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June 14th, 2013
04:05 PM ET

Superman: Flying to a church near you

By Eric Marrapodi, Co-Editor CNN Belief Blog

Baltimore, Maryland (CNN) - As the new Superman movie takes flight this weekend, filmmakers are hoping the Man of Steel lands not only in theaters, but also in pulpits.

Warner Bros. Studios is aggressively marketing "Man of Steel" to Christian pastors, inviting them to early screenings, creating Father’s Day discussion guides and producing special film trailers that focus on the faith-friendly angles of the movie.

The movie studio even asked a theologian to provide sermon notes for pastors who want to preach about Superman on Sunday. Titled “Jesus: The Original Superhero,” the notes run nine pages.

“How might the story of Superman awaken our passion for the greatest hero who ever lived and died and rose again?” the sermon notes ask.

(Disclaimer: CNN, like Warner Bros., is owned by Time Warner.)

Similar campaigns to corral the country's large number of Christians into the movie theater have been used for "Les Miserables," "Soul Surfer" and "The Blind Side," all of which had at least some faith angle.

Baltimore pastor Quentin Scott is among dozens of ministers who received an e-mail invitation from Grace Hill Media, a Hollywood-based Christian marketing firm, to an early screening of “Man of Steel.”

“There was an actual push to say `We’re putting out something that speaks to your group,' ” said Scott, one of the pastors of Shiloh Christian Community Church in Baltimore.

At first, Scott said, he didn’t buy the religious pitch. Then he decided to attend a free midweek screening in Baltimore.

“When I sat and listened to the movie I actually saw it was the story of Christ, and the love of God was weaved into the story," said the pastor.

"It was something I was very excited about that with the consultation of our senior pastor, we could use in our congregation.”

CNN Entertainment: 'Man of Steel' director Zack Snyder on Superman's Christ-like parallels

Grace Hill’s sermon notes are specially designed for churches like Shiloh that integrate multimedia into their services.

“Let’s take a look at the trailer for `Man of Steel,’” the notes suggest after briefly introducing the movie’s history and themes.

The man behind the notes, Pepperdine University professor Craig Detweiler, has prepared similar material for films like 2009’s "The Blind Side" and "The Book of Eli" from 2010.

The spiritual themes in “Man of Steel” are abundant, Detweiler said, and his notes enable Christians to thoughtfully engage with pop culture instead of shunning it.

“All too often, religious communities have been defined by what they're against. With a movie like `Man of Steel,’ this is a chance to celebrate a movie that affirms faith, sacrifice and service,” Detweiler said.

It will be hard for even casual Christians to miss the messianic metaphors in "Man of Steel.”

The movie focuses on the origins of Superman, who was sent from the planet Krypton as an infant to save his species.

He is raised by surrogate parents who help him grapple with his special powers, even though they don’t fully understand the source of his extraordinary abilities.

When he turns 33, Superman must willingly sacrifice himself to save the human race.

Sound familiar?

If that’s not enough, as a boy Clark Kent is shown wrestling with his superpowers, and asks his earthly dad, Jonathan Kent, “Did God do this to me?”

“Somewhere out there you have another father and he sent you here for a reason,” says Jonathan Kent.

Even the visuals hammer home the messianic motifs.

During a fight with his archenemy, General Zod, Superman plunges down to Earth, his arms outstretched as if he were being crucified. Of course, he rises again.

Detweiler writes in the sermon notes, “What Jesus and Superman both give us, through their `hero’ actions but also their `human’ actions – is hope.”

“I think it’s a very good thing that Hollywood is paying attention to the Christian marketplace,” said Ted Baehr, who runs Movieguide, a website that reviews family friendly films from a Christian perspective.

“Where it gets sticky is when they try to manipulate the market and when Christians try to manipulate Hollywood. But here I think we have the right balance.”

But other Christians are heaving a supersized sigh at the movie marketing.

"Any pastor who thinks using `Man of Steel Ministry Resources' is a good Sunday morning strategy must have no concept of how high the stakes are, or very little confidence in the power of God’s word and God’s spirit," writes P.J. Wenzel, a deacon and Sunday School teacher at Dublin Baptist Church in Ohio.

