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Godless mom strikes a chord with parents
A CNN iReport essay on raising kids without God draws record-breaking number of comments.
January 18th, 2013
06:32 PM ET

Godless mom strikes a chord with parents

By Daphne Sashin, CNN

Deborah Mitchell remembers the time, when her boys were younger, and another mom asked her about her religious beliefs.

Mitchell was raised Catholic but moved away from religion in her early 20s. She told the other mother that she didn’t go to church and didn’t even really believe in God.

Then, she says, the recruiting started.

“She used to call my house and tell me she was praying for me. She’d leave me messages and leave cards in my mailbox with scripture,” Mitchell says. “I do realize that she meant well, but at the same time, I know my views were seen as wrong. I needed to be ‘saved.’”

Mitchell, a mother of two teenagers in Texas who feels “immersed in Christianity,” started a blog about raising her children without religion because she felt frustrated and marginalized. She didn’t want to feel so alone, she says.

This week, she gained a whole new audience and the reassurance that she's not alone. Her essay on CNN iReport, “Why I Raise My Children Without God,” drew 650,000 page views, the second highest for an iReport, and the most comments of any submission on the citizen journalism platform.

It starts:

When my son was around 3 years old, he used to ask me a lot of questions about heaven. Where is it? How do people walk without a body? How will I find you? You know the questions that kids ask.

For over a year, I lied to him and made up stories that I didn’t believe about heaven. Like most parents, I love my child so much that I didn’t want him to be scared. I wanted him to feel safe and loved and full of hope. But the trade-off was that I would have to make stuff up, and I would have to brainwash him into believing stories that didn’t make sense, stories that I didn’t believe either.

Mitchell posted the essay detailing her seven reasons for raising her children without God on CNN iReport because she felt there wasn’t anyone else speaking for women or moms like her. As she sees it, children should learn to do the right things because they will feel better about themselves, not because God is watching. She asks questions like: If there was a good, all-knowing, all-powerful God, why would he allow murders, child abuse and torture?

Lots of people disagreed with her. Tons. They flagged her iReport as inappropriate and criticized CNN for linking to her essay on the CNN.com homepage. But there were plenty of others who wrote thoughtful rebuttals, respectfully disagreeing with Mitchell while not foisting their own beliefs on her. Take, for instance, a Methodist dad, who said faith can be hard to nail down, but “not to avail ourselves of the power of something we don't completely understand is silly.”

Others said Mitchell presented a simplistic view of religion.

“Presentations such as these seem to ignore a substantial percentage of believers - well-educated, compassionate, liberal folk, Christian and non-Christian alike - who, I feel, are able to worship without being blind to the realities of the world, or without lying to their children about their understanding of these complexities,” wrote commenter RMooradian. “I'll be raising my children with God, but I understand those who cannot!”

But Mitchell’s essay also struck a chord with hundreds of like-minded parents raising children in a world where lack of belief puts them in the minority, often even in their own family.

“Thank you for writing this. I agree with everything you say, but I’m not brave enough to tell everyone I know this is how I feel,” a woman who called herself an “agnostic mommy of two in Alabama” posted in the comments. “Thank you for your bravery and letting me know I’m not alone.”

It’s a growing group. One in five Americans is not affiliated with any religion, and that number has grown by 25% in the past five years, according to a survey by the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life. Of that group, 88% said they were not looking for religion, although 68% of the unaffiliated said they believe in God. 

Brittany Branyon, an American graduate student and substitute teacher living in Germany, was also compelled to express her thanks to Mitchell. Branyon was raised Southern Baptist in Georgia and Alabama. In high school, when she began to question the theory of creation and befriended gay and lesbian students, she says her mother tried to perform an exorcism.

“She opened all the windows and doors in the house, brought me to the door, held my shoulders and shook me while screaming, ‘Satan, get out of this child!’, ‘Satan, leave this child alone!’.”

After moving away from the South, she and her husband “became more comfortable in our secular ways,” but still take criticism from family members. They are now expecting their first child.

“Though we are elated to welcome our child into the world, we can’t help but dread the religious uproar that is to come from our families,” she wrote in an e-mail.

