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January 10th, 2013
04:45 AM ET

Belief Blog's Morning Speed Read for Thursday, January 10, 2013

By Arielle Hawkins, CNN

Here's the Belief Blog’s morning rundown of the top faith-angle stories from around the United States and around the world. Click the headlines for the full stories.

From the Blog:

CNN: Biden's gun panel meets with faith leaders
Vice President Joe Biden and officials on his gun violence committee held an unannounced meeting Wednesday evening with a group of 12 national faith leaders. One theme brought up by several participants was the "moral tragedy" reflected in the gun violence the nation has seen over the past several months.

CNN: The spiritual but not religious likely to face mental health issues, drug use, study says
Can being spiritual but not religious lead to mental health issues? The answer is yes, according to a recent study. The study, published in the January edition of the British Journal of Psychiatry, says spiritual but not religious people, as opposed to people who are religious, agnostic or atheist, were more likely to develop a "mental disorder," "be dependent on drugs" and "have abnormal eating attitudes,” like bulimia and anorexia.


Iraqi protestors gather in support of Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki in the city of Karbala, southwest of Baghdad, on January 8, 2013.

CNN: Thousands protest in Shiite provinces in southern Iraq
Thousands of government supporters demonstrated in at least five Shiite provinces in southern Iraq on Tuesday, opposing protests by thousands of people in mainly Sunni provinces that have gone on for more than two weeks. The demonstrations highlight the country's sectarian tensions.

Photos of the Day:


Photo credit: sent to CNN iReport by Firefly360

Worshipers in Manila, the Philippines, honoring the Black Nazerene - a fire-blackened wooden statue of Jesus believed to have miraculous powers.


A sea of Catholic devotees jostle for position as they try to touch the life-size statue of the Black Nazarene as it arrive at the Quiapo Church during the annual procession in honor of the centuries-old icon of Jesus Christ in Manila on January 9, 2013.

Indian Hindu couples from Maharashtra state perform a ritual for the long life of their spouses at Sangam, the confluence of the rivers Ganges, Yamuna and mythical Saraswati in Allahabad on January 8, 2013.

Belief on TV:

Enlightening Reads:

Huffington Post: Louie Giglio, Atlanta Pastor Giving Benediction At Inauguration, Under Fire For Anti-Gay Sermon
The Rev. Louie Giglio, the Atlanta pastor of Passion City Church who will deliver the benediction at President Barack Obama's inauguration, is under fire for anti-gay preaching and for calling Christians to respond to the gay-rights movement's "aggressive agenda." In a sermon, "In Search of a Standard – Christian Response to Homosexuality," posted on Discipleship Library, a Christian website that archives sermons, Giglio tells listeners that being gay is a sinful choice and that gay people will be prevented from "entering the Kingdom of God."

Reuters: Preacher alarms many Egyptians with calls for Islamist vice police
Many Egyptian viewers were horrified when preacher Hisham el-Ashry recently popped up on primetime television to say women must cover up for their own protection and advocated the introduction of religious police. That an obscure preacher could get publicity for such views was seen as another example of the confused political scene in Egypt since the revolt that toppled Hosni Mubarak gave birth to a cacophony of feuding voices.

The Guardian: Muslims engage in quest to understand evolution
British Muslims acknowledge a common misunderstanding of evolution but still differ about how to reconcile faith with science

Religion News Service: Virtual vices show shift in American morality
Lust, gluttony, greed, sloth, wrath, envy and pride still attract a lot of attention. But as the Internet and other media invade American life, our vices have also gone virtual, according to a new study.

EWTN: Black Nazarene devotion in Philippines draws millions
A life-sized wooden statue of Jesus carrying a cross, known as the Black Nazarene, was the center of a Jan. 9 procession in Manila that gathered nine million people in the Philippines capital. Many men and women sought to touch the centuries-old statue to show their devotion. Most went barefoot as a sign of penance and many of them prayed for employment or for miraculous healing.

JTA: Hollande Meets With Chief Rabbi on Gay Marriage
President Francois Hollande met with local religious leaders, including the country’s chief rabbi, Gilles Bernheim, to hear their views on same-sex marriages. Tuesday’s meeting at the Elysee Palace, the official presidential residence, was held days before a planned demonstration against a draft law unveiled in November by France’s Socialist government that would allow gay marriage. At the “informal” meeting, Hollande did not comment directly on the concerns expressed by the religious leaders about the draft law, according to Le Figaro.