"As they entertain their congregants with material pumped out from Hollywood’s sewers, lives are kept in bondage, and people’s souls are neglected," according to Wenzel, who said he was e-mailed information about the movie.

Scott, the Baltimore pastor, said he knows that Warner Bros. Studios has a financial incentive in pushing the film to pastors.

But he said that’s fine with him. “They’re using us but in fact we’re using them,” he said.

His church won't show clips from the movie this weekend because it had already planned out its service. But he plans to use them later, during meetings with the church’s men’s group.

“If you give me another opportunity to talk to someone about Jesus Christ, and I can do that because of your movie, that’s a win for me, because it is about spreading the Gospel.”

CNN's Erin McPike contributed to this report.

- CNN Belief Blog Co-Editor

Filed under: Belief • Celebrity • Christianity • Church • Entertainment • Media • Movies

soundoff (6,545 Responses)
  1. Atheism is not healthy for children and other living things

    Prayer changes things .

    June 16, 2013 at 1:14 pm |
    • Attack of the 50 Foot Magical Underwear

      I've been praying that you change your retarded comment. Hasn't worked so far.

      June 16, 2013 at 1:59 pm |
  2. lol??

    Again, I'll take bronze knuckles over tingling brass knuckles any day of the week.

    June 16, 2013 at 1:11 pm |
  3. el flaco

    I hope he removes this comment too.

    June 16, 2013 at 1:11 pm |
  4. muslim2012

    [youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PWhPSk5pfHg&w=640&h=390]

    June 16, 2013 at 1:07 pm |
    • lol??

      55 minutes?? you're too hopeful.

      June 16, 2013 at 1:13 pm |
  5. meh...

    Be careful what you wish for. (Remember, this is CNN!)

    June 16, 2013 at 1:06 pm |
  6. Jg

    Maybe the S stands for Satan

    June 16, 2013 at 1:06 pm |
  7. Birdyboyz

    Now, let me get this straight...Mary had a child from the Father who was called Jesus...the son...who is also...the ...Father ...who was crucified and then...became a ...ghost...who was the son...who went to Heaven to meet the Father ...who is also the son/Father/same person ...and also ...a ...ghost???!!!!!!!

    June 16, 2013 at 1:05 pm |
    • Vic

      http://religion.blogs.cnn.com/2013/05/11/my-take-gay-christian-is-not-an-oxymoron/comment-page-6/#comment-2338237

      June 16, 2013 at 1:09 pm |
    • Jase

      You're out of your mind if you think people are going to look up what you said previously, Vic ~ just repeat you argument, or don't answer.

      June 16, 2013 at 1:18 pm |
    • Ken

      Vic thinks that his wisdom is sooo impressive that he can't personally be bothered with doing that. Ego much, Vic?

      June 16, 2013 at 1:21 pm |
    • Mick

      Maybe that's what inspired "I'm my Own Grandpa".

      June 16, 2013 at 1:45 pm |
  8. meh...

    What's the big deal? Fictional works often barrow ideas from other fictional works. (Its not like the late Bronze Age – early Iron Age authors are going to take anyone to court...)

    June 16, 2013 at 1:02 pm |
    • Peter

      Look up Joseph Campbell's Hero Cycle of archetypical elements to all classic hero tales. Jesus scores about as high as Luke Skywalker and Superman. Just good storytelling.

      June 16, 2013 at 1:27 pm |
  9. tallulah13

    Any attention is good attention to trolls. They are just that pathetic.

    June 16, 2013 at 1:00 pm |
  10. Nicodemus Grumpschmidt

    lol//,

    You still here? Aren't you tired of the abuse and being taken to the cleaners on every last one of your lame responses? Admit it, you can't keep up here. On your behalf, however, I do find your ill-conceived comments very entertaining. Did I get your ire up? Good! Can't wait for your response.

    June 16, 2013 at 12:58 pm |
  11. lol??

    Time Warner is a cheap tipper, too. The rich are like that. Ask any waitress or waiter, err wait person about it.

