home
RSS
Proof of heaven popular, except with the church
They claim that they’ve glimpsed heaven but survivors of near-death experiences face a surprising skeptic: the church.
May 19th, 2013
06:00 AM ET

Proof of heaven popular, except with the church

By John Blake, CNN

“God, help me!”

Eben Alexander shouted and flailed as hospital orderlies tried to hold him in place. But no one could stop his violent seizures, and the 54-year-old neurosurgeon went limp as his horrified wife looked on.

That moment could have been the end. But Alexander says it was just the beginning. He found himself soaring toward a brilliant white light tinged with gold into “the strangest, most beautiful world I’d ever seen.”

Alexander calls that world heaven, and he describes his journey in “Proof of Heaven,” which has been on The New York Times bestseller list for 27 weeks. Alexander says he used to be an indifferent churchgoer who ignored stories about the afterlife. But now he knows there’s truth to those stories, and there’s no reason to fear death.

“Not one bit,” he said. “It’s a transition; it’s not the end of anything. We will be with our loved ones again.”

Heaven used to be a mystery, a place glimpsed only by mystics and prophets. But popular culture is filled with firsthand accounts from all sorts of people who claim that they, too, have proofs of heaven after undergoing near-death experiences.

Yet the popularity of these stories raises another question: Why doesn’t the church talk about heaven anymore?

Preachers used to rhapsodize about celestial streets of gold while congregations sang joyful hymns like “I’ll Fly Away” and “When the Roll is Called up Yonder.” But the most passionate accounts of heaven now come from people outside the church or on its margins.

Most seminaries don’t teach courses on heaven; few big-name pastors devote much energy to preaching or writing about the subject; many ordinary pastors avoid the topic altogether out of embarrassment, indifference or fear, scholars and pastors say.

“People say that the only time they hear about heaven is when they go to a funeral,” said Gary Scott Smith, author of “Heaven in the American Imagination” and a history professor at Grove City College in Pennsylvania.

Talk of heaven shouldn’t wait, though, because it answers a universal question: what happens when we die, says the Rev. John Price, author of “Revealing Heaven,” which offers a Christian perspective of near-death experiences.

“Ever since people started dying, people have wondered, where did they go? Where are they now? Is this what happens to me?” said Price, a retired pastor and hospital chaplain.

A little girl’s revelation

Price didn’t always think heaven was so important. He scoffed at reports of near-death experiences because he thought they reduced religion to ghost stories. Besides, he was too busy helping grieving families to speculate about the afterlife.

His attitude changed, though, after a young woman visited his Episcopal church one Sunday with her 3-year-old daughter.

Price had last seen the mother three years earlier. She had brought her then-7-week-old daughter to the church for baptism. Price hadn't heard from her since. But when she reappeared, she told Price an amazing story.

She had been feeding her daughter a week after the baptism when milk dribbled out of the infant's mouth and her eyes rolled back into her head. The woman rushed her daughter to the emergency room, where she was resuscitated and treated for a severe upper respiratory infection.

Three years later, the mother was driving past the same hospital with her daughter when the girl said, “Look, Mom, that’s where Jesus brought me back to you.”

“The mother nearly wrecked her car,” Price said. “She never told her baby about God, Jesus, her near-death experience, nothing. All that happened when the girl was 8 weeks old. How could she remember that?”

When Price started hearing similar experiences from other parishioners, he felt like a fraud. He realized that he didn’t believe in heaven, even though it was part of traditional Christian doctrine.

He started sharing near-death stories he heard with grieving families and dejected hospital workers who had lost patients. He told them dying people had glimpsed a wonderful world beyond this life.

The stories helped people, Price said, and those who've had similar experiences of heaven should “shout them from the rooftops.”

“I’ve gone around to many churches to talk about this, and the venue they give me is just stuffed,” he said. “People are really hungry for it.”

Why pastors are afraid of heaven

Many pastors, though, don’t want to touch the subject because it’s too dangerous, says Lisa Miller, author of “Heaven: Our Enduring Fascination with the Afterlife.”

Miller cites the experience of Rob Bell, one of the nation’s most popular evangelical pastors.

John Price ignored heaven until he met a woman with an amazing story.

Bell ignited a firestorm two years ago when he challenged the teaching that only Christians go to heaven in “Love Wins: A Book About Heaven, Hell, and the Fate of Every Person Who Ever Lived.”

The book angered many members of Bell’s church as well as many in the evangelical establishment. He subsequently resigned.

“Farewell, Rob Bell,” one prominent evangelical tweeted.

“It’s a tough topic for a pastor,” said Miller, a former religion columnist for the Washington Post. “If you get too literal, you can risk sounding too silly. If you don’t talk about it, you’re evading one of the most important questions about theology and why people come to church.”

If pastors do talk about stories of near-death experiences, they can also be seen as implying that conservative doctrine – only those who confess their faith in Jesus get to heaven, while others suffer eternal damnation – is wrong, scholars and pastors say.

Many of those who share near-death stories aren’t conservative Christians but claim that they, too, have been welcomed by God to heaven.

“Conservative Christians aren’t the only ones going to heaven," said Price, "and that makes them mad."

There was a time, though, when the church talked a lot more about the afterlife.

Puritan pastors in the 17th and 18th centuries often preached about heaven, depicting it as an austere, no fuss-place where people could commune with God.

African-American slaves sang spirituals about heaven like “Swing Low, Sweet Chariot.” They often depicted it as a place of ultimate payback: Slaves would escape their humiliation and, in some cases, rule over their former masters.

America’s fixation with heaven may have peaked around the Civil War. The third most popular book in 18th century America – behind the Bible and “Uncle Tom’s Cabin” – was "Gates Ajar," written in the wake of the war, Miller says.

The 1868 novel was “The Da Vinci Code” of its day, Miller says. It revolved around a grieving woman who lost her brother in the Civil War. A sympathetic aunt assures her that her brother is waiting in heaven, a bucolic paradise where people eat sumptuous meals, dogs sun themselves on porches and people laugh with their loved ones.

“This was a vision of heaven that was so appealing to hundreds of thousands of people who had lost people in the Civil War,” Miller said.

Americans needed heaven because life was so hard: People didn’t live long, infant mortality was high, and daily life was filled with hard labor.

“People were having 12 kids, and they would outlive 11 of them,” said Smith, author of "Heaven in the American Imagination." “Death was ever-present.”

