home
RSS
Godless mom strikes a chord with parents
A CNN iReport essay on raising kids without God draws record-breaking number of comments.
January 18th, 2013
06:32 PM ET

Godless mom strikes a chord with parents

By Daphne Sashin, CNN

Deborah Mitchell remembers the time, when her boys were younger, and another mom asked her about her religious beliefs.

Mitchell was raised Catholic but moved away from religion in her early 20s. She told the other mother that she didn’t go to church and didn’t even really believe in God.

Then, she says, the recruiting started.

“She used to call my house and tell me she was praying for me. She’d leave me messages and leave cards in my mailbox with scripture,” Mitchell says. “I do realize that she meant well, but at the same time, I know my views were seen as wrong. I needed to be ‘saved.’”

Mitchell, a mother of two teenagers in Texas who feels “immersed in Christianity,” started a blog about raising her children without religion because she felt frustrated and marginalized. She didn’t want to feel so alone, she says.

This week, she gained a whole new audience and the reassurance that she's not alone. Her essay on CNN iReport, “Why I Raise My Children Without God,” drew 650,000 page views, the second highest for an iReport, and the most comments of any submission on the citizen journalism platform.

It starts:

When my son was around 3 years old, he used to ask me a lot of questions about heaven. Where is it? How do people walk without a body? How will I find you? You know the questions that kids ask.

For over a year, I lied to him and made up stories that I didn’t believe about heaven. Like most parents, I love my child so much that I didn’t want him to be scared. I wanted him to feel safe and loved and full of hope. But the trade-off was that I would have to make stuff up, and I would have to brainwash him into believing stories that didn’t make sense, stories that I didn’t believe either.

Mitchell posted the essay detailing her seven reasons for raising her children without God on CNN iReport because she felt there wasn’t anyone else speaking for women or moms like her. As she sees it, children should learn to do the right things because they will feel better about themselves, not because God is watching. She asks questions like: If there was a good, all-knowing, all-powerful God, why would he allow murders, child abuse and torture?

Lots of people disagreed with her. Tons. They flagged her iReport as inappropriate and criticized CNN for linking to her essay on the CNN.com homepage. But there were plenty of others who wrote thoughtful rebuttals, respectfully disagreeing with Mitchell while not foisting their own beliefs on her. Take, for instance, a Methodist dad, who said faith can be hard to nail down, but “not to avail ourselves of the power of something we don't completely understand is silly.”

Others said Mitchell presented a simplistic view of religion.

“Presentations such as these seem to ignore a substantial percentage of believers - well-educated, compassionate, liberal folk, Christian and non-Christian alike - who, I feel, are able to worship without being blind to the realities of the world, or without lying to their children about their understanding of these complexities,” wrote commenter RMooradian. “I'll be raising my children with God, but I understand those who cannot!”

But Mitchell’s essay also struck a chord with hundreds of like-minded parents raising children in a world where lack of belief puts them in the minority, often even in their own family.

“Thank you for writing this. I agree with everything you say, but I’m not brave enough to tell everyone I know this is how I feel,” a woman who called herself an “agnostic mommy of two in Alabama” posted in the comments. “Thank you for your bravery and letting me know I’m not alone.”

It’s a growing group. One in five Americans is not affiliated with any religion, and that number has grown by 25% in the past five years, according to a survey by the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life. Of that group, 88% said they were not looking for religion, although 68% of the unaffiliated said they believe in God. 

Brittany Branyon, an American graduate student and substitute teacher living in Germany, was also compelled to express her thanks to Mitchell. Branyon was raised Southern Baptist in Georgia and Alabama. In high school, when she began to question the theory of creation and befriended gay and lesbian students, she says her mother tried to perform an exorcism.

“She opened all the windows and doors in the house, brought me to the door, held my shoulders and shook me while screaming, ‘Satan, get out of this child!’, ‘Satan, leave this child alone!’.”

After moving away from the South, she and her husband “became more comfortable in our secular ways,” but still take criticism from family members. They are now expecting their first child.

“Though we are elated to welcome our child into the world, we can’t help but dread the religious uproar that is to come from our families,” she wrote in an e-mail.

Such an uproar is familiar to Carol Phillips, a stay-at-home mother in northern Virginia. When she gave birth to her first child, she said her family was shocked that the baby wasn’t baptized. She said her mother-in-law cried and told her the little girl’s soul would not go to heaven.

