home
RSS
Is Pope Francis the Catholic Princess Diana?
Taking a page from Princess Diana's playbook, Pope Francis has taken the papacy into the streets.
July 14th, 2013
12:25 AM ET

Is Pope Francis the Catholic Princess Diana?

By Eric Marrapodi, CNN Belief Blog Co-Editor

(CNN)–It was a shipwreck of African migrants off the coast of Lampedusa, a small island in the Mediterranean, that spurred Pope Francis into action.

In the past 18 months more than 500 people have died, or gone missing at sea, trying to escape Africa. The world barely noticed.

Standing on Lampedusa on Monday, Francis prayed for the victims and cast a wreath in the water to commemorate the dead. More importantly, he drew attention to the desperate plight of migrants, in his country and around the world.

“We have fallen into a globalization of indifference,” Francis said, as he stood near an altar made from the salvage of shipwrecks.

The pope wore purple – a color that symbolizes penance in Catholicism - and prayed that world leaders who ignored the plight of migrants might be forgiven.

“The fact he wore purple and asking for forgiveness was very powerful,” Christopher M. Bellitto a church historian and Associate Professor at Kean University said.

“This is a guy that socks you in the gut and touches your heart.”

It was his first trip outside of Rome since Argentinian Cardinal Jorge Bergoglio was elected in March as the head of 1.2 billion Catholics worldwide. And it showed how quickly he is learning to shine the megawatt spotlight of his popular papacy on issues dear to his heart.

There are obvious differences between a Catholic pontiff and a princess.

But watching Francis’ first few months in office, it’s hard not to notice that he seems to have taken a page from the late Princess Diana’s playbook.

The Princess of Wales knew where she went, the media followed. Her activism brought global attention to homelessness, HIV/AIDs, and, most prominently, land mines.

Just as Diana ventured far from Buckingham Palace to wrap her arms around landmine victims in Africa and elsewhere, Pope Francis has taken the papacy out of the the Sistine Chapel and into the streets.

Through acts such as embracing a child with cerebral palsy, washing the feet of juvenile delinquents and celebrating Mass on a migrant island, Francis is using the power of his celebrity to bring media attention to dark forgotten corners of the world.

Spiritual life requires more than meditating and reading books, Francis says. Catholics and other people of faith don’t need a “refresher course” to “touch the living God,” he said.

“All we have to do is go out onto the street.”

Taking it to the Streets

On the streets of Lampedusa the pope scaled back on the pomp
to be with the migrants, many of whom were Muslim.

The Rev. Thomas Rosica, a Canadian priest close to the Vatican, said the pope had wanted to go to Lampedusa with just a small group, flying commercial.

“There was a simplicity to this that is not normally given to papal visits.”

But challenging messages come with the pope’s simple style.

While Francis was praying at the harbor, a tweet was sent from his @Pontifex account: “We pray for a heart which will embrace immigrants. God will judge us upon how we have treated the most needy.”

The tweet was a 140-character shot across the bow at global leaders wrestling with immigration, most notably in Europe and the United States, said Rosica.

“I think he was giving a very clear signal to many countries, including the United States, about its outreach to refugees and all the blocks that are put it,” Rosica said. “He’s not just speaking as Jorge Bergoglio; he’s speaking as the leader of the Catholic Church addressing the world.”

The world has taken notice.

Italian Vanity Fair named him “Man of the Year” this month in a cover story calling him “Pope Courage.” In the article, rock star Elton John called Francis “a miracle of humility in a era of vanity.”

John hasn’t been the only non-Catholic to sing the pope’s praises.

“It’s time to admit it; Pope Francis is kind of Awesome,” Stephen Marche, an atheist, wrote in Esquire Magazine’s website last week.

Pilgrims pack St. Peter’s Square when Francis delivers his Sunday speeches. The crowds are noticeably larger than his predecessor Pope Benedict had been drawing. Twice as large, by some accounts in Rome.

Despite his popularity, Francis continues to live in at Casa Santa Marta, the Vatican hotel, instead of the opulent papal apartment. He prefers to drive through St. Peter’s Square to greet the masses in an open-topped Jeep instead of the bulletproof bubble.

Last week he said that priests shouldn’t drive fancy cars. After his speech, Francis visited the Vatican garage to inspect his own fleet, according to The Associated Press.

During Mass on July 3 at Casa Santa Marta Francis explained why he has been so hands-on, so insistent on greeting the disabled, the poor, the refugee, and the prisoner.

"The body of your wounded brother, because he is hungry, because he is thirsty, because he is naked, because it is humiliated, because he is a slave, because he's in jail, because he is in the hospital. Those are the wounds of Jesus today,” he said.

Setting up charities to solve society’s problems is not enough, he said. Catholics and other believers have to get their hands dirty.

“We need to touch the wounds of Jesus, we must caress the wounds of Jesus, we need to bind the wounds of Jesus with tenderness, we have to kiss the wounds of Jesus, and this literally.”

Big preparations for Brazil

World Youth Day, which will be held in Brazil later this month, has the potential to show the full measure of the new pope’s popularity.