The church eventually stopped talking about heaven, though, for a variety of reasons: the rise of science; the emergence of the Social Gospel, a theology that encouraged churches to create heaven on Earth by fighting for social justice; and the growing affluence of Americans. (After all, who needs heaven when you have a flat-screen TV, a smartphone and endless diversions?)

But then a voice outside the church rekindled Americans' interest in the afterlife. A curious 23-year-old medical student would help make heaven cool again.

The father of near-death experiences

Raymond Moody had been interested in the afterlife long before it was fashionable.

He was raised in a small Georgia town during World War II where death always seemed just around the corner. He constantly heard stories about soldiers who never returned from war. His father was a surgeon who told him stories of bringing back patients from the brink of death. In college, he was enthralled when he read one of the oldest accounts of a near-death experience, a soldier’s story told by Socrates in Plato’s “Republic.”

His fascination with the afterlife was sealed one day when he heard a speaker who would change his life.

The speaker was George Ritchie, a psychiatrist. Moody would say later of Ritchie, “He had that look of someone who had just finished a long session of meditation and didn’t have a care in the world.”

Moody sat in the back of a fraternity room as Ritchie told his story.

It was December 1943, and Ritchie was in basic training with the U.S. Army at Camp Barkeley, Texas. He contracted pneumonia and was placed in the hospital infirmary, where his temperature spiked to 107. The medical staff piled blankets on top of Ritchie’s shivering body, but he was eventually pronounced dead.

“I could hear the doctor give the order to prep me for the morgue, which was puzzling, because I had the sensation of still being alive,” Ritchie said.

He even remembers rising from a hospital gurney to talk to the hospital staff. But the doctors and nurses walked right through him when he approached them.

He then saw his lifeless body in a room and began weeping when he realized he was dead. Suddenly, the room brightened “until it seemed as though a million welding torches were going off around me.”

He says he was commanded to stand because he was being ushered into the presence of the Son of God. There, he saw every minute detail of his life flash by, including his C-section birth. He then heard a voice that asked, “What have you done with your life?"

After hearing Ritchie’s story, Moody decided what he was going to do with his life: investigate the afterlife.

Raymond Moody revived interest in heaven by studying near-death experiences.

He started collecting stories of people who had been pronounced clinically dead but were later revived. He noticed that the stories all shared certain details: traveling through a tunnel, greeting family and friends who had died, and meeting a luminous being that gave them a detailed review of their life and asked them whether they had spent their life loving others.

Moody called his stories “near-death experiences,” and in 1977 he published a study of them in a book, “Life after Life.” His book has sold an estimated 13 million copies.

Today, he is a psychiatrist who calls himself “an astronaut of inner space.” He is considered the father of the near-death-experience phenomenon.

He says science, not religion, resurrected the afterlife. Advances in cardiopulmonary resuscitation meant that patients who would have died were revived, and many had stories to share.

“Now that we have these means for snatching people back from the edge, these stories are becoming more amazing,” said Moody, who has written a new book, “Paranormal: My Life in Pursuit of the Afterlife.”

“A lot of medical doctors know about this from their patients, but they’re just afraid to talk about it in public.”

Ritchie’s story was told through a Christian perspective. But Moody says stories about heaven transcend religion. He's collected them from Jews, Muslims, Buddhists and atheists.

“A lot of people talk about encountering a being of light,” he said. “Christians call it Christ. Jewish people say it’s an angel. I’ve gone to different continents, and you can hear the same thing in China, India and Japan about meeting a being of complete love and compassion.”

It’s not just what people see in the afterlife that makes these stories so powerful, he says. It’s how they live their lives once they survive a near-death experience.

Many people are never the same, Moody says. They abandon careers that were focused on money or power for more altruistic pursuits.

“Whatever they had been chasing, whether it's power, money or fame, their experience teaches them that what this (life) is all about is teaching us to love,” Moody said.

Under 'the gaze of a God'

Alexander, the author of “Proof of Heaven,” seems to fit Moody's description. He’s a neurosurgeon, but he spends much of time now speaking about his experience instead of practicing medicine.

He'd heard strange stories over the years of revived heart attack patients traveling to wonderful landscapes, talking to dead relatives and even meeting God. But he never believed those stories. He was a man of science, an Episcopalian who attended church only on Easter and Christmas.

That changed one November morning in 2008 when he was awakened in his Lynchburg, Virginia, home by a bolt of pain shooting down his spine. He was rushed to the hospital and diagnosed with bacterial meningitis, a disease so rare, he says, it afflicts only one in 10 million adults.

After his violent seizures, he lapsed into a coma — and there was little hope for his survival. But he awakened a week later with restored health and a story to tell.

He says what he experienced was “too beautiful for words.” The heaven he describes is not some disembodied hereafter. It’s a physical place filled with achingly beautiful music, waterfalls, lush fields, laughing children and running dogs.

In his book, he describes encountering a transcendent being he alternately calls “the Creator” or “Om.” He says he never saw the being's face or heard its voice; its thoughts were somehow spoken to him.

“It understood humans, and it possessed the qualities we possess, only in infinitely greater measure. It knew me deeply and overflowed with qualities that all my life I’ve always associated with human beings and human beings alone: warmth, compassion, pathos … even irony and humor.”

Holly Alexander says her husband couldn’t forget the experience.

“He was driven to write 12 hours a day for three years,” she said. “It began as a diary. Then he thought he would write a medical paper; then he realized that medical science could not explain it all.”

“Proof of Heaven” debuted at the top of The New York Times bestseller list and has sold 1.6 million copies, according to its publisher.

Alexander says he didn’t know how to deal with his otherworldly journey at first.

“I was my own worst skeptic,” he said. “I spent an immense amount of time trying to come up with ways my brain might have done this.”

Conventional medical science says consciousness is rooted in the brain, Alexander says. His medical records indicated that his neocortex — the part of the brain that controls thought, emotion and language — had ceased functioning while he was in a coma.

Alexander says his neocortex was “offline” and his brain “wasn’t working at all” during his coma. Yet he says he reasoned, experienced emotions, embarked on a journey — and saw heaven.

“Those implications are tremendous beyond description,” Alexander wrote. “My experience showed me that the death of the body and the brain are not the end of consciousness; that human experience continues beyond the grave. More important, it continues under the gaze of a God who loves and cares about each one of us.”

Skeptics say Alexander’s experience can be explained by science, not the supernatural.