    June 16, 2013 at 12:57 pm |
  12. Jase

    It's apparent someone knocked you upside the head with something, lol??.

    June 16, 2013 at 12:55 pm |
  13. Vic

    Christians in Show Biz list:

    http://www.adherents.com/largecom/fam_christian.html

    June 16, 2013 at 12:53 pm |
    • Doobs

      So? Are we supposed to be convinced because Mr. T is a christian?

      June 16, 2013 at 12:57 pm |
    • Vic

      & the list goes on and on and on ...

      http://www.hollywoodinvestigator.com/2002/christian.htm

      June 16, 2013 at 1:02 pm |
    • devin

      If by "reason and proof," you meann quantifiable and observable data, and that is your only criteria, then obviously you will remain in your unbelief. In case you didn't grasp the concept, there is an added element that comes into play here, it's called faith.

      June 16, 2013 at 1:02 pm |
    • tallulah13

      You seem to be heavily influenced by the actions of others, Vic.

      June 16, 2013 at 1:07 pm |
    • Peter

      devin
      "Faith" is also something that every person who was ever swindled by a con man had as well, and look where it got them!

      June 16, 2013 at 1:08 pm |
    • Jase

      I am unimpressed by the argument that people who make their living by pretending to be other people is somehow compelling, Vic.

      June 16, 2013 at 1:08 pm |
    • Wendy

      A just over a hundred years ago, acting was seen as a sinful occupation because it depended upon deceiving other people. Read Ann of Green Gables; there is a cute scene where the girls acted in secret and worried about their souls.

      June 16, 2013 at 1:12 pm |
    • devin

      Peter

      Perhaps that is true, it is ,however, irrelevant to the discussion of faith in a God who has created us.

      June 16, 2013 at 1:12 pm |
    • Doobs

      And I'm positive that all of these "celebrities'" are practicing christians who attend church every Wednesday night and twice on Sundays, don't smoke, drink alcohol, listen to anything but religious music, never curse, and would never, ever say that they are a christian to make them more family friendly.

      Aren't you supposed to stay away from the Babylon Hollywood and all their minions of satan? Why are you using them to promote your cause?

      June 16, 2013 at 1:16 pm |
    • Wendy

      Vic
      Really, who cares what Hollywood types have to say about anything? I include the atheists as well. Some of them say some funny things in their stand up acts, but not many of them have presented any arguments that were at all compelling. And then there's Kirk Cameron. An emptier-headed former child star I have yet to encounter.

      June 16, 2013 at 1:16 pm |
    • devin

      Pizzo

      Nope, didn't say that. What I did say is that if quantifiable and observable data is your ONLY criteria... You see, words have meaning, make sure you read precisely.

      June 16, 2013 at 1:17 pm |
    • Peter

      devin
      It's the exact same placing of trust in things "unseen" between Christianity and any Ponzi scheme promise of huge returns. I'm sad that you can't see that.

      June 16, 2013 at 1:19 pm |
    • devin

      Peter

      And I'm sad that you are unable to see the difference between the two. Apples and oranges my friend.

      June 16, 2013 at 1:22 pm |
    • Vic

      http://religion.blogs.cnn.com/2013/05/16/end-times-for-doomsday-linked-radio-network/comment-page-1/#comment-2343757

      June 16, 2013 at 1:22 pm |
    • The real Tom

      Vicky, nobody cares what was posted even 20 minutes ago.

      June 16, 2013 at 1:25 pm |
    • Secular Humanist from Ohio

      I could just as easily come up with a list of atheist celebrities. So what?

      June 16, 2013 at 1:26 pm |
    • Peter

      devin
      It's apples and apples, unless you want to somehow argue that religious frauds, cults, and false religions don't exist? If you want to claim that your faith doesn't fall into this category, then it's up to you to prove that. Can you?

      June 16, 2013 at 1:30 pm |
    • devin

      Peter

      Actually, I have no desire or need to prove a negative. You created this analogy that has no bearing on my faith. I believe in a being who exists outside our natural order who has both caused us to be and who has created this universe. This faith has absolutely nothing to do with the reality of con artists.