Then there are the comments from strangers. Last year, Phillips said she and her daughter were at a birthday party when a tornado warning sounded.

“We were all in the basement keeping safe. A little girl was saying baby Jesus will keep us safe. My daughter asked who Jesus was. The rest of the time was spent hearing ‘I'll pray for you sweetie, we can take you to church with us if you want,’” Phillips told CNN.

Commenting on Mitchell’s iReport, Phillips said, “To live out loud and to speak freely about my beliefs brings many clucking tongues. I would think it’s easier to come out as gay than atheist.”

Mitchell said she spent years studying the history of religion and does believe it has “an important place in our community.” She has told her children that she’ll be fine if they decide to join a church when they are older.

She ended her essay:

I understand why people need God. I understand why people need heaven. It is terrifying to think that we are all alone in this universe, that one day we—along with the children we love so much—will cease to exist. The idea of God and an afterlife gives many of us structure, community and hope.

I do not want religion to go away. I only want religion to be kept at home or in church where it belongs. It’s a personal effect, like a toothbrush or a pair of shoes. It’s not something to be used or worn by strangers. I want my children to be free not to believe and to know that our schools and our government will make decisions based on what is logical, just and fair—not on what they believe an imaginary God wants.

After her post ran on CNN, Mitchell said she was encouraged by the number of people who agreed with her, or who disagreed but wanted to have a respectful discussion.

“I’m not saying that everybody should think how I do. I’m saying the people that do should have a place in our society and have acceptance and respect,” she said. “I just want to have children grow up and be able to not be afraid to say ‘I don’t believe that,’ or ‘I’m not part of that.’” 

- CNN Belief Blog

Filed under: Atheism • Belief • Christianity • iReport

soundoff (15,081 Responses)
  1. Mary

    Yay go Godless mom! I'm with you, my whole family is with you. It takes a lot of courage to admit what is unpopular, but true. We non-Christians get this rammed down our throats all the time. Especially our kids in public schools here in the south. What is legal and what is practiced are too totally different things, and unless you are willing to make a stink about it, and get ostracized, you live with it.

    January 19, 2013 at 7:04 am |
    • George

      By the way Mary, you do realize you share the same name as Jesus' mother? Ironic, wouldn't you say?

      January 19, 2013 at 7:17 am |
  2. DocBlogger

    Nothing wrong with belief in God. Just keep it yourself.

    January 19, 2013 at 7:02 am |
    • Live4Him

      Nothing wrong with belief in evolution. Just keep it yourself.

      January 19, 2013 at 7:10 am |
    • Robert Brown

      Romans 10:14
      How then shall they call on him in whom they have not believed? and how shall they believe in him of whom they have not heard? and how shall they hear without a preacher?

      January 19, 2013 at 7:17 am |
    • Robert Brown

      Mark 16:15
      And he said unto them, Go ye into all the world, and preach the gospel to every creature.

      January 19, 2013 at 7:19 am |
    • George

      so this is an issue with some christens as evangelization is core to their religion. by the way you can segregate faith vs. religion. i have faith but would not encroach on you belief system. i think conversion and faith begins in ones heart. you either have it or you don't.

      January 19, 2013 at 7:20 am |
    • Robert Brown

      George,

      How did you obtain faith?

      January 19, 2013 at 7:25 am |
  3. Rick

    How many days in a row is CNN going to run this story? Why is CNN running this story for so many days in a row?

    January 19, 2013 at 7:01 am |
    • kuate

      Why do you ask this twice? Why is this one time more than once?

      January 19, 2013 at 7:04 am |
    • Psudavid91

      Rick, it's because this story has created a buzz. Is it particularly newsworthy? No, but most media today is sensationalist in nature. Because 20 gazillion people commented when this blog first came out, we now get the sequel.

      January 19, 2013 at 7:17 am |
  4. Jana Modarelli

    No one "wins" this argument. It's impossible. Truth will out, but we will not be the ones to do it.

    January 19, 2013 at 7:01 am |
  5. DocBlogger

    Nobody loves God. If they did they would marvel evolution.

    January 19, 2013 at 7:00 am |
    • Live4Him

      I cannot marvel something that is logically impossible.