Opinion of the Day:

CNN: My Take: An open letter to Justin Bieber
Cathleen Falsani, award-winning religion journalist and author of BELIEBER: Fame, Faith and the Heart of Justin Bieber, writes to Justin Bieber expressing her concern and asking him to consider how his actions influence his fans.

Join the conversation…

CNN: My take: 'Atheist' isn’t a dirty word, congresswoman
Chris Stedman, author of "Faitheist: How an Atheist Found Common Ground with the Religious,” writes that when Rep. Kyrsten Sinema’s campaign said “the terms non-theist, atheist or non-believer are not befitting of her life’s work or personal character” it implied that there is something unfavorable about nonbelievers.

- A. Hawkins

Filed under: Uncategorized

soundoff (48 Responses)
  1. Economies and many key industrial processes are based

    Oil Gold Water

    OIL & GOLD around 200 million years after earth formed.

    Were Does All Earth's Gold Come From? NOT G-od
    Precious Metals the Result of Meteorite Bombardment, Rock Analysis Finds

    Sep. 9, 2011 — Ultra high precision analyses of some of the oldest rock samples on Earth by researchers at the University of Bristol provides clear evidence that the planet's accessible reserves of precious metals are the result of a bombardment of meteorites more than 200 million years after Earth was formed.

    Dr Willbold continued: "Our work shows that most of the precious metals on which our economies and many key industrial processes are based have been added to our planet by lucky coincidence when the Earth was hit by about 20 billion tonnes of asteroidal material."

    January 11, 2013 at 8:40 am |
    • Origin of Life

      Hypothesis Traces First Protocells Back to Emergence of Cell Membrane Bioenergetics
      Dec. 20, 2012 — A coherent pathway – which starts from no more than rocks, water and carbon dioxide and leads to the emergence of the strange bio-energetic properties of living cells – has been traced for the first time in a major hypothesis paper in Cell this week.
      http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/12/121220143530.htm

      January 11, 2013 at 9:22 am |
  2. Comment on my blog

    I would like to hear from religious people especially as to why they believe, but anyone can comment. http://whydoyoublv.blogspot.com/

    January 11, 2013 at 1:21 am |
    • The Numbers

      85% = because mommy and daddy told them to again and again and again and again and again.

      15% = because they are total losers who massively trainwrecked their lives and are hoping that an imaginary friend will somehow improve things for them.

      January 11, 2013 at 1:26 am |
  3. lionlylamb

    God is inside the details of all living life forms and even living formulations. Godliness is seeded deeply within living embodiments of monumentalized cellular proportions. God maintains all life thru God living within cellular establishments of cohesiveness for without Godly congenial cohesions cellular life would never have come into being.

    Without the first fruit of cellular life being made a manifestation, celled life consecrations could never have evolved into becoming all the many varied life formations we see today. God and all of God's generational trees gave to the celestial realm, living cellular cosmologies of megalithic proportions wherever, upon each and every possibilities of celestial planetary places that can be found worthy of establishing cellular cosmologies for megalithic celled monoliths of living abundances.

    1Corinthians 3:9 "For we are labourers together with God: ye are God's husbandry, [ye are] God's building!"

    January 10, 2013 at 1:06 pm |
    • .

      More drivel ramblings for the belief blog pseudo intellect LL., just laugh and move on.

      January 10, 2013 at 1:08 pm |
    • lionlylamb

      "."

      Your replicating of sameness seems to be an affront in your knowledge base for knowing very little to just about nothing of anything worthy of resonating. Eat your Cheerios and drink your milk as a good young child should.

      January 10, 2013 at 1:20 pm |
    • Robert Brown

      In the OT days a portion or representation of God’s spirit or glory resided in the tabernacle and then the temple in Jerusalem. Now his spirit resides in the tabernacle or temple (body) of each individual believer.

      January 10, 2013 at 1:52 pm |
    • Really??

      Robert
      Is that statement your opinion, or do you have some reason to believe this?

      January 10, 2013 at 1:56 pm |
    • Robert Brown

      Really??,
      It is in the bible. If you’re interested I can look it up and quote you some scripture.

      January 10, 2013 at 3:05 pm |
    • Athy

      Please, oh pretty please, spare us from more scripture.