      June 16, 2013 at 1:42 pm |
    • Peter

      devin
      Again, I'm sorry to hear that you can't see how your faith isn't different from any other. None could be "proven" any more than yours. It's like claims of inventing perpetual motion machines: with so many failures, please don't bother us unless you have a working model.

      Christianity has had more than it's share of con artists, or have you forgotten Peter Popoff and Jim Bakker?

      June 16, 2013 at 1:54 pm |
    • devin

      Peter

      This is the last time I will beat this dead horse. You seem obsessed with making a correlation between Christianity and con artists. As I previously mentioned, the fact that there are those who use faith to serve their own purposes, I would include 99 % of TV preachers/charlatans in this category, has no bearing on the truthfulness of the Christian faith. Now with respect to faith, if you are seeking something that you can verify and quantify in a test tube, then you would do well to remain in your unbelief. The writer of the book of Hebrews in the bible gives the most concise definition of faith: " Faith is the substance of things hoped for, the evidence of things not seen". We obviously have different takes on what faith is.

      June 16, 2013 at 2:07 pm |
    • Peter

      devin
      I'm not obsessed; it's just an easy correlation to make, is all. You have no proof whatsoever that any of the time, money, and effort believing you put into Christianity will pay off any more than your typical scam. All you have is your hope that it does, and people have lost their entire life savings on the same hope. Faith is not evidence of anything because you can't really know if anything "unseen" is really there at all. How is your faith any different than the assurance some people have of one day being famous, or even winning the lottery? Oh, that's right, some people actually do become famous and win lotteries, unlike your delusion. Sorry, but that's the cold truth.

      June 16, 2013 at 6:30 pm |
    • devin

      Peter

      In the chance you are still lingering.

      No need to be sorry, it may be "cold" but it's not the "truth". What you fail to grasp is that my faith is paying off in the here and now. It is pragmatic not in the next life only, but in the present also. My faith makes me a better person than what I would be had I not embraced it. It helps me love my wife and children unconditionally, it gives me a clear conscience in spite of the sin that has infected me and every other person in this world, it gives me peace knowing that this life with all its toxicity is only a stepping stone to eternal life, it gives me cause to practice kindness, empathy, compassion even to those who would be enemies, and I could go on. I have no problem with you calling all of this a delusion, I hope your unbelief serves you well in the end.

      June 16, 2013 at 10:19 pm |
    • Peter

      devin
      Nice speech, but anyone of another faith can say the exact same thing and I, who have no faith, can claim most of those things as well and be equally, or even more content than you. The key difference seems to be that I don't have to work at being happy like you apparently do, because most of the things that give you angst, like sinning against a god and the afterlife, I don't worry about. Have you connected the dots of where you got these worries to the faith that claims to solve them for you yet?

      June 17, 2013 at 12:04 am |
    • devin

      Peter

      Of course those of other faiths, and perhaps you as well, can make the same claims,but that is irrelevant. I was responding to your false claim that " you have no proof whatsoever that time, money , effort believing in Christianity will payoff. " For me it has paid off, regardless of what you may think works for you.

      You fully misunderstand if you think I need to "work" at being happy. Quite the opposite.

      Actually, I have connected the dots, not to worries but as to why I view the state of humanity in the way I do. The reality of the human condition, combined with the effects of sin in the world, are some of those "proofs" of my faith. Now you may choose to pacify, and perhaps even obliterate your conscience to the fact of your own personal sin, but that does mean it is not present. Sin and its consequences have infected every facet of this earth. To attribute this to evolutionary survival mechanisms or any other natural processes is at best naive and at worst, silly.

      June 17, 2013 at 12:43 am |
    • Observer

      devin,

      Sin is just an abiguous word for doing wrong according to some group of people.

      It's just an opinion, not an absolute. For instance, most societies consider slavery to be a "sin", but not the Bible. In our more enlightened times, we consider discrimination against women and the handicapped, but not the Bible which supports those.

      It's all a matter of opinion.