      1) For evolution to have occurred, it needs milions of years. According to evolutionists, dinosaurs died out 65 million years ago. However, we find dino pictures (cave paintings, carvings, etc.) from long ago. We find accurate descriptions of a dinosaur in the Bible. And, most telling, we find dino soft tissue in fossils. Soft tissue cannot survive for more than 10,000 years. Yet, we find it in dinosaur bones.

      2) For evolution to have occurred, it needs for there to be 1 centillion species (i.e. 1 followed by 303 zeros). If only a millionth of them left fossil evidence, we'd have a million times more species identified than our national debt.

      3) If evolution occured, then we should be able to dupicate it in a labatory setting – but it has been found to be impossible, even when scientists simulate millions of years of mutatations.

      January 19, 2013 at 7:09 am |
    • Bernard Webb

      Live, you had better stick to religion. Your version of "science" is crazily wrong and misguided.

      January 19, 2013 at 7:11 am |
    • Live4Him

      Bernard Webb : Live, you had better stick to religion. Your version of "science" is crazily wrong and misguided.

      IF this were true, then you would be able to point out factual flaws in my posts. Instead, you resort to personal attacks (i.e. ad hominems).

      January 19, 2013 at 7:13 am |
    • Jen

      If you not a hypocrite Live4him you would answer the question I have repeated to you several times of whether you consider an abortion before 5-6 weeks (before the heart starts beating) okay? Since you have repeated over and over again that you consider life to have a beating heart (therefore embryos are not life).

      Yet you have refused to answer this question. Why? You are a hypocrite. I have no doubt you will ignore me again because you can not answer this question without coming across as extremely unintelligent.

      January 19, 2013 at 7:21 am |
    • Dan GA

      And these dinosaurs are in the bible where?

      January 19, 2013 at 7:26 am |
    • George

      I have belief in God and evolution... they are commingled.

      January 19, 2013 at 7:26 am |
    • Bernard Webb

      Live, the facts on evolution are easily available here in the Real World, for example at the library. (This is a place like the Sacred Reading Room at your church, but it has books on things other than God and Jesus.) The errors and misconceptions in your three points are numerous and overwhelming.

      There are no "dino pictures from long ago". Where on earth did you get this idea? Animals shown in cave art are those hunted and eaten by the people living there.

      There is no "dino soft tissue in fossils". This is even crazier than the "dino pictures". Where are you GETTING this stuff?

      Your statement about "1 centillion species" is asinine and absurd. Where did you get the idea that evolution requires "1 centillion" species? This is so dumb and ignorant it has my jaw dropping in amazement.

      Evolution IS "duplicated in a laboratory setting" on a routine basis! The principles of evolution have been demonstrated and studied over and over using fruit flies, who go through many generations in a short time. In a recent study, single-celled yeast was put under simulated evolutionary pressure and had evolved into a multi-cellular lifeform in just 60 days. (Google "multicellular life evolves" for the full story.)

      You asked for a point by point discussion of your amazingly ignorant views of evolutionary science, and there it is. If you are as ignorant about religion as you are about science, then evidently you know nothing at all.

      January 19, 2013 at 7:27 am |
    • Live4Him

      @Jen : If you not a hypocrite Live4him you would answer the question I have repeated to you several times of whether you consider an abortion before 5-6 weeks (before the heart starts beating) okay?

      Jen, I have a life outside of these forums. I always get more posts than I can answer, but I'm always willing to discuss honest and logical issues. However, I don't always see the post. That said, I'll address your issue now, but on the abortion forum.

      January 19, 2013 at 7:31 am |
    • Robert Brown

      Dan GA,
      Job 40

      15 Behold now behemoth, which I made with thee; he eateth grass as an ox.

      16 Lo now, his strength is in his loins, and his force is in the navel of his belly.

      17 He moveth his tail like a cedar: the sinews of his stones are wrapped together.

      18 His bones are as strong pieces of brass; his bones are like bars of iron.

      19 He is the chief of the ways of God: he that made him can make his sword to approach unto him.

      January 19, 2013 at 7:31 am |
  6. Patrick Henry

    I gave it a look and a go. Baptized four times christened twice. We would be well to spend our precious time here on earth being of service to each other rather than using a concept called God to support our individual self-centeredness to feel superior." Our problem we believe is self-centeredness. is quote from a practical guide which cites "God" but does not demand "God" At the time it was written one had to include "God" in order to get the message it carried to those who needed it. The method for over-comming your self-centeredness is to "Help Somebody"

    January 19, 2013 at 6:57 am |
    • MormonChristian

      I know plenty of non believers that are also self-centered as well as believers. I agree the goal is to spend our time here as well as we can, and to help others with whatever talents or strengths we have, and to be forgiving of ourselves and others.

