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First on CNN: Who’s delivering prayers at the DNC
New York Archbishop Timothy Dolan, who closed out the GOP convention, is also giving the final prayer at the Democratic convention.
September 3rd, 2012
11:01 PM ET

First on CNN: Who’s delivering prayers at the DNC

By Dan Gilgoff, CNN.com Religion Editor

President Barack Obama has a penchant for using high-profile prayer givers to send messages to the nation.

At his 2009 White House inauguration, Obama called on Pastor Rick Warren to deliver the invocation, signaling an attempt to tamp down on the culture wars (Warren is a theologically conservative evangelical who was close to George W. Bush).

Closing out the inauguration of the first black president was a prayer from The Rev. Joseph Lowery, a civil rights leader who worked alongside Martin Luther King, Jr.

The Obama campaign sent us a list of who will be delivering the opening and closing prayers each day at this week’s Democratic National Convention.

“The important role faith has played in President Obama’s own life and the lives of many Americans will be reflected in Charlotte," said Clo Ewing, a spokesperson with the campaign. "The Convention will include diverse religious leaders who are committed to the common good and understand that America needs a president who leads with values.”

Here’s a cheat sheet of who the prayer givers are – and why they matter:

Tuesday’s invocation (opening prayer): Metropolitan Nicholas, bishop of the Greek Orthodox Diocese of Detroit

Why he matters: Nicholas is a leader in a giant global movement that has a tiny U.S. presence, with the Greek Orthodox representing a fraction of 1% of the U.S. population. But Nicholas is a symbol of the country’s rich religious diversity, opening the convention with a nod to minority religions.

Tuesday’s benediction (closing prayer): Jena Lee Nardella, executive director of Blood: Water Mission

Why she matters: Nardella represents the young evangelical demographic that the Obama campaign is targeting in this election, knowing that older evangelicals are largely locked up for Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney. Nardella started Blood: Water Mission, which focuses on combating the HIV/AIDs and water crises in Africa, at age 22 with the Christian music group Jars of Clay.

Wednesday’s invocation: Vashti Murphy McKenzie, presiding bishop in the African Methodist Episcopal Church

Why she matters: McKenzie is the first woman elected bishop in the AME Church, the country’s oldest black religious denomination. She offered opening prayer at the 1996 Democratic National Convention and is an Obama campaign co-chair. Earlier this summer, first lady Michelle Obama addressed a big AME conference, saying: “To anyone who says that church is no place to talk about these issues, you tell them there is no place better.”

Wednesday’s Benediction: David Wolpe, rabbi of Sinai Temple in Los Angeles

Why he matters: Hailed as the most influential rabbi in America by Newsweek, Wolpe is a prolific author and media personality who's recognizable to many American Jews, who constitute an important voting bloc in some swing states and whose whose ranks include many big political donors. Though Obama won 78% of the Jewish vote in 2008, Romney is claiming that Obama has mistreated Israel and Republicans say they see an opening, especially among Orthodox Jews.

Thursday invocation: The Rev. Gabriel Salguero, president of the National Latino Evangelical Coalition

Why he matters: Salguero is cutting an increasingly high profile in America’s Hispanic community, a crucial Democratic bloc whose evangelical ranks are swelling and who tend to be socially conservative but liberal on immigration reform, education and economic matters. Getting those voters is a top priority for Obama in swing states like Colorado, Nevada and Florida.

Thursday benediction: Timothy Dolan, Roman Catholic Archbishop of New York

Why he matters: As the nation’s highest-visibility Catholic official in a year when the Catholic vote may tip the election, Cardinal Dolan is in high demand by the political parties. Just last week, he was in Tampa, delivering the benediction for the Republican National Convention. Dolan has blasted the Obama administration for compelling insurance companies to provide free contraception coverage to nearly all American employees, but having the cardinal follow Obama on Thursday is a way for the president to show he isn’t at war with the Catholic Church.

