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My Take: What all those Jesus jokes tell us
The authors note that Jesus jokes have become popular just since the 1970s.
November 10th, 2012
10:00 PM ET

My Take: What all those Jesus jokes tell us

Editor’s note: Edward J. Blum is a historian of race and religion at San Diego State University. Paul Harvey is a history professor at the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs and runs the blog Religion in AmericanHistory. They co-authored “The Color of Christ: The Son of God and the Saga of Race in America.”

By Edward J. Blum and Paul Harvey, Special to CNN

Did you ever hear the one about Jesus being Mexican? Well, he was bilingual; he was constantly harassed by the government; and his first name was Jesus.

Or, perhaps Jesus was Irish? He loved a good story; he never kept a steady job; and his last request was for a drink.

Or maybe it’s possible that Jesus was Californian? He never cut his hair; he was always walking around barefoot; and he started a new religion.

You may not have heard these Jesus jokes, but you’ve heard others. They represent a comedic trend that has animated the United States since the 1970s. More and more comedy gimmicks hit on Jesus, his ethnicity and his relationship to politics. Laughing with (and at) the Lord is now fodder for major motion pictures, barroom comedy tours, graphic novels, t-shirts and bumper stickers.

How is it that a figure sacred to so many Americans has become the punch line of so many jokes? And why is it acceptable to poke fun at Jesus when other sacred figures are deemed off limits or there is hell to pay for mocking them?

The explanations are as numerous as the laughs.

Immigration shifts from the 1960s changed the ethnic and religious faces of the country so no tradition dominates today. The Christian right made such a moral spectacle of itself that it practically begged to be mocked. The emergence of “spiritual, but not religious” sensibilities left many Americans willing to denounce or laugh about traditional faith. The public rise of agnosticism, atheism, and secularism led to aggressive mockery as a form of persuasion.

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If we pause to consider why we’re laughing, we find that the comic bits delve into some of our thorniest and unresolved problems. The jokes reveal much more about us than they do Jesus. They speak to how our society has changed, how it hasn’t, and what we’re obsessed with.

The first public jokes about Jesus were heard in the 1970s. There had been religious jokes before this, but none about Jesus had become widely popular because organized Christianity held such authority. As the economic recession and problems of urban decay collided with civil rights exhaustion and new immigration, however, some Jesus jokes emerged.

Archie Bunker on “All in the Family” was the white racist and misogynist you loved to hate and hated to love. On one occasion, his son-in-law challenged Bunker’s rampant anti-Semitism with the claim, "Jesus was Jewish." Archie shot back immediately: "Only on his mother's side."

The “All in the Family” spin off “Good Times” featured a black family that lives in an inner-city housing project, probably Chicago's infamous Cabrini Green. On the show's second episode, the oldest son J. J. astounded everyone by painting Jesus as black. The younger son loves it, and says he learned all about Christ’s blackness from the local Nation of Islam.

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As the family debates whether this black Jesus should be hung on the wall in place of their white Jesus, they “miraculously” receive $140 from the Internal Revenue Service. Feeling blessed, the family placed the painting on its living room wall, and the elated J. J. shouted his tagline, "Dyno-mite!”

From the 1980s to the present, the number of prominent Jesus jokes has multiplied like loaves and fishes:

• In “Talladega Nights,” Ricky Bobby and his family debated which Jesus to pray to (“baby Jesus in golden fleece diapers,” “grown-up Jesus,” “ninja Jesus”). Their overall hope is that Jesus will help them continue their extravagant lifestyle.

• “South Park” featured Jesus as a weak-kneed host of a local talk show who boxes the devil.

• “Family Guy” had Jesus perform magic tricks that wowed his ancient audience.

• “The Colbert Report” placed a gun in Christ’s hand and had him defend conservatives against the liberal “War on Easter.”

• “Saturday Night Live” let Jesus chastise Tim Tebow for using the Lord’s name in vain and ended the bit by declaring that the Mormons have it right.

One unforgettable scene in the rather forgettable recent film “21 Jump Street” may explain why Jesus has become such a joke.

Before Jonah Hill’s character returns to high school as an undercover cop, he prays to a small, crucified “Korean Jesus.” Down on his knees, he says: “Hey Korean Jesus, I don’t know if you only cater to Korean Christians or if you even exist, no offense. I’m just really freaked out about going back to high school. It was just so f***ing hard the first time. … I just really don’t want to f*** this up. Sorry for swearing so much. The end? I don’t really know how to end the prayer.”

The hilarity of the moment only makes sense in our time. Hill's character is unchurched and agnostic, but wants spiritual power to guide him. We can laugh at how agnosticism and being “spiritual, but not religious,” leave him uncertain of what to say, how to say it, and even how to end.

We can also laugh at how ethnic factors color his approach. By wondering if Korean Jesus cares only about Korean problems, Hill pokes fun at the issue which was made a media spectacle in 2008, when the Rev. Jeremiah Wright could be heard preaching that “Jesus was a poor black man” as part of his support for Barack Obama. What good is a God who only cares for those who look like him?

The Jesus jokes not only reveal how tangled our religious, racial, economic and political positions have become, but also how many outlets there are for the jokes. In these tense times, when presidential hopefuls point fingers at one another and families unfriend one another over political and cultural differences, laughing may be one way to talk about the problems without killing one another.

The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of Edward J. Blum and Paul Harvey.

- CNN Belief Blog

Filed under: Christianity • Entertainment • Jesus • Opinion

soundoff (5,750 Responses)
  1. Rose

    Hi, guys. Just a few things to get off my chest:
    First of all, being a Christian does not make a person "ignorant" or "foolish" or stupid or close-minded. I'm a CHRISTIAN student at one of the best colleges in the country. I was raised to understand that God loves absolutely EVERYBODY. It doesn't matter who you are or what you've done–that's right. God loves Hitler. He loves Jeffrey Daumer. Therefore, as Christians, if we are to attempt to live in the ways of the Lord, we should attempt to show love and understanding to everyone we meet. This means that I acknowledge that other people may not believe what I do. Perhaps I disagree with them, but that does not mean that I am going to tell them their religion is wrong.Each one has merit of it's own. I find that it strengthens my faith to learn about other cultures and beliefs.
    Second of all, God hears all prayers. He may not answer in the way we expect, or even in the way that we are hoping to see our prayers answered. But he's always there. That little boy who died of cancer died because his mother didn't realize that her prayers were already answered– in the form of medicine. Yes. I'm a christian who believes in science. Fascinating, isn't it? I'll admit that I haven't got every part of the evolutionary thing straightened out quite yet, but neither does the rest of the world (ask my physical anthropology professor... we're always finding new pieces of the puzzle)
    Next, the Bible. You have to understand: We don't know how years were measured during the early Old Testament. A day of creation could actually have been 4 million years, for all we know. We also do not "manipulate" the bible. But there are certain parts that we have adjusted to fit in the modern world. Many of the stories are to be interpreted as lessons and we can learn loads from them. There are chapters that give us hope, that remind us that we are loved beyond measure, and that we hear everyday without realizing it. Love Is patient, love is kind, love is GOD.
    I feel sorry for you people who haven't found someone to go to on your bad days. and on the good ones. How do you handle it? I survive on the understanding that there is someone who loved me SO much that he sent his only son to earth to live and die for us. Did you know that He had the choice to leave? At any time during his arrest, the torture, carrying the cross up that hill, or even while he HUNG on the cross (which is a horrible way to die, btw) but he didn't. He begged God for another way, but in the end, he stuck it though. (no pun intended) He passed up the option to send 40 thousand legions of angels to his rescue, but it had to be done. If you're reading this, and you think I'm a crazy old fool, I'm sorry. I wish you the best in life. I hope you're happy where you are, if you're still incredibly adamant about... nothing.
    PS: God does have a sense of of humor– look at Canadian geese ;-)

    November 12, 2012 at 12:12 pm |
    • mk

      "That little boy who died of cancer died because his mother didn't realize that her prayers were already answered– in the form of medicine."

