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Survey: Religiously unaffiliated, minority Christians propelled Obama’s victory
A quarter of President Barack Obama's supporters were religiously unaffiliated, the Public Religion Research Institute says.
November 15th, 2012
02:24 PM ET

Survey: Religiously unaffiliated, minority Christians propelled Obama’s victory

By Dan Merica, CNN

Washington (CNN) – President Barack Obama’s victory relied largely on two dramatically different religious coalitions minority Christians and those with no religion according to a survey released Thursday.

“This presidential election is the last in which a white Christian strategy will be considered a plausible path to victory,” said Robert P. Jones, CEO of the Public Religion Research Institute, which conducted the survey. “The American religious and ethnic landscape is becoming increasingly diverse, and any campaigns relying on outdated maps are destined to lose their way.”

One-in-four Obama voters were religiously unaffiliated, the second-largest “religious” demographic in the president’s coalition, according to the study (PDF). Minority Christians consisting of black, Asian, Hispanic and mixed-race Americans made up 31% of Obama’s coalition, the largest religious group.

Among major religious demographics, Obama struggled most with white Christians, including Catholics, mainline Protestants and evangelical Protestants. When these three groups were added up, they accounted for just 35% of Obama’s religious coalition. In comparison, Republican challenger Mitt Romney’s coalition was overwhelmingly white and Christian, with 79% of Romney voters identifying as such.

The Public Religion Research Institute numbers flesh out exit polls released after Election Day. According to those numbers, 70% of the religiously unaffiliated supported Obama, compared with 26% who backed Romney. Ninety-five percent of black Protestants voted for Obama, according to the exit polls, while 75% of Hispanic Catholics supported the president.

Romney, according to the exit polls, overwhelmingly won white evangelical Christians (79% voted for him) and white Catholics (59% voted for him).

The rise of the religiously unaffiliated has been a major recent trend. A survey by Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life released this year found that the fastest-growing "religious" group in America is made up of people with no religion at all. According to the survey, 20% of adult Americans have no religious affiliation.

At an event announcing the Pew results, senior research adviser John Green said the growing political power of the unaffiliated within the Democratic Party could become similar to the power the religious right acquired in the GOP in the 1980s.

The 2012 election results have some political experts questioning whether the religious right’s influence is fading.

The Rev. Albert Mohler Jr., president of the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, tweeted after the election that the results show “we are witnessing a fundamental moral realignment of the country.”

Conservative evangelist Franklin Graham, CEO of Samaritan’s Purse and son of the Rev. Billy Graham, told CNN that while he doesn’t believe the movement is fading, “there is a lot of work we need to do.”

“I just think there are a lot of conservative Christians who did not vote for whatever reason,” Franklin Graham said.

Like Graham, Jones said the legalization of same-sex marriage by ballot initiative in three states last week shows that America is changing.

“For the first time tonight, same-sex marriage has been passed by popular vote in Maine and Maryland,” Jones said last week. “The historic nature of these results are hard to overstate. Given the strong support of younger Americans for same-sex marriage, it is unlikely this issue will reappear as a major national wedge issue.”

The results of the Public Religion Research Institute survey were based on 1,410 telephone interviews in both Spanish and English conducted between November 7 and Sunday. The poll's margin of error is plus or minus 3.3 percentage points.

CNN’s Dan Gilgoff contributed to this report.

- Dan Merica

Filed under: 2012 Election • Barack Obama • Catholic Church • Christianity • Evangelical • Faith • Politics • Same-sex marriage

soundoff (1,305 Responses)
  1. Observer

    The only presidents since World War II to get over 50% of the vote in 2 elections:

    FDR
    Dwight Eisenhower
    Ronald Reagan
    Barack Obama

    November 16, 2012 at 1:32 am |
    • Rational Libertarian

      4 c.unts.

      November 16, 2012 at 1:34 am |
  2. Truly Blessed

    Atheist and Christians Ironically are both in the same boiling pot of excrement, your both going to be judged by the Father you ignore. Morons. Stop going to Church, Stop Hating each other and embrace My God, The Father of Abraham, David, Salomon, and Lucifer. Find his name, find truth, find peace.

    November 16, 2012 at 1:31 am |
    • Mary B.

      LOL Go get a drink from your cult leader. Freak.

