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Las Posadas: Joseph and the Virgin Mary travel in Maryland
December 24th, 2012
10:44 PM ET

Las Posadas: Joseph and the Virgin Mary travel in Maryland

By Arielle Hawkins, CNN

Silver Spring, Maryland (CNN) - Guitars strummed and the cheerful voices of young and old sang “Feliz Navidad” as people in the streets cheered the birth of Christ with Spanish lyrics and upbeat rhythms in Oakview, a neighborhood in Silver Spring.

Though it wasn’t immediately apparent, these members of St. Camillus Church weren’t caroling, but were celebrating the Central American Catholic tradition of Las Posadas. The celebration comes just as the world celebrates the birth of Jesus on Tuesday.

The religious event commemorates the grueling journey of the Virgin Mary and Joseph as they traveled from Nazareth to Bethlehem in search of a haven to give birth to their son. This year, St. Camillus celebrated the Christmas tradition Friday through Sunday.

The nativity story narrates how the Virgin Mary and her husband were turned away from inn after inn until a kind man allowed them to rest their heads in a barn. The word “posada” translates to “inn” or “lodging” in English.

Usually, members of a congregation march through the community to a preselected home, where they re-enact the dialogue between Joseph and the innkeepers as he tries to find lodging for his growing family. St. Camillus’ procession, however, visited four houses.

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“Usually with this celebration, the procession goes to one house a night,” said Father Michael Johnson, pastor of St. Camillus. “But because our community is so large, we try to accommodate because everyone wants to participate.”

A different St. Camillus organization was responsible for organizing the procession each night of the celebration. Cristo Joven, the church’s youth group, which caters to members 18 to 33 years old, organized Sunday’s procession.

Between 25 and 30 congregants met in the church lobby around 7 p.m., and a young woman and man dressed as Mary and Joseph led the procession to the first home. Yellow balls of light from flashlights and candles danced along the street, guiding the way as participants sang of the ringing bells in Bethlehem welcoming the Messiah.

Mary and Joseph lined up under the red and green strands of Christmas lights lining the porch of the first home. The group divided to sing “La canción para pedir posadas,” with half of the congregants outside on the deck and the others inside. The interactive song represents the conversation between Joseph and the inn owners, with the father of the unborn savior requesting shelter as those inside deny it.

The group outside initiated:

En el nombre del cielo, [In the name of the heavens,]
yo os pido posada, [I request lodging from you,]
Pues no puede andar, [because she cannot walk,]
mi esposa amada. [my beloved wife.]

Faintly, behind closed doors and through cracked windows, came the voices of the innkeepers inside.

Aquí no es mesón, [This is not an inn,]
sigan adelante, [go on ahead,]
Pues no puedo abrir, [I cannot open up for you]
No sea a algún tunante. [in case you’re a crook]

It is not until the group outside sang the magic words that they were allowed entry.

Mi esposa es María, [My wife is Mary,]
es la Reina del Cielo, [queen of the heavens,]
y madre va a ser [and she’s going to be the mother]
del Divino Verbo. [of the divine oath.]

They then all sang in unison:

Dichosa la casa [Happy is the house]
Que abriga este día [that shelters today]
a la Virgen Pura [the pure virgin]
la hermosa María. [the beautiful Mary.]
Entren Santos Peregrinos, [Enter holy pilgrims,]
reciban este rincón. [receive this haven.]
Aunque pobre la morada, [Although it’s a poor dwelling,]
se las doy de corazón. [I offer it with my heart.]

As the song concluded, the owners of the home welcomed everyone in. The sweet aroma of desserts filled the air as congregants filed into the foyer. Parishioners read scriptures in Spanish from the books of Mark and Luke and gave prayers for families. Father Michael blessed the home.

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People laughed and chatted as they sipped hot chocolate before venturing back into the cold to march to the next house. Families joined the procession from adjoining streets, left and right, until roughly 60 people were on the lawn of the second dwelling.

This was repeated three times, and the songs grew louder as more voices joined the ranks. Different Scriptures were read describing the lives of those touched by the first Christmas and of those in need whom we must remember during the holiday. Faces were illuminated next to decorative reindeer and inflatable snow men. Homeowners offered steaming spiced tea, tamales and cuisine from the Dominican Republic.