      January 19, 2013 at 7:03 am |
    • Robert Brown

      Patrick Henry,
      1 Peter 5:5
      Likewise, ye younger, submit yourselves unto the elder. Yea, all of you be subject one to another, and be clothed with humility: for God resisteth the proud, and giveth grace to the humble.

      January 19, 2013 at 7:04 am |
  7. MormonChristian

    I think the most important thing is how we live our lives and treat others – regardless of our belief or non belief. I believe God lives and can help us to become better people. For me, that is more important than how long I live or whether I am disease or accident free. I hope all of us can see the value in the teachings of Jesus to "love your enemies", to "do unto others as you would have them do unto you", and to care for the poor, etc. and not focus on the weakness of people in churches or whether God saves us from all misfortune.

    We will someday all know the truth when we die – either we enter oblivion or life continues. In any event, we will be judged by what we did with our time here and how we benefitted others. That anyway is the whole point of "accepting Christ" and being "saved".

    January 19, 2013 at 6:56 am |
  8. DocBlogger

    Want to know how good your religion is? No better than the one you so despise.

    January 19, 2013 at 6:55 am |
    • George

      that comes across as very bitter. its also presumptuous. so it seems to me that those w/o faith can be as nasty as you suggest those with faith can be. its saturday my friend, lighten up.

      January 19, 2013 at 7:24 am |
  9. Chuck

    As I say to my non-believingfriends – and I have many -. "We will believe what we want and in the end we will find out the truth. If you're right, game over. There will be nothing more. But if I'm right, I will be sorry for you. But I won't be there for you to advocate for you."

    We all make the choice and we are all big boys and big girlls and we know what the rules and guidelines are. I love them. They are my friends. I don't pray for them. I'm not interested in converting them. Just make your choice, either way....shut up about it and live your life the best you can accordingly.

    January 19, 2013 at 6:55 am |
    • Bernard Webb

      You are paraphrasing Pascal's Wager: since we can't know for sure, acting as though the religious stuff is true covers your rear just in case. One problem with this is that there have been many hundreds of religions down through history, each with its own separate god or gods and its own separate set of fairy tales. What if you have picked the wrong god?

      January 19, 2013 at 7:09 am |
    • nemo0037

      Ah yes... Pascal's Wager as always, raises its ugly head. Not a logical view of the situation... but then again religion is inherently devoid of logic anyway. No matter. At least you are decent enough to not pester your infidel friends. Heck, I think it's above average that you even HAVE infidel friends.

      January 19, 2013 at 7:14 am |
    • Chuck

      I generally don't hang around them because I find them...ias with both of....to be condecending, arrogant, 'I'm smarter than you' a-blanks. Not far Nemo from your comments towards me to be truthful. But, whatever. I went to Mass today. and prayed to my invisble, phony friend. Certainly not for you guys. But to live a better life and to help those who need it. If we all do that, the world will be better...God or not.

      January 20, 2013 at 11:56 am |
  10. Faith

    It requires faith to believe in the unknown, just as it takes faith to believe in a God whom we do not see but know is real. That is one of the main reasons people do not believe in God and Jesus Christ. There has to be a personal encounter with Jesus Christ to believe. If you have not had the personal encounter, then no, you will not see the God and Jesus as being real, but a figment of someone's imagination. He is real to me and I know He lives because of my first personal encounter with Him many years ago and even today. When I speak of encounter it is like your spiritual eyes and spiritual heart is open and becomes illuminated to the things of His Kingdom. You do not see as other people see. You do not hear as other people hear. You hear from His realm–His Heavenly Kingdom, and my God it is real!!!

    January 19, 2013 at 6:54 am |
    • Honey Hush

      Your first post was enough to show that you are a fine christian nutter, we get it, you can step back from the keyboard now. Go read the book and try and see how ugly it really is.