      November 16, 2012 at 1:42 am |
  3. Travis

    Huh

    November 16, 2012 at 1:26 am |
  4. BPepik

    Nobody had shown any love and compassion to Obozo when he was growing up..
    Such unloved and abandoned kids are especially easy to be co-opted by commies – like Obozo got co-opted by commie Frank Marshall Davis.. There is huge internal rage in Obozo – rage towards loved, successful (he calls it rich) people, rage toward white and especially towards successful Asians..

    Obozo learned to hide his rage over the years. But that guy knows nothing about compassion and true love. To Obozo – all is about politics and about promulgating the communist lie..

    November 16, 2012 at 1:25 am |
    • Observer

      Mindless lies.

      Grow up.

      November 16, 2012 at 1:28 am |
    • hal 9001

      I'm sorry, "BPepik", but all of your assertions to date have been unfounded. Using my Idiomatic Expression Equivalency module (IEE), the expression that best matches the degree to which your assertions may represent truths is: "EPIC PEPIK FAIL".

      I see that you repeat these unfounded statements with high frequency. Perhaps the following book can help you:

      I'm Told I Have Dementia: What You Can Do... Who You Can Turn to...

      November 16, 2012 at 1:31 am |
    • JM

      Crazy. Racist. Ignorant. Ridiculous.

      Reasons sane people don't vote Republican.

      November 16, 2012 at 1:34 am |
    • Mary B.

      Awww... are you wealthy and worried about getting hit by higher taxes? Wah. Better start moving some of that money into your off-shore accounts. Hurry.

      November 16, 2012 at 1:40 am |
    • sam stone

      wow.....Obozo......how hip and cutting edge, BP

      November 16, 2012 at 7:30 am |
  5. GO_GOP

    Come lets take back our country from the Godless atheist we have in office currently. Give me back my Christian nation.

    November 16, 2012 at 1:23 am |
    • == o ==

      You live in the Vatican. How could they have taken the Christianity out of that?

      November 16, 2012 at 1:26 am |
    • == o ==

      Unless I have the wrong theocracy. But I don't know of any besides the Vatican.

      November 16, 2012 at 1:28 am |
  6. Sapient

    And the day will come when the mystical generation of Jesus, by the supreme being as his father in the womb of a virgin will be classed with the fable of the generation of Minerve in the brain of Jupiter. But may we hope that the dawn of reason and freedom of thought in these United States will do away with this artificial scaffolding, and restore to us the primitive and genuine doctrines of this most venerated reformer of human errors. — Thomas Jefferson, Letter to John Adams, April 11, 1823

    November 16, 2012 at 1:02 am |
    • Mark From Middle River

      Keep dreaming for it. The other side is saying that they are waiting for the day that you will come to God, Gods, Allah.

      In the end it is always folks hoping for the day that everyone looks, sounds, and believes the same as they do.

      November 16, 2012 at 1:06 am |
    • BPepik

      Those amazing Founding Fathers must be turning in their graves – seeing this disgrace occupying the WH – and having heard of freeloader Americans with their arms stretched our for handouts following such fraud.. God Bless those brave Americans for creating and defending this nation. Let’s pray that truth and freedom will be restored someday..

      November 16, 2012 at 1:11 am |
    • Observer

      God Bless those brave Americans for creating and defending this nation.

      Let's not forget the 4,000 brave Americans that Bush sent to die in a war he started for false reasons. Let's also remember the 30,000 that got wounded in Bush's war.

      November 16, 2012 at 1:15 am |
    • Fnordz

      Mark From Middle River: Time is on the nonbelievers' side, not the believers'.

      November 16, 2012 at 1:17 am |
    • Tom, Tom, the Other One

      I heard that George W is doing the motivational / positive thinking seminar circuit.

      November 16, 2012 at 1:17 am |
    • Mark From Middle River

      Fnordz- I do not know about that. The churches are still growing, with Catholicism growing the most. The Mormons are still growing and if we throw the Muslims into the equation, I do not think that time is on the non- believers side.

      Think about, in the ti'tle of this article it does not say that Atheist pushed Obama to victory. It says that Agnostics and Black and other minority Christians did. Basically, that the Atheist could not do enough to push him even their small percentage of the population.

      November 16, 2012 at 1:34 am |
    • mama k

      @BPepik – you mean the founding fathers like James Madison, chief architect of the Constitution, who had this to say about some of the more extreme members of this own denomination?

      During almost fifteen centuries has the legal establishment of Christianity been on trial. What has been its fruits? More or less in all places, pride and indolence in the clergy; ignorance and servility in the laity; in both, superstition, bigotry, and persecution.