After prayers were said, people called out their favorite villancicos, or Christmas carols. With two guitars, a snare drum, bongos, a güiro and speakers, they sang "La cancion del tamborillero" (“The Little Drummer Boy”), “Noche de Paz” (“Silent Night”) and other favorites.

The 12-block excursion took roughly two hours, on a cold night when parents still had to wrap gifts, cook Christmas dinner and go to work the next morning. Regardless of the long to-do lists, people didn't eye their watches or check their phones, but instead enjoyed the moment.

“It’s a way for the church to come together, celebrate and reconnect with our traditions,” said Ingrid Garcia, a member of Cristo Joven.

About half of St. Camillus’ congregation, of 5,800 members, is Central American. Roughly 100 countries around the world are represented among the parish, Father Michael said.

The church is not alone in its diverse congregation. Similar statistics are reflected throughout of the rest of the United States.

Latinos have accounted for 71% of the growth of the Catholic Church within the country since 1960, according to the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops. Latinos also make up more than 35% of American Catholics.

In addition to having a multicultural congregation, St. Camillus has a young population with an average age of less than 40 years old, Father Michael said. “A lot of children were born here, but their parents were born in other countries. This is a way to pass on the traditions and teach the children the songs,” he explained.

Congregants of this church recognize the value of instilling faith in the younger generations.

Religious affiliation tends to be strong among foreign-born Latinos in the United States. Roughly 70% identify as Catholic, according to a survey conducted by the Pew Research Center in 2012. That number drops to 59%, however, among the second generation and falls still lower to 40% among their immediate descendants.

Whether it’s a conscious decision to educate younger generations of cultural and religious traditions, or simply a celebration of a beloved holiday, Las Posadas has attracted St. Camillus’ congregants in large numbers for more than 15 years.

“We just get together to talk about Jesus and celebrate him, and it’s actually a really nice experience,” said Danny J., a Cristo Joven member.

- A. Hawkins

Filed under: Christmas

soundoff (57 Responses)
  1. seo

    Thanks a lot for your blog post.Really thank you! Great. seo http://fiverr.com/twnseobacklink

    April 24, 2013 at 9:59 am |
  2. Atheism is not healthy for children and other living things

    When a person is getting more important than the message itself, the religion is in trouble ;-)

    December 25, 2012 at 7:28 pm |
    • Stop Talking Like An Idiot

      All religions are in trouble because they are utter bullshlt.

      December 25, 2012 at 8:23 pm |
  3. Betty Bowers

    [youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UVok167KJPw&w=640&h=390]

    December 25, 2012 at 4:18 pm |
  4. Reality

    "And the day will come,
    when the mystical generation of Jesus,
    by the Supreme Being as His Father,
    in the womb of a virgin,
    will be classed with the fable of the generation of Minerva”

    Letter to John Adams, from Monticello, April 11, 1823.

    December 25, 2012 at 2:33 pm |
  5. Chad

    MERRY CHRISTMAS EVERYONE!

    December 25, 2012 at 12:41 pm |
    • Tom, Tom, the Other One

      Merry Christmas to you, Chad.

      December 25, 2012 at 12:53 pm |
  6. Mohammad A Dar

    regardless of religion or personal belief, all religious traditions must lived on, for future generation to see them live, not just on National Geography docu-mentaries

    can you believe CNN's stu'pid du mb ass know-nothing goon robo-moderator is not letting me use the word "do-c-u-m-entaries", because it is detecting c-u-m inside the word?

    December 25, 2012 at 12:07 pm |
    • tallulah13

      You also have to break up "Const.itution." The filter is nothing more than a computer program, and programs don't care.

      December 25, 2012 at 12:10 pm |
  7. thatmedicalguy

    May God help us and save us on this remembrance of his Son's birth!

    December 25, 2012 at 11:54 am |
  8. Brampt

    The Bible does not give the date of Jesus’ birth, nor does it say that we should celebrate his birthday. As McClintock and Strong’s Cyclopedia states: “The observance of Christmas is not of divine appointment, nor is it of NT [New Testament] origin.”

    Instead, an examination of the history of Christmas exposes its roots in pagan religious rites. The Bible shows that we offend God if we try to worship him in a way that he does not approve of.—Exodus 32:5-7.