      But those medicines already existed, so wasn't the "answer" to the prayer already there? And if god had really intended to answer the prayer to save the boy, wouldn't he have done everything in his power to make sure the mother knew to use the drugs? Ultimately, the prayer wasn't answered.

      November 12, 2012 at 12:23 pm |
    • Cal

      "God loves Hitler."
      And maybe Hitler loved God too, he certainly thought that God was on his side. Maybe he repented in that bunker and is looking down from heaven on all the Jews he sent to the ovens.

      Yup, funny sense of humor your God has.

      November 12, 2012 at 12:23 pm |
    • BonnieS

      Wonderful Rose! :)

      November 12, 2012 at 12:24 pm |
    • God's Oldest Dreamer

      Rose,

      From you venting post, I am abridged to say you are rooted in the pottage of Christiandom which may be said to be a goodly thing. What differs from your post and my venting is that I see this world as not being God or His sons' kingdom domains. In orders for this world to make it into the next Age, the majority of the worldly must deny God to be but a falseness in order to carry on the learning curvatures of reason. God has ever been humanisms' back-seat passenger. He does not anymore want to be mankind's eyeing principia.

      Love Lettuce,
      Love Let Us,
      G.O.D.

      November 12, 2012 at 12:27 pm |
    • Bootyfunk

      god drowned every human on earth but one family in his great flood. that means god drowned babies. read that again - BABIES. only an evil monster could drown babies.

      November 12, 2012 at 12:28 pm |
    • JesusIsMyGardener

      "I feel sorry for you people who haven't found someone to go to on your bad days. and on the good ones. How do you handle it?"

      Logic and reason do it for me. Why do you need anything outside of your belief in yourself to get through bad days? And why do you need something to help you through good days? Start believing in yourself, build some confidence and self-esteem, and you won't need the crutch of a non-existent deity to hold your hand for you.

      November 12, 2012 at 12:29 pm |
    • Cal

      "A day of creation could actually have been 4 million years"
      Except that it's the same word being used during the r=creation myth and when Moses brings the commandment to keep the Sabbath holy. Actually, if you think about it, the creation myth explains why the Sabbath is holy. That's it's purpose.

      November 12, 2012 at 12:29 pm |
    • Primewonk

      Your god commands you to kill gay people. Where is the love?

      Hell, your god commands you kill lots of folks.

      November 12, 2012 at 12:36 pm |
    • ME II

      @Rose,

      "God hears all prayers. He may not answer in the way we expect, or even in the way that we are hoping to see our prayers answered. "
      As yet there is no evidence that 'God's answers to prayers' are any different than the normal outcome of our efforts and random events.

      http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16569567

      "You have to understand: We don't know how years were measured during the early Old Testament."
      First, it's not just the duration, but the sequence that is in error.
      Second, the evidence dose not agree with the OT, if it is taken literally. If you want to take it as allegory, parable, or whatever, fine, but taken literally it does not work.

      "...there is someone who loved me SO much that he sent his only son to earth to live and die for us. Did you know that He had the choice to leave? At any time during his arrest, the torture, carrying the cross up that hill, or even while he HUNG on the cross (which is a horrible way to die, btw) but he didn't."
      Why exactly did he need to send his son?
      Compared to the eternal torture that the supposed God threatens us with, Jesus had a 'day at the beach', i.e. how can anything lasting only a few days compare to eternal torture? Not to mention that God knew Jesus (himself?) would be resurrected, which kind of ruins the whole noble sacrifice thing.

      November 12, 2012 at 12:37 pm |
    • Blessed are the Cheesemakers

      Rose,

      You seem like a very intelligent and nice person. Pretty much all you wrote is rationalization. If you were born in an Arab community or a Jewish Community don't you think you would be equally adament of those beliefs? That is because your belief is based on indoctrination. It may make you feel better to think there is a god watching your every move and thought, but that does nothing to answer the question of 'is it true'.

      November 12, 2012 at 12:38 pm |
    • Madtown

      there is someone who loved me SO much that he sent his only son to earth to live and die for us
      --------
      Rose, do you find it at all interesting that God only had 1 son? The creator of everything natural around us, of the vast universe, and every living thing in it, yet God could only have 1 son?! His "only son"? Seems to me God could have as many sons/daughters as he'd want, and why couldn't he? So, seems more than a little odd that God would only send 1 person to a small area of this world, when he could've sent numerous sons/daughters to all reaches of this world, in an effort to reach all the people in this world that he created. To me, that says that the christian message is NOT the "only right way" to see God. Otherwise, God would provide it to all his earthly creations.

      November 12, 2012 at 12:38 pm |
    • Mike, Albany

      "Next, the Bible. You have to understand: We don't know how years were measured during the early Old Testament. A day of creation could actually have been 4 million years, for all we know." Oh come on. How could the original authors of the Old Testament have known that centuries later, strong evidence would emerge to suggest that the universe ("The Heavens" in the Book of Genesis). This is a classic example of trying to make the numbers in the Bible "conform" to those of modern science. Also, why would the original authors of the Old Testament try to be deliberately confusing by using the word "day" (or "yom" in the original Hebrew) if they meant something else. You either take it at face value, or you face the fact that the Bible is wrong on many accounts and you reject it.

      November 12, 2012 at 12:46 pm |
    • Ting

      "God loves Hitler. "

      Of course he loves Adolf. Hitler followed in God's footsteps. Read the Bible again. God was the creator of genocide.

      November 12, 2012 at 12:49 pm |
    • iheartyou

      Nice post, Rose. I don't agree with anything that you said, but at least you said it politely. I'm glad that you have something that gets you through life and helps you through the rough times. But please save your sympathy for people who actually need it. Folks that don't believe in god do not need you to feel sorry for them. They're fine. They believe in a lot of things... things that actually exist and that can be seen, touched, examined and proven. Science works quite nicely for me. Common sense and faith in myself and my abilities is what gets me through the rough times, and the not so rough times. Just because people don't believe in god does not meant that they believe in nothing. And even if they do believe in nothing.... so what....who/what is that hurting? The arrogance of religious people is, i think, what annoys others so much. The whole concept of having sympathy for, or feeling someone is lesser than you, because they don't believe in your storybooks. No, I don't think you're a crazy old fool at all. You're probably a really nice person, good neighbor, great mother, fun aunty, etc. And I also wish you the best in life. But each person on this planet has to find what's best for their lives on their own. And if some of us choose not to pick the path of imaginary beings, then respect that please. Don't feel sorry for it. Respect it and move on with your life. Peace and love.