      June 17, 2013 at 12:53 am |
    • devin

      Observer

      We will just disagree on who determines this concept called sin. Since I'm guessing you're not a theist, it only makes sense for you to simply ascribe it to human origins. I would expect nothing less from a moral relativist. On the other hand, I attribute the defining of sin to a creator God.

      As for your interpretation of the bibles teaching on slavery and the discrimination of women and the handicapped, I find it lacking.

      I will agree that it's " all a matter of opinion." However, the fact that there are varieties of opinions does not necessitate there being no possibility that one particular opinion is right.

      June 17, 2013 at 2:35 am |
    • Peter

      devin
      There's doing things that hurt others and there's "sin", which goes further to include acts in defiance of some deity and its rules. I may do some bad things, and I make every effort to limit those and make amends, but I do not believe that I "sin". Thinking about the feelings of some unknowable super-being requires far too many mental gymnastics for me to even care about making that effort.

      That's the kind of "work" I mentioned is required of you. If you really believe in a supreme intelligence so alien from human understanding that its motivations are beyond us, as apologists insist when we ask about the problem of evil, then you must worry whether or not you are actually following orders correctly and paying the right homage to it. Mess up even a little, like the Hebrews often did in the OT, and you could be in for a world of pain from such an emotional and powerful being. It would be like living under the same roof with the most abusive person imaginable, never knowing when he'll blow. For me, that would take a lot of work trying to appease such a being.

      June 17, 2013 at 8:39 am |
    • devin

      ww

      June 17, 2013 at 8:23 pm |
    • Observer

      Devin,

      "As for your interpretation of the bibles teaching on slavery and the discrimination of women and the handicapped, I find it lacking."

      It is YOUR lack of understanding of the Bible that leaves you lacking.

      The Bible basically says that it's okay to use a rod to break the arms and legs of a female slave and there is NO punishment for it. PATHETICALLY immoral by most standards, but fine to God.

      June 17, 2013 at 8:38 pm |
  14. lol??

    I'll take bronze knuckles over tingling brass knuckles any day of the week.

    June 16, 2013 at 12:53 pm |
  15. frandell

    It is indeed significant and not at all surprising, that most of these posts do not deal with the movie, but instead use the opportunity to reveal deep hatred for GOD, his Son JESUS, and those who belong to Him, Christians. This is not surprising because man, in his natural self, hates GOD. For those of you who scorn and despise the Word Of GOD, the bible, instead of speaking vain words, at least have the intellectual integrity to do the research...... real, serious, honest research...... If you dare!!
    As for the movie, JESUS CHRIST cannot and must not be compared with any earthly, mythical or fictional being. He is way beyond comparison. He is GOD. While mature Christians can perhaps relate to this movie in its proper context, younger Christians can be considerably damaged since their relationship with, and view of GOD is still in early process. In addition, unbelievers, who have already created god in their own image, are further sealed in their unbelief and deception

    June 16, 2013 at 12:53 pm |
    • jungleboo

      Please tell me you are kidding.

      June 16, 2013 at 12:56 pm |
    • Jase

      Well, this is a nice, long post full of supposition and garbage.

      June 16, 2013 at 1:03 pm |
    • Richard Cranium

      frandell
      It is obvious that you have not studied where your bible comes from, the true history of it.

      Also, since when is disagreeing hate? I do not hate your god. I do not hate that which does not exist. I do hate the ignorance that creates gods such as yours.
      God is the product of men's imaginations in answer to his own ignorance. Just exactly the same as every other one of the thousands of gods men have created.

      June 16, 2013 at 1:04 pm |
    • devin

      Capt. D
      If by "reason and proof" you mean quantifiable and observable data, and that is your only criteria,then obviously you will remain in your unbelief. In case you didn't grasp the concept, there is an added element that comes into play here, it's called faith.

      June 16, 2013 at 1:08 pm |
    • tallulah13

      Hey frandell? I don't hate your god. I just don't believe in him. Just like I don't believe in any of the other gods (thousands of them!) that humans have worshiped throughout history. Do you know why I don't believe in gods? Because there is no proof that they exist.