    History of Christmas customs
    Celebrating Jesus’ birthday: “The early Christians did not celebrate [Jesus’] birth because they considered the celebration of anyone’s birth to be a pagan custom.”—The World Book Encyclopedia.
    December 25: There is no proof that Jesus was born on that date. Church leaders likely chose this date to coincide with pagan festivals held on or around the winter solstice.
    Gift-giving, feasting, partying: The Encyclopedia Americana says: “Saturnalia, a Roman feast celebrated in mid-December, provided the model for many of the merry-making customs of Christmas. From this celebration, for example, were derived the elaborate feasting, the giving of gifts, and the burning of candles.” The Encyclopædia Britannica notes that “all work and business were suspended” during Saturnalia.
    Christmas lights: According to The Encyclopedia of Religion, Europeans decorated their homes “with lights and evergreens of all kinds” to celebrate the winter solstice and to combat evil spirits.
    Mistletoe, holly: “The Druids ascribed magical properties to the mistletoe in particular. The evergreen holly was worshiped as a promise of the sun’s return.”—The Encyclopedia Americana.
    Christmas tree: “Tree worship, common among the pagan Europeans, survived after their conversion to Christianity.” One of the ways in which tree worship survived is in the custom of “placing a Yule tree at an entrance or inside the house in the midwinter holidays.”—Encyclopædia Britannica.

    December 25, 2012 at 11:40 am |
  9. Ken

    Rainer, stop spamming us with your psycho-sicko website.

    December 25, 2012 at 9:35 am |
    • Rainer Braendlein

      Are you not able to write an own comment. Very poor!

      December 25, 2012 at 9:37 am |
    • Ken

      Speaking of writing, Rainer, you spammer, you posted the same copy and paste linkspam content under another post too. Shove it up your aft end sideways, spammer.

      December 25, 2012 at 9:40 am |
    • Paul

      Good catch, Ken. Rainer, you just got PWNED big time. Caught!

      December 25, 2012 at 9:42 am |
  10. Jill

    Rainer Braendlein, fear not the coming of the essential kangaroo. Strawberries are your incidental chemistry. Present the fulcrum in advance of the gypsum cookie, for as the tree is combed, so goes the predicate. In the locale of catalysts, there is always a way to the lavatory for the unimpeded.

    Whether or not you agree with the plumber, harvest away ye hearties. Kalabash in Friebourg but not in spanners if you are so purple. It's raining. Bring out the mustard but flap flap flap until takeoff. Why would you say such a thing in the presence of the substrate? 64.

    The impediment to your posterior is large but can be dissected with chestnuts and a screwdriver. Obermeyer. Glasnost and shallot cookies will do the main job (84)

    And remember, never ever miss an opportunity to watch an elephant paint Mozart.

    December 25, 2012 at 9:29 am |
    • Rainer Braendlein

      Are you ill Jill? Jesus can cure you.

      December 25, 2012 at 9:32 am |
    • Jill

      Rainer Braendlein, fear not the coming of the essential kangaroo. Strawberries are your incidental chemistry. Present the fulcrum in advance of the gypsum cookie, for as the tree is combed, so goes the predicate. In the locale of catalysts, there is always a way to the lavatory for the unimpeded.

      Whether or not you agree with the plumber, harvest away ye hearties. Kalabash in Friebourg but not in spanners if you are so purple. It's raining. Bring out the mustard but flap flap flap until takeoff. Why would you say such a thing in the presence of the substrate? 64.

      The impediment to your posterior is large but can be dissected with chestnuts and a screwdriver. Obermeyer. Glasnost and shallot cookies will do the main job (84)

      And remember, never ever miss an opportunity to watch an elephant paint Mozart.

      December 25, 2012 at 9:34 am |
    • Akira

      Whoever you are, Jill, your posts are always inspiring.

      December 25, 2012 at 10:11 pm |
    • sam stone

      "Are you ill Jill? Jesus can cure you."

      Apparently, Rainy, he has made you a delusional idiot.

      December 26, 2012 at 8:29 am |
  11. Rainer Braendlein

    Finally an article about Jesus birth!

    Actually it is only important for us to understand that the Son of God, Christ, became man, and he was called Jesus from Nazareth, the carpenters son.

    The parents of Jesus, Mary and Joseph, were very poor. This becomes clear when we regard the small sacrifice which they were able to offer in connection with Jesus' circu-mcision.

    Christ indeed became one of us, even a brother of the poorest people amongst us whereby he yet was a descendant of King David but at the time of Jesus birth the royality of Jesus family was no longer acknowledged.