They cite experiments where neurologists in Switzerland induced out-of-body experiences in a woman suffering from epilepsy through electrical stimulation of the right side of her brain.

Michael Shermer, founder and publisher of Skeptic magazine, says the U.S. Navy also conducted studies with pilots that reproduced near-death experiences. Pilots would often black out temporarily when their brains were deprived of oxygen during training, he says.

These pilots didn’t go to heaven, but they often reported seeing a bright light at the end of a tunnel, a floating sensation and euphoria when they returned to consciousness, Shermer says.

“Whatever experiences these people have is actually in their brain. It’s not out there in heaven,” Shermer said.

Some people who claim to see heaven after dying didn’t really die, says Shermer, author of “Why People Believe Weird Things.”

“They’re called near-death experiences for a reason: They’re near death but not dead,” Shermer said. “In that fuzzy state, it’s not dissimilar to being asleep and awakened where people have all sorts of transitory experiences that seem very real.”

The boy who saw Jesus

Skeptics may scoff at a story like Alexander’s, but their popularity has made a believer out of another group: the evangelical publishing industry.

While the church may be reluctant to talk about heaven, publishers have become true believers. The sales figures for books on heaven are divine: Don Piper’s “90 Minutes in Heaven” has sold 5 million copies. And “Heaven is for Real: A Little Boy’s Astounding Story of His Trip to Heaven and Back” is the latest publishing juggernaut.

Colton Burpo says he saw heaven and describes the color of Jesus' eyes.

“Heaven is for Real” has been on The New York Times bestseller list for 126 consecutive weeks and sold 8 million copies, according to its publisher.

The story is told from the perspective of Colton Burpo, who was just 4 when he slipped into unconsciousness while undergoing emergency surgery for a burst appendix.

Colton says he floated above his body during the operation and soared to heaven, where he met Jesus. Todd Burpo, Colton’s father, says he was skeptical about his son’s story until his son described meeting a great-grandfather and a miscarried baby sister — something no one had ever told him about.

Todd Burpo is a pastor, but he says he avoided preaching about heaven because he didn’t know enough about the subject.

“It’s pretty awkward,” he said. “Here I am the pastor, but I’m not the teacher on the subject. My son is teaching me.”

Colton is now 13 and says he still remembers meeting Jesus in heaven.

“He had brown hair, a brown beard to match and a smile brighter than any smile I’ve ever seen,’’ he said. “His eyes were sea-blue, and they were just, wow.”

Colton says he’s surprised by the success of his book, which has been translated into 35 languages. There’s talk of a movie, too.

“It’s totally a God thing,” he said.

Alexander, author of “Proof of Heaven,” seems to have the same attitude: His new life is a gift. He’s already writing another book on his experience.

“Once I realized what my journey was telling me," he said, "I knew I had to tell the story.”

He now attends church but says his faith is not dogmatic.

“I realized very strongly that God loves all of God’s children,” he said. “Any religion that claims to be the true one and the rest of them are wrong is wrong.”

Central to his story is something he says he heard in heaven.

During his journey, he says he was accompanied by an angelic being who gave him a three-part message to share on his return.

When he heard the message, he says it went through him “like a wind” because he instantly knew it was true.

It’s the message he takes today to those who wonder who, or what, they will encounter after death.

The angel told him:

“You are loved and cherished, dearly, forever.”

“You have nothing to fear.”

“There is nothing you can do wrong."

- CNN Writer

Filed under: Art • Belief • Bible • Books • Christianity • Culture & Science • Faith • God • Heaven • History

soundoff (4,945 Responses)
  1. Over-the-Moon

    "If God has spoken, why is the world not convinced?"
    ~Percy Bysshe Shelley

    May 19, 2013 at 11:27 am |
    • Dean

      Because man is stupid.

      May 19, 2013 at 11:43 am |
    • terri

      If medicine is real, why can't two, or ten, doctors agree on a diagnosis?

      May 19, 2013 at 11:58 am |
  2. mama k

    @N&W 1000

    1. You obviously have no idea what atheism is. (All of your points were absurd.)
    2. The brain has activity that under different situations causes people to sense all kinds of crazy things.
    3. If you dangle enough chicken nuggets over a child's head, you can get them to say just about anything.

    May 19, 2013 at 11:26 am |
    • N&W 1000

      I heard once, a lady in Port St. Lucy (sp) Florida when thru the drive through, they did not have McNuggets, so she called 911 on them.

      True story, so I know you are correct.

      May 19, 2013 at 11:28 am |
  3. N&W 1000

    This simply not the forum to answer long treatises such as Colin suggests; though each point does have an easy and clear answer.

    I would recommend The Berean Call website to you; Dave Hunt, who just passed away last month, made a career of refuting and educating evolutionists and atheists, well, those who are able to check out a different viewpoint. Most are more than satisfied to get 2nd or 3rd hand information and run with it.

    May 19, 2013 at 11:26 am |
    • I Am God

      Is that they guy who keeps yelling at you every time an Atheist tries to make a point about something? Yes, he is quite a debater. Won't even let the other guy give his or her piece on the issue.

      May 19, 2013 at 11:28 am |
    • Colin

      That's the problem. Science and scientific explanations take a little explanation. A soundbite won't cut it. If a few paragraphs are too much for you, there is little anybody can do to help you.

      May 19, 2013 at 11:28 am |
    • N&W 1000

      No, that's not him.

      And, nobody wants to sit on here and read 10 paragraph answers like you have been doing; learn to reply in sound bites, make your points succinctly.

      May 19, 2013 at 11:30 am |
    • .

      Troll. I assume your brother and sister are also your mom and dad, correct?

      May 19, 2013 at 11:31 am |
    • HotAirAce

      N&W, humor us. Give us your best detailed response to any of Collin's questions. We'll let you know if it is too long. Or are you the gutless, superficial, pseudo intellect you appear to be?

      May 19, 2013 at 11:39 am |
    • HotAirAce

      What's with delusional believers putting their faith in dead dudes? You might think they're hiding behind alleged gods or experts that can't be (physically) questioned, that can't speak for themselves.