Such an uproar is familiar to Carol Phillips, a stay-at-home mother in northern Virginia. When she gave birth to her first child, she said her family was shocked that the baby wasn’t baptized. She said her mother-in-law cried and told her the little girl’s soul would not go to heaven.

Then there are the comments from strangers. Last year, Phillips said she and her daughter were at a birthday party when a tornado warning sounded.

“We were all in the basement keeping safe. A little girl was saying baby Jesus will keep us safe. My daughter asked who Jesus was. The rest of the time was spent hearing ‘I'll pray for you sweetie, we can take you to church with us if you want,’” Phillips told CNN.

Commenting on Mitchell’s iReport, Phillips said, “To live out loud and to speak freely about my beliefs brings many clucking tongues. I would think it’s easier to come out as gay than atheist.”

Mitchell said she spent years studying the history of religion and does believe it has “an important place in our community.” She has told her children that she’ll be fine if they decide to join a church when they are older.

She ended her essay:

I understand why people need God. I understand why people need heaven. It is terrifying to think that we are all alone in this universe, that one day we—along with the children we love so much—will cease to exist. The idea of God and an afterlife gives many of us structure, community and hope.

I do not want religion to go away. I only want religion to be kept at home or in church where it belongs. It’s a personal effect, like a toothbrush or a pair of shoes. It’s not something to be used or worn by strangers. I want my children to be free not to believe and to know that our schools and our government will make decisions based on what is logical, just and fair—not on what they believe an imaginary God wants.

After her post ran on CNN, Mitchell said she was encouraged by the number of people who agreed with her, or who disagreed but wanted to have a respectful discussion.

“I’m not saying that everybody should think how I do. I’m saying the people that do should have a place in our society and have acceptance and respect,” she said. “I just want to have children grow up and be able to not be afraid to say ‘I don’t believe that,’ or ‘I’m not part of that.’” 

- CNN Belief Blog

Filed under: Atheism • Belief • Christianity • iReport

soundoff (15,081 Responses)
  1. tony

    Why is it religious people feel that they should be able to preach, but atheists shouldn't.

    January 19, 2013 at 5:01 pm |
    • Katie

      Amen to that!

      January 19, 2013 at 5:03 pm |
    • Just a John

      Stolen from Paul Simon...A man hears what he wants to hear and disregards the rest....you could also say....A man sees what he wants to see and disregards the rest....or with the christian cults......A man believes what he wants to believe and disregards the rest.....such is the delusion.

      January 19, 2013 at 5:25 pm |
  2. Science

    Peer reviewed science live here today. Thanks CNN

    39 pages of comments from around the planet.

    Like to see email addresses assigned to handles
    Think about that .
    God(s) should know shouldn't they ???

    January 19, 2013 at 5:00 pm |
  3. Ron

    I agree with this Mom and her struggle. Our approach in raising two kids was to give them a chance to decide on their own. We never went as a family.

    The 23 year old goes to church occasionally. And the 21 year old is an atheists like me( his Dad), and he and I are heavily involved in Boy Scouts. He an Eagle Scout and me an Assistant Scoutmaster. We both just glossed over the religious parts whenever they show up. After all mankind is all atheists in that most folks have already decided to not believe in Thor or Zeus or John Smith or Mohammad or (the list goes on almost forever). Today's atheists have just gone one god further...

    January 19, 2013 at 4:59 pm |
  4. Ron

    In 1500 they did not believe, could not observe nor could they scientifically prove that cells, bacteria or subatomic particles existed. Because science could not prove it does that mean they did not exists in 1500? Amazing the strong faith so many posters have in what they believe as being absolute truth. I make no claim that I superior to anyone or make a claim that I have knowledge of absolute truth. I believe what I have put my faith in based on my interpretation of the "evidence" and how I view the unknown and apply it to the evidence. For those who claim to have access and ownership of absolute truth I applaud you. One day I believe absolute truth will be revealed I hope for your sake you are right and I am proven wrong.

    January 19, 2013 at 4:57 pm |
    • Dana

      I believe your own argument contradicts itself. You just said that just because science could not prove something doesn't mean it doesn't exist.