    Jesus was born into this world by a virgin. Jesus was conceived by the Holy Spirit, that means Jesus body was a new creation, Jesus was a new man (of course Jesus Christ's divine nature is eternal, and not created). Jesus felt no lust like we feel but he suffered much more hostility by the Jewish leaders than any Christian suffers today by disbeliefers or has ever suffered. At last the Jews and the Romans decided to crucify Jesus, and he was extremly tempted to forsake God in the garden Gethsemane.

    We can be glad that the man Jesus remained in God, and accepted the will of his Father, and the will of his divine nature to die for the whole mankind.

    Jesus has borne our sins on the cross. If we believe that, and get sacramentally baptized, we die and resurrect with him. In Christ we can overcome our natural sinfulness. Furthermore we are forgiven in Christ.

    Let us praise Jesus for now and for ever that he died for us, and that he became man.

    December 25, 2012 at 9:20 am |
    • Rainer Braendlein

      http://confessingchurch.wordpress.com

      December 25, 2012 at 9:23 am |
    • Jill

      Rainer Braendlein, fear not the coming of the essential kangaroo. Strawberries are your incidental chemistry. Present the fulcrum in advance of the gypsum cookie, for as the tree is combed, so goes the predicate. In the locale of catalysts, there is always a way to the lavatory for the unimpeded.

      Whether or not you agree with the plumber, harvest away ye hearties. Kalabash in Friebourg but not in spanners if you are so purple. It's raining. Bring out the mustard but flap flap flap until takeoff. Why would you say such a thing in the presence of the substrate? 64.

      The impediment to your posterior is large but can be dissected with chestnuts and a screwdriver. Obermeyer. Glasnost and shallot cookies will do the main job (84)

      And remember, never ever miss an opportunity to watch an elephant paint Mozart.

      December 25, 2012 at 9:28 am |
    • Ken

      Jill, good response to Rainer's linkspam. More meaningful than his crap posts too.

      December 25, 2012 at 9:36 am |
    • Brad

      Good morning, Rainer. I'm sure you were thinking of this:

      Romans 5:8
      But God demonstrates his own love for us in this: While we were still sinners, Christ died for us.

      December 25, 2012 at 10:20 am |
  12. Aden

    Good morning. Xtians, try to get through the day without hating.

    December 25, 2012 at 8:38 am |
    • truth be told

      Then try addressing other peoples viewpoints with respect. There is no such thing as an xtian. Try getting through your day without stupidity.

      December 25, 2012 at 8:47 am |
  13. niknak

    Merry Mythmas everyone!

    December 25, 2012 at 8:36 am |
  14. Happy

    No Angels

    http://religion.blogs.cnn.com/2012/11/23/explaining-the-popes-christmas-debunking-book/

    Biggest joke under the sun!!!
    Who is telling the truth ??

    December 25, 2012 at 7:24 am |
  15. Chick-a-dee

    Wow! What a cheerful bunch are here! I guess this group is bent on proving stereotypes true. oh well... Merry Christmas! Joyeux Noel!

    December 25, 2012 at 4:05 am |
    • Rational Humanist

      And you are cheerful? Sorry, I'm not feeling the love here. But have a nice holiday season anyway. :D

      December 25, 2012 at 4:30 am |
  16. Apple Bush

    What Chrstmas means to me by Apple Bush:
    1. Death
    2 Destructon
    3. Horror
    4. Misery
    5. Sicknss
    6. Despair
    7. Rape
    8. Lies
    9. Torture
    10. Mental Illness
    11. Cancer
    12. Child Abuse
    13. Genocide
    14. Female Castration
    15. Drug Abuse
    16. Kidknapping
    17. Nucleur Weapens
    18.Gang Rape
    19. Christians

    Same as any other day on this fucked up world.

    December 25, 2012 at 2:05 am |
    • laserBreath

      The strong eat the weak. Christmas is for the strong.

      December 25, 2012 at 2:16 am |
    • Apple Bush

      Christmas is for every fool that every lived and ever will.

      December 25, 2012 at 2:25 am |
    • Apple Bush

      Christmas is death and hell and destruction masquerading as the glorious freedom of love and caring. The great deceiver that the religious warn you about but are too blind to see. Do you want to see goodness? Then look to death. That is the only peace. Only from an eternity of nothingness can come the truth.