      May 19, 2013 at 11:46 am |
  4. Matt Knott

    You do not have a soul, you ARE a soul.. you have a body. We are spiritual beings having a human experience!! With an open mind, please read... I have come across veryy sufficient evidence (or PROOF to me) that there is INDEED life after physical death.. and that once we die, our spirits will have the ability to where thoughts will = manifestations to the fullest extent possible! Undeniable proof for me... 3 years ago the manager of my job passed away in a tragic motorcycle accident. Our job attended his funeral, very sad. My close coworker was engaged to his sister and after his funeral she shared a story with me that changed my life. She cried herself to sleep one night and had a dream with her brother in it. In the dream, her and her brother were hanging out having a good time together. At the end of the dream, he handed her an acorn.. real random. Well when she woke up, there was a piece of an acorn cap by her pillow. She moved the pillow to the side and there was an acorn underneath her pillow! Proof beyond any doubt in my mind there is indeed life after death and that consciousness survives physical death!

    May 19, 2013 at 11:23 am |
    • EvinAR

      Ever think maybe she was feeling the acorn in her sleep and that's why she was dreaming about it? There have been cases of that before – people holding things dreaming about them. Also, if it's not just that, WHY an acorn?? That's kind of random, isn't it?

      May 19, 2013 at 11:31 am |
    • Saraswati

      I had a friend who had a nightmare that she was eating a co.ckroach. When she woke up there was a co.chroach leg on the corner of her mouth.

      May 19, 2013 at 11:31 am |
    • EvinAR

      Also, I'd be tempted to ask – does she have any pets? Small children? That would have brought the acorn to her in the middle of the night? C'mon, man, think about this realistically.... : / acorns don't just appear supernaturally, and the appearance of one in the middle of the night is hardly extraordinary evidence for the supernatural.

      May 19, 2013 at 11:33 am |
    • Factoidlover

      If everyone is indeed a soul inside a body, why isn't more easily apparent and verifiable? That you are convinced doesn't help the hundreds of millions who are not and the one or two billion who are on the fence. If 10,000 spirits could demonstrate en masse their existence to everyone at once, we might be on to something. But for an individual to simply claim they know it via intuitive feelings alone is insufficient.

      May 19, 2013 at 11:43 am |
    • Matt Knott

      No, she lives on her own. An acorn does not randomly appear under your pillow when you live alone. You are limited by your beliefs and don't even realize it! Just because science can't prove something.. DOES NOT mean it is impossible. Lol I love the theories of dismissal.. there is nothing to dismiss but rather something extraordinary to embrace. Why an acorn? Well, it gets deep on a metaphorical level... an acorn resembles your Pineal Gland. What is the Pineal Gland?? Well... all I can say is.. it is the 'seat of your soul.' If you haven't already.. please research The Pineal Gland.. and also DMT or the drug dimethyltryptamine – life changing stuff! DMT causes us to dream.. (ever had a 'trippy' dream.. it only makes sense!)

      May 19, 2013 at 11:57 am |
    • Saraswati

      @matt, While the pineal gland is named for the pine cone there is another much more visible and obvious body part named in both greek and latin for the acorn. Your logic looks like very selective picking and choosing to me. I'm not saying things we don't understand can't happen – how would I know? But this is not objectively selected evidence.

      May 19, 2013 at 12:09 pm |
    • Matt Knott

      Saraswati... seriously – please do yourself a HUGE favor and research The Pineal Gland.. and DMT (dimethyltryptamine) as it honestly does not appear you have researched either. Get off of the subject of what body part an acorn resembles lol, that metaphor flew right over your head!

      May 19, 2013 at 12:12 pm |
    • HotAirAce

      And for all these years believers have been saying the heart is where the soul lives – who would have thought it's really the pineal gland?

      May 19, 2013 at 12:14 pm |
    • The real Tom

      Yeah, Matt, I believe EVERY WORD of that story. And you should know that my cat can play Mozart. I have a video to prove it.

      May 19, 2013 at 12:14 pm |
    • Matt Knott

      My logic is not very selective. I keep trying to post ALL of the info I have on the Pineal Gland (which would make my story make near complete sense) yet CNN does not want to actually post the comments I am trying to post with that info.. for whatever damn reason.. very frustrating

      May 19, 2013 at 12:14 pm |
    • Really-O?

      @Matt Knott –

      No offense intended, but the most parsimonious explanation for you viewing your acorn story as "proof beyond any doubt...that consciousness survives physical death" is that you are credulous.

      May 19, 2013 at 12:20 pm |
    • Matt Knott

      Really O – research The Pineal Gland and DMT or dimethyltryptamine. CNN is not letting me post all of the info I have, this is ridiculous and super frustrating!

      May 19, 2013 at 12:26 pm |
    • HotAirAce

      Matt, CNN doesn't actually care about what you are trying to post. They have a filter in place to detect word fragments that might be part of an inappropriate (by their definition) word. For example, if you type "document" your post will be rejected because "cum" triggers the filter. You should be able to use your imagination to detect possible nasty words and change them to get past the filter. Or you can cling to your nonsensical christian persecution complex.

      May 19, 2013 at 12:34 pm |
    • Saraswati

      Matt, anyone who doesn't already know what the pineal gland does can look it up. But this is pretty basic anatomy 101 – you might want to start accepting that maybe you don't have some special secret knowledge unavailable to the rest of us. We just don't agree and think you are making giant leaps of logic based on highly selective evidence.

      May 19, 2013 at 12:34 pm |
    • Really-O?

      @Matt Knott –

      I'm familiar with the pineal gland and DMT. DMT – as well as a number of other psychedelics – is a very interesting molecule that can induce profound mental states; perhaps these mental states are the result of the molecule opening "The Doors of Perception" or, perhaps, the molecule simply induces a temporary mental state similar to schizophrenia...we don't currently, and may never, know. Regardless, the psychedelic experience is in no way necessary or sufficient evidence supporting the claim that consciousness survives physical death. Seriously, you can see that...right?

      May 19, 2013 at 12:34 pm |
  5. Over-the-Moon

    Oh what the religious quacks do say! LOL!

    May 19, 2013 at 11:23 am |
    • Matt Knott

      lol

      May 19, 2013 at 11:43 am |
  6. jd

    i find it hard to believe. ive always wanted too, but my brain just doesnt accept it. but when i read the part about what the little girl said..that gave me goosebumps.

    May 19, 2013 at 11:21 am |
    • HotAirAce

      Assuming the story is true. As others have noted, the number of even alleged miracles has declined as our ability to record reality has increased. I was watching a show about searching for Sasquatches in Kentucky yesterday. I learned that recording devices often/always fail in the presence of Sasquatches – this is not my observation, it was a statement by a Sasquatch hunter. Amazing how that works. . .