- CNN Belief Blog Co-Editor

Filed under: 2012 Election • Barack Obama • Politics

soundoff (427 Responses)
  1. George

    The only thing Obama has faith in are the AFL/CIO and naive, liberal voters to get him re-elected. Remember, he attended a church for 20 years that preached hatred of the U.S. government. For the record, Obama lives in the same neighborhood as Louis Farrakhan and other extremists. Michelle's father was a cog in the exceedingly corrupt mayor Daley political machine. Obama is about Obama. Take the rose-colored glasses off and see him for what he is and the trail of wreckage and deception he has left from when he first entered politics. (also for the record, I am a registered independent)

    September 4, 2012 at 9:57 am |
    • keeth

      For the record, you're a GOP plant.

      September 4, 2012 at 10:08 am |
    • Mop

      And yet, another nut case.

      September 4, 2012 at 12:49 pm |
    • cedar rapids

      "Remember, he attended a church for 20 years that preached hatred of the U.S. government."

      funny i thought the repubs all believe the government is the enemy as well.

      September 4, 2012 at 2:11 pm |
  2. David

    Prayers at the DNC? Then why no mention of the Jumah, CNN?

    September 4, 2012 at 9:30 am |
  3. Brother Lindh

    Whoaa theah brothers & sisters! There is a great deal of money to be made by pitching a tent to summon the faithful!

    September 4, 2012 at 9:19 am |
  4. johnmenacherjr@rocketmail.com

    Way to much religion in politics they need to pay property taxes period they are way to political.

    September 4, 2012 at 9:17 am |
  5. scatheist

    Maybe they should add a science experement.

    September 4, 2012 at 9:17 am |
  6. Enough

    Too much money and too much religion in American political campaigns. Makes me sick.

    September 4, 2012 at 9:15 am |
  7. PraiseTheLard

    This country will never move ahead as long as the population insists on communing with make-believe Deities...

    September 4, 2012 at 9:15 am |
  8. Randy, San Francisco

    Doesn't matter...separation of church and state.

    September 4, 2012 at 9:02 am |
    • Drock

      Too bad this has nothing to do with separation of Church and state... the conventions are not government functions per se, and people of all religious beliefs vote in America.

      September 4, 2012 at 9:06 am |
  9. person

    Our power of thinking is going to heal Americaplanet.

    September 4, 2012 at 8:52 am |
  10. Bupkis

    Religious people don't know me.

    September 4, 2012 at 8:48 am |
  11. Steve

    Odd, I thought these were the people who were for seperation of church and state? Removal of prayer from schools? Against any form of moral judgement?? Simply amazing that anyone would take these events seriously other that what they are: Political!

    September 4, 2012 at 8:43 am |
    • Mirosal

      Moral judgement ... hmmmm.. and just WHO would be the judge in deciding what's moral and what's not?

      September 4, 2012 at 8:49 am |
    • The Raven

      It's about the money and the votes. Nothing more.

      September 4, 2012 at 8:50 am |
    • Doc Vestibule

      @Steve
      Last I checked, democrats were in favour of teh judicial system.
      No moral judgement?

      September 4, 2012 at 8:52 am |
    • snowboarder

      about 90% of americans identify as some type of religious group. your comment is meaningless.

      September 4, 2012 at 9:00 am |
    • PrimeNumber

      @Mirosal "... and just WHO would be the judge in deciding what's moral and what's not?" Well, since the 1960's, the main judge of morality has been "ME". If it feels good, do it. That sort of thing. And "who are you to judge?!" has been the only scriptural concept people seem to have known.

      September 4, 2012 at 9:02 am |
    • Doc Vestibule

      @PrimeNumber
      Would you rather it be the shamans who decide?

      September 4, 2012 at 9:04 am |
    • cutedog2

      ..and I also bet that you believe that if CNN doesn't post your comments, it is evoking your right to free speech. Educate yourself about separation of church and state before you state before your cry abuse of power.

      September 4, 2012 at 9:12 am |
    • c

      This is why we have free speech,everybpody shoudl have a voice- close your eyes and tune it the religious folk out if it offends you. Aren't you a little puzzled about why Mitt didn't have at least one of his 12 Apostle's speak at his RNC?