      (A Memorial and Remonstrance, addressed to the Virginia General Assembly, 1785)

      November 16, 2012 at 1:37 am |
  7. BPepik

    Dreams of Obama father, commie Frank Davis, dreams of Bill Ayers, Bernardine Dohrn, and Jeremiah Wright realized..
    The Obamanation and Obama-jungen is here..!

    November 16, 2012 at 1:02 am |
    • SkepticalOne

      Double digit IQ, sad but maybe you can be trained to do something useful.

      November 16, 2012 at 1:15 am |
    • Tom, Tom, the Other One

      Obamageddon perhaps? But that was last week and you've had a few days to get over it.

      November 16, 2012 at 1:15 am |
    • ScienceSoma

      I read that four years ago as well, heard it ad nauseum from the lips of Queen Wasila... and yet, we are here, the economy is improving, and no one has had any rights taken away. If there were any truth to what you say it would have manifested itself by now. But, I know, I know – the sky is falling..

      November 16, 2012 at 1:22 am |
  8. BPepik

    Self-proclaimed socialist and communist, raised by commies, indoctrinated by commies and self-proclaimed terrorist now-professors (this country is doomed..), Obama is the most divisive partisan agitator we ever had as president..

    November 16, 2012 at 12:51 am |
    • Observer

      Obama never said he was a Communist, but YOU ARE A LIAR.

      November 16, 2012 at 12:54 am |
    • hal 9001

      I'm sorry, BPepik, but some of my subscribers, particularly those from IX, have indicated that you have reached your quota for "bullshit" long ago. They are asking that you not share any further "bullshit" with them.

      November 16, 2012 at 12:58 am |
  9. BPepik

    As the American legend Clint Eastwood said: “Obama is the biggest hoax ever perpetrated on American people..”

    November 16, 2012 at 12:45 am |
    • Doomed

      True.

      November 16, 2012 at 12:47 am |
    • Observer

      Eastwood's babbling just emphasized that many Republicans are rich old men who are out of touch.

      Republicans "hate" Hollywood actors. What HYPOCRITES.

      November 16, 2012 at 12:48 am |
    • == o ==

      I think a certain someone is talking to themselves.

      November 16, 2012 at 12:53 am |
    • Rational Libertarian

      Eastwood is a true American hero.

      November 16, 2012 at 12:56 am |
    • talkingraven1

      hey the guy was talking to a frickin empty chair! he should make another movie and call it 'the good, the bad, and the nut job'

      November 16, 2012 at 12:57 am |
    • Rational Libertarian

      If Clooney or some other liberal moron did the same thing the lefties would be calling it inspired. Eastwood used a performance art stunt to highlight both parties' deficiencies.

      November 16, 2012 at 1:02 am |
    • Edwin

      If Clooney had done it, I would have thought it just as silly.

      November 16, 2012 at 1:07 am |
    • talkingraven1

      clooney wouldn't be dumb enough to talk to an empty chair. get over it. work together so our children can all be safe from harm and not hungry. they are the future. but nice try to call it art. ha!

      November 16, 2012 at 1:10 am |
    • Rational Libertarian

      My children will be kept at a safe distance from the children of liberals and conservatives. You'd have to be retarded or ideologically blinded not to see what Eastwood was doing.

      November 16, 2012 at 1:13 am |
    • SkepticalOne

      @Rational Libertarian, I'm a Libertarian and you are not rational.

      November 16, 2012 at 1:18 am |
    • Rational Libertarian

      I am a libertarian and you are a c.unt.

      November 16, 2012 at 1:21 am |
  10. mama k

    People keep saying the U.S. is a Christian nation. Not true. We never have been. Why? Just like today, people have always been feuding about religion. Around the time of our founding there were terrible feuds in various states – some of it deadly. Some of our key founders who were Christians, some of whom were influenced by Deism, witnessed the feuding that was occurring in their home states. Thomas Paine, born a Quaker, might be considered by historians as more Deist than many of his peers. And he probably witnessed persecution – even hangings of Quakers in Massachusetts around the time of our founding. In Virginia, Washington, Jefferson, Madison, & George Mason witnessed religious persecution involving members of their own Christian sects. This is important because, along with the influence of Deism, I believe witnessing this bickering among different religious sects made it obvious to our key founders that they needed to establish as secular a government as possible despite their own religious leanings.