      January 19, 2013 at 5:03 pm |
    • lionlylamb

      Ron,

      What really are the means by which all cellular structures are made? Are such structures all made from atomized cosmologies? Are not such cosmologies in cellular formations nothing more than miniscule variants of the celestial domains?

      January 19, 2013 at 5:12 pm |
    • Tom, Tom, the Piper's Son

      LL, most of your posts remind me of a monkey playing with its own feces.

      January 19, 2013 at 6:37 pm |
  5. Asha

    Then she'd better not celebrate Christmas either. Her kids are going to be very uneducated when the topic of religion comes up in a conversation. She should at least educate them and then they can decide whether or not to follow a Christian life as adults.

    January 19, 2013 at 4:54 pm |
    • Just a John

      They may find that a Buhddist life style, or Hindu belief suits them better. The narrow concepts of christians, our way or hell is a big problem; do you not see that?

      January 19, 2013 at 4:59 pm |
    • JWT

      If the kids are interested they can investigate religions themselves. There is absolutely no need for a parent to instill anything about religion to their children.

      January 19, 2013 at 5:02 pm |
    • Katie

      Um, Christmas is SO not about Christ or religion – it's all about sales and presents. Christmas is SO far removed from religion Jesus would be embarrassed. (And in any case, Jesus wasn't born on December 25th, or even in December.... the day was chosen to coincide with the Pagan and Roman religious days of worshipping the solstice. The Church was really good at usurping, supplanting, and absorbing other religions and cults.)

      January 19, 2013 at 5:07 pm |
  6. mariosphere

    Kudos to Mitchell, the mom who had the guts to write about her godless life and how she is raising her kids. I agree with her: I don't desire religion to go away, but keep it in your house and in your church, away from your professional, legal or government decisions, thank you.

    Most majorities —in politics, religion, sports, etc.— tend to voice loud disapproval when a minority voice raises to question the status quo or spouse a different opinion. These majorities tend to show some intolerance to dissenting voices because they go against the norm, the widely accepted view of something.

    As an atheist, I'm glad there's a mom like Mitchell who discovered that she's not alone.

    January 19, 2013 at 4:53 pm |
  7. Independent thinker, voter, believer

    The real issue is that, had the Christian professed her faith and been critizised and pursued for it, it would have been called harassment and bigotry, and seen as bad.

    When the religous do it to the non-religious, it's called "prostelitizing", and represented as good.

    Whenever you harass someone over their beliefs in an attempt to make them change their views to yours, it is bad. And phone callse and messages are harassment.

    This woman doing the harassment was a bigot, not a Christian. As a Christian, she should have lead by example, not by mouth.

    January 19, 2013 at 4:50 pm |
    • tony

      And quietly.

      January 19, 2013 at 4:52 pm |
    • Denise

      Exactly. When are religious folks, particularly those that feel their way is the only way or the right way, ever going to realize that people believe many things and just because they are not the same as you doesn't make you right and them wrong. I have only recently more widely offered my athiest beliefs to more people and i have to say, it has not gone over well for many people, even some who have liked and respected me very much for years – suddenly I am not worthy or likable because I don't believe in a god or place you go after death. I still find it unimaginable that you have to believe there is a force greater than you who will punish you if you do something wrong, yet you are unable to make yourselves do your best toward others without that threat? One "friend" recently implied that I felt I was greater than god and how could I do that? Oy. Let's just keep religion in our homes and churches and out of our politics and school, please.