      December 25, 2012 at 2:34 am |
    • Apple Bush

      False promises. Deceit. The beast, his crag fangs, pink with the past. Come my darlings. Come and lap the milk of paradise. Come with me and cuddle in my luxurious fur. I am your mother. Your keeper. I keep you safe. Nothing bad can harm you. No. Nothing. Join me. Merry Christmas lost ones.

      December 25, 2012 at 3:13 am |
    • Apple Bush

      It is no coincidence that the world is evil. It is also no coincidence that no evil happenes when one is dead. Dead good. Living bad.

      December 25, 2012 at 3:26 am |
    • Rational Humanist

      Just what is an "apple bush" anyway?

      December 25, 2012 at 4:31 am |
    • Mrs. Pepperpot

      Apple Bush, your list describes black Friday at Walmart.

      Rational Humanist, it's a song by Alice Cooper, who AB is a ginormous fan of.

      December 25, 2012 at 10:12 am |
    • Mohammad A Dar

      AB, what do you think of life? do you think it is just an accident?

      December 25, 2012 at 12:29 pm |
    • Apple Bush

      Life is a dream. And a nasty dream a that.

      December 25, 2012 at 1:12 pm |
    • Rational Humanist

      "ginormous" = vagina-enormous

      Thanks for the info, Mrs. Pepperpot!

      December 25, 2012 at 6:12 pm |
    • Rational Humanist

      apple bush – vigorous South African spiny shrub grown for its round yellow juicy edible fruits.

      Lyrics to the Apple Bush song by Alice Cooper:
      October in a land that's in my back yard
      There's a people who succeed they don't try hard
      Well, they've found a way to live with ease
      Eating from the bush instead of the tree
      Apple bush, apple tree
      Back to eternity
      Find you a path and you buy with a car
      Apple bush, apple tree
      Back to eternity
      Cut you a path with a chance may might fall
      Move over in a corner, standing there
      Tell my house they have to see it again
      But my house doesn't worry it's got a path of it's own
      And a bush, and a tree
      Gotta leave it alone
      Apple Bush, apple tree
      Back to eternity
      Find you a path and you buy with a car
      Apple bush, apple tree
      Back to eternity
      Cut you a path with a chance may might fall
      Someday like my house you're going to chose too
      If you cut this new path well the old one will do
      If you live with the people who live with ease
      The red apple bush, the blue apple tree

      December 25, 2012 at 6:17 pm |
    • Mrs. Pepperpot

      I've never heard that definition of ginormous before; 'round my area, it means giant and enormous: ginormous.
      Whatever works for you, though, lol.

      December 25, 2012 at 8:06 pm |
    • Gino R. Mous

      Somebody taking my name in vain again? I'm going to sue the hell out of whoever made up that word. It's rude as hell.

      December 25, 2012 at 8:28 pm |
    • Mrs. Pepperpot

      Gino R. Mous, that's how I felt when those bloody rude Monty Python gits stole my husband's last name!

      December 26, 2012 at 12:27 am |
  17. Rational Libertarian

    Merry Christmas everybody!! Sure the whole concept behind Christmas is as true as Transformers but it doesn't change the fact that modern Christmas celebrates three of the most important things on the planet: friends, family and consumer capitalism.

    December 25, 2012 at 1:49 am |

    • Well, there's celebration and then there's gorging and wallowing in it.

      December 25, 2012 at 1:53 am |
  18. capitalist

    Love Xmas: biggest $$$ making season of the whole year Yeah !!!

    December 25, 2012 at 12:42 am |

  19. Stand firm and remember: Atheist means without God.

    December 24, 2012 at 11:57 pm |
    • Moby Schtick

      No, it means without god belief. God is imaginary; nobody "has" him/her/it.

      December 25, 2012 at 12:00 am |

    • No, we are without God. We imagined one fewer thing than the others.

      December 25, 2012 at 12:07 am |
  20. Reality

    Now for 21st century enlightenment (only for the new members of this blog:)

    Christmas, the embellished story of the birth of a simple, preacher man named Jesus.

    As per many contemporary NT scholars, his parents were Mary and Joseph although some say Jesus was a mamzer, the result of a pre-marital relationship between Mary and a Roman soldier.

    http:// http://www.earlychristianwritings.com/theories.html

    Jesus was not born in Bethlehem at least the one we are familiar with and there were no pretty wingie thingies singing/talking from on high, no slaughter of the innocents by Herod, no visiting wise men and no escape to Egypt.

    "Mark's gospel, the most historical of the four gospels, does not even mention the event.