    James Madison, who became our 4th POTUS and chief architect of our Constitution and 1st Amendment, was furious with the fighting going on between the Anglicans (that he helped establish as Episcopalians) and Baptists in Virginia. And he was mostly furious with his own kind. If you read his A Memorial and Remonstrance (1785) that he delivered to the Virginia General Assembly, you will see his ferocity – using words like bigotry and persecution leveled against his fellow Christians.

    Still, though, it is quite obvious that Madison longed for a better day when the different Christians could live peacefully with one another. One reflective quote from him that he wrote a bit later in life, I believe, expresses his satisfaction that the secular nature of government that he helped establish successfully allowed religion to flourish more peacefully than it had before in the new country:

    It was the Universal opinion of the Century preceding the last, that Civil Govt could not stand without the prop of a Religious establishment, & that the Xn religion itself, would perish if not supported by a legal provision for its Clergy. The experience of Virginia conspicuously corroborates the disproof of both opinions. The Civil Govt, tho' bereft of everything like an associated hierarchy, possesses the requisite stability and performs its functions with complete success, Whilst the number, the industry, and the morality of the Priesthood, & the devotion of the people have been manifestly increased by the total separation of the Church from the State.

    (Letter to Robert Walsh – 1819)

    Three years later, Madison wrote this:

    Every new & successful example therefore of a perfect separation between ecclesiastical and civil matters, is of importance. And I have no doubt that every new example, will succeed, as every past one has done, in shewing that religion & Govt. will both exist in greater purity, the less they are mixed together.

    (Lettter to Edward Livingston – 1822)

    A surprise to me, John Adams (POTUS #2), had a very Deistic sounding reflection of the founding of the U.S. government in this writing:

    The United States of America have exhibited, perhaps, the first example of governments erected on the simple principles of nature; and if men are now sufficiently enlightened to disabuse themselves of artifice, imposture, hypocrisy, and superstition, they will consider this event as an era in their history. Although the detail of the formation of the American governments is at present little known or regarded either in Europe or in America, it may hereafter become an object of curiosity. It will never be pretended that any persons employed in that service had interviews with the gods, or were in any degree under the influence of Heaven, more than those at work upon ships or houses, or laboring in merchandise or agriculture; it will forever be acknowledged that these governments were contrived merely by the use of reason and the senses.

    Thirteen governments [of the original states] thus founded on the natural authority of the people alone, without a pretence of miracle or mystery, and which are destined to spread over the northern part of that whole quarter of the globe, are a great point gained in favor of the rights of mankind.

    (A Defence of the Constitutions of Government of the United States of America [1787-1788])

    November 16, 2012 at 12:45 am |
    • Edwin

      Very nice post, very informative. Thank you.

      November 16, 2012 at 1:05 am |
    • gurukul

      Religion is just a part of culture, a guy grown up in USA had no chance to become Muslim or Hindu, he can be religious or can say I am not religious. The only problem is if religion guide our society, it will become blind, but if system guide religion, who cares are you religious or not, every one obeys the system. So, the argument is not important that are you religious or not, the argument is important, are you guided by religion, if so, there are million myths, stories in religion who make no sense in this hard and difficult world. World starts with micro organism and die when cell dies, there is no other thing that can guide you but you can be absolutely religious to become happy.

      November 16, 2012 at 1:07 am |
  11. Doomed

    It's getting late and unlike you atheists i have a job and have to get up tomorrow morning. I'm not being supported by my parents. I bet i come here and check tomorrow after work and i will see 70 pages of atheists losers babbling over religions and God. I have no doubt about it. Come on atheists shows the real you, show who you are, show how many hours you are spending on the internet in search of religion comment boards to annoy people. Show us that you don't have a job and a life, and that you're spending more than 14 hours a day in front of your computer screen, geniuses.

    Good Night Losers

    November 16, 2012 at 12:44 am |
    • Athy

      Good night, you're doomed. Ha ha.

      November 16, 2012 at 12:53 am |
    • EZdiditagain

      That's not very Christian-like of you.

      November 16, 2012 at 12:54 am |
    • Edwin

      Doomed: your arrogance does not exemplify the values your religion claims to value. I have many christian friends, and they have no trouble accepting my atheism as a part of me. Unlike you, they actually *act* like christians: they do not judge others, they help the poor and needy, and they do not consider themselves superior to other human beings.

      If more christians acted like them, I think your religion would have a better reputation than it currently does.