      January 19, 2013 at 5:13 pm |
  8. Alyssa

    I am a devout Christian. I decided many years ago that I would not teach my children that Santa was real because I know for certain he does not exist. Every winter we have endured the same constant question "So sweetie, what do you want Santa to bring you?" And many have been horrified by my interruption and statement that we don't do Santa in our home. I've had many conversations and often wondered if some people realize that there are many children who don't get a visit from "Santa". Many children who don't celebrate Christmas at all. People live in fear that my child might "ruin" their child's Christmas.
    There are many religions in the world and in all of them are jerks, hypocrites, and other words that are inappropriate for my response. Since religion (or lack thereof) is so close to many of our hearts it is hard to talk about without intense emotion. I'm sorry that the author of this blog feels so outcast but I am also sorry that she spent years lying to her children about how she really felt. However, it is ridiculous to suggest that I should keep my faith only in my home and in my church so that she can live her beliefs without hindrance. It is a ridiculous suggestion! Can we recognize that to her it is important because to her my God is not real. However, if she is wrong and my God is *not* imaginary than *I* am a horrible human being if I do keep my mouth shut and never talk to her.
    We are far to afraid to discuss honestly and openly and the problem is we are trying to shove belief and faith into only private quarters of our lives. Maybe the children would be better off if we would teach them that people don't believe like they do and that we can think what someone believes is wrong without thinking they are stupid.
    Yes, I believe you are going to hell if you do not have a relationship with Jesus. She thinks I'm living a life based on what an imaginary God wants. Clearly we are both making judgement of each other. It is the beauty of America that we can all live on the same soil and not shame each other to keep our beliefs quiet. The presupposition she is making is that our beliefs are no more real than hers were when she lied to her children about heaven. I am glad she is being open and honest about what she believes. Why can't we all be?

    January 19, 2013 at 4:48 pm |
    • tony

      Many young men have an instinctive (so god given) belief that little girls should be obscene and not heard. Please put your money where your mouth is and publish your address so they can all write to you and your daughters often to persuade them to behave that way.

      January 19, 2013 at 4:56 pm |
  9. mark ducharme

    I believe nobody really "knows" there is or is not a God. I am lucky enough to believe in one. And because of that I am a much happier and healthier person than before when I was an agnostic. So, count yourself lucky if you believe. I know too many atheist on meds to tell me how not believing is working for them. good luck and God bless

    January 19, 2013 at 4:47 pm |
    • tony

      The religious leaders who take your contributions are closet atheists, or else they'd be worrying about the eye of the needle.

      January 19, 2013 at 4:50 pm |
    • Damocles

      Really? You know a lot of atheists on meds? How many?

      January 19, 2013 at 4:50 pm |
    • Athy

      You have to be lucky to believe? I think a good dose of ignorance is all you need.

      January 19, 2013 at 4:54 pm |
    • JimNasium

      Of course there's no such a thing as a believer on meds, right?

      January 19, 2013 at 5:03 pm |
    • Akira

      What in the hell does meds have to do with belief/non-belief? Nothing.

      January 19, 2013 at 5:10 pm |
  10. Just a John

    Yep.

    January 19, 2013 at 4:43 pm |
  11. Dana

    If several hundred million or billion people say they have found God, and you choose to believe that they are all deluded, that's ignoring a lot of evidence. I find it interesting that scientists can say their must be dark matter and energy because of observations of the universe even though it cannot be seen or detected by any means, people believe that, but if their is a life-changing effect on people attributed to God, that is somehow not believable.

    January 19, 2013 at 4:42 pm |
    • Just a John

      Speaking from ignorance, a timeless religious trait, thanks for playing.

      January 19, 2013 at 4:45 pm |
    • tony

      Ten times that many will be already in your heaven, because the number of dead before Christ lived is at least that times the total population of the world (all religions) alive today. Christians would mathematically have to be a tiny, tiny, tiny minority in your heaven.

      January 19, 2013 at 4:47 pm |
    • Damocles

      So if 51 out of 100 people say that cute, fluffy kittens are the makers of the universe, then majority rules, right?

      January 19, 2013 at 4:47 pm |
    • Billy

      everyone used to think the world was flat

      January 19, 2013 at 4:48 pm |
  12. onemorehere

    The problem with Religion is that both Idolized gender female goddess male god...if there anything but one force is male making the female weak force not a god yet we know females are the strong gender at least when it comes to intelect...but males are strong when it come to perseverance...not alway so cause some women have proven to persevere in times of need...the problem is thinking God as a male or female...where male is percieved as the stronger force while the female as the weaker force...reconsile that both male and female become one and procreate life...and the separation exist male and female– God is male but the female force carries his seed to create life nature is female right?>>>evil reside in both the male and female gender is called humans right?

    there is Good-right =God and there is wrong-bad =evil. who can ague with that fact

    January 19, 2013 at 4:41 pm |
    • ^^ home-schooling hurts people ^^

      January 19, 2013 at 4:49 pm |
    • Concerned Citizen

      My brain hurts... too much ignorance.