      November 12, 2012 at 12:59 pm |
    • God's Oldest Dreamer

      The world as it is today is strewn full of povertous and diseased calamities within makind's principias. Many an eye of the people see but cannot bend themselves to the needs of those wantings' sakes. Feeding the poorest is good yet it does nothing about their conditioning to be raised out of poverty. Who amongst our intellectuals do justice when confronting the most poorest of people and who amongst the Pharisees' most wealthy will sell all they have gained and give it all to the poor?

      November 12, 2012 at 12:59 pm |
    • 12345

      "God loves EVERYBODY"

      Is that why he tortures them for all eternity after they die because they don't trust what's written in the bible?

      November 12, 2012 at 1:07 pm |
    • sybaris

      Rose, Christianity makes so much sense!

      An omnipotent god who created the first man out of dirt and the first woman out of the dirt man’s rib later impregnates a man’s wife to reproduce itself. After the baby (Jesus) is born it disappears for over 30 years, reappears and sacrifices itself to itself with the aid of the Romans. Before he is killed though he walks on water, turns water into wine, heals lepers and makes a zombie out of a man named Lazarus. Jesus tells us that his death is redemption for having created imperfect beings (why a perfect and omniscient being would create imperfect beings and not foresee the failure is anyone's guess) and that his crucifixion is better than the previous attempt to rid the world of evil a few thousand years earlier. That effort involved 40 days and nights of rain to drown every single living thing except good fish and that which boarded a large wooden boat and dispersed themselves on island continents thousands of miles from where the boat eventually landed. After Jesus’ death he reawakens three days later and tells his followers that if you telepathically promise that you accept him as your master, symbolically eat his flesh and drink his blood he will accept you and cleanse you of an evil force you inherited from the dirtman who was convinced by a talking snake to eat a fruit from a magic tree. How can you not believe that?

      November 12, 2012 at 1:22 pm |
    • Bible Clown©

      " God loves absolutely EVERYBODY" Yep, same as an abusive husband loves his wife. Let me guess, God only hits us because we make Him hit us, right? If we would only stop looking at Him funny, He'd be much nicer to us, Unless He came home drinking, then look out, am I right?

      November 12, 2012 at 1:25 pm |
    • God's Oldest Dreamer

      Demagoguery runs the gauntlets of all humanisms.

      November 12, 2012 at 1:35 pm |
    • ME II

      @God's Oldest Dreamer,
      I have to say, for a minute, I was very impressed, until I realized I misread the following:
      "Demagoguery runs the gauntlets of all humanisms."
      as
      "Demagoguery runs the gamut of all humanisms."
      Which seems profound to me.

      November 12, 2012 at 1:58 pm |
    • sam stone

      "I feel sorry for you people who haven't found someone to go to on your bad days. and on the good ones. How do you handle it?"

      high quality cannabis

      November 12, 2012 at 2:38 pm |
  2. RedskinsFan

    My take? I think humor is a way for us to relate to things. Jokes tie us together. The same thing is discussed in detail in popular culture. Take Mass Effect 3. One of the random conversations you can hear is between Joker, the pilot of your ship, and EDI, the ship's AI, discussing humor. Joker tells a joke about a Krogan soldier and a Salarian specialist. After the punchline, EDI discusses how the joke plays on stereotypes (Salarians being weak scientists and Krogan being brutish morons). Joker simply says: It's also one of the few jokes you will hear both Salarians and Krogan tell. Jokes rely on stereotypes and perceived weaknesses sure, but in the end, they also bring peoples together. The point being, if they can both laugh at the their foibles and follies, there is hope they can one day mend the divide between them.

    I don't know if there is a God. I believe in science and the Big Bang. I don't know if Jesus was what he claimed to be, if he ever really existed. But I do know this: The jokes about him being Latino, Black, Irish, or a hippie make me laugh, and they make most of the Christians I know laugh. They bridge a gap. So why does it matter? We can joke about Mohammed, Buddha, Thor, Anubis, Zeus. In the end, I have to think most believers think they are just as funny as us "infidels" do. If we can get over this pompous belief that our views are the right views and learn to laugh at some of the things that, most of us will freely admit, sound a little nonsensical, the world will be a better place.

    November 12, 2012 at 12:06 pm |
  3. Religion is not healthy for children and other living things

    A Muslim dies and finds himself before the Pearly Gates.
    He is very excited, as all his life he has longed to meet the Prophet Muhammad. Having arrived at the Gates of Heaven, he meets a man with a beard.
    'Are you Muhammad?' he asks.
    'No, my son. I am Peter. Muhammad is higher up.
    And he points to a ladder that rises into the clouds.
    Delighted that Muhammad should be higher than Peter.
    he climbs the ladder in great strides,
    climbs through the clouds coming to a room where he meets another bearded man.
    He asks again, 'Are you Muhammad?
    'No, I am Moses. Muhammad is higher still.
    Exhausted, but with a heart full of joy.
    he continues to climb the ladder and, yet again,
    he discovers an even larger room
    where he meets another man with a beard.
    Full of hope, he asks again, 'Are you Muhammad?
    'No, I am Jesus...You will find Muhammad higher up.
    Muhammad higher than Jesus! The poor man can hardly contain his delight and climbs and climbs, ever higher. Once again, he reaches a larger room where he meets a man with a beard and repeats his question:
    'Are you Muhammad?' he gasps,
    as he is, by now, totally out of breath from all his climbing.
    'No, my son...I am God. But you look exhausted.
    Would you like a coffee?'
    'Yes, please, my Lord'
    God looks behind him, claps his hands and calls out:
    'Hey, Muhammad, two coffees!'

    November 12, 2012 at 12:06 pm |
    • marc

      Awesome!!!

      November 12, 2012 at 12:11 pm |
  4. Concerned in Cleveland

    It speaks a lot towards the maturity of modern Christianity
    that Christians quietly and peacefully abide the mean spirited jokes and comments heaped upon their beliefs
    While Atheists spout obscenities at the peaceful faithful
    and Muslims burn and murder at the very thought of making fun of their religion

    Christianity grew up, it's time for the rest of you too as well.

    November 12, 2012 at 12:05 pm |
    • ME II

      Non-believers, of whatever the prevalent belief happens to be, have been enduring worse than mockery for centuries.

      November 12, 2012 at 12:10 pm |
    • Shootmyownfood

      You must know some really awful atheists. However, what you should be aware of is there is no organized group of atheists. Not all react the same way to the beliefs of others. I personally am willing to let anyone believe anything they wish, as long as they don't try to impose their beliefs or the actions generated by those beliefs on me or anyone else. The biggest issue I have with organized religion is proselytizing – if I wanted to join your faith, I'd come to your church. My home is my castle – too bad I can't maintain an alligator-filled moat.

      November 12, 2012 at 12:11 pm |
    • Mittology

      CiC, Evolved maybe; not grown-up. Pastors living the high-life on the money from their sheep, priests abusing children, fundies wanting everyone else to conform to their interpretation of a guide to life as defined by their religion.

      November 12, 2012 at 12:12 pm |
    • Brent

      "It speaks a lot towards the maturity of modern Christianity"

      You are wrong. Religion-based bigotry use religious teachings to justify discrimination against Native Americans, African Americans, minority religious groups, woman and interracial couples. Most people know that, historically, religion has been used to justify discrimination against women, religious minorities and people of color. The point is that religion-based bigotry has been a common denominator of injustice toward many groups in American society’s past. When given a chance, many people will see the underlying historical pattern of using religious teachings and beliefs to justify harmful discrimination. History provides the moral judgment, and we do not have to be theologians engaged in scriptural debates to point people to the judgment rendered by history.