      September 4, 2012 at 9:34 am |
    • Mike K

      No, Steve, Democrats are as religious as anyone else. We're not against prayer in school. Anyone can pray whenever he wants to, wherever he wants to. We simply hew to the first amendment, which says the government cannot sponsor prayer, that's all. If your child were Hindu and his class recited the Lord's Prayer every day and the other kids taunted your child for not saying it, would you be happy about it? Would you want your tax money supporting a system that takes a particular religious position, especially if it weren't yours? Suppose your Christian child were in a school where Hindu prayers were recited in class and your child were made to feel like an outcast? I know I wouldn't like it.

      We limit God when we get upset and say we MUST have OFFICIAL prayers to Him, don't you think? Is He that small? I grew up in the '50s. We said the Lord's Prayer every morning. If you're my age, you know that doing that sparked no discussions among the students, not ever, and that when we spoke of God to one another, we never mentioned anything about that morning prayer. I'm not knocking it per se, I'm saying only that one's relationship with his Maker is entirely personal, not in the sense of it being nobody else's business, but that it is what it is. No child should have to be ostracized for following his own conscience in not reciting a particular prayer, or avoid it by melting into the crowd by saying a prayer he does not believe.

      Are we really so afraid that God will glare at us for not saying a mandated prayer to Him? Surely you can't believe that. Thanks, Mike

      September 4, 2012 at 9:50 am |
    • Mop

      Removal of prayer from schools?

      Nobody has removed prayer from school, moron.
      You been listening to bad people again.

      September 4, 2012 at 12:51 pm |
  12. pditty

    The political motives reflected in this article make me sick. The way politicians use their faith as a tool while campaigning is disingenuous.

    September 4, 2012 at 8:39 am |
  13. harry

    But there is no fire in the hell...

    September 4, 2012 at 8:36 am |
  14. John3:16

    Why Are Atheists More Afraid Of Fire Than Anyone Else? Because They Know Deep Down In Their Wicked Hearts That They Are Going To HELL When They DIE!!!!!

    September 4, 2012 at 8:13 am |
    • truth be trolled

      No, not really. And they are not frightened by capital letters, either.

      September 4, 2012 at 8:35 am |
    • jrod

      That's not very christian of you

      September 4, 2012 at 8:44 am |
    • Mirosal

      Yep .. you're a tyical christard.. Do you enjoy using empty threats against others? Didn't your dead Jewish zombie guy (IF he ever existed in the first place) say to love thy neighbor? Guess you forgot that little tidbit of info didn't you?

      September 4, 2012 at 8:47 am |
    • John3:16

      Balderdash More Athiest Mumbo Jumbo You Athiests Are All Autistic Your Missing A Gene That Helps The Rest Of Us Understand What You Dont May Christ Have Mercy On Your Poor Deluded Souls

      September 4, 2012 at 8:52 am |
    • Doc Vestibule

      @john 3:16
      So the rest of the humanity, like Shintoists, Buddhists, Wiccans etc. understand the same things that you do but atheists don't?
      FYI: Autistic people aren't missing any genes.

      September 4, 2012 at 8:59 am |
    • snowboarder

      why do theists make such ridiculous statements?

      September 4, 2012 at 9:02 am |
    • cutedog2

      I am a monotheist who has Atheist friends. They have no fear for that which they do not believe in.

      September 4, 2012 at 9:15 am |
    • John3:16

      Lord Jesus Christ, Most Merciful Saviour Of The World, We Humbly Beseech You, By Your Most Sacred Heart, That All The Democrats And Athiest Sheep Who Stray Out Of Your Fold May In One Days Be Converted To YOU, The Sheperd And Bishop Of Their Souls, Who Lives And Rains With G-D The FATHER In The Unity Of The Holy Spirit, World Without End.
      Amen.

      September 4, 2012 at 9:40 am |
    • snowboarder

      john – i never understand why some theists insist that everyone should believe the same as they do.

      September 4, 2012 at 10:08 am |
    • snowboarder

      "rains with god the father?"

      it is certainly no brainstorm.

