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Newly revealed Coptic fragment has Jesus making reference to 'my wife'
September 18th, 2012
03:28 PM ET

Newly revealed Coptic fragment has Jesus making reference to 'my wife'

By Eric Marrapodi, CNN Belief Blog Co-Editor

(CNN) - A newly revealed, centuries-old papyrus fragment suggests that some early Christians might have believed Jesus was married. The fragment, written in Coptic, a language used by Egyptian Christians, says in part, "Jesus said to them, 'My wife ..."

Harvard Divinity School Professor Karen King announced the findings of the 1 1/2- by 3-inch honey-colored fragment on Tuesday in Rome at the International Association for Coptic Studies.

King has been quick to add this discovered text "does not, however, provide evidence that the historical Jesus was married," she wrote in a draft of her analysis of the fragment set to appear in the January edition of Harvard Theological Review. The divinity school has posted a draft of King's article to which AnneMarie Luijendijk, an associate professor of religion at Princeton University, contributed.

"This fragment, this new piece of papyrus evidence, does not prove that (Jesus) was married, nor does it prove that he was not married. The earliest reliable historical tradition is completely silent on that. So we're in the same position we were before it was found. We don't know if he was married or not," King said in a conference call with reporters.

FULL POST

- CNN Belief Blog Co-Editor

Filed under: Bible • Christianity • Faith Now • Jesus

September 18th, 2012
06:58 AM ET

Belief Blog's Morning Speed Read for Tuesday, September 18

By Arielle Hawkins, CNN

Here's the Belief Blog’s morning rundown of the top faith-angle stories from around the United States and around the world. Click the headlines for the full stories.

From the Blog:

CNN: What really enrages Muslims? Twitter knows
What really enrages Muslims? Having a really good hair day - but no one knows because you wear a hijab. Not being able to say "Hi" to your friend Jack in a plane - or to call out for your nephew when he gets lost in an airport because his name is "Jihad." The tongue-in-cheek answers are part of an explosion of sharply satirical responses on Twitter to a Newsweek magazine cover showing Muslim men in turbans and keffiyahs, apparently rioting, under the banner all caps headline "MUSLIM RAGE." Thousands of Muslims have made fun of the magazine headline since Monday, when it published a long article by the Somali-born writer Ayaan Hirsi Ali, a former Muslim who describes herself as a "combatant in the clash of civilizations."

CNN: Obama campaign expands faith effort
President Barack Obama's campaign is continuing its push for people of faith to cast a November ballot in their favor. On Monday they unveiled a "People of Faith for Obama" a new initiative to mobilize voters that included Web video of the president and a faith platform.

FULL POST

- A. Hawkins

Filed under: Morning Read

What really enrages Muslims? Twitter knows
September 18th, 2012
06:26 AM ET

What really enrages Muslims? Twitter knows

By Richard Allen Greene, CNN

What really enrages Muslims?

Having a really good hair day - but no one knows because you wear a hijab.

Not being able to say "Hi" to your friend Jack in a plane - or to call out for your nephew when he gets lost in an airport because his name is "Jihad."

The 72 virgins all turn out to be male.

The tongue-in-cheek answers are part of an explosion of sharply satirical responses on Twitter to a Newsweek magazine cover showing Muslim men in turbans and keffiyahs, apparently rioting, under the banner all caps headline "MUSLIM RAGE."

FULL POST

- Newsdesk editor, The CNN Wire

Filed under: Islam • Muslim • Religious violence

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About this blog

The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke and Eric Marrapodi with daily contributions from CNN's worldwide newsgathering team.

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