      November 12, 2012 at 12:12 pm |
    • Dick Izinya

      "Christianity grew up"? If that were true, it would have vanished in a puff of logic.

      November 12, 2012 at 12:15 pm |
    • JesusIsMyGardener

      If you grew up, then why do you still believe in something equally as non-sensical as the Tooth Fairy, Easter Bunny, and Santa Claus? No, you haven't grown up; you've just mastered denial.

      November 12, 2012 at 12:15 pm |
    • mk

      Christians are anything but peaceful and quiet.

      November 12, 2012 at 12:25 pm |
    • jrmullowney

      So to sum up your post: Christians good, everyone else bad.

      November 12, 2012 at 12:25 pm |
  5. palintwit

    A teabagger's dream vacation is a trip to the Barbed Wire Museum in Kansas.

    November 12, 2012 at 12:04 pm |
  6. JonathanL

    Anyone who is born Black (almost black?) and Jewish, looks like a hippie, wears long hair, wanders homeless, preaching wisdom and claiming to be a king and a God, claiming his mother is a virgin, and that he can walk on water, would be the brunt of many jokes. He would also require video and scientific evidence to back his claims. Would anyone get away with putting God as his father on his birth certificate? Imagine what would happen if Donald Trump got wind of it? But the jokes about Jesus can be expected. Times have changed. What was normal back then might only pass for normal in San Fransisco, or in parts of NYC.

    November 12, 2012 at 12:03 pm |
  7. The LORD of ALL THE HEAVENS

    Turn in to FOXNEWS to hear my Word.
    CNN is the Devil's channel.

    November 12, 2012 at 12:02 pm |
    • Nelson Muntz

      'cos they're so good at polls and unbiased opinion. ha-ha

      November 12, 2012 at 12:07 pm |
    • tallulah13

      Tell me that was a joke, I am glad that President Obama won the re-election. I can continue to be on welfare for alteast another four years and collect my unemployment benefits without any discrimination.This will be my consti/tutional right barring all the the jokes about jesus aside.

      November 12, 2012 at 12:09 pm |
  8. Chad

    The public rise of agnosticism, atheism, and secularism led to aggressive mockery as a form of persuasion

    – Is mockery a form of persuasion?
    – Why not just use evidence?

    Mockery and personal attacks is what a person engages in when they have nothing substantive to say. The best they can do in the situation is just call the other person names.

    What does that say about the atheist argument? Is mockery the best they can do? Why?

    November 12, 2012 at 11:57 am |
    • TrollAlert

      "Ronald Regonzo" who degenerates to:
      "Salvatore" degenerates to:
      "Douglas" degenerates to:
      "truth be told" degenerates to:
      "Thinker23" degenerates to:
      "Atheism is not healthy ..." degenerates to:
      "another repentant sinner" degenerates to:
      "Dodney Rangerfield" degenerates to:
      "tina" degenerates to:
      "captain america" degenerates to:
      "Atheist Hunter" degenerates to:
      "Anybody know how to read? " degenerates to:
      "just sayin" degenerates to:
      "ImLook'nUp" degenerates to:
      "Kindness" degenerates to:
      "Chad" degenerates to
      "Bob" degenerates to
      "nope" degenerates to:
      "2357" degenerates to:
      "WOW" degenerates to:
      "fred" degenerates to:
      "!" degenerates to:
      "pervert alert" is a degenerate;

      This troll is not a christian.

      November 12, 2012 at 11:59 am |
    • .

      Chad, pot meet kettle, kettle meet pot. What a hypocrite.

      November 12, 2012 at 12:00 pm |
    • sam stone

      nothing substantative to say?

      you're a fine one to talk, chad

      November 12, 2012 at 12:01 pm |
    • ME II

      Mockery is not a valid logical argument, no. But, it can be an effective persuasive tool. In fact it's been used for centuries against nonbelievers.

      "The fool says in his heart, "There is no God." They are corrupt, their deeds are vile; there is no one who does good." (Psalm 14:1)

      November 12, 2012 at 12:04 pm |
    • Shootmyownfood

      I mock no-one's belief. I do not, however, feel the need to "believe" along with them.

      November 12, 2012 at 12:04 pm |
    • ME II

      @TrollAlert,
      I wouldn't consider Chad a Troll. He actually seems to believe what says and will try to defend it. Trolls generally are hit and run types, just out to get a rise out of people.

      November 12, 2012 at 12:07 pm |
    • JesusIsMyGardener

      I see a lot more hate-spew coming from you "believers" than from the atheists/secularists/non-believers.

      November 12, 2012 at 12:18 pm |
    • Chad the debator

      Check out the Munk debate Hitchens vs Blair "Is Religion a force for good in the world?". The problem with the likes of Chad he only defines religion as Christian cults and disregards the rest. A very narrow view that he will defend no matter how much he has to twist the facts, lame. Chad you ignore the best atheists can do because that is what you want to do.

      November 12, 2012 at 12:34 pm |
    • Chad

      "you do the same thing" seems to be the common response:
      A. "You are equally poor in constructing arguments" is a crappy response as it acknowledges your own failure to construct a good argument and does nothing to address it.
      B. On the contrary, the theistic argument is very sound and data driven on the other hand It is demonstrated again and again that atheist argument is typically emotional and ad-hominem.

      November 12, 2012 at 12:43 pm |
    • John not the Baptist

      A man sees what he wants to see, is that what you mean by is mockery the best they can do? You ignore all the learned writings on the death of god or the impossibility of god. Strange in that you manage to cut paste and post all sorts of cherry picked material to back your positions.

      November 12, 2012 at 12:44 pm |
    • Chad

      @John not the Baptist "You ignore all the learned writings on the death of god or the impossibility of god. Strange in that you manage to cut paste and post all sorts of cherry picked material to back your positions."

      @Chad "such as.. what?
      I have read "The God Delusion"
      I have listened to dozens of debates, Hitchens, Ludemann , Ehrman, Croissan, Avalos. I know the positions (10x better than you I'm sure)

      what information am I not considering?

      November 12, 2012 at 12:51 pm |
    • John not the Baptist

      Chad, please.
      You seem to be looking for another of your long winded arguements, why?, you already know that whatever evidence was provided by the other side you would ignore as usual. You win, OK, feel better!

      November 12, 2012 at 12:52 pm |
    • ME II

      @Chad,
      You misunderstood my point.
      My argument here was: "Mockery is not a valid logical argument, no. But, it can be an effective persuasive tool."
      My evidence: It has been used effectively for centuries against nonbelievers.

      November 12, 2012 at 12:54 pm |
    • Chad

      "The problem with the likes of Chad he only defines religion as Christian cults and disregards the rest."

      =>I am not interested in, nor do I think it is an effort that should be expended, to defend anything other than Judeo-Christian belief system..

      How exactly is that a problem?

      November 12, 2012 at 12:54 pm |
    • Chad

      @ME II, the fact that mockery exists in the bible does not make it an effective persuasion tool any more than the fact that adultery exists in the bible makes that acceptable conduct.