      January 19, 2013 at 7:12 am |
  11. DocBlogger

    Those who don't believe in evolution, ironically, are the ones that have yet to evolve.

    January 19, 2013 at 6:53 am |
    • Chuck

      I believe in evolution doc. I'm going to Mass later on too. Lots of people who believe in God believe in evolution. Grow up.

      January 19, 2013 at 6:59 am |
    • MormonChristian

      What if one is an ardent believer in both Science and God? I find room in my mind to believe in evolution and I believe that is how God organized the Earth. I see design and purpose in the Universe. Perhaps God is the supreme Scientist.

      January 19, 2013 at 7:00 am |
    • Marsally

      Chuck – while at Mass this morning be sure to listen to the many words about kindness. Soften up.

      January 19, 2013 at 7:07 am |
    • George

      believing in God and evolution is not necessarily mutually exclusive. true some sects of christianity belive the earth is only 6k years old but others, like myself, believe God initiated the formation of the universe and evolution is part of His handy work. i have no issue with those that have no faith. i can understand their perspective that it seems born from tribal beliefs that have been socialized over time. however, if you ask someone why they have faith its typically because they just feel it in their hearts. many people attend church and have doubts. i know i have, but at the same time there are moments when your intuition becomes so sharp that your faith in God is solidified. may sound stupid to you and others but God is as real a presence in many peoples lives as a physical person.

      January 19, 2013 at 7:07 am |
  12. Robert Brown

    Therefore being justified by faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ:

    By whom also we have access by faith into this grace wherein we stand, and rejoice in hope of the glory of God.

    (Romans 5:1-2)

    January 19, 2013 at 6:53 am |
    • Marsally

      Quoting scripture for the benefit of those who don't hold scripture to be inspired, because they doubt the existence of God, is not helpful.

      January 19, 2013 at 7:03 am |
    • Robert Brown

      Marsally,

      The word of God is a good way to obtain faith.

      Romans 10:17
      So then faith cometh by hearing, and hearing by the word of God.

      January 19, 2013 at 7:13 am |
    • Bernard Webb

      And THIS is how you will convince me your god is real? You weren't on the debating team in your school days, were you?

      January 19, 2013 at 7:14 am |
    • Robert Brown

      Bernard Webb,

      No, I wasn’t on the debating team. We give out the word, God does the work. If you believe it will not be by the skillful words of a person, it will be by the power of God. We sow the seed, God gives the increase.

      January 19, 2013 at 7:22 am |
    • Bernard Webb

      Robert, you sound hypnotized. Are you one of those hyper-Christians who go around with a glassy-eyed blissed-out stare? Those people really give me the creeps when I see them on TV.

      January 19, 2013 at 8:13 am |
  13. Don - Texas

    My question has always been: If the believers of a God (any God...) are permitted to believe, in their God, and have earned that privelige without retributions; why can't the disbelievers be permitted to disbelieve, of any God, without retributions, as well? Of course, it's just my opinion...

    January 19, 2013 at 6:52 am |
    • Live4Him

      Here's my take. Why should a Christian child be taught the naturalist religion in our public schools? Why can't religious beliefs be taught at home only? Instead, we force children to know about religious principles of evolution and Big Bang, which are contrary to their parent's religious beliefs.

      January 19, 2013 at 6:56 am |
    • JWT

      By the time those topics are taught in school you have had more than enough time teach your children about your god.

      January 19, 2013 at 7:01 am |
    • Bernard Webb

      Live, your referring to the scientifically proven knowledge of evolution as "religious" shows just how far from the Real World you are. I realize that there are lots of people like you and although I find them to be irrational and to to delight in believing things that couldn't possibly be true (while denying things that clearly ARE true), I usually just smile indulgently and move on. The only time it bothers me is when the false-belief crowd starts dabbling in politics. Then we get people like the birthers, whose beliefs are every bit as off base as yours. And just as fervently held.

      January 19, 2013 at 7:04 am |
    • Jason

      because the big bang and evolution are fact, not belief.

      January 19, 2013 at 7:11 am |
    • a reasonable atheist

      @Live

      Science is the opposite of religion. It does not require belief. Theories are tested repeatedly and changed when tests show they are incorrect.

      January 19, 2013 at 7:14 am |
    • Live4Him

      Jason : because the big bang and evolution are fact, not belief.