      May 19, 2013 at 11:32 am |
    • mjbrin

      i felt the child probably overheard the story from someone plus a relative or friend may have pointed out the hospital to her long ago.

      May 19, 2013 at 11:43 am |
  7. Scott

    Obviously, the afterlife is real. The "proof" is all around you. There are those who have convinced themselves that death is eternal oblivion. This is the truly absurd notion. They will call you ignorant and blind and a fool, but the truth is inescapable. Our journey continues. Humanity has understood this since our creation. Do not be fooled by the willfully blinded. Keep your eyes and your heart open, because there is an eternal source of love and hope to which, one day, you will return. Something inside each an every one of us KNOWS this to be true.

    May 19, 2013 at 11:21 am |
    • Factoidlover

      Would appreciate some actual proof, rather than a confident statement the proof is all around.

      May 19, 2013 at 11:27 am |
    • EvinAR

      Nah, when you go into a courtroom, you're not allowed to submit "evidence" in quotation marks, so why would you accept "proof" in quotation marks? Science HAS addressed the wonders all around us, with pretty extraordinary claims, which, extraordinarily, human grit and brilliance has proven with extraordinary evidence. We're talking machines that accelerate elementary particles through MAN-MADE means to fractions of a percent below the speed of light.

      I'm going to need more than 'look around you' – because the scientists HAVE looked around them, a whole lot more than you have. Emoting about nature does NOTHING. You don't figure out any of the laws of nature by wondering and then not questioning. Every scientist, even from the religious ones early in western science's history, have had to put their religion aside to answer serious questions about the order of nature.

      Brahe and Kepler, both religious, battling not over what God 'decided to do' but over what the simplest explanation would be. Brahe didn't refute heliocentrism because it refuted the Bible (although this was probably his secret motive) but because it would mean the orb of stars would have to be unimaginably far away... but today we know they ARE unimaginably far away...

      May 19, 2013 at 11:54 am |
    • EvinAR

      Also, when you say 'something we've known to be true since our creation', I would ask that you replace that to be 'something I and the people around me have known since we've been raised in a church our entire lives'. That more adequately explains the reasons for what you believe.

      Thanks,

      EvinAR

      May 19, 2013 at 12:00 pm |
    • Scott

      This life is not a courtroom in which one sides is trying to prove and the other is trying to disprove. For the believers, no proof is necessary and for the skeptic no proof will suffice. Cliche but true. Believe or don't. It is inconsequential to the truth. God is the original scientist and our meager understanding allows us to visualize the brush strokes of his creation. Just don't close your mind to the possibility. Dont harden your heart. God will find you.

      May 19, 2013 at 12:09 pm |
    • EvinAR

      Really? Because I don't fit into that black and white mold you've created – I'm neither 100% believer or 100% skeptic. How could a person possibly function as wholly either?

      If you summoned your God, and I saw him create another universe that I could see, and show me exactly how everything came to be, explained everything, and then completed the theories of Einstein, Heisenberg, Hubble, et al. then I most certainly would become a believer – IN a person who COULD be God.

      Conversely, if somebody 'unrotted', came alive again, and told me that they have never had any experience other than being on this earth, and will continue to never have any experience excepting of earth, I would have proof of no afterlife as soon as I sampled such cases from among those who were rising again from the grave.

      Do you see, now, what reasonability is? You can't reasonably expect either of these things to happen, so you have reasonable doubt about both, and on top of that, you believe in those things for which you DO have that level of proof.

      May 19, 2013 at 12:23 pm |
    • EvinAR

      Also LOL "don't harden your heart". Do you know what hardens hearts? Cholesterol. I'll be sure to not have a high cholesterol, Scott.

      NOTHING comes from your heart except the oxygenated blood from your lungs. Please go back to school and learn what parts of the body do what things... NONE of the things you experience come from the other parts of the body – the things you smell? See? Hear? Are your BRAIN'S interpretations of things that exist as supersensory, not supernatural, phenomena. Your brain is dumbing reality down for you, and your thoughts and emotions are an even dumber thing.

      The way to understanding reality, I hope you realize, is in the universal abstraction of reality, i.e. mathematics. All the beauty and wonder in nature that you see? Is created by your brain. lol It's really JUST mathematical probability. You can still wonder and awe over it, though, without God. It's very satisfying to the complexity of our human intellect, I assure you.

      May 19, 2013 at 12:33 pm |
    • EvinAR

      Putting it bluntly, Scott, math is the only thing that we know which will affect a dolphin similarly to a human, similarly to a rock, to a sponge, to a fern, etc.

      You may look at a flower, and have an emotional response – but what if I do not? What if I hear a symphony and hear something great, and you do not? A dolphin doesn't see or hear the way we do, a bat doesn't, a mole doesn't, snakes don't, insects certainly don't.... so how can you call upon everything you find wonderful about the world and say "THIS IS PROOF!"... well, I say then, as you say about your own experience, that the ONLY thing which EVERYTHING experiences – the mathematical construct of reality – is a sign that there is nothing BUT that. That means NO intervening BEING.

      May 19, 2013 at 12:52 pm |
    • Scott

      I would hope that if a corpse unrottedd in front of you and had something to say that you would be able to conclude that death is relative. That dead does not mean gone forever regardless of what the corpse said. but I get your point. Reasonability is applicable to each and every choice you make. You gather info, you reason, and you make a choice. Some will choose differently based on their individual interpretation of reasonability. You are just refusing to make a choice (or choosing not to choose) Fortunately, we are greater than the sum of the choices we make and your continued existence is not subject to whether you choose to believe or choose to disbelieve or choose to ride the fence. We are here for a reason. I'm just saying that you should keep an open mind. How is it that you would listen to a corpse that came out of the grave, unrotted, and told you there is an afterlife, but you won't listen to a fresh corpse that returned from the dead having been gone for a bit and told you the same thing? here is where you adamantly state these people were not really dead. The ONLY reason you can come up with and one that goes against our scientific understanding of what defines dead (absence of brain wave patterns,etc ie many of these folks met every scientific criteria for death). Why would you just outright refuse to acknowledge what these folks are saying (and the uncanny and statistically impossible similarities among the details of many reported near death experiences). Again, the choice is yours to make. To me, it is a no brainer, but that is just me.