      You need to stop looking at the bible as a "owners manual", or a philosophy for improving the human race. It is a narrative which describes the relationship between God and humanity, it's fundamental message is that we are estranged and incapable of "good".
      Every word is accurate, in context. Ignore context, and one is just making it suit ones own agenda.

      November 12, 2012 at 12:59 pm |
    • I'm not a GOPer, nor do I play one on TV

      @Chad,

      slow day at work today? By the way, this is hilarious:

      "the theistic argument is ... data driven"

      Thanks for the laugh!

      November 12, 2012 at 12:59 pm |
    • Tom, Tom, the Other One

      Chad may have come up with an important number. I'm not sure what Chad's counting, but it's a pretty big number.

      @Atheist " but there are no witnesses of his (Jesus's) continued existence. I think we need support of that part of the claim before the rest can be believed."
      @Chad "????
      only 2.2 billion... what number were you looking for?

      November 12, 2012 at 1:00 pm |
    • John not the Baptist

      So you read the God Delusion by Dawkins, good for you and your ego jumps to the conclusion that makes you 10 times more informed than others, typical. Try...
      Death of God Vahanian
      Impossibility of God Martin & Monnier
      God is not Great Hitchens
      Feath of God Altizer & Hamilton
      Anything from Bertrand Russell
      etc.
      If you have tuned into the debates you may find that the atheist side has managed to carry the day when it was held in a neutral setting, not at a highly prejudiced, venue.

      November 12, 2012 at 1:14 pm |
    • ME II

      @Chad,
      Again, you misunderstood my point.

      It is not the fact that it exists in the Bible that makes it effective. It is the fact that the quote is used so often in order to mock nonbelievers, that shows its effectiveness.
      Other evidence of effectiveness of mockery, look at the propaganda from Nazi Germany about Jews (I'm not making a comparison to Christianity or the Bible), or look at the portrayals of blacks in certain sectors in pre-Civil rights US, e.g. Sambos, black-face actors, lawn-jockey-ornatments, etc., or look at any ethnic jokes in general.

      "You need to stop looking at the bible as a 'owners manual', or a philosophy for improving the human race."
      First, "You need to stop" telling me what I "need" to do.
      Second, you don't know how I view the Bible, so please stop building your staw-men.
      Third, how do you know what the Bible is? Because it says so?

      November 12, 2012 at 1:14 pm |
    • Chad

      @ME II "It is not the fact that it exists in the Bible that makes it effective. It is the fact that the quote is used so often in order to mock nonbelievers, that shows its effectiveness."
      @Chad "no, frequent use of something doesnt mean it is effective.
      mockery is not effective, because it is not based on fact, on evidence. It is a retreat to emotional ad-hominem when nothing better can be constructed.

      =====
      @ME II "Third, how do you know what the Bible is? Because it says so?"
      @Chad "It is a narrative, because it is a narrative. That's the genre.
      How do you know that "The rise and fall of the roman empire" is a history book. Because, it is.. analyze the authors intent and the contents. simple..

      November 12, 2012 at 1:27 pm |
    • John not the Baptist

      Chad,10X better than you I'm sure, a little back hand mocckery there, practice what you preach. Such an outstanding human being resorting to such behaviour and a christian to boot. Hypocrisy, not Chad.

      November 12, 2012 at 1:46 pm |
    • ME II

      @Chad,
      This grows tiresome. Persuasive does not mean logically valid. It means convincing to others. As I started with "Mockery is not a valid logical argument." But it can be very persuasive to some people.

      Actually, I think narrative is a style, not a genre, but whatever, fine, the Bible is a narrative, a story, a tale. you convinced me (and without any evidence either.)

      November 12, 2012 at 1:47 pm |
    • John not the Baptist

      Chad,10X better than you I'm sure, a little back hand mockery there, practice what you preach. Such an outstanding human being resorting to such behaviour and a christian to boot. Hypocrisy, not Chad.

      November 12, 2012 at 1:47 pm |
    • Chad

      @John, what information am I not considering?
      @ME II, to be clear, the bible IS a historically accurate description of the interaction of the God of Israel with humanity.The bible is NOT fiction.

      November 12, 2012 at 2:36 pm |
    • mama k

      It is fiction so far, Chad, at least until any claim made by any religion regarding interface with a higher being to date can be credibly proven. Of course I don't expect this to ever happen. But certainly, you've tried many times, but have always failed to provide credible proof of such.

      November 12, 2012 at 3:09 pm |
    • Chad

      @mama k "It is fiction so far, Chad, at least until any claim made by any religion regarding interface with a higher being to date can be credibly proven. Of course I don't expect this to ever happen. But certainly, you've tried many times, but have always failed to provide credible proof of such."

      =>1. No historical detail in the bible has ever been proven to be incorrect
      2. The ONLY way that the supernatural events recorded in the bible can be claimed to be fiction a-priori, is if you can demonstrate that God does NOT exist.
      3. If you can not prove that the God of Israel does not exist, then you need to be open to the possibility that the supernatural has occurred, and can not discredit supernatural events a-priori.

      so, if you claim that the supernatural is impossible, then you need to prove the God of Israel does not exist.

      November 12, 2012 at 3:45 pm |
    • ME II

      I should just leave it alone, I guess.

      @Chad,
      This may depend on what you mean by "proven", but there is evidence that some events in the Bible are historically inaccurate. Here's a few.
      Gen 1
      Birds didn't exist before land animals. Fruit-bearing (flowering) plants didn't exist before land animals. The Earth didn't exist before stars or the sun.
      Gen 6
      There is no evidence for a global flood and it would likely be very evident.
      Joshua 10:13
      If the sun "stood still" for "about a full day" it more than likely would have been recorded by humans and the cataclysmic results would have shown in the geologic record.
      Nativity
      Was Jesus born before the death of King Herod (Matthew) or after (Luke)?

      November 12, 2012 at 4:07 pm |
    • mama k

      Chad: "1. No historical detail in the bible has ever been proven to be incorrect"

      I don't buy that, Chad. But actually, that matters not for what we are mainly talking about. Because as equally, if not more, we can easily say that: no assertion of contact with a higher being claimed in the bible has every been proven to be true.

      Chad: "2. The ONLY way that the supernatural events recorded in the bible can be claimed to be fiction a-priori, is if you can demonstrate that God does NOT exist."

      Not true on more than one level, Chad. First, one can equally say that there are no means, that would seriously be deemed credible, by which supernatural events asserted and recorded in the bible can be proven to be non-fiction. Therefore, it is reasonable to highly suspect not only all assertions of such supernatural events, but of the particular validity of the god of israel altogether.

      Chad: "3. If you can not prove that the God of Israel does not exist, then you need to be open to the possibility that the supernatural has occurred, and can not discredit supernatural events a-priori."

      The part is OK, Chad. It is always good to be open to things, I agree.

      Chad: "so, if you claim that the supernatural is impossible, then you need to prove the God of Israel does not exist."

      Lol. First of all, I do not claim that the supernatural is impossible. That goes along with being open in your #3. You should try more of that. But more importantly, there's no need to refute a poor assertion, Chad. Because the bible and its stories have been the assertion since they were first written and assembled. And since then, it and it's followers have failed to give any reasonable proof of the supernatural claims made, and until they do, if ever, their/your claim is just that – only an unproven claim. Others I'm sure would refute them – but it's just as telling to let them speak for themselves as rehashed iron-age folklore. When the most base foundation of such a religion is something that came to us from only writing and stories where already so unstable over time, then you have to wonder about what is built atop it, Chad. Christianity would have proved more convincing if it had completely pretended to be something brand new and unrelated to the OT foundation that is the most suspect folklore of all.