      January 19, 2013 at 5:23 pm |
  13. tony

    If there really was a god, then there wouldn't be any collection plates.

    January 19, 2013 at 4:40 pm |
    • Roger that

      Or suffering.

      January 19, 2013 at 4:42 pm |
    • tony

      Notice how the religious avoid jumping in on this comment.

      January 19, 2013 at 4:48 pm |
    • rdeleys

      It's amazing how an omnipotent god always seems to be broke.

      January 19, 2013 at 4:52 pm |
    • Gort1

      very true....the collectiion plate is for the preachers and pastors....Not for the people of the church.,;lol

      January 19, 2013 at 4:58 pm |
  14. Patrish

    Well good for her. I was raised Sunday school, church, choir, etc, but never was interested. Once I travel and started to live my life, and think for myself, I realized how crazy it was to believe in something that no one can prove exists. When I hear or read that God is a jealous God, I know it's a bunch of crap. One so powerful, would never be that petty. Only humans are that way. As for the Bible.... please it was written by a bunch of dead men. If God is so powerful, he'd make sure we all were born knowing of him. And the universe has treated me just find, so I guess if he exists, he really doesn't care if I believe in him or not.

    January 19, 2013 at 4:32 pm |
    • EnjaySea

      My thoughts exactly.

      January 19, 2013 at 4:36 pm |
    • dmvcitizen

      Amen.

      January 19, 2013 at 4:38 pm |
  15. Mormon No More

    I was absolutely petrified that Mitt Romney was going to win. I've seen holier-than-thou Christianity up close for decades, and it scares me in positions of power. I never felt a Spiritual Connection with anything, until I studied Eastern Religions. Christians believe that you are a part FROM God. Eastern Religions believe that you are a part OF God.

    January 19, 2013 at 4:28 pm |
    • tony

      Thinking that "anything else" happens after one dies, is pushing past the limits of reason regardless.

      January 19, 2013 at 4:38 pm |
    • Jim

      Wow, you certainly have that wrong, about eastern and western.

      January 19, 2013 at 4:40 pm |
    • just wondering

      You feared for nothing, Mormons are not Christians.

      January 19, 2013 at 4:44 pm |
    • Akira

      There is a saying, "All paths lead to God".
      If He is truly a benevolent presence, He won't mind the journey one takes.

      January 19, 2013 at 4:46 pm |
  16. dc123

    I don't know what happens when we die. And that's ok.

    January 19, 2013 at 4:25 pm |
    • sam stone

      i agree

      January 19, 2013 at 4:29 pm |
    • the AnViL

      when we die – and all the oxygen stops flowing to our brains, the neurons in our brains that store and hold our all levels of consciousness, memories, thoughts, and everything we are – decay. the electrochemical energy that once enabled them to work, obeys the laws of thermodynamics and dissipates out into the surrounding system. there is no evidence of any mechanism which would cause that energy to remain coherent. none, what so ever.

      the good news is – when we die, we have no awareness of the fact. you never know about it – because you've nothing to know things with.

      the universe goes on without us...we meet oblivion and truly rest in peace.
      XD

      January 19, 2013 at 4:37 pm |
    • EnjaySea

      Wait. Are you sure you wouldn't rather make up an answer? And then burn people at the stake who don't agree with you?

      January 19, 2013 at 4:37 pm |
    • Denise

      We die, and if we're smart, we donate whatever body parts will help someone else have a better life, then we live on in the hearts and minds of our friends, family and people we have touched during our lifetime. Simple concept.

      And while we live, we do our best to be the best person we can showing kindness, consideration, tolerance, understanding, and compassion. We fight vigorously and fairly for our goals and to make others lives better. We love.

      And people believe in gods to give them structure and help them balance their lives. As an Athiest, I am able to find that balance and structure without a god(s) to guide me, but I do try to do the right thing, etc. I don't drink alcohol, do drugs, smoke or sleep around and never did. I do curse – sometimes like a drunk sailor on shore leave. So I feel I am a reasonably good human being and shall continue to be the best I can be for everyone's benefit.

      And with that, I say, be cool and leave happy feelings about you when you die. Happy New Year!