      May 19, 2013 at 1:14 pm |
    • Scott

      "go back to school and learn what body parts do what things" actually, I am a practicing MD anesthesiologist that has a pretty good understanding of what body parts do what. I also have the unique opportunity to occasionally see folks when their pride and hubris has failed them and they are forced to accept the truth they had long ago suppressed. You, like all of us, will be humbled by this same truth.

      May 19, 2013 at 1:30 pm |
    • Really-O?

      @Scott –

      If you practice anesthesiology, I'm guessing your real name is Conrad Murray. Who do you think you're fooling?

      May 19, 2013 at 1:35 pm |
    • Scott

      Conrad Murray was a cardiologist. Haha.

      May 19, 2013 at 1:46 pm |
    • Really-O?

      @Scott – "Conrad Murray was a cardiologist. Haha."

      Yup...you missed the irony...who'da thought?

      So, Scott, if you're an anesthesiologist, how about succinctly explaining the pharmacokinetics of propofol?

      May 19, 2013 at 1:50 pm |
    • Scott

      Propofol (brand name diprivan) is the most commonly used IV inductinon agent in medicine today. I can be given as an infusion at doses of 75-150 mg/kg/minute (not a strict rule) and is useful for light to deep sedation as respiratory depression is lessened at these doses. It is more commonly used for the induction of general anesthesia. Propofol, followed by a dose of either a short acting depolarizing paralytic (succhinylcholine or sux) or a longer acting non-depolarizing paralytic (of which there are several) allows intubation of the trachea with an endotracheal tube. This is then used for the administration of a volatile anesthetic gas for the maintenance of anesthesia during the procedure. These agents include sevoflurance, isoflurane, or desflurane and less commonly halothane. The end tidal concentration of these volatile anesthetics is measured in MAC or minimum alveolar concentration and differes for each gas. sevo 1 mac=1.2, des 1 mac = 6.1, etc. would you like to talk more about the volatile gasses? or perhaps neostigmine, glycopyrrolate, ketamine, ondansetron, ketorolac, lidocaine, ropivicaine, decadron, dopamine, dobutamine, levophed, ephedrine, phenylephrine, or any of the myriad of drugs I give on a daily basis?

      I dont care if you believe a single word I have said. The choice is yours to make. Im just saying that to believe that our current understanding of science has enabled us to rule out the possibility of God's/afterlife's existence is an error of the highest magnitude. It is the result of pride. The prideful will be brought low.

      May 19, 2013 at 2:52 pm |
    • Really-O?

      @Scott –

      I figured I'd check back.

      Nice, copy and paste from several websites. And, of course, you did not detail the drugs pharmacokinetics. I expected no less. I do not claim that "our current understanding of science has enabled us to rule out the possibility of God's/afterlife's existence". What I do claim is that it is obvious you are a liar when you claim to be an "MD" and an "anesthesiologist". Again, you're not fooling anyone.

      BTW – "I would hope that if a corpse unrottedd in front of you" is something no medical doctor, or anyone with a high school diploma, for that matter, would ever post.

      Again – you're not fooling anyone.

      May 19, 2013 at 4:44 pm |
  8. N&W 1000

    You know Colin, I TRIED THAT VERY LINE OF REASONING THE OTHER DAY with a DOLPHIN, then a gorilla; I told them every
    thing you told me, then asked them HOW do we solve world hunger, war, homelessness, etc....

    You know what they told me?

    "ohhh ooohhh ooooh ooooh ooooh....and squesk squeak squeak."

    May 19, 2013 at 11:21 am |
    • Colin

      I have no idea of the point you are trying to make.

      May 19, 2013 at 11:25 am |
    • Over-the-Moon

      Oh and your god made a woman from a man's rib! LOL- keep believing that!

      May 19, 2013 at 11:25 am |
    • .

      Troll.

      May 19, 2013 at 11:25 am |
    • Colin

      So, do you still think evolutionists believe we evolved from monkeys, or have we at least dispelled that garbage from your head?

      May 19, 2013 at 11:26 am |
    • EvinAR

      You mean, you asked a dolphin and a gorilla how to solve problems created by human flawed belief systems?

      No wonder they didn't give a sh**.

      May 19, 2013 at 12:03 pm |
  9. zeus_z

    Beautifule article- as a Christian that is fallen, and broken and seek Gods forgiveness daily it brings a warm feeling to my heart. This especially should be higlighted- that i found very important in the reading

    “I realized very strongly that God loves all of God’s children,” he said. “Any religion that claims to be the true one and the rest of them are wrong is wrong.”

    May 19, 2013 at 11:20 am |
  10. birdseye

    There is a method in this world and everything is not perfectly random. But no one should be forced to believe in the idea of another man's god. That's how you know that something is false, when you get forced or indoctrinated into something that you didn't come to figure out based on evidences. Being spiritual and not religious is the most scientific approach to the unknown. There is nothing positive or negative about good and bad. Everyone has a role to play in this world, some bad, others good. That's the story of life. It does not make one higher or lower..at the end of the day the king and the pawn go back into the same box. As for afterlife..there is no afterlife in the sense that life is not created or destroyed, it just takes different forms at different times. So you could take consciousness as bacteria after life as a human.

    May 19, 2013 at 11:19 am |
  11. 086wpd

    i believe. nuff said. case closed. 🙂

    May 19, 2013 at 11:18 am |
    • Colin

      YEs, that sums up bicely the simple brain of many believers. As Sagan once said, "The believers mind is like an iris, the more light you shine on it, the more it will withdraw and contract."

      May 19, 2013 at 11:21 am |
    • 086wpd

      Colin – so, what – you are spiritually dead because there is no "proof" of an afterlife ? is that yer best shot ? see you in heaven/afterlife . B|

      May 19, 2013 at 11:33 am |
    • Factoidlover

      What do you say to those who don't believe, nuff said?

      May 19, 2013 at 11:45 am |
    • JD

      Colin, the simple minded people are the ones with a closed mind because they are afraid of leaning anything new or that they might be wrong in their beliefs.

      May 19, 2013 at 11:46 am |
  12. Dood

    I have a science background and education. Yet, from the very great to very small, I don't believe that things like time and space just "come about" without some intelligent designer. It makes no sense to me. Our existence can't be proven, but can certainly be suggested and point to, a designer. Even physicists talk of alternate universes and dimensions. That, to me says not only do we not know 100% of what we see and experience, but also know very little of what we can't see or experience. To not recognize this would be intellectually dishonest, IMO. Given that, to say that there is no God is foolish because one really doesn't know.