      November 12, 2012 at 4:37 pm |
    • Chad

      @mama k "I don't buy that, Chad. But actually, that matters not for what we are mainly talking about. Because as equally, if not more, we can easily say that: no assertion of contact with a higher being claimed in the bible has every been proven to be true."
      @Chad "A. Nothing in the bible has ever been proven to be false.
      B. I dont make an assertion that God can be proven.

      =========
      @Chad: "2. The ONLY way that the supernatural events recorded in the bible can be claimed to be fiction a-priori, is if you can demonstrate that God does NOT exist."
      @mama k "Not true on more than one level, Chad. First, one can equally say that there are no means, that would seriously be deemed credible, by which supernatural events asserted and recorded in the bible can be proven to be non-fiction. Therefore, it is reasonable to highly suspect not only all assertions of such supernatural events, but of the particular validity of the god of israel altogether."
      @Chad "you are merely re-stating that God cant be proven, and again, I dont make the assertion that His existence can be proven.
      What I do correctly assert, is that you may not reject the supernatural as a live option a-priori unless you can prove that God does not exist.
      Unless you prove God does not exist, the supernatural remains a live option.

      =======
      @Mama K "the bible and its stories have been the assertion since they were first written and assembled. And since then, it and it's followers have failed to give any reasonable proof of the supernatural claims made, and until they do..."
      @Chad "origin of the universe, origin of life, fine tuning, fossil record, empty tomb."

      more of the same right? The AU (Atheist University) debate team motto: "that's all nonsense!!!"

      November 12, 2012 at 11:42 pm |
    • Herpaderp Jenkins

      I can't believe you people are wasting your time with this pathetic piece of stunted slime known as Chad.
      I thought you were smarter than that.

      Don't feed this twisted filthy troll. Stop feeding these idiots and they'll stop coming here.

      November 12, 2012 at 11:54 pm |
    • Tom, Tom, the Other One

      "origin of the universe, origin of life, fine tuning, fossil record, empty tomb" Yes, the evidence is overwhelming that the God of Abraham exists and begat his only Son in a young virgin ... wait, is it the origins, the fossil record, or fine tuning that tells us that God is male and can impregnate?

      November 13, 2012 at 12:20 am |
    • Tom, Tom, the Other One

      Ah, it is clear now. The Bible is the only clear and relevant thing. The Universe must be seen in the context of the Bible which does not itself need explanation. Everything points to it, not just the fossil record, but everything. All the symmetries of nature are clearly revealed in it. It shines with an inner light. My hand seems transparent when I touch it. No! Stop! It's revealing too much ...

      November 13, 2012 at 12:49 am |
    • ME II

      @Chad,

      What is your response to my previous post?

      You said, "I dont make an assertion that God can be proven."
      Perhaps you mean the 'assertion that God has been proven', because it would be simple for God to be proven, well supported by evidence anyway. If He exists, He just needs to reveal himself and submit to verification. A few photos, finger prints(?), a couple of miracles, and voila, hard evidence.

      What you are asserting, in effect, is that God exists. But you are trying to avoid the 'burden of proof' for making such a claim, by this rephrasing.

      You said, "Unless you prove God does not exist, the supernatural remains a live option."
      This is logically incorrect. The supernatural is possible or not without God.
      If the supernatural is possible (S), then perhaps God is possible (G), but perhaps not.
      I.E.: if S then (G or notG)
      However, if notS then notG, is true, I think.

      What you are saying, by "Unless you prove God does not exist, the supernatural remains a live option," is if notG then notS, which is not true. "The supernatural" may be possible without God (the God of Israel).

      You said, "origin of the universe, origin of life, fine tuning, fossil record, empty tomb."
      It is not nonsense, or not all of it anyway, but is not evidence of God or the supernatural.

      November 13, 2012 at 10:13 am |
    • Chad

      @ME II 'What is your response to my previous post?"
      @Chad "missed it.."

      =====
      @ME II You said, "I dont make an assertion that God can be proven."
      Perhaps you mean the 'assertion that God has been proven', because it would be simple for God to be proven, well supported by evidence anyway. If He exists, He just needs to reveal himself and submit to verification. A few photos, finger prints(?), a couple of miracles, and voila, hard evidence."
      @Chad "1. I dont make an assertion that God can be proven, nor do I make the assertion that God has been proven.
      2. I do make the assertion that the evidence clearly supports the premise that God exists
      3. "Submit to verification" LOL
      4. Hard evidence: origin of the universe, fine tuning, origin of life, fossil record, resurrection of Jesus Christ, personal experience.

      =========
      @ME II "What you are asserting, in effect, is that God exists. But you are trying to avoid the 'burden of proof' for making such a claim, by this rephrasing. You said, "Unless you prove God does not exist, the supernatural remains a live option."
      This is logically incorrect. The supernatural is possible or not without God. If the supernatural is possible (S), then perhaps God is possible (G), but perhaps not. I.E.: if S then (G or notG) However, if notS then notG, is true, I think.
      What you are saying, by "Unless you prove God does not exist, the supernatural remains a live option," is if notG then notS, which is not true. "The supernatural" may be possible without God (the God of Israel)."

      @Chad "1. I do make a claim that God exists, and I do provide evidence (you may not personally find that evidence compelling, but it IS evidence). As such I do NOT avoid the burden of proof for my claim.
      2. You are not understanding the purpose of my statement: ""Unless you prove God does not exist, the supernatural remains a live option.""

      which is this: Atheists can not make an a-priori claim that the supernatural is impossible, unless they disprove the existence of the God of Israel

      – for the supernatural to be impossible, no supernatural entity can exist.
      – God of Israel is a supernatural entity
      – therefor, for the supernatural to be impossible, the God of can not exist

      November 13, 2012 at 12:54 pm |
    • Chad

      and I owe you answers on your Genesis questions...

      November 13, 2012 at 1:02 pm |
    • Chardwatch2 Electric Bugaloo

      "@Chad "1. I do make a claim that God exists, and I do provide evidence (you may not personally find that evidence compelling, but it IS evidence). "

      Whaaaat????

      November 13, 2012 at 1:17 pm |
    • Veritas

      Chad. "Nothing in the bible has ever been proven to be false."
      That is not a true statement, but presuming it is – the same can be said for the myths of Odin, Zeus, etc. so why do you disbelieve those myths but not your own?

      November 13, 2012 at 1:25 pm |
    • ME II

      @Chad,
      "2. I do make the assertion that the evidence clearly supports the premise that God exists"
      "4. Hard evidence: origin of the universe, fine tuning, origin of life, fossil record, resurrection of Jesus Christ, personal experience."

      Obviously, we disagree on the validity/existence of your "evidence".

      "Atheists can not make an a-priori claim that the supernatural is impossible, unless they disprove the existence of the God of Israel"
      First, I would say that I don't think anyone is claiming the supernatural is "impossible", just that there is no evidence of it.
      Second, your order of precedence, if that's the right term, seems off. Basically, if someone makes a claim that the supernatural is impossible and can prove it, logically, then God would be proven impossible as well, since He is supposedly supernatural.