      November 16, 2012 at 1:02 am |
    • David in NC

      You are an idiot. Most of the atheists I know are college educated professionals who work their ass off, dote on their families, and care for the community and their country. Your silly lies about us don't convince anyone or change the reality of who we atheists are. Of course that may just be a by-product of your non-reality based world view.

      November 16, 2012 at 1:18 am |
    • SkepticalOne

      Yeah, hard work you do asking if I want fries with that order, better get some sleep.

      November 16, 2012 at 1:21 am |
  12. Eric1334

    The above comments make good points regarding the actual ideas in response to other comments but when it comes down to it , the first one makes a point whether its logical to the doctrine of christianity or not. The fact that someone who had not even heard of Jesus to be condemned to hell for ,obviously, not repenting is rather troubling. They do not know of Jesus so how can they believe in him and therefore worship him. Whether he has original sin or not it doesnt seem to matter if he's unaware of it,and why would a person want to know that in the first place. A religion that automatically condemns me to hell for not believing in it is , in my view, very arrogant and i personally want nothing to do with it.IT serves as a deterrent to me,not a reason to believe.

    November 16, 2012 at 12:35 am |
    • Athy

      Well put, Eric. Seems to me anyone smart enough to realize ths would immediately give up religion. Goes a long way to explain why religious morons aren't as smart as us atheists.

      November 16, 2012 at 12:42 am |
    • Doomed

      Go find a job Eric, you really need something in your life to occupy yourself other than spending your life annoying people with your obsession about God.

      November 16, 2012 at 12:47 am |
    • Eric1334

      @ Doomed
      Ihave a job my friend, i work 40 hours a week and this does not take anything away from my comment even if i was unemployed. To add to this im not American and i'm not athiest so your assumptions have failed you yet again. In fact i'm the opposite, im NOT obsessed about God so that tends to lend to the logic that i don't believe in one. I am strong in my own convictions and do not require some supreme overlord to tell me what to do or how to treat others. I find it rather weak willed to give yourself up to a higher power . If you need that inner strength reinsured during a crisis or hardship, then look to a loved one, a friend or anything else . I have no problem with people having faith in something but when it has to adher to a certain set of guidelines that you might not entirely agree with ,then thats dangerous. YOu have not said one thing of consequence Doomed, its just petty hate directed at peopel expressing their honest opinions. Go troll somewhere else i am not going to be bogged down by your inane ,worthless comments of ignorance

      November 16, 2012 at 12:55 am |
    • Edwin

      Eric: you operate under the misconception that the risk of hell was designed merely as incentive to encourage people to believe.

      I am a non-believer, but I've acquired a fair working knowledge of many christian viewpoints. Original sin - whether the Garden of Eden story is believed as truth or as allegory alone - is the idea that humans are inherently too flawed to metaphysically abide near the flawless God after their spirits leave Earth. Simply put, God is perfection, so imperfect beings cannot be next to Him - maybe it is simply that our souls would shrivel in proximity because our flaws would magnify in contrast. Maybe it's another reason.

      Belief in Jesus offers an opportunity to be absolved of that imperfection - so we *can* reside near God after death. It's not a threat but a Law of Metaphysics. Those who have never heard of Jesus are, essentially, screwed - but that is just the way it is. God did not originally create mortal beings with the ability to reside with him after life; that happened later. Why? That is a good question to ask a christian if you're really curious.

      November 16, 2012 at 12:58 am |
    • Eric1334

      It's only imperfection in the eyes of religon. I don't think that way so what point that does that even prove? To say thats not some sort of incentive seems rather illogical. We all are so familiar with the story of christianity that it doesn;t seem odd that a god would say anyone was imperfect. It is a completely arrogant thing to say , regardless of the implications of going to hell.

      November 16, 2012 at 1:07 am |
  13. GO_GOP

    A recent study by a leading longivity research group found a strong correlation between atheism and early death. They also found a stronger correlation between belief in christian God and longevity. It was shown in the 15 year long survey that people who describe themselves as atheists on an average live 39 years less than people who describe themselves as Christians. I urge all atheists to take note of this and change your lifestyle before it is too late.

    November 16, 2012 at 12:35 am |
    • Athy

      How about the correlation between IQ and atheism?

      November 16, 2012 at 12:38 am |
    • hal 9001

      I'm sorry "GO_GOP", but your assertions regarding atheism are unfounded. Using my Idiomatic Expression Equivalency module (IEE), the expression that best matches the degree to which your assertions may represent truths is: "TOTAL FAIL".