      September 4, 2012 at 10:12 am |
    • cedar rapids

      ignore the troll folks, he is about as religious as i am.

      September 4, 2012 at 2:13 pm |
    • John3:16

      lol

      September 4, 2012 at 3:17 pm |
  15. workinprogress

    As a christian, I cannot in good conscience vote for someone who advocates abortion and would refuse medical care to a baby born alive after an attempted abortion.

    September 4, 2012 at 8:13 am |
    • nzv

      But as a christian you could wage wars on false pretext and kill thousands of innocent human beings. As a christian you are willing to let a person in medical need die because they lack insurance.
      You are free to practice what you believe in and live your life any way you deem fit. If you make the decision to abort the baby the decision is entirely yours and so are the consequences. The government had nothing to do with that decision. On the other hand the only control you have in waging a false war and killing people in the process is voting people like yourself into office. So sadly, again you are at fault.

      September 4, 2012 at 8:23 am |
    • Doc Vestibule

      “But I do not believe that just because you’re opposed to abortion that that makes you pro-life. In fact, I think in many cases, your morality is deeply lacking. If all you want is a child born but not a child fed, not a child educated, not a child housed... and why would I think that you don’t? Because you don’t want any tax money to go there. That’s not pro-life. That’s pro-birth. We need a much broader conversation on what the morality of what pro-life is.”
      — Benedictine nun – Sister Joan Chittister

      September 4, 2012 at 8:27 am |
    • workinprogress

      @nvc,
      sorry but you have me pegged wrong. I am not pro-war. And I would love for everybody to have affordable healthcare. Perhaps you shouldn't overgeneralize.

      @Doc,
      It's rather interesting how you can make such bold assumptions without knowing where I stand on these issues.

      September 4, 2012 at 8:36 am |
    • religion; a way to control the weak minded

      But as a christian you feel the need to dis...cri...min...ate against a group of people based on their se....xu....al orientation.

      Disgusting.

      September 4, 2012 at 8:41 am |
    • Your religion is a stench

      Some people never develop fully. Perhaps your brain is stunted. You should get it checked by a medical professional.

      September 4, 2012 at 8:43 am |
    • workinprogress

      @religion; a way to control the weak minded
      again, you are making a bold assumption without knowing where I stand. I could care less what you do in the bedroom, and I am for civil unions.

      September 4, 2012 at 8:44 am |
    • workinprogress

      @Your religion is a stench

      You can insult me all you want, I just find it laughable, but please don't expect to be taken seriously if you cannot carry an intelligent conversation without feeling the need for insults.

      September 4, 2012 at 8:45 am |
    • religion; a way to control the weak minded

      "again, you are making a bold assumption without knowing where I stand. I could care less what you do in the bedroom, and I am for civil unions."

      Civil union and marriage do not hold equal rights....I think I know exactly where you stand on this issue.

      September 4, 2012 at 8:49 am |
    • workinprogress

      What is disgusting is that so many of you make such bold assumptions about where I stand, but cannot defend our President's actions regarding the treatment of born babies after an attempted abortion.

      September 4, 2012 at 8:49 am |
    • Doc Vestibule

      @workinprogress
      Your post implies that you'll be voting republican – a party not known for supporting social programmes.

      September 4, 2012 at 8:50 am |
    • your religion is a stench

      You think I was being insulting? I was being helpful. Don't scoff at medical technology. You should make sure you are healthy.
      You might have frontal lobe damage. Why not be sure? Go see a doctor.

      September 4, 2012 at 8:53 am |
    • workinprogress

      My post does not imply that I am voting Republican, you made that leap. My post implies that I cannot stand behind a President that would allow a baby suffer and die without any medical intervention after an attempted abortion.

      September 4, 2012 at 8:53 am |
    • PraiseTheLard

      If you profess to be a "christian" you're too stupid to be allowed to vote...

      September 4, 2012 at 9:13 am |
    • Doc Vestibule

      How about a president who would allow children to suffer and die, regardless of whether after a botched abortion or not, due to lack of health insurance?