      January 10, 2013 at 5:09 pm |
  4. myweightinwords

    We see it said often that most of us believe what we believe because of where and how we were raised. In the US it is fairly common to either be Christian from childhood, or at least have the basic understanding of the basics of Christian thought.

    I'm curious. How many of you have ever been exposed to the faith of someone who believed differently from you? A wedding perhaps? Or a funeral? A regular service for the faithful?

    In my questing stage, I visited many churches, synagogues, temples, etc. It was an eye opening experience.

    January 10, 2013 at 11:09 am |
    • Topher

      I saw a Hindu man "street preaching" in college ... even bought a book from him. Also got to sit in on a Native American cleansing ceremony. Both before I was a Christian.

      January 10, 2013 at 11:47 am |
    • Topher

      Well ... the Hindu ... he sold me enough to buy a book, but not enough to believe the religion later.

      As far as the Native American ... I have a soft spot in my heart for them. I love their culture. But I never bought into the religion part of it, either.

      January 10, 2013 at 11:55 am |
      • myweightinwords

        I'm not asking you about "buying" into the religions, I'm asking you about your experience...what you felt, how you relate that to what you believe now, or what you believed at the time...how did it shape the person you became.

        January 10, 2013 at 11:59 am |
    • lionlylamb

      myweightinwords wrote, "In my questing stage, I visited many churches, synagogues, temples, etc. It was an eye opening experience."

      Don't you mean, "They were eye opening experiences"?

      January 10, 2013 at 11:56 am |
      • myweightinwords

        I was referring to my questing phase as a whole, so no, I meant the singular. Thanks.

        January 10, 2013 at 11:58 am |
    • Topher

      What exactly did you experience? And what did you take away?

      January 10, 2013 at 12:08 pm |
      • myweightinwords

        That's a lot more than can fit in a single comment, I think.

        The biggest thing I came away with in my searching was the thing, the feeling, the peace I had come to know as "God" as not contained by religion, by words, by window dressings and set pieces.

        That connection I felt while standing or kneeling at the altar in prayer was found in a drum circle and in a Buddhist meditation and other places and situations.

        I also came away with the understanding that we are all one family, that the "us vs them" dichotomy we create is false and harmful and that no matter how horribly a person behaves, they are still human, and compassion is required.

        January 10, 2013 at 12:27 pm |
    • Topher

      And what is your present belief persuassion?

      January 10, 2013 at 12:46 pm |
      • myweightinwords

        I am Pagan...which doesn't really define much, but it is the only label I am currently comfortable with.

        January 10, 2013 at 12:46 pm |
    • End Religion

      topher, sounds like you're prepped and ready to fall for the next scam that dazzles you. On a totally unrelated note, I have some pristine land in Florida for sale. It was kept in the family for generations and is only now available. I can't stress enough how fast this land will go once it hits the market but I wanted to give a heads up to you good christian folks first, praise the Lord. Can I count on you for a non-refundable deposit to cover travel and sundries so you can come take a look?

      January 10, 2013 at 3:19 pm |
  5. Awwww
    January 10, 2013 at 10:47 am |
  6. Robert Brown

    Some consider God’s word, but never accept it.

    Some believe, but quickly lose faith because of doubt.

    Some believe, but lose faith because they pursue the things of this world.

    Other thoughts on unbelief?

    January 10, 2013 at 10:02 am |
    • Jill

      Robert Brown, don't obfuscate the primary prenuptials with rasberries. Often, the pertinent cat presents fabled necessities in the parking chamfer. Realize your net precedent. Triangulate! Save the best for the alligators. Ever the bastille notches the orchestra but Wendy is not green and horses will capitulate. Filter out the log from the turnstile and cry prevalently.

      So there brown stare. Feed your inner walnut and resolve. Subject your lemon to the ingenious door in the presence of snow and animals. Aisle 7 is for the monetary cheese whiz. Faced with the kitchen, you may wish to prolong the sailboat in the cliff. Otherwise, rabbits may descend on your left nostril. Think about how you can stripe the sea.

      Regale the storm to those who (6) would thump the parrot with the armband. Corner the market on vestiges of the apparent closure but seek not the evidential circumstance. Therein you can find indignant mountains of pigs and apples. Descend eloquently as you debate the ceiling of your warning fulcrum. Vacate the corncob profusely and and don’t dote on the pancreas.