      – The supernatural is impossible (this is a premise. I'm not claiming it's true.)
      – God is supernatural
      – Therefore, God is impossible

      i.e. One doesn't need to specifically disprove God, if one can, in general, disprove the supernatural.

      November 13, 2012 at 1:52 pm |
    • Chad

      "The supernatural is impossible (this is a premise. I'm not claiming it's true.)"

      your first premise cant (by definition) be demonstrated to be correct, so your deduction must necessarily fail.
      Deductive reasoning involves using given true premises to reach a conclusion that is also true.

      November 13, 2012 at 2:04 pm |
    • hawaiiguest

      The same crap over and over and over.
      Hey Chad, the fact that the supernatural hasn't been disproven is completely fucking irrelevant. The fact remains, until you can prove there is a supernatural, there is absolutely no justification to posit it in the first place. Do you automatically posit the existence of everything that hasn't been disproven? I realize that you will ignore that last question, but I figured I'll ask anyway so there can be another example of your complete dishonesty.

      November 13, 2012 at 2:07 pm |
    • Chardwatch2 Electric Bugaloo

      Chad – "4. Hard evidence: origin of the universe, "

      Lol. Try no evidence, Chad.

      November 13, 2012 at 2:10 pm |
    • ME II

      @Chad,
      A valid logic argument is constructed in such a way that if the premises are true then the conclusion must follow. A valid logic argument does not mean, by itself, that the conclusion is true.

      Valid, but untrue, logical argument:
      – Gods are immortal
      – Socrates is a God
      – Therefore, Socrates is immortal

      Valid and true argument:
      – Men are mortal
      – Socrates is a man
      – Therefore, Socrates is mortal

      All I was saying is that logically it is not necessary to disprove God in order to disprove the supernatural. If one can disprove the supernatural, then God will also be disproven as a logical consequence of the supernatural being disproven.

      November 13, 2012 at 2:24 pm |
    • ME II

      @Chad,

      p.s. I was not claiming the conclusion, "God is impossible" was a true statement. (does that help?)

      November 13, 2012 at 2:29 pm |
    • Chad

      @ME II "All I was saying is that logically it is not necessary to disprove God in order to disprove the supernatural. If one can disprove the supernatural, then God will also be disproven as a logical consequence of the supernatural being disproven."

      @Chad "that is a true statement, and it also shows why the statement "The supernatural is impossible " is not valid as a premise.

      November 13, 2012 at 2:33 pm |
    • ChardWatch2 Electric Bugaloo

      @Chad – "that is a true statement, and it also shows why the statement "The supernatural is impossible " is not valid as a premise."

      ME II (a few lines up) – "First, I would say that I don't think anyone is claiming the supernatural is "impossible"

      translation – Chad falls back to a previous argument that no longer exists to regroup and rework a different argument.

      November 13, 2012 at 2:43 pm |
    • Chad

      you are missing the point.. a premise must be true, otherwise the deduction fails.

      November 13, 2012 at 3:10 pm |
    • ME II

      @Chad,
      You are missing the point. I was not offering a "proof", I was merely showing a logically constructed argument to show that your statement was logically invalid. i.e. it is not necessary to disprove God in order to disprove the supernatural.

      "The proof of a conclusion depends on both the truth of the premises and the validity of the argument."
      (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Premise, [not that it's definitive at all.])

      November 13, 2012 at 3:26 pm |
    • Chad

      As I said, I agree that your argument is logically constructed, I am just questioning the validity of the premise to begin with.

      If you can demonstrate the truth of the premise"The supernatural is impossible " ,then you're all set, you will have proved that God doesnt exist :-)

      November 13, 2012 at 3:36 pm |
    • ME II

      @Chad,

      Obviously

      November 13, 2012 at 3:40 pm |
    • hawaiiguest

      @ME II

      Good job, the moronic emoticons from Chad is a telltale sign of a realization of his ignorance, and that he will continue dishonest idiocy in order to avoid conceding he is wrong.

      November 13, 2012 at 3:41 pm |
  9. Mike, Albany

    Oh come on. The reason for telling Jesus jokes is that they are funny and harmless. Like this one:

    Moses and Jesus are out playing golf one day, and they come to a particularly difficult shot across a small lake. Moses asks Jesus how he is going to play it, and Jesus says that he's going to use a 7 iron. Moses advises him against that particular club, but Jesus says, "I once saw Arny Palmer make a shot like this with the 7 iron, and if Arny can do it, well then, of course, I can too." So Jesus shoots with a 7 iron, and the ball goes right into the lake. Jesus asks Moses to be a pal and part the waters for him. "On all right", says Moses, and he parts the waters so that Jesus can go in an get his ball. When he comes back, Moses says, "Well I hope you learned your lesson. Maybe you'll rethink which club to use." Jesus says that he's going to try again with the 7 iron, again stating that if Any can do it, then he can too. So Moses says, "Fine. If the ball goes in the water this time, I'm not going to part the waters for you!" Jesus tries again with the 7 iron, and sure enough, it goes into the water. So Jesus steps out onto the surface of the lake and starts looking beneath the surface for his ball. While he's looking, two other players come up to Moses, and seeing this long-haired guy standing on the surface of the lake looking around, they ask Moses, "Who does that guy think he is, Jesus Christ?" to which Moses answers, "No, Any Palmer!"

    November 12, 2012 at 11:50 am |
    • American

      So it is ok to make fun of Jesus but not that pervert the prophet Mohammad?

      November 12, 2012 at 12:04 pm |
    • BananaSlug

      So it is ok to make fun of Mohammad but not that pervert Jesus?

      November 12, 2012 at 12:12 pm |
    • Bet

      @ American

      Feel free to tell all the Muhammed jokes you want.

      November 12, 2012 at 12:17 pm |
    • RedskinsFan

      No "American"... its fine to make fun of each of them. And you. And me. I'm an engineer and I laugh at jokes about myself and other engineers all the time. Do you know the difference between and introverted and extraverted engineer is? The Extravert looks at your shoes during the conversation!

      It's funny because it pokes fun at a stereotype that is usually pretty true. Most engineers, myself included, are a little nerdy, bookish, aloof... the joke pokes fun at it. It's funny. It's a sign of maturity to laugh at yourself this way. If Jesus was 1/2 the man we believe, if Mohammed was, chances are good they'd laugh too. They may even say: You forgot this...

      November 12, 2012 at 12:23 pm |
    • ME II

      What did Mohammed say to Jesus?

      "I said no wine or blood, sheesh."

      November 12, 2012 at 3:15 pm |
  10. Ted Ward

    This shallow article is as ignorant as are the people who think these jokes are funny. Not because anyone is offended or threatened by such stupidity, but because the jokes depend upon an ignorant audience who has no idea what Christianity is about in order for them to work. What the jokes say about us is how uneducated we have become.

    November 12, 2012 at 11:45 am |
    • mk

      I was a christian for 30 years and I think these jokes are hilarious. What I don't find hilarious, but quite embarrassing, is that I believed the scam for 30 years.