    May 19, 2013 at 11:18 am |
    • HotAirAce

      True, we really don't know, but I will take Dawkins, Hawking and Krauss explanations over The Babble. "We don't know" is a far superior answer than "some yet to be proven god did it."

      May 19, 2013 at 11:25 am |
    • jd

      i agree with you. while i do not attend church, and have a hard time excepting that there is a god (because i tend to be a logical see-to-believe-type of person), nobody really knows. big bang theory, is just that. a theory. i just go through life and respect everyones beliefs. i think non-believers could repect believers a little more. its arrogant to act like you know, when you dont know anything at all.

      May 19, 2013 at 11:28 am |
  13. Gypsy

    A death experiences is NOT death. Case closed.

    May 19, 2013 at 11:15 am |
    • Gypsy

      A near death is experience is NOT death. Case closed.

      May 19, 2013 at 11:17 am |
  14. N&W 1000

    Oh, the wonders and joy of ATHEISM!

    1. I came from a money who has not made a nickle's worth of progress in a thousand years;

    2. I have NO hope in this present world, nothing to live for outside my miserable self;

    3. I have no hope for the future, just back to oblivion, dust, or turning into a dog or cat or bug or whatever.

    Wow atheism sure is intellectual.

    May 19, 2013 at 11:15 am |
    • Gypsy

      Clearly, you don't know what atheists "believe" and you have no understanding of evolution. MONEY? Really?

      May 19, 2013 at 11:19 am |
    • Colin

      I know of no evolutionary biologist wh thinks man "came from a monkey" That would be as silly as a talking snake.

      There is actually a rich, diverse, temporally consistent and vast array of hominid fossils we have acquired over the last170 years. We have found thousands upon thousands of hominid fossils in Ethiopia, Chad, Tanzania, South Africa, Croatia, Isreal, Germany, France, Spain, Portugal, Russia, Moldovia, the Ukraine, Java, China, the Phillipines, Iraq, Pakistan and Iran. They tell an interesting tale and show the gradual evolution in "humanness" including bipedalism, tool use, and brain capacity.

      The last common ancestor of man and chimpanzees lived about 6 million years ago in Africa. Around that time, there was a branching in the evolution of the species and any intermediate species between this last common ancestor and modern man (Ho.mo sapiens) is called a hominid.

      A number of different species of hominids have been identified. Beginning, roughly with the oldest to the newest, these are –
      Sahelanthropus tchadensis
      Australopithecus afarenses
      Australopithecus africanus
      Ho.mo habilus
      Ho.mo ergaster
      Ho.mo erectus
      Ho.mo heidelbergensis
      Ho.mo neanderthalis (Neanderthal man)
      Ho.mo foresiensis
      And us, Ho.mo sapiens.

      The ages of the respective fossils suggest that our immediate ancestor was Ho.mo Erectus and that Ho.mo heidelbergensis, Ho.mo neanderthalis (Neanderthal man) and Ho.mo floresiensis all went extinct. That is to say, they were not in our lineage, they were our “cousins” although some interbreeding may have occurred.

      The above is an over-simplification, omits many other intermediate species and is not without controversy in some areas, but is a useful yardstick to gauge how humans evolved from the last common ancestor we shared with the great apes.

      sorry buddy, it is a little more complex than Adam begat Seth, Seth begat Enoch, Enoch begat ......etc

      May 19, 2013 at 11:20 am |
    • HotAirAce

      None of your claims are true. They are just ignorant statements by a delusional believer trying to frame atheism to support their own delusions.

      Thanks for demonstrating that religion is particularly appealing to idiots.

      May 19, 2013 at 11:21 am |
    • .

      Troll.

      May 19, 2013 at 11:21 am |
    • N&W 1000

      Gypsy, when I evolved, I forgot my glasses; and, I think you know I meant monkey, so why be disingenuous?

      May 19, 2013 at 11:22 am |
    • I Am God

      Only a clueless troll like you would be blind to reality.

      May 19, 2013 at 11:23 am |
    • N&W 1000

      Again, falling back on name calling; as if TROLLS that live under bridges and scare little billy goats are not people too; LITTLE PEOPLE have rights too.

      May 19, 2013 at 11:23 am |
    • I Am God

      N&W you are just looking for a fight and that is it. You know most of your comments are just dumb rhetoric that you try to use to get into a fight with someone who is an Atheist. Pointless to debate clueless people like you and since you look to fight with people online, well, then you are just a cowardly troll.

      May 19, 2013 at 11:26 am |
    • Saraswati

      "1. I came from a money who has not made a nickle's worth of progress in a thousand years;"

      Do you think this sentence means something in English? Just wondering.

      "2. I have NO hope in this present world, nothing to live for outside my miserable self;"

      Atheists work for global change and a better society all the time. Atheists live for their children, helping the poor, protecting other animals and bringing about global peace and progress. I suggest you google atheist philanthropists and look at the research indicating that when purely religious donations are not considered, atheists give more than religious people.

      "3. I have no hope for the future, just back to oblivion, dust, or turning into a dog or cat or bug or whatever."

      OK, this one is kind of weird, but at least you acknoledge that atheists (who just don't believe in gods) do sometimes believe in supernatural ideas that don't involve gods. Kudos on that...even some atheists don't get it. That said, many atheists who believe death is the "end" look at it quite differently. Many would say Christians don't appreciate the moments of life because all they think about is the post-death future, and then since it is likely nothing, they don't get that either, so an atheist enjoing today is better off. Others still don't look at time as you do and believe every moment of life will be lived, in a sense, foever.

      As for those who believe in reincarnation you assume they only believe in being reborn as something lower, like a cat or bug. Many, however, believe they might be reincarnated as higher level humans or beings with which we aren't familiar...or that they will one day be part of a great global consciousness.

      I think your difficulty is that you have been exposed to very few ideas so your ideas about what others actually believe are far to narrow and inaccurate. Consider taking a few years to read and explore the world and then manybe look at these opinions again.

      May 19, 2013 at 11:28 am |
    • D

      Atheism is simply the lack of belief in any god. It has nothing to do with accepting the theory of evolution, or any of the other things you mentioned. But since you brought them up. evolution does not assert that humans came from monkeys. You might want to learn the basics of evolution.

      Why is it that you assume that if someone does not believe in your god that their life is miserable? That is a silly position to take.

      May 19, 2013 at 11:28 am |
    • Gypsy

      N&W1000 – Sorry your god screwed up when he made you, thus requiring glasses. Great designer that god of yours is.