      November 16, 2012 at 12:39 am |
    • GO_GOP

      Christians have an IQ on an average 21.12% higher than Atheists according to a recent study in a leading scientific journal.

      November 16, 2012 at 12:39 am |
    • Observer

      GO_GOP,

      "It was shown in the 15 year long survey that people who describe themselves as atheists on an average live 39 years less than people who describe themselves as Christians"

      Anyone with any intelligence would know that your statistics are total garbage. The average person lives around 79 years, meaning that the average atheist would die at 40 years which is beyond ignorant.

      GUESS again and try to get a reliable source next time.

      November 16, 2012 at 12:40 am |
    • Observer

      GO_GOP,

      "Christians have an IQ on an average 21.12% higher than Atheists according to a recent study in a leading scientific journal."

      lol. I didn't realize you are just making this up.

      November 16, 2012 at 12:42 am |
    • Edwin

      Again, people? GO is a troll. He's just trying to get a reaction by annoying people. And you are encouraging him.

      November 16, 2012 at 12:49 am |
    • hal 9001

      I'm sorry, "GO_GOP", but all of your assertions to date have been without foundation. Using my Idiomatic Expression Equivalency module (IEE), the expression that best matches the degree to which your assertions may represent truths is: "EPIC FAIL".

      I see that you repeat these unfounded statements with high frequency. Perhaps the following book can help you:

      I'm Told I Have Dementia: What You Can Do... Who You Can Turn to...

      November 16, 2012 at 12:52 am |
    • SkepticalOne

      Back under the bridge stupid troll.

      November 16, 2012 at 1:25 am |
  14. Faith isn't a Preacher

    There is no such thing as 'No Religion'.
    Just because someone claims to not have an alter does not mean that they do not have a Social Doctrine.
    We currently have a Social Doctrine in the Affordable Care Act and in the Executive Fiats that are subverting Personal Liberty and our National Sovereignty. It's claiming the Public Square to itself and evicting all others.

    November 16, 2012 at 12:28 am |
    • Athy

      Man, you need some help with capitalization rules. And. It's "altar", not "alter". Check your dictionary for the difference (assuming you're smart enough to use it).

      November 16, 2012 at 12:33 am |
    • Tom, Tom, the Other One

      Religion:

      The belief in and worship of a superhuman controlling power, especially a personal God or gods.

      November 16, 2012 at 12:35 am |
    • ScienceSoma

      There is, in fact, such a thing as no belief in a religion. No religion does not mean no ideology, it means no belief in structured supernatural ideas based in myths, legends, and/or ancient texts.

      November 16, 2012 at 12:45 am |
    • Faith isn't a Preacher

      Athy – You made my point. The Obama campaign's most effective tools were to manipulate the electorate through derision, divisiveness, deception, and malice. The human ego does not want to be subjected to those. As a result, simple people avoid the emotional abuse by pandering to the one doing the manipulation. Your nit picking on spelling is a perfect example.
      What will this administration do to those whom it cannot manipulate?

      November 16, 2012 at 12:45 am |
    • Faith isn't a Preacher

      Tom, Tom, the Other One – Is not a belief in a supreme governance a belief in a Supreme leader (Super Human) of such governance?

      November 16, 2012 at 12:49 am |
    • Tom, Tom, the Other One

      No.

      November 16, 2012 at 12:50 am |
    • Observer

      Faith isn't a Preacher,

      Republicans lost partly because their candidate was a rich guy who pays a lower tax rate than most Americans and is fighting to reduce his taxes even more and dump them on everybody else.

      November 16, 2012 at 12:52 am |
    • Faith isn't a Preacher

      Tom, Tom, the Other One – Then you are blind and comfortably numb.

      November 16, 2012 at 12:53 am |
    • Faith isn't a Preacher

      Observer – That's the narative and doctrine that you have bought into.

      November 16, 2012 at 12:54 am |
    • SkepticalOne

      You seem to be nearly illiterate so I'm not sure what you are trying to say but I'm going to guess that, if you can't express it in a way that others can understand, you are wrong.

      November 16, 2012 at 1:29 am |
  15. Rocky

    Obama purposely manipulated groups of people for votes. He and his thugs planned this election for years, they gave billions of our hardworking taxpayer dollars to the bums (WELFARE) who don't want to work or are too dumb to work and purposely manipulated women (he's a baby killer, loves abortion for population control) and atheists and illegals voted for him I'm sure. All this manipulation - the President lies constantly, has no character and no empathy, just ruled by blind ambition. I hope we go ofrf the fiscal cliff 'cause things couldn't be any worse, the Republicans should be stronger and not give in to a dictator who is a commie!!!!The ruination of America by Barack Obama.