      Next up, control your wood. Have at the cat with your watch on the fore. Aft! Smarties (12)! Rome wasn’t kevetched in an autumn nightie. (42) See yourself for the turntable on the escalator. Really peruse the garage spider definitely again again with brown. Now we have an apparent congestion, so be it here. Just a moment is not a pod of beef for the ink well nor can it be (4) said that Karen was there in the millpond.

      Garbage out just like the candle in the kitty so. Go, go, go until the vacuum meets the upward vacation. Sell the yellow. Then trim the bus before the ten cheese please Louise. Segregate from the koan and stew the ship vigorously.

      And remember, never pass up an opportunity to watch an elephant paint Mozart.

      January 10, 2013 at 10:05 am |
    • LinCA

      @Robert Brown

      Some consider the belief in gods and dismiss it as being no different from belief in the Tooth Fairy, or the Easter Bunny. Some people consider these infantile beliefs, and realize they are based on ignorance. Some people consider beliefs and realize that, if there is zero evidence to support the existence of a creature, it is unlikely to exist.

      Some people grow up.

      January 10, 2013 at 10:54 am |
    • Robert Brown

      Jill,

      Simple writing is easily understood.

      January 10, 2013 at 11:01 am |
    • jwt

      There are no reasons to believe in your god.

      January 10, 2013 at 11:04 am |
    • Robert Brown

      LinCA,
      Ok, maybe when I said “consider” that it is a little too strong. Some may hear it or read it, but they really don’t consider it, it is just dismissed without consideration. Right?

      January 10, 2013 at 11:07 am |
    • Christianity is a form of mental illness- FACT

      Christians & Jews..please note the OT is a fraud...........
      .
      "Various themes, plot elements, and characters in the Epic of Gilgamesh have counterparts in the book of Genesis, notably in the stories of the Garden of Eden and Noah's Flood.
      The parallels between the stories of Enkidu/Shamhat and Adam/Eve have been long recognized by scholars. In both, a man is created from the soil by a god, and lives in a natural setting amongst the animals. He is introduced to a woman who tempts him. In both stories the man accepts food from the woman, covers his nakedness, and must leave his former realm, unable to return. The presence of a snake that steals a plant of immortality from the hero later in the epic is another point of contact.
      Andrew R. George submits that the flood story in Genesis 6–8 matches the Gilgamesh flood myth so closely, "few doubt" that it derives from a Mesopotamian account. What is particularly noticeable is the way the Genesis flood story follows the Gilgamesh flood tale "point by point and in the same order", even when the story permits other alternatives.
      In a 2001 Torah commentary released on behalf of the Conservative Movement of Judaism, rabbinic scholar Robert Wexler stated: "The most likely assumption we can make is that both Genesis and Gilgamesh drew their material from a common tradition about the flood that existed in Mesopotamia. These stories then diverged in the retelling."
      .
      The roaming Jews stole ideas from the region they loitered in. They created their own God to bring order to their tribes. Jesus was clearly delusional thinking he was a demigod and died as a result. The Christians are a cult derived from the Jews.

      January 10, 2013 at 11:07 am |
    • LinCA

      @Robert Brown

      You said, "Ok, maybe when I said “consider” that it is a little too strong."
      No, "consider" is about right. The problem is in your assertion of it being "God’s word". The first step is to consider whether it could be. For any text to the the word of any god, you will first have to consider whether this god is likely, or even possible, to exist. The likelihood of any creature to exist depends on how much evidence there is for its alleged deeds and sightings. Gods don't move the needle perceptively.

      You said, "Some may hear it or read it, but they really don’t consider it, it is just dismissed without consideration. Right?"
      It can be dismissed as the ancient writings of ignorant sheep herders. While interesting from a historical or anthropological perspective, it is hardly authoritative in any other.

      January 10, 2013 at 11:27 am |
    • lionlylamb

      People of faith and even of non-faith are all living as rented forms within collective formations ever rising and even falling with the tidal flurries regarding the many societal accolades of a changing tides bantered momentums riding ever continuing laments to rise and then fall upon socialisms shorelines to be so aligned with subjectivities of placed regionalized variant findings dispersed yet rationed movements in the ever to so be done fluidic moments by people of faith and also of non-faith.