      November 12, 2012 at 1:00 pm |
  11. Buck

    Did Jesus believe in astro-evolution like NASA???

    http://www.fountainsofthegreatdeep.com/IFS.htm

    November 12, 2012 at 11:43 am |
    • ME II

      Talk about jokes. JESUS! That's one silly web site. LMAO

      November 12, 2012 at 11:48 am |
  12. God's Oldest Dreamer

    Origins, formed thru 'originalisms' vied as originalities from the original Originator. You question my Origin theory? Futz-face.

    November 12, 2012 at 11:42 am |
  13. Doomed

    It's funny to see that atheists are proclaiming to be intelligent and yet they keep fighting against the invisible, something they don't believe in. This only shows how childish and ridiculous they are.

    November 12, 2012 at 11:39 am |
    • God's Oldest Dreamer

      Too many straws need too many 'strawed-pickers' wherever the straws are strewn upon the abundancy in the frontages of strawmen straying for strewn straws..

      November 12, 2012 at 11:47 am |
    • ME II

      Atheists struggle against the very real laws that believers impose on them, e.g. creationism in science class, same-se.x marriage bans, stem cell research bans, etc.

      November 12, 2012 at 11:51 am |
    • Be Ready to Use Your Brain

      Actually I think they are fighting the humans that believe in such things who are trying to infringe upon their rights.

      November 12, 2012 at 11:52 am |
    • God's Oldest Dreamer

      ME II,

      Imaged reasonings are not void of godlessness yet rational reasonings have little imaged soundness from which to see with. A clod is a dumb futz and becomes a dumber klutz who becomes the dumbest buffoon in all the fooleries of angst rationalisms.

      November 12, 2012 at 11:59 am |
    • ME II

      Perhaps God's Oldest Dreamer should consider retiring?

      November 12, 2012 at 12:13 pm |
    • Bet

      I don't bother fighting against something that doesn't exist. I will fight against having the rules of a non-existent god made the law of the land.

      November 12, 2012 at 12:20 pm |
    • JesusIsMyGardener

      Keep your Dark-Ages beliefs out of the legislative agenda and we'll all be pals. If someone wants to waste good brain power on make-believe, I don't care, but when your make-believe starts infringing my rights, it becomes a problem. Keep your god where he belongs: in your head!

      November 12, 2012 at 12:21 pm |
    • mk

      It's funny to see that christians are proclaiming to be intelligent and yet they keep BELIEVING IN the invisible. This only shows how childish and ridiculous they are.

      November 12, 2012 at 12:27 pm |
    • sam stone

      we are not fighting agaist god. we are fighting against the impact of the faithful who influence laws to deny others' their civil rights. if you cannot see the difference, you are an idiot

      November 12, 2012 at 1:13 pm |
  14. Truman Angel

    Has anyone noticed that the Mormon Jesus has blue eyes, blond hair and is built like a weight lifter? The Norse Jesus? Crown of thorns or helmet with horns on it. People shape Jesus into whatever or whoever they want just like sit-coms do.

    November 12, 2012 at 11:33 am |
    • I'm not a GOPer, nor do I play one on TV

      Someone who posts here regularly has the handle:

      If we were horses, our God’s would be horses.

      We create our Gods in our image.

      November 12, 2012 at 11:36 am |
    • I'm not a GOPer, nor do I play one on TV

      Ooops – greengrocer's apostrophe!

      November 12, 2012 at 11:37 am |
  15. Harvard's Veritas

    It is always there, next to you.

    November 12, 2012 at 11:32 am |
  16. Dwight

    When people get full of themselves they turn from God, but when they are humbled by life and near death it is amazing how many turn to Him at the last minute.

    November 12, 2012 at 11:27 am |
    • UncleBenny

      Doesn't mean that he actually exists.

      November 12, 2012 at 11:46 am |
    • Shootmyownfood

      Turn to whom?

      November 12, 2012 at 12:05 pm |
    • JeramieH

      And kids turn to Santa Claus for their Christmas wishes.

      November 12, 2012 at 12:30 pm |
  17. Catholics are all Pedo Supporters like all Penn State Fans

    The Lord of Imaginationland isn't so insecure about himself that he would care about harmless jokes.

    Sticks and Stones my break my bones but words will never hurt me... unless you are an Omnipotent God, she sweats the small stuff.

    November 12, 2012 at 11:14 am |
  18. Dwight

    The reason Jesus is fair game for the liberals is because if they put down a moral authority it makes them less guilty of the things they do and they know that Christians will not attack them for it. Let them put down Mohammed or Buddha and that's another story. It is not that Christians do not love Jesus, but they also for the most part follow His teachings of non-retaliation and are accepting disapproval as a way of life.

    November 12, 2012 at 11:12 am |
    • I Am

      It's often hard to take someone's argument seriously when gross exagerations are used , I.e., 'Liberals believe , etc ' . I don't know how it got started that liberals are heathen pagans. Well, that is not true.

      November 12, 2012 at 11:55 am |
    • Shootmyownfood

      Note for future blog posts: Liberal does not equal immoral.

      November 12, 2012 at 12:07 pm |
    • sam stone

      Yeah, Dwight.....all those maurauding Buddhists...

      What incredible insight.

      Go home, boy......

      November 12, 2012 at 1:16 pm |
  19. TYRANNASAUR

    What all those Jesus jokes tell us....

    Since REAL HISTORY and the ROMAN CHRONICLES never mention anyone named Jesus ( a guy who supposedly threatened the power of EMPEROR TIBERIUS of Rome) the chances of there ever having been a Jesus is NIL...so you can make all the jokes you want and still not go to the heaven that doesn't exist..

    November 12, 2012 at 11:11 am |
    • Christian

      [youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bpnU_4a1BCw&w=640&h=390]

      November 12, 2012 at 11:13 am |
    • Dwight

      Jesus was never a threat to Tiberius of Rome, but to Herod who rulled over the Jewish state. Even Pontus Pilate didn't think Jesus was a threat. Jesus concern wasn't about seizing power from the rulers, but it was a below the scenes work. The Jews hated Him and the Romans later hated Him and tried to wipe out of existence all Christianity and you wonder why there are very few Roman references. But there are some. It is amazing that this person who did not exist had such a following and an impact on society.

      November 12, 2012 at 11:21 am |
    • Ted Ward

      Hmmm..tell that to Roman emperor Constantine.

      November 12, 2012 at 11:48 am |
    • JesusIsMyGardener

      I just love the way they brainwash their children into believing this muck. That child's brain has already been destroyed by Dark Ages thinking. His parents should be locked up for child abuse.

      November 12, 2012 at 12:33 pm |
    • UncleBenny

      Tell what to Constantine? That he fell for a myth? He probably wouldn't care, since his "conversion" was more politically motivated than religious.

      November 12, 2012 at 2:17 pm |
    • Great White Horse Prophecy FAIL = Mormons no longer blogging

      Biblical Jesus never existed...no evidence period. Odds are there might have been a n insane bast ard child with a cultic personality....probalby was put to death for being insane. Very good chance that he was also bi se#ual and slept with prost i tutes.

      November 12, 2012 at 2:23 pm |
  20. I'm not a GOPer, nor do I play one on TV

    This article generated 3,000 posts?

    It hardly even makes a point let alone being thought provoking.

    November 12, 2012 at 11:11 am |
    • Alex

      It is an article about christianity so it is a great place for people to be rude to each other and throw out facts that are unprovable.

      November 12, 2012 at 11:19 am |
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About this blog

The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.