      September 4, 2012 at 9:16 am |
    • workinprogress

      @PraiseTheLard – "If you profess to be a "christian" you're too stupid to be allowed to vote..."

      Sorry, but your insults do not bother me at all, as I said, I find them laughable.

      September 4, 2012 at 9:50 am |
    • PerceivedReality

      To the Atheists advocating social programs, God helps those who help themselves. Why can't these people provide their own health insurance? Where are their families? Do you really think it is fair to FORCE someone to pay for someone else's benefits? If medical care was very affordable would this even be an issue? If we are to have social programs, shouldn't they be fiscally possible without stealing from one group to provide for another?

      September 4, 2012 at 9:52 am |
    • workinprogress

      @Doc Vestibule – "How about a president who would allow children to suffer and die, regardless of whether after a botched abortion or not, due to lack of health insurance?"

      As I said, you have made broad assumptions about me without knowing where I stand. I don't care for any of our presidential choices this year.

      September 4, 2012 at 9:55 am |
    • PerceivedReality

      Dyeing from disease or injury is a natural occurrence; it is to be expected and is easily understood. Murdering your own flesh and blood on the other hand requires something not natural, evil and perverse, something the dems seem especially in tune with.

      September 4, 2012 at 10:33 am |
    • workinprogress

      @perceivedreality – agreed
      It is very telling how they avoid this fact.

      September 4, 2012 at 12:07 pm |
    • cedar rapids

      "God helps those who help themselves"

      you know that actually isnt in the bible right? Its got absolutely nothing to do with christianity as all. In fact its base if from Ancient Greece

      'Do you really think it is fair to FORCE someone to pay for someone else's benefits?"

      sure, why not. Its part of living in a society. You want to benefit from society then you pay into society.

      September 4, 2012 at 2:17 pm |
    • cedar rapids

      "and would refuse medical care to a baby born alive after an attempted abortion."

      except that is false. Its a claim often made but is incorrect. Obama voted against a specific bill because 1) he believed other laws covered the provisions mentioned and 2) that it was a back door bill to attempt to wedge open a path to completely removed row vs wade.
      To claim its because he thinks its because he wanted to refuse medical care is disingenuous and frankly smacks of the assumptions you are accusing others of here.

      September 4, 2012 at 2:20 pm |
    • PerceivedReality

      Cedar,
      Yes I know the saying is not from the Bible.

      September 4, 2012 at 4:45 pm |
  16. Geeeez

    Bring in the wizards and magicians! We're having a party!

    September 4, 2012 at 8:11 am |
  17. John

    Hey, brother maynard, prove love exists.

    September 4, 2012 at 8:09 am |
    • Doc Vestibule

      @John
      First you must define love.
      My definition is quite simple: Love is the state in which another person's happiness is necessary for your own.
      Some might define it as a series of neuro-chemical reactions.

      September 4, 2012 at 8:30 am |
    • Brother Maynard

      Excellent !!
      I believe REALLY what you are trying to do is say
      "You cannot PROVE that love exists therefore you must admit that you cannot PROVE everything via the senses. Therefore god exisist"
      This is a falacy. Because I cannot PROVE "A" doesn't not imply that "B" is true. What it means is that I cannot PROVE "A".
      Now that being said. There have been a number of studies done that measure the emotion of 'love' on the human brain.

      September 4, 2012 at 8:53 am |
  18. harry

    Oh wait, the Hindus, Sikh, Muslims and Budhists Priests are not invited but a Jewish Rabbi is?
    Hmmmmm... whatever happened to equal rights....and i thought there was seperation of church and state...?

    September 4, 2012 at 7:57 am |
    • james

      No Native American spiritual leader either. I also think that religion & government should be totally separate, but if they're going to have the religious folks casting their magic spells at the convention, they do need to be more even-handed about which religions they invite.