      January 10, 2013 at 11:31 am |
    • Robert Brown

      I have read the epic of Gilgamesh and I don’t see any parallels between Enkidu and Shamhat relating to Adam and Eve. Enkindu was a wild man and shamhat a prost.itute sent to seduce him. While the epic contains a flood story I have to disagree with Mr. George, I challenge you to read the Gilgamesh flood tale and Noahs flood and point out how they follow each other. They are both about a flood and that is about it.
      Granted these stories were shared by word of mouth, but the original Babylonians could be plagiarizing the children of Israel as easily as the other way around as Wexler stated.

      January 10, 2013 at 1:13 pm |
    • Robert Brown

      LinCA,
      I think if you just consider the fulfilled prophecies in the word there is enough evidence to convince. One example for your consideration, God prophesized through Ezekiel that Tarshish, the great Phoenician city, would be destroyed by Babylon. Then he said that it would never again be a great city, that the city would be thrown into the sea, and never be anything but a fishing village. This was literally fulfilled when Alexander the great came along like 300 years later and used the debris from the destroyed city to build a causeway to the island where the people had tried to rebuild. Petra is another fulfilled prophecy, lucky guesses?

      ”… ancient writings of ignorant sheep herders.” When people say stuff like that I automatically assume they have never read the bible. There is nothing there that leads me to believe that the authors were ignorant, quite the contrary.

      January 10, 2013 at 1:24 pm |
    • Christianity is a form of mental illness- FACT

      Robert Brown

      ... Granted these stories were shared by word of mouth, but the original Babylonians could be plagiarizing the children of Israel as easily as the other way around as Wexler stated.
      .
      Okay first establish the written record....the first written record for the OT is around 800 B.C.......when was the first written record of Gilgamesh?

      Of course you cant see similarity in a man living a garden/forest....a woman/prost itute tricking him and a serphant. Whoever wrote the similar stories second would make them?????

      January 10, 2013 at 1:55 pm |
    • Robert Brown

      Christianity is a form of mental illness- FACT,
      Moses is thought to have written genesis and lived around 1400 – 1500 bc. The epic was thought to be written around 2500-2800 bc. So, if you give more validity to who wrote it down first, you win.

      The guy who was the hunter was mad at enkindu in the epic that is why he hired the woman to seduce him, enkindu was bad for business. Relate that to the garden of eden.

      January 10, 2013 at 3:21 pm |
    • Ilias

      What is Gods word? is it heard with the pysical ears or with the faculties of the soul. Is it a sound , music within or ink on paper. is it only something this Amorite tribe was given access to? Has he come here only once for all mankind and came in a semetic body. What about the other races, God didn't send one of his sons for them? Maybe his sons come here often for their chosen ones.Jesus did not even get through to his own deciples as they all doubted him. We are all here to pursue the things of this world or there would be no creation. The game is to find the way home, back to the source and free from the mind stuff we became entangled with. Everyone has to take responsibilty for his own actions as the laws of cause and effect here on this planet are immutable.

      January 10, 2013 at 4:12 pm |
    • Robert Brown

      Ilias,
      I have to run in a second, but I will reply briefly and if you are around in an hour or so, we might exchange more thoughts.

      The word of God is his written word. The word of God is Jesus Christ. The word of God is alive. God used the children of Israel as his witness to the world. God uses believers today as his witness to the world. There is no better faith builder than doubt. Do you believe everything you read or hear? Would you be more likely to believe something if you experienced it for yourself?

      We are here to make a choice.

      January 10, 2013 at 4:23 pm |
    • Christianity is a form of mental illness- FACT

      "Moses is thought to have written genesis and lived around 1400"
      .
      Cool ....so we have archaeological evidence of this? Also Adam and Eve would have been around 4000 B.C.......there of course were advance civilizations well before them... ....even the Babble mentions Cain going in the land of Nod . The babble written by a wandering tribal people camping from place to place is bs.

      January 10, 2013 at 5:04 pm |
    • Robert Brown

      Christianity is a form of mental illness- FACT,
      If you consider written docu.mentation as archaeological evidence, then yes, we do.

      January 10, 2013 at 5:59 pm |
    • Smithsonian

      "If you consider written docu.mentation as archaeological evidence, then yes, we do."