    And from Professor Gerd Ludemann in his book, Jesus After 2000 Years, pp. 269-272, "The historical yield of the Lukan infancy narrative in respect to the birth of Jesus is virtually nil.

    Matt 1:18-25: , pp. 123-124, "The fathering of Jesus from the Holy Spirit and his birth from the virgin Mary are unhistorical". Ludemann gives a very detailed analysis to support his conclusions. One part being the lack of attestations to these events and the late time strata of said story.

    "Lüdemann [pp. 261-63) discounts Luke's account as a legend deriving from Jewish Hellenistic circles that were concerned to hold together the procreation of the Spirit, the authentic sonship of the Messiah and the virginal conception. "

    Then there are these additional conclusions:

    Professor Bruce Chilton

    "In [Rabbi Jesus: An Intimate Biography] (2000), Chilton develops the idea of Jesus as a mamzer; someone whose irregular birth circu-mstances result in their exclusion from full participation in the life of the community. He argues for the natural pa-ternity of Joseph and finds no need for a miraculous conception. In his subsequent reconstruction of Jesus' life, Chilton suggests that this sustained personal experience of exclusion played a major role in Jesus' self-ident-ity, his concept of God and his spiritual quest.

    Professor John Dominic Crossan

    "In [Historical Jesus] (p. 371) Crossan treats this cluster, like 007 Of Davids Lineage, as an example of the interplay of prophecy and history in the development of the Jesus traditions.

    "In [Birth of Christianity] (pp. 26-29) Crossan uses Luke's account of Jesus' conception and birth to explore ethical issues concerning the public interpretation of the past. He notes the tendency of Christian scholars to disregard "pagan" birth legends while investing great effort in the defence of biblical birth narratives. He concludes:

    I do not accept the divine conception of either Jesus or Augustus as factual history, but I believe that God is incarnate in the Jewish peasant poverty of Jesus and not in the Roman imperial power of Augustus. "

    "The following ancient parallels to Jesus' miraculous conception should be noted:

    Birth of Moses (Exod 2:1-10)
    Birth of Plato (Diogenes Laertius, Lives of Eminent Philosophers, 3.45) [see Acts of Jesus, p. 507]
    Birth of Alexander the Great (Plutarch, Parallel Lives, 2.1-3.5) [see Acts of Jesus, p. 502f]
    Birth of Apollonius (Philostratus, Life of Apollonius, I.4) [see Acts of Jesus, p. 505]"

    And some final words from Thomas Jefferson, not a contemporary NT scholar, but indeed a very learned man:

    "And the day will come,
    when the mystical generation of Jesus,
    by the Supreme Being as His Father,
    in the womb of a virgin,
    will be classed with the fable of the generation of Minerva”

    Letter to John Adams, from Monticello, April 11, 1823.

    Conclusion: Christmas is historically a non-event. Ditto for the Feast of the Magi and the solemnity of Mary aka New Years day.

    December 24, 2012 at 11:39 pm |
    • Rational Libertarian

      Takr the day off reality and some eggnog. Religion is bogus but enjoying life is a very real necessity.

      December 25, 2012 at 1:52 am |
    • Rational Humanist

      Hey, Reality! If you want to cleanse neurons, you will have a greater impact with shorter posts. I've seen you do shorter posts...

      December 25, 2012 at 2:54 am |
    • Reality

      For the reading-challenged – only for the new members of this blog:

      Putting the kibosh/”google” on all religion in less than ten seconds: Priceless !!!

      • As far as one knows or can tell, there was no Abraham i.e. the foundations of Judaism, Christianity and Islam are non-existent.

      • As far as one knows or can tell, there was no Moses i.e the pillars of Judaism, Christianity and Islam have no strength of purpose.

      • There was no Gabriel i.e. Islam fails as a religion. Christianity partially fails.

      • There was no Easter i.e. Christianity completely fails as a religion.

      • There was no Moroni i.e. Mormonism is nothing more than a business cult.

      • Sacred/revered cows, monkey gods, castes, reincarnations and therefore Hinduism fails as a religion.

      • Fat Buddhas here, skinny Buddhas there, reincarnated/reborn Buddhas everywhere makes for a no on Buddhism.

      Added details available upon written request.

      December 25, 2012 at 9:00 am |
    • Rational Humanist

      *sigh*

      December 25, 2012 at 6:18 pm |
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The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.