      September 4, 2012 at 8:26 am |
  19. Brother Maynard

    I have heard over and over believers say "You cannot prove that god doesn't exist" , to which non-believers say "The burden of proof for a claim is the one making the claim". I agree with the non-believer statement ... but it really doesn't solve anything. To that end I propose the following:

    God does not exist because -
    I cannot see him like I can a rainbow
    I cannot smell him like I can a flower
    I cannot touch him like I can a brick
    I cannot hear him like I can a symphony
    I cannot taste him like I can a cheeseburger
    I cannot build a machine to measure any hypothosis of him like I can a windmill
    I cannot deduce a mathimatical equation of hime like I can with the pythagorean theorem
    Therefore god is non-existent

    September 4, 2012 at 7:55 am |
    • harry

      Bravo...see American mind can reason... and find truth.

      September 4, 2012 at 8:00 am |
    • Tim

      The burden of proof isn't on you to prove he exists, but to merely accept a logical philosophical proof.

      1. Every being that exists or ever did exist is either a dependent being or a self-existent being.
      2. Not every being can be a dependent being.
      3. So there exists a self-existent being.

      Call it what you want.

      September 4, 2012 at 8:50 am |
    • John3:16

      Yeah Well You Cant Do Any Of Those Things To Love Either But It Exists
      Well For Most Of Us It Does Ha Ha Ha
      Explain That Mister Smartie Pants

      September 4, 2012 at 9:03 am |
    • Brother Maynard

      @John ( repeated from above )
      Excellent !!
      I believe REALLY what you are trying to do is say
      "You cannot PROVE that love exists therefore you must admit that you cannot PROVE everything via the senses. Therefore god exisist"
      This is a falacy. Because I cannot PROVE "A" doesn't not imply that "B" is true. What it means is that I cannot PROVE "A".
      Now that being said. There have been a number of studies done that measure the emotion of 'love' on the human brain.

      September 4, 2012 at 9:23 am |
    • Brother Maynard

      ... or I'll take another tack
      John sez:
      "Yeah Well You Cant Do Any Of Those Things To Love Either But It Exists"
      Love exists?? you are making a claim PROVE IT !!

      September 4, 2012 at 9:35 am |
    • PerceivedReality

      So you think matter is real even though at the sub quark level, it could be matter (particle) or energy (wave)? So is it matter or energy? If it is energy, then what is manipulating (controlling) it to be a certain type of matter at any given time? What force or being is programming the matter to create life? Why does an assortment of different matter program itself out of seemingly nowhere to produce lifeforms for no apparent reason? If there are other dimensions with different physical laws, and these dimensions are numerous, that would mean our perception of this universe is infantesimally limited, yet you are so sure there is no one at the helm. How presumptive and small minded of you, but feel free to think you are intelligent.

      September 4, 2012 at 10:03 am |
    • Brother Maynard

      So you think matter is real even though at the sub quark level, it could be matter (particle) or energy (wave)?
      I think there is a law of physics that we have not 'obtained' ( for lack of a better word ) as of yet. We humans have not harnessed the intricacies of this law. They have on Star Trek by turning matter into energy via the transporter. We have not.

      So is it matter or energy?
      I don't know. But it has been observed that when particles reach absolute zero they are both.

      If it is energy, then what is manipulating (controlling) it to be a certain type of matter at any given time?
      Why do you assume something is manipulating it? That is a classic leap of faith.

      What force or being is programming the matter to create life?
      This has not been determined as of yet

      Why does an assortment of different matter program itself out of seemingly nowhere to produce lifeforms for no apparent reason?
      This has not been determined as of yet

      If there are other dimensions with different physical laws, and these dimensions are numerous, that would mean our perception of this universe is infantesimally limited ...
      TRUE - I agree.

      ... yet you are so sure there is no one at the helm.
      If my understanding of the univers is infantesimally limited ... how can I invstigate who what is at the helm? Let's take this one step at a time

      How presumptive and small minded of you, but feel free to think you are intelligent.
      I know this was meant as sarcasm ... but "THANKYOU". I am intelligent because I am willing to admit that I DON'T know. I do not interject suppositions (sp? ) that cannot be proven. This is the difference between believers and non-believers. The MAIN problem with this is that when answers ARE given your god gets smaller.