      May 19, 2013 at 11:38 am |
  15. Steve

    The spirit world is far beyond our comprehension – and yes it exists – but not like the way religion says it does. The notion of "only Christians go to heaven" is a complete joke. First off – everyone will go to spirit world no matter what they believed – they could be atheists – they will still go on. Religion is a man made concept and bible has been modified by man to further their cause. Lastly - as Eben pointed out - his brain was in a dead state and could not product conscionous - therefore his and millions of others whom have glimances of spirit world – its real. It's not a brain fart because the brain is scared of dying - that is a stupid as saying only Christians go to heaven

    May 19, 2013 at 11:14 am |
    • D

      If it is beyond comprehension, how can you know it exists?

      May 19, 2013 at 12:09 pm |
  16. Reality

    See p. 4 of the comments for a review of the Cons of Christianity and Other Religions.

    May 19, 2013 at 11:13 am |
  17. N&W 1000

    NONE of you atheists will answer the simple question I put to you.

    Surely, with all your BRIGHTS as Mr. Dawkins, who is the smartest, most enlightened, most learned, bright light in the world, because he told us, could help you with this?

    May 19, 2013 at 11:12 am |
    • Secular Humanist from Ohio

      Go to a museum of natural history.

      May 19, 2013 at 11:13 am |
    • Colin

      I answered it, and so did a few others (see page 6). To repeat "But animals can form conceptual ideas. They love and protect their offspring, many have social organization, many can use basic tools, many have language and many can experience sensory input that we cannot.

      We do have more developed neocortexes than any animal, but so what. We share 98.4% of our DNA with chimpanzees and about 97.9% with gorillas."

      May 19, 2013 at 11:17 am |
    • Reality

      In support of Dawkins et al:

      o Think infinity and recycling with the Big Bang expansion followed by the shrinking reversal called the Gib Gnab and recycling back to the Big Bang repeating the process on and on forever. Human life and Earth are simply a minute part of this cha-otic, sto-cha-stic, expanding, shrinking process disappearing in five billion years with the burn out of the Sun and maybe returning in another five billion years with different life forms but still subject to the va-ga-ries of its local star.

      What we do know: (from the fields of astrophysics, biology, biochemistry, archeology, nuclear physics, geology and the history of religion)

      1. The Sun will burn out in 3-5 billion years so we have a time frame.

      2. Asteroids continue to circle us in the nearby asteroid belt.

      3. One wayward rock and it is all over in a blast of permanent winter.

      4. There are enough nuclear weapons to do the same job.

      5. Most contemporary NT exegetes do not believe in the Second Coming so apparently there is no concern about JC coming back on an asteroid or cloud of raptors/rapture.

      6. All stars will eventually extinguish as there is a limit to the amount of hydrogen in the universe. When this happens (100 trillion years?), the universe will go dark. If it does not collapse and recycle, the universe will end.

      7. Super, dormant volcanoes off the coast of Africa and under Yellowstone Park could explode cataclysmically at any time ending life on Earth.
      8. Many of us are part Neanderthal and/or Denisovan.

      Bottom line: our apocalypse will start between now and 3-5 billion CE. The universe apocalypse, 100 trillion years?

      May 19, 2013 at 11:17 am |
  18. One one

    Some of Jesus teachings are absurd. Take "love your enemies" for instance. First of all NOBODY actually does that. However some may lie and pretend they do. Second, that seems like a good way to get harmed or killed. Christians insist we are a Christian nation. Then why do we have the biggest military in the world ? If we follow that teaching, we should be sending care packages instead of drones.

    May 19, 2013 at 11:12 am |
    • Poopnoodle

      Love your enemy's as in dont go looking for a fight dude. And plus the military should be used for defense and humanitarian aid only and here lately as in the past ten years or so I think we have waned in being a christian nation. Just sayin duder.

      May 19, 2013 at 11:44 am |
  19. everybodyshouldbeagnostic

    Why do we as humans have such a big ego as to think we actually know what takes place after death, if anything even happens at all...we are not as important as we make ourselves out to be in this vast universe...our life holds no great importance in the grand scheme of things

    May 19, 2013 at 11:11 am |
  20. N&W 1000

    The really sad part is, people like "Religion" are quite frankly dishonest people.

    This is what I mean when I say most atheists and evolutionists have no earthly idea what they are talking about, they get 2nd or 3rd hand information, never go to the source themselves, and are thereby clueless.

    and they can't answer a question...still waiting...

    May 19, 2013 at 11:09 am |
    • Colin

      I have a few outstanding Qs to you. When did the dinosaurs die out? How could aboriginals have been in Australia for 60,000 years if Adam and Eve lived 6,000 years ago? How could all of the Americas be covered with indigenous people by 10,000 years ago if Adam and Eve lived 6,000 years ago?

      What is a ho.minid in your view of the world and why have the follwing been found in Africa if man did not evolve?
      roughly with the oldest to the newest, these are –
      Sahelanthropus tchadensis
      Australopithecus afarenses
      Australopithecus africanus
      Ho.mo habilus
      Ho.mo ergaster
      Ho.mo erectus
      Ho.mo heidelbergensis
      Ho.mo neanderthalis (Neanderthal man)
      Ho.mo foresiensis
      And us, Ho.mo sapiens.

      May 19, 2013 at 11:13 am |
    • One one

      So, How do you go from not fully understanding the origin of life
      the belief that a cosmic Jewish zombie who is his own father can make you live forever if you symbolically eat his flesh and telepathically tell him you accept him as your master, so he can remove an evil force from your soul that is present in all humanity because a rib-woman was convinced to eat from a magical tree by an infinitely sadistic being disguised as a talking snake with legs ?

      May 19, 2013 at 11:14 am |
    • Poopnoodle

      Ok Collin first off your times are a little off there, it dosent specify exactly when anything really before Jesus happened. Even then we don't know when that was exactly, and second simply because the bible makes no reference of dinosaurs specifically. You act as if Christians do not believe they were real and now thirdly and I hope you are following me here cause it can get kinda difficult to cut through ignorance. But how come we cannot find the link to what we evolved from ? I'm just saying every other species on this planet can fond that but we as the human race cannot why do you think that is ? So why dp you have to come on here and post something against someone like that simply because they believe in something different than you? It's just rude.

      May 19, 2013 at 11:28 am |
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62
Advertisement
About this blog

The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.