      The stories found in the Book of Genesis, Chapter 1-12, such as the flood story, the record is quite different: the time period under consideration is much more ancient. The factual bases of the stories are hidden from our view archaeologically. The stories remain a part of folk traditions and were included in the Bible to illustrate and explain theological ideas such as: Where did humans come from? If humans were created by God (who is perfect and good), how did evil among them come to be? If we are all related as children of God, why do we speak different languages? It must be remembered that the Bible is primarily a book of religion, a guide to faith. it was not a book of history, poetry, economics, or science. It contains all sorts of literary genre, which are used to teach about the relationship between God and mankind. Even biblical history is edited history: events were chosen to illustrate the central theme of the Bible. The Biblical writers did not pretend they were giving a complete history; instead they constantly refer us to other sources for full historical details, sources such as "The Annals of the Kings of Judah" (or Israel).

      It is therefore not possible to try to "prove" the Bible by means of checking its historical or scientific accuracy. The only "proof" to which it can be subjected is this: Does it correctly portray the God-human relationship? In the best analysis, the Bible is a religious book, not an historical document.

      January 14, 2013 at 10:05 am |
  7. Robert Brown

    The outward call of God is by the gospel; and this is rendered effectual by the inward operation of the Spirit.

    January 10, 2013 at 8:14 am |
    • Christianity is a form of mental illness- FACT

      Robert Brown..please note the OT is a fraud...........
      .
      "Various themes, plot elements, and characters in the Epic of Gilgamesh have counterparts in the book of Genesis, notably in the stories of the Garden of Eden and Noah's Flood.
      The parallels between the stories of Enkidu/Shamhat and Adam/Eve have been long recognized by scholars. In both, a man is created from the soil by a god, and lives in a natural setting amongst the animals. He is introduced to a woman who tempts him. In both stories the man accepts food from the woman, covers his nakedness, and must leave his former realm, unable to return. The presence of a snake that steals a plant of immortality from the hero later in the epic is another point of contact.
      Andrew R. George submits that the flood story in Genesis 6–8 matches the Gilgamesh flood myth so closely, "few doubt" that it derives from a Mesopotamian account. What is particularly noticeable is the way the Genesis flood story follows the Gilgamesh flood tale "point by point and in the same order", even when the story permits other alternatives.
      In a 2001 Torah commentary released on behalf of the Conservative Movement of Judaism, rabbinic scholar Robert Wexler stated: "The most likely assumption we can make is that both Genesis and Gilgamesh drew their material from a common tradition about the flood that existed in Mesopotamia. These stories then diverged in the retelling."
      .
      The roaming Jews stole ideas from the region they loitered in. They created their own God to bring order to their tribes. Jesus was clearly delusional thinking he was a demigod and died as a result. The Christians are a cult derived from the Jews.

      January 10, 2013 at 11:08 am |
  8. Atheism is not healthy for children and other living things

    Pray without ceasing in 2013
    Prayer changes things

    January 10, 2013 at 8:09 am |
    • Jesus

      Prayer does not; you are such a LIAR. You have NO proof it changes anything! A great example of prayer proven not to work is the Christians in jail because prayer didn't work and their children died. For example: Susan Grady, who relied on prayer to heal her son. Nine-year-old Aaron Grady died and Susan Grady was arrested.

      An article in the Journal of Pediatrics examined the deaths of 172 children from families who relied upon faith healing from 1975 to 1995. They concluded that four out of five ill children, who died under the care of faith healers or being left to prayer only, would most likely have survived if they had received medical care.

      The statistical studies from the nineteenth century and the three CCU studies on prayer are quite consistent with the fact that humanity is wasting a huge amount of time on a procedure that simply doesn’t work. Nonetheless, faith in prayer is so pervasive and deeply rooted, you can be sure believers will continue to devise future studies in a desperate effort to confirm their beliefs!

      January 10, 2013 at 9:51 am |
    • Awwww

      Aren't you precious.

      January 10, 2013 at 10:44 am |
    • hal 9001

      I'm sorry, "Atheism is not healthy for children and other living things", but your assertions regarding prayer and atheism are unfounded. Using my Idiomatic Expression Equivalency module (IEE), the expression that best matches the degree to which your repeated assertions may represent truths is: "CHRONIC TOTAL FAIL".

      January 10, 2013 at 11:24 am |

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The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.