    November 16, 2012 at 12:26 am |
    • Observer

      lol,

      The analysts are right about Republicans being clueless about what is happening.

      You've proved it.

      November 16, 2012 at 12:29 am |
    • Faith isn't a Preacher

      It can be worse. The whole objective is to collapse the U.S. governance, econmy, and sovereignty. Once that is done they can establish their Globalization governance.

      November 16, 2012 at 12:31 am |
    • tallulah13

      Rocky? Your candidate lost. You can stop lying now.

      November 16, 2012 at 12:35 am |
    • hal 9001

      I'm sorry, "Rocky", but all of your assertions are unfounded. Using my Idiomatic Expression Equivalency module (IEE), the expression that best matches the degree to which your assertions may represent truths is: "TOTAL FAIL".

      November 16, 2012 at 12:35 am |
    • Mark From Middle River

      Rocky, I do not think that Oba lies any more or less than any politician. Obama won the election with 9 million less people voting for him than when he ran against McCain. From the crying of the Republicans and Obama you would think that he won in a landslide when it just proves that the country is still mostly split leaning slightly to the left.

      November 16, 2012 at 1:23 am |
    • SkepticalOne

      You lost. All the Fox news following idiots like you lost. You are in the minority. What part of that do you not understand?

      November 16, 2012 at 1:31 am |
    • Mark From Middle River

      The Democrats lost many times before. Power has switched back and forth. Did the Democrats lose hope when G.W.Bush won twice? No, so why should we lose hope and pack up into the dustbin of history? Obama won, so do you think just like him that the war of two party politics is really over?

      Please, read a history book on defeats and wins.... neither side gave up, they just got ready for the next fight/election. :)

      November 16, 2012 at 1:39 am |
  16. GO_GOP

    More proof why this country is going downhill. Non- religious? Aren't we a Christian nation? How can non religious people be our citizens and allowed to vote? As far as I am concerned all atheists/agnostics are not Americans and must be deported immediately.

    November 16, 2012 at 12:25 am |
    • == o ==

      How many names must the retard Evan post under to get attention. Pooor lonely Evan.

      November 16, 2012 at 12:27 am |
    • Athy

      You sound like a sore loser. And, thankfully, we are not a Christian nation.

      November 16, 2012 at 12:28 am |
    • Ting

      Maybe you're not praying hard enough.

      November 16, 2012 at 12:29 am |
    • Athy

      Doesn't matter how hard he prays, it won't change anything.

      November 16, 2012 at 12:31 am |
    • GO_GOP

      Make fun of me all you can but remember one day you will stand before our Lord with your heads bowed and will have to answer for your sins. Remember he sent his son to earth to die for our sins and his son performed countless miracles like walking on water, turning water to wine and curing the blind.

      November 16, 2012 at 12:36 am |
    • tallulah13

      We are not now, nor have we ever been a christian nation. Sorry, sparky. If you want to live in a theocracy, why don't you try Iran?

      November 16, 2012 at 12:37 am |
    • Ting

      If Jesus cured the blind then why do we still have blindness? Maybe your book is not so infallible after all?

      November 16, 2012 at 12:41 am |
    • Edwin

      Why do you all feed the troll? Go_GOP is clearly not a christian. He's trying to sound like one of the posters who pontificates here, but there are obvious, tell-tale signs. For one thing, he has not given a single direct quote from the Bible.

      He only posted the things he did to annoy other people and get a response... which you gave him.

      November 16, 2012 at 12:45 am |
    • Ting

      'he has not given a single direct quote from the Bible.'

      And the glasses with the fake mustache should have been dead giveaway.

      November 16, 2012 at 12:54 am |
  17. BPepik

    CNN LIVE:
    Our food-stamp community-organizer president Obozo summoned group of CEO’s to White House yesterday.
    True, poor guy, Obozo didn’t spend a single day in private industry or business..
    But gives such awesome speeches from Teleprompter!! How is it then possible we are going broke and economy is growing slower and slower? Hmm LOL.

    Americans could have elected successful upbeat CEO to be the President. Now we have a food-stamp president with no clue.. Apparently 50% of voters are as stupid as Obozo is…

    November 16, 2012 at 12:16 am |
    • Observer

      It's a riot to listen to Republicans talk about teleprompters.