      So please stop making assumptions about why people don't believe in gods. It just makes you look ignorant and hateful.

      June 16, 2013 at 1:12 pm |
    • Jase

      You have faith that it's true...but that doesn't mean it IS true, devin, which is where it starts to get a little bit foggy...

      June 16, 2013 at 1:14 pm |
    • tallulah13

      devin: "Faith" is believing what you want to believe, despite the facts. It's an emotional response, but if facts don't support the belief, then it is not the most honest response.

      June 16, 2013 at 1:17 pm |
    • devin

      tallulah

      That may be your definition of faith, but not mine, which makes your point of no consequence to me.

      June 16, 2013 at 1:20 pm |
    • tallulah13

      I get it devin. You believe what you want to believe, despite the facts. This makes you pretty much like every other believer. How very nice for you.

      June 16, 2013 at 1:26 pm |
    • devin

      talluh

      Please tell me exactly which "facts" you are referring to. Have I missed something? Is there some factual evidence you posses which clearly precludes the possibility of a super natural being who has created the universe and given us life? I really would like to know.

      June 16, 2013 at 1:34 pm |
    • Richard Cranium

      Devin
      The fact is there are no facts about if there are any gods. The fact is there isn't one fact to back up the claim. So , yes, it is possible, but it is also possible that we are inside a giant speck of dust on the pedal of a flower at the end of a trunk owned by an elephant named Horton. Both possibilities, equal PROBABILITIES... until there is some evidence.

      June 16, 2013 at 1:40 pm |
    • devin

      Richard

      We simply disagree. For me, the entire universe, not to mention the vast complexity of life on this earth both on the micro and macro level, SCREAMS that there is a creator who has produced this. Now you may dismiss the super natural, and that's fine, but please don't make silly statements like " equal probabilities" in reference to your speck of dust analogy.

      June 16, 2013 at 1:49 pm |
    • tallulah13

      Devin, did you not say this yourself?

      "If by "reason and proof" you mean quantifiable and observable data, and that is your only criteria,then obviously you will remain in your unbelief. In case you didn't grasp the concept, there is an added element that comes into play here, it's called faith."

      Perhaps I'm mistaken, but I thought that this meant that your faith was enough for you.

      But if you are still curious: The utter lack of evidence for a creator is compelling proof for those willing to be honest with themselves. Humans have invented and worshiped literally thousands of gods. Worship, sacrifice and ceremony have been used as attempts to control and appeal to the unknown and the number of gods worshiped has decreased as the actual causes for natural phenomena have been learned.

      Humans create gods that reflect their own cultural habits and morals. Gods never go where humans don't take them. The same gods never develop simultaneously in unrelated locations. They may be similar, as cultures may be similar, but they are not the same.

      It took the christian god 1500 years to cross the ocean to the New World; he needed humans with ships and navigational ability to take him, and even then it took a near genocide of the indigenous population (by European disease and then by force) in order for christian faith to take root.

      These are just the examples that immediately come to mind.

      When I look at history, I see nothing there to indicate the existence of any god. If you have proof, please provide it. As far as I can tell, your faith is simply believing what you want to believe.

      June 16, 2013 at 2:00 pm |
    • Richard Cranium

      Devin
      My analogy is accurate. Perfectly mathematically accurate. Your beliefs are based on nothing more than what we think MIGHT be possible. Without a shred of evidence to back it up, the probability of one thing over another is equal. Simple logic and math. Don't argue with me...try arguing with the math.
      just because you BELIEVE one thing over another does not change the math. Do you even understand how probabilities are calculated?

      June 16, 2013 at 2:05 pm |
    • Richard Cranium

      Devin
      Not only did you refer to perfect mathematical logic as "silly" , but then you refer to believing in the super natural...You do understand that anything that exists is natural...by definition...also anything that is supernatural can not exist outside of the imagination, because if it existed, it exists naturally ....right? You do understand what the word supernatural means...right?