      From the uninformed viewpoint. The experts disagree – even the naturalists.

      January 19, 2013 at 7:15 am |
    • Live4Him

      a reasonable atheist : Science is the opposite of religion. It does not require belief. Theories are tested repeatedly and changed when tests show they are incorrect.

      How do you test events that occurred in the past? Isn't that contradictory?

      January 19, 2013 at 7:16 am |
    • a reasonable atheist

      Live4Him: How do you test events that occurred in the past? Isn't that contradictory?

      @Live

      No. You test a theory. How would do you test an event? That's nonsensical.

      January 19, 2013 at 7:30 am |
  14. DocBlogger

    When I run into believers, its a hint that irrationality may be expected from them.

    January 19, 2013 at 6:50 am |
    • Faith

      That is why in the Book of Romans, why He takes what is foolish and confound them to the wise........Selah!

      January 19, 2013 at 7:01 am |
    • MormonChristian

      I find rationality and irrationality to be equal among all people. Be careful of prejudice...

      January 19, 2013 at 7:01 am |
  15. Big Red Neck

    People should keep their religion "at home or in church where it belongs" and their beliefs are "like a toothbrush or a pair shoes". This lady needs to go to 'Merica school. Freedom ain't free.

    January 19, 2013 at 6:49 am |
    • Faith

      Unfortunately, religion can be left at home but the creator and savior of and for the universe cannot. He's too big to be left at home, school, church or the nation. Each day you awaken, you see Him........Selah!

      January 19, 2013 at 7:03 am |
    • Marsally

      Faith – can you stop with the "selah" please. Most folks don't even know what you're doing with that, and those of us who do find it silly.

      January 19, 2013 at 7:11 am |
  16. Frank

    This is disgusting. Our fore fathers used the bible for the principles and morals of this nation. Now we have trash like this twisting the minds of children. How touching.

    January 19, 2013 at 6:48 am |
    • Bernard Webb

      While it is candid of you to admit that the founders justified holding other people as slaves and other evils with Biblical verses, your characterization of those who disagree with you as "trash" is not very Christ-like. But then, today's "Christians" never are.

      January 19, 2013 at 6:59 am |
    • JimNasium

      It's called freedom. If you prefer a society where everyone is forced to have the same beliefs consider North Korea.

      January 19, 2013 at 7:00 am |
    • kuate

      Our nation had slavery and used the bible as a way to justify it because the bible had scriptures allowing it. Don't you think that disgusting?

      January 19, 2013 at 7:02 am |
    • Sara

      Frank please do your research... look up the Treaty of Tripoli. You are very wrong, sir. In the future please research history before spouting off humorous lies.

      January 19, 2013 at 7:41 am |
  17. Faith

    As it were in biblical days, so will it be in this generation and thereafter. There will always be people who do not believe in God. I am not talking about a religion but God and Jesus Christ who became the savior for the world. In order to believe, there has to be a hearing, not with the mind or intellect, but with the spiritual ear. He cannot draw those who do not hear within.

    Many people attempt to rationalize and understand a God who created them (and not a bang theory either) and gave them life based on their own human understanding. God has taken the foolish things of this world and have confounded those who deem themselves wise. No, they will not understand and hear unless they humble themselves and ask God to show them who He is.

    Persoanlly, I do not attempt to convince man anything. I am not God. God will do the drawing if they want to truly hear the message of salvation. Some things every a believer may not have all the answers to. That is O.K. it just reinforces that I am not God.

    God has given mankind the right to choose. He tells the children of Israel in the Old Testament choose ye this day whom you will serve. If God then serve god and if Baal then serve Baal (a false god). So essentially, Ms. Mitchell does have the right to choose which side she will be on. However, on the day when Jesus returns for His church (which many believe that will not happen either), I feel sorry for the unbelieving because their eternal home will not be Heaven.

    January 19, 2013 at 6:43 am |
    • Live4Him

      Excellent points.

      January 19, 2013 at 6:52 am |
    • Bernard Webb

      "Persoanlly, I do not attempt to convince man anything."

      You say this in the midst of a long comment in which you try to convince people that you speak for God and know his mind well (despite your statement that "I am not God"). You tell us what God wants, what God says, and what God has done as if you are talking about your Aunt Tillie rather than an imaginary, invisible all-powerful being that you believe you can speak for (while saying you are not).