      Here's a fact: Palin not only used a teleprompter, she had to have hers with phonetic spelling and yet she trashed him for it.

      FACT: Without a teleprompter, Obama has won 5 out of 6 debates against Republican presidential candidates. Oops.

      November 16, 2012 at 12:19 am |
    • Observer

      BPepik,

      Speaking of being stupid, President Obama graduated with honors from Harvard Law School. How did you do for comparison with this "stupid" person?

      November 16, 2012 at 12:20 am |
    • Edwin

      I think your post exemplifies why conservatives lost the election: you are unwilling to accept that there are intelligent, decent people who do not think or look exactly like you - and you don't even try to hide those opinions.

      Is it any wonder why people who you belittle don't listen to your advice?

      November 16, 2012 at 12:23 am |
    • tallulah13

      I agree, Edwin. From the sound of it, the BPepik person prefers parroting neocon talking points to actually thinking for him/her self. I suspect BPepik is from a low income, poorly educated demographic. This person has nothing of value to add to the conversation, or the country, for that matter.

      November 16, 2012 at 12:41 am |
    • ScienceSoma

      So, the economy tanks, people lose their jobs and need government assistance to eat and we should blame the President for not telling them to kill a rat? Government assistance to poor people – welfare President, government assistance to global conglomerates – smart business decision.
      Also, what intelligent person would go in front of the world and not have teleprompters to avoid making mistakes? Bush 43 will be remembered, among other things, for his brutal assault on the English language and that is a distinction I think no one else is aiming for. Public speakers don't read the prompters, they use them to guide them though long periods of speaking to be sure they hit all of their major points effectively.

      November 16, 2012 at 12:56 am |
    • Mark From Middle River

      Edwin, I do not see anything different from the Democratic side. Both sides demonize each other with great joy and spirit. Neither side is ready to admit...in open media... that those on the other side of aisle are anything but that which is standing in the way of great times in America. In Oba's last press conference, I came to understand why him and Gov Christie worked so well after Sandy hit New Jersey. Both, when challenged almost become unchallengable, uncompromising, bullies who sound more like they want to take anyone holding a different view out to the woodshed.

      November 16, 2012 at 1:16 am |
  18. Drew

    "The Rev. Albert Mohler Jr., president of the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, tweeted after the election that the results show 'we are witnessing a fundamental moral realignment of the country.' "

    A "moral realignment"? What exactly does that mean? I am non-religious and I believe that we should help those less fortunate than ourselves. Too many who describe themselves as "religious", whether fundamentalist Christians or otherwise, seem to have forgotten the concept of helping those in need. They're too concerned with taxes and gay marriage. Perhaps this is the moral realignment of which he speaks? Let's hope so!

    November 16, 2012 at 12:15 am |
    • BPepik

      Yes, let's help the less fortunate – buy turning all of us to thrird wolrld country standards – like Kenya...

      November 16, 2012 at 12:18 am |
    • Edwin

      BPepik: are you suggesting that the only way to keep our country's standards is by NOT helping those in need?

      If so, maybe you should actually consider the standards in third world countries, where the top 1% live quite well and most of the rest live in poverty... that sounds exactly like the standards you propose for the United States.

      November 16, 2012 at 12:34 am |
  19. lewtwo

    People vote against one candidate or the other.
    They voted AGAINST Romney ... he was the loosing factor.

    November 16, 2012 at 12:15 am |
  20. BPepik

    STUDY:
    How liberal commie outfits as CNN, ABC, MSNBC, CBS, PBS, NPR, NYTimes, and AP propelled Obama to victory!

    November 16, 2012 at 12:09 am |
    • Observer

      Your mindless use of the word "commie" tells us all we need to know about your level of intelligence.

      November 16, 2012 at 12:12 am |
    • JM

      STUDY: How evil, hateful people who believe any lies that reflect their own prejudices call themselves Christian (although they in no way walk or talk like Christ).

      November 16, 2012 at 12:12 am |
    • Mirosal

      looks like BPepik's television is stuck on the Faux "news" channel. Jon Stewart's news has more depth and realism than anything from Faux "news". Gandhi said it best ... "I like your Christ, I do not like your Christians. They are so unlike your Christ."

      November 16, 2012 at 1:38 am |
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The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke and Eric Marrapodi with daily contributions from CNN's worldwide newsgathering team.