pm |
    • DrTom

      Perfectly said.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:04 pm |
    • DrTom

      My "Perfectly said" was in reply to 'Religious scientist' not to Adam who apparently can't quite grasp the "different realms" concept.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:08 pm |
    • Grant C

      "The natural world vs. the supernatural world" can also be expressed as "reality vs. fantasy".

      And sorry, but when people start demanding that we take their fantasy as reality the mocking will commence. That applies to claims a magic super being created the universe and it applies to anyone who tells me the gravity elves may go on strike tomorrow so hang on to something or you might fly off the planet.

      Some things *deserve* mocking.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:12 pm |
    • Adam

      The "non-overlapping magisteria" claim is hooey.

      It is intellectually dishonest, and does nothing to further the conversation, only muck it up with half-truths and pleasant reassurances. That approach is merely arguing that we should demand rigorous conversation and discourse and demand belief to scale in proportion to the evidence supporting it, IN EVERY ASPECT OF OUR LIVES SAVE ONE... and in that one sacred, and unimpeachable shell of unreason, we should be ok if people want to believe manifestly fraudulent things because it makes them feel warm inside.

      Well, Tom, I think that is the epitome of intellectual dishonesty. It precludes conversation, and merely lets people usher whatever nonsense they wish throughout their lives without it being checked by reality. That sort of thinking has no place in this project we call civilization.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:15 pm |
    • RichardSRussell

      To follow up on Grant's comment, people who don't want their beliefs laffed at shouldn't believe such funny things.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:17 pm |
    • Born to be Free

      1st, there are different types of Creationist. There are the ones that believe the earth is only 5000 years old and men lived amount the dinosaurs. There are others that believe man was created by God, but not necessarily according to that timeline. Have you considered the possibility of both Creationism and Evolution being true? That man evolved from a single cell organism that eventually crawled out of the ocean – a series of events that took place over billions of years and an intelligent being set all that into motion knowing that the series of events would eventual lead to the first man (and woman). God created the earth 6 days but a day in God's time could be a billion years.

      August 27, 2012 at 7:19 pm |
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About this blog

The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.