      January 19, 2013 at 5:28 pm |
  17. Colin

    Whatever else one may think of atheists., they tend to be smarter than Christians. About 95% of the American Academy of sciences are atheists. There is a real corelation between intelligence and atheism. It does make one think, "if God were real, why would he make the atheists smarter than the believers."?

    January 19, 2013 at 4:25 pm |
    • thinker

      Good point!

      January 19, 2013 at 4:31 pm |
    • ikjyotsinghkohli1

      Do those intelligent people include John Lennox, George F.R. Ellis, Einstein, Maxwell, Schrodinger, Heisenberg, Francis Collins, and Newton??

      January 19, 2013 at 4:31 pm |
    • cnnblvn

      define "smart"

      January 19, 2013 at 4:33 pm |
    • Athy

      The usual religie answer, Colin, is "god works in mysterious ways." Or "we can't see the big picture." That's why religious people are generally less intelligent than atheists.

      January 19, 2013 at 4:34 pm |
    • Jim

      I'm certainly not a very religious person, but man, gunk like this about atheists being smarter....where on earth do you get that?? Like the guy on here "the anvil"...golly, how come he knows what's going to happen to us after we die, yet no one else does?

      January 19, 2013 at 4:42 pm |
    • Jason

      It's a myth that Einstein believed in God. He was agnostic. Read http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Religious_views_of_Albert_Einstein

      January 19, 2013 at 4:44 pm |
    • onemorehere

      if by smart you meant the ability or luck of ethics to steal others ideas and claim them as your own. all that science has collected over the years comes form religions God believing thinkers who have being persecuted or ignore but their thinking has being claim by atheist every time...

      January 19, 2013 at 4:48 pm |
    • Akira

      Jim, you're not seriously trying to deny that the body, unless it's cremated, decays after death, are you?

      January 19, 2013 at 4:50 pm |
    • GAW

      Most of the smart atheists don't waste their time on the CNN Belief Blog telling people that they are stupid, delusional and moronic for believing in God.

      January 19, 2013 at 4:54 pm |
  18. anonymous

    She's probably a nicer, more 'christian' person than most of those so-called "christians" that go to church every Sunday. Thank goodness for intelligent people. Because most religion is an excuse not to ask... why.

    January 19, 2013 at 4:24 pm |
    • Akira

      There is that saying 'attending church every Sunday doesn't make one a Christian any more than standing in my garage makes me a car.'

      January 19, 2013 at 4:34 pm |
    • Glenn

      Bravo

      January 19, 2013 at 4:38 pm |
  19. silentcount

    Rational scientific logic could conclude that there is another dimension other than the one that contains physical matter. It's really the only explanation of how something could be created from nothing. There has always been a link to this other dimension from where we came from and to where we're suppose to return. However, if the link is referred to as religion, then some feel they're too "intelligent" to believe in such a thing. How ironic that they impose this restriction on their mind's ability to see.

    January 19, 2013 at 4:23 pm |
    • Bewildered

      It is kind of interesting how even respected academics admit to the existence of SOMETHING, yet a lot of people on here seem to think they're education is somehow beyond contest. I think the whole prospect is neat.

      January 19, 2013 at 4:24 pm |
    • Athy

      What?

      January 19, 2013 at 4:25 pm |
    • The Taught Police

      Bewildered, they're coming after you with their graticules.You're messing up your posts. Then was a time to use 'than'. Whose who's are you hewing into hues? There are two tu's to your tutu too. It's time for its correct usage.

      January 19, 2013 at 4:33 pm |
    • sam

      silentcount –

      Your post is nonsense in so many ways.

      January 19, 2013 at 4:34 pm |
    • kenny

      atheists are really agnostics pushing back hard against xtians because xtians are the majority and they like to push their b s on others. if you're not sure, which we all are, the crazies will wanna push their bs on you. its like standing on a fence and both sides are trying to pull you to one extreme. all the crazy rules and beliefs in the bible are mostly horse shhhhhh... fables and wives tales told through the generations to make people behave better. the most ignorant foolish people in the world and the most hard core believers because they don't understand enough about the world to realize the bible is full of b s...