      Your contradictory stance, combined with the smug "I know God" arrogance that characterizes religionists, makes your comment seem more sad and even pathetic than anything else. Clearly you are in your own world. Fine. Just quit trying to drag the REST of us there.

      January 19, 2013 at 6:55 am |
    • Live4Him

      Bernard Webb : You say this in the midst of a long comment in which you try to convince people that you speak for God

      Who forced you to read her post?

      January 19, 2013 at 7:00 am |
    • Honey Hush

      Faith and all your fellow christians that have abandoned logic and reason for your mythical god, enjoy your delusion while here on earth because when you do die there will be no eternal home for you or anybody else. Believe if it turns your crank but please do not waste your wealth on the scam.

      January 19, 2013 at 7:04 am |
    • Faith

      No need to be hateful Mr. Webb. Why is it so insulting to you that I am sharing my own experience. It's like a person sharing their own experience they thought would benefit the life of someone eles. You do not have to believe. Again, you are not being forced to agree or disagree with what was written. You are free to choose and believe whatever it is you want. I am not your judge. There is only one judge. For me, it is my Heavenly Father!

      January 19, 2013 at 7:12 am |
    • Bernard Webb

      It bothers me when humans speak for an imaginary god, since this has so often led to misery and suffering for other humans. What tends to happen is that people project their own beliefs and prejudices onto their gods. (Why not? Nobody knows what these imaginary beings REALLY are like.) So we get phenomena like "right-wing Jesus", who never mentions or evokes the Sermon On the Mount (supposedly the centerpiece of his message) but instead appears to favor small government, unregulated corporations, a reduction in women's rights, unfair treatment of gays and minorities, and other policies more associated with today's extreme conservatives than with an ineffable celestial deity.

      I am not saying this applies to you. But whenever I read "God wants this", "God thinks that", or "God told me to do this other thing", I get very nervous. I know where that road leads.

      January 19, 2013 at 8:08 am |
  18. Bernard Webb

    How polite the author is to refer to the efforts of religionists to cram their fairy tales down our throats as "recruiting". That makes it sound so much less annoying than it really is.

    January 19, 2013 at 6:43 am |
  19. Live4Him

    AJD : If you study things like chemistry, biology, statistics, and other sciences, ... it IS entirely possible for things to occur "by chance"

    False. Read up on A E Wilder-Smith, a triple doctorate in organic chemistry ... and a devout Creationist.

    January 19, 2013 at 6:40 am |
    • midwest rail

      The creationist definition of the scientific method is baseless and biased from the start.
      "By definition, no apparent, perceived or claimed evidence in any field, including history and chronology, can be valid if it contradicts the scriptural record."

      January 19, 2013 at 6:57 am |
    • Live4Him

      midwest rail : The creationist definition of the scientific method is baseless and biased from the start.

      Strawman (i.e. I haven't given this definition). NEXT!

      January 19, 2013 at 6:59 am |
    • midwest rail

      You DID, however, put forth a devout creationist as a legitimate source to contradict a previous post. Next.

      January 19, 2013 at 7:01 am |
  20. Richard

    Jesus is Santa Claus for adults.

    January 19, 2013 at 6:40 am |
    • Live4Him

      Richard : Jesus is Santa Claus for adults.

      Evolution is Santa Claus for adults. - Do you see how silly this looks? Anyone can advance a posit, but without any premises it just looks silly.

      January 19, 2013 at 6:41 am |
    • Bernard Webb

      Yes, "Live", what you said is indeed silly. But what Richard said is true. True wins.

      January 19, 2013 at 6:44 am |
    • Live4Him

      Bernard Webb : Yes, "Live", what you said is indeed silly. But what Richard said is true. True wins.

      Some people are so biased they can never see truth. Truth is objective, not subjective. Once again, a subjective person posits a conclusion without any premises.

      January 19, 2013 at 6:51 am |
    • Bernard Webb

      Live, my only rsponse is to turn what you said back on you, since it applies exactly:

      Some people are so biased they can never see truth. Truth is objective, not subjective. Once again, a subjective person posits a conclusion without any premises.

      January 19, 2013 at 6:57 am |
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 137 138 139 140 141 142 143 144 145 146 147

Post a comment

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Advertisement
About this blog

The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.