      June 16, 2013 at 2:11 pm |
    • Attack of the 50 Foot Magical Underwear

      @ Devin: So you look around and interpret it one way – the result of a creator. So? Saying that the universe "screams" creator to you doesn't make it any more likely. Lots of paranoid schizophrenics say they have voices screaming at them – does that make the voices real? Richard's statement that the two scenarios – a creator or a speck of dust – are equally probable IS wrong. At least we know that there are elephants; we know that specks of dust exist; we know that tiny organisms can inhabit tiny places. So, there are analogues in our world to the speck of dust analogy. however, there is NO analogue for an all-powerful, eternal, omniscient creator of everything, Richard's analogy is actually far more probable, based on the evidence we have.

      June 16, 2013 at 2:13 pm |
    • Richard Cranium

      Attack
      You are correct... I hadn't calculated that in...the fact that elephants, flowers and dust all do exist, does increase the probability...except we do not know if they exist outside of what we consider the universe...but you are on to something.

      June 16, 2013 at 2:18 pm |
    • devin

      talluh

      What you fail to comprehend, as is the case with many in the anti-theism crowd, is that my faith in no wise precludes belief in objective truth. There are virtually no factual ( and by factual I mean scientifically proven facts) that are at odds with my faith. You seem to want to create this dichotomy between faith and objective truth, but this is your doing , not mine.

      "As far as I can tell, your faith is simply believing what you want to believe". Well, I can't let this one go. Without heading down a philosophical path, let it suffice for me to say that my faith is unequivocally not something I believe just because I want to. You will not understand the implications of this statement but, the acceptance of a degree of irrationality to my faith has been more than a small struggle.

      June 16, 2013 at 2:21 pm |
    • devin

      Richard

      Yes, silly. You know it and I know it. As much as you try to make it an issue of mathematical probability, you ultimately realize that that is just subterfuge.

      June 16, 2013 at 2:25 pm |
    • tallulah13

      So basically, devin, you believe what you want to believe, but you try to defend it by pretending that there is more to it than that. Okay. That's fairly typical among believers. I just can't figure out why you needed so much effort to say absolutely nothing.

      June 16, 2013 at 2:40 pm |
    • devin

      talluh

      Actually, it's not that I'm saying "absolutely nothing", it's that you are not able to comprehend. Comprehension is a skill somewhat above simple reading. Repeating the mantra " fairly typical among believers" is quite foolish and significantly detracts from your point of view. Just so you know.

      June 16, 2013 at 2:53 pm |
  16. Do the Right Thing

    Superman is fiction. God is fiction. Why not do a little cross-marketing?

    June 16, 2013 at 12:51 pm |
    • Nicodemus Grumpschmidt

      Rim shot to you, Do The Right Thing! Wonderfully put!

      June 16, 2013 at 12:54 pm |
  17. muslim2012

    [youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aTwk7WlBP0M&w=640&h=390]

    June 16, 2013 at 12:46 pm |
    • STFU

      Crow is a Satan's messenger, so Allah is Satan.

      June 16, 2013 at 7:05 pm |
  18. muslim2012

    [youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gWmcT94MU1w&w=640&h=390]

    June 16, 2013 at 12:40 pm |

    • Cats are stupid.

      June 16, 2013 at 12:47 pm |
    • tallulah13

      Actually, that cat was probably dreaming about when his kind was worshiped as gods. That's why he was so cranky when he was woken..

      June 16, 2013 at 12:59 pm |
    • The real Tom

      Cats are smarter than most of the people here, including you.

      June 16, 2013 at 2:06 pm |
  19. Carol

    Bad move, Hollywood. Attempting to align one film with the approval of religious leaders will lead to more being 'required' to be.
    You should have left well enough alone and kept 'their approval' out of it.

    June 16, 2013 at 12:39 pm |
    • lol??

      They were really cheap in their wage offer, too.

      June 16, 2013 at 12:48 pm |
  20. muslim2012

    [youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ONR7YcoQJvk&w=640&h=390]

    June 16, 2013 at 12:38 pm |

    • It is so sad to see so many people mislead by Islam. Sometimes I cry myself.

      June 16, 2013 at 12:51 pm |
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About this blog

The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.