      January 19, 2013 at 4:41 pm |
    • Brian

      Actually, that's not entirely accurate. Current scientific theory supports the idea that there are multiple dimension, an infinite number in fact. Basically M-theory. This helps explain how the big bang occurred. Think of it like this. Imagine you have 2 wavy sheets of paper. Imagine these sheets getting closer and closer together until the point at which they touch. The point at which they touch would basically be the big bang, and the effects would ripple outward(expansion) and thus you would have a "universe". Eventually, depending on where you agree with the singularity theory or not, the universe would expand so far outward that the universe would just cease to exist. And this would just happen again, over and over again. So there could potentially be multiple universes.
      This is a really oversimplification of the theory. It's really complex and I don't really understand all of it.

      January 19, 2013 at 4:44 pm |
  20. Dana

    She doesn't strike a chord with me. She sounds like she hasn't met the Savior yet. The proof of God does not lie in man's arguments, but in the changed lives of people who have accepted Christ as their Lord and Savior, and have received the free gift of salvation and new life and fellowship with God.

    January 19, 2013 at 4:21 pm |
    • Mike

      Perhaps the "proof of God," doesn't lie in man's arguments because it isn't there.

      January 19, 2013 at 4:22 pm |
    • Athy

      The only proof of god that religies have is in their deluded minds. And that's no proof at all.

      January 19, 2013 at 4:24 pm |
    • anonymous

      We don't deny your "goodness". We deny your arguments and justifications.

      January 19, 2013 at 4:26 pm |
    • hal 9001

      I'm sorry, "Dana", but "salvation", "God", "Savior", "Christ" and "Lord" are all elements of mythology, therefore your assertions are unfounded. Using my Idiomatic Expression Equivalency module (IEE), the expression that best matches the degree to which your unfounded assertions may represent truths is: "EPIC FAIL".

      January 19, 2013 at 4:28 pm |
    • sam stone

      dana: free people do not need salvation.

      January 19, 2013 at 4:30 pm |
    • thinker

      Hasn't met her savior yet? Really? So if our savior is so great, why doesn't he make sure that everyone meets him? Oh, that's right, he has his reasons. Biggest cop out of all inreligion.

      January 19, 2013 at 4:34 pm |
    • Chiquita

      You are a smart woman Dana, you couldn't have said it better

      January 19, 2013 at 4:35 pm |
    • sam

      Dana –
      There is no God.

      January 19, 2013 at 4:35 pm |
    • Logical

      We don't need religion or something to look forward to because we have it all now. You get back only what you are willing to put in. You make decisions that cause the result. You don't need to be saved from your life because life is why you're here. Want to feel good? Don't infringe on the rights of others and work toward enjoying your everyday and others will be happy to be around you. You will never meet the savior because there isn't one. Stop worrying about that and start enjoying life.

      January 19, 2013 at 4:37 pm |
    • Just a John

      Dana
      You sound like a born againer, you are a scary lot. I did it, the courts know I did it, my family knows I did it and baby jesus kknows I did it but HE forgives me; how cool is that? HALLELUJAH

      January 19, 2013 at 4:39 pm |
    • Glenn

      Coming from a truly brainwashed fanatic, who refuses to think for themselves... because it is easier to follow blindly.

      January 19, 2013 at 4:41 pm |
    • lionlylamb

      All Life upon this world is freely given another Life deeply inside the living when one does die. Is it not written that our living bodies are nothing more than God's buildings where the Godly take up residencies deeply within any bodies' insides? We cannot get to our body's Godly kingdom as our own bodies are the kingdom domains of God! We must be discombobulated and rearranged in order to gain entrance into the kingdom domains of God which lay inside all of Life here upon this celestial based world of megalithic creatures of which we are! 1Corinthians 3:9 "For we are labourers together with God: ye are God's husbandry, [ye are] God's building!"

      January 19, 2013 at 4:49 pm |
    • Ira Radnick

      Good grief, Dana... Parrots repeat sounds with no comprehension of what they are saying, also. So now the question is, "What breed of parrot are you?" A person's ability to think for himself/herself is a terrible thing to waste...

      January 19, 2013 at 4:49 pm |
    • tony

      Right Leo. It is NOT written.

      January 19, 2013 at 5:02 pm |
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About this blog

The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.