      September 4, 2012 at 10:32 am |
    • PerceivedReality

      Maynard,
      Thank you for your response. I suppose it comes down to making your own reality in a way, if both the possibility of God existing and not existing are equal, and finding myself awash in this energy/matter soup without explanation, I will choose the more logical assumption that there is a reason, there is a God. If Atheists are correct, then there is absolutely no reason to expend any more effort to stay alive, you are better off dead because it takes less effort to be dead. Why do Atheists struggle to go on living when there is absolutely no reason to live? Nothing you will ever do or say, not even the universe’s existence makes any difference whatsoever! Why not just jam a gram of smack in your mainline and fade away?
      If all the evidence presented is ambiguous, then deductive reasoning says the simplest answer is the most likely. Since everything we observe in nature seems to be created then I conclude that it was created. The Jewish/Christian God has the most spiritual truth and the richest accounts in my opinion, so I have the most faith in him. All the other “Gods” I have read about are thinly developed characters with little of what I perceive as spiritual truth, they are myths to answer simple questions.
      My advice to all my fellow humans stumbling in the darkness of this matter realm is to trust what your “Spirit” alerts you is true. Your spirit will know if something is true or false to you instantly, it doesn’t use your flesh mind, it just knows instantly, follow it.
      Love and peace to all, and in the end, all will be revealed.

      September 4, 2012 at 12:51 pm |
    • Brother Maynard

      Wow I guess it DOES come down to making your own reality.
      Well really it takes NO effort to be dead. I'm not sure what you are getting at however.
      The reason to live ... is live itself.
      I see it the other way. BECAUSE there IS no after-life ... BECAUSE the destination is the journey itself is WHY I ( as an atheist ) want to live as long as possible. I refuse to cower in the immenseness and darkness of the universe. I will be the opposite of those who glance up at the night sky and feel small. BECAUSE I am a giant, I am one of the most complex collection of atoms I rejoice in being ME. ... NO GOD NECESSARY.
      See I don't get why believers live. The after-live of heaven eternal and a place of everlasting bliss. WHY stay here when heaven is so much better? Why didn't you baptize your child and then immediatley kill him / her. You just sent that child directly to heaven, to be in the arms of the Lord.

      September 4, 2012 at 2:01 pm |
    • PerceivedReality

      Maynard,
      So you are a god, I was starting to get the feeling that was what Atheists thought and you just confirmed it. No one can be more righteous, intelligent or charismatic as you! Funny, in a way, the new Atheists are much like the old Satanists.

      "Anyone who says 'thou shall' is my enemy" -The Satanic Bible

      "Do as thou will"-The Satanic Bible

      I know you guys "Gotta get yours before the whole s88thouse goes up"-Jim Morrison

      Use and consume whatever gets you off until you are physically incapable of continuing

      Evil always finds its prey, what/who is yours?

      September 4, 2012 at 4:56 pm |
  20. Blah blah the wheel's off your trailer

    CALLING ALL TEAPUBLICANS...CALLING ALL TEAPUBLICANS...CALLING ALL TEAPUBLICANS...

    I have a question for ya...

    Why are you lunatics still posting comments complaining about President Obama? Haven't you just nominated Mitt Romney to be your candidate of choice for President in November? So what are you still complaining about? And why are you still posting comments when you have already nominated a candidate who you are going to vote for in November? Hey, just go vote for your candidate and shut to hell up! Trolls!

    September 4, 2012 at 7:52 am |
    • harry

      I fully agree with you...

      September 4, 2012 at 8:01 am |
    • Lisa

      Here here.. Yes they were doing it all last week during the RNC in direct response to articles that were solely about Romney or Ryan – their own candidate. Hello? Want to support your guy? Tell us more about Bain – that he did or didn't really send that many jobs overseas... support your candidate!

      September 4, 2012 at 8:04 am |
    • King

      And for the love of god STOP ASKING ABOUT THAT DAMNED BIRTH CERTIFICATE!!!

      September 4, 2012 at 8:08 am |
    • eroteme

      We will perhaps learn about that damned birth certificate after Obama leaves office.

      September 4, 2012 at 9:44 am |
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The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.