Brazil is home to the world’s largest Catholic population, but in the past 10 years the church has been steadily losing ground to evangelical churches.
Could the first Latin-American pope’s homecoming reverse that longterm trend?

Some 60,000 volunteers have signed up to help for the weeklong pilgrimage the week of July 22, 2013.

Events include an opening Mass on Copacabana beach for pilgrims, Catholic DJs spinning records at a beach festival, and a final Mass that is open to the public at a giant field west of the city.

Benjamin Paz Vernal, director of communications for World Youth Day communications said for the week they have ordered 4 million hosts for Holy Communion.

Paz Vernal said site where the final Mass will be held is 2 1/2 times bigger than that of the last World Youth Day in 2011. At that Mass, Spain’s National Police estimated the crowd was 1.5 million people.

The pope will be busy in Brazil: and it’s a typical itinerary for Francis.

He will visit a drug rehabilitation hospital, a Marian shrine, hear confessions from young inmates, and tour a slum in Rio de Janiero that the Vatican notes was “recently pacified.”

But what everyone will be watching is what is not what on the itinerary from a pope who seems to relish improvisation.

“I’ve utterly given up trying to figure out what he’s going to do,” said the Rev. Paddy Gilger a newly ordained Jesuit priest who runs the website “The Jesuit Post.”

In Francis he sees a pope unafraid to push the boundaries and keep his minders – as well as the media - on their toes.

“It’s very Jesuit: whatever it takes,” Gilger said. “He’s unafraid to use any tool he can to share the gospel. If it wasn’t so sincere it’d be very manipulative.”

Back to the clown Masses?

Francis’ style is not without critics, most notably in his approach to worship.

When he first stepped out on the balcony to meet the world as pope, Francis wore a simple iron cross instead of one made from gold. The throne of St. Peter has literally been stripped of its jewels and the brocaded papal cape left with Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI. In its place: a simple white cassock.

“Benedict, in his relatively short papacy of eight years, worked very hard to bring back a lot of things that were identified with Catholicism. With the Vatican it was splendor, it was dignity,” Kenneth Wolfe a writer for traditionalist Catholic publications such as Rorate Caeli.

“Francis is more of a … American Protestant,” he said with a sigh. “Not in beliefs but in demeanor and approach to religion. Dressing as one of the people.”

The pope’s trip to Lampedusa was charitable, Wolfe said, but the Mass there summed up what Wolfe dislikes about Francis.

“The Mass was pretty much a joke. I mean to have an altar made out of a boat, a wooded chalice, a lectern that had a ship’s steering wheel on it and altar girls?” he said. “It resembles the clown Masses of the 1960s. It’s not a serious way to present liturgy.”

After the Second Vatican Council, Latin was dropped from the Masses in favor of local languages, opening the door for a host of new hymns and practices, some of which traditionalists derisively refer to as “clown Masses.”

And, as Wolfe notes, it also opened the door for Masses that featured actual clowns.

“I would be lying if I said I hadn’t seen a little disgruntledness,” Ashley McGuire, a senior fellow with the Catholic Association said about the response to Pope Francis.

But the distaste is limited and mostly concerns matters of liturgy, according to McGuire.

“The overwhelming response has been positive,” she said.

The path forward

When he returns to the Vatican after World Youth Day, the new pope will finally have some down time, the Vatican said.

But Francis still has an ambitious to-do list – and no one expects the 76-year-old to slow down.

In fact, he’s already pledged to reform everything from the Vatican bank to the Curia, the professional staff at the Vatican.

Monsignor Kevin Irwin, a theology professor at the Catholic University of America in Washington, offered some insight into why the pope has been so busy.

“The clock is ticking. He’s got one lung. You’d better do it now.”

- CNN Belief Blog Co-Editor

Filed under: Belief • Catholic Church • Christianity • Pope Francis • Vatican

soundoff (523 Responses)
  1. Bernie

    Lex Orandi, Lex Credendi, Lex Vivendi

    July 14, 2013 at 10:57 am |
    • Reality

      ex Orandi, Lex Credendi, Lex Vivendi. As we Worship, So we Believe, So we Live.

      And in the 21st century:

      Recognizing the flaws, follies and frauds in the foundations of Islam, Judaism and Christianity, the "bowers", kneelers" and
      "pew peasants" are converging these religions into some simple rules of life e.g. Do No Harm.

      No koran, bible, clerics, pope, "divine righted" queens/kings/princes/princesses, nuns, monks, imams, evangelicals, ayatollahs, rabbis, professors of religion or priests needed or desired.

      Ditto for houses of "worthless worship" aka mosques, churches, abbeys, basilicas, cathedrals, temples and synagogues.

      July 14, 2013 at 12:37 pm |
  2. Ralph Lawrence

    Get serious! I think Pope Francis is following a much deeper tradition

    July 14, 2013 at 10:55 am |
  3. KR

    Pope Francis is the best thing that has happened to the Roman Catholic Church in a long time. I am a big fan!

    July 14, 2013 at 10:49 am |
    • JR

      Big fan of child rapists eh? You members of this large pedophile infested cult disgust me.

      July 14, 2013 at 12:09 pm |
    • jazzguitarman

      I'll respect Francis when he kicks Mahoney and the others that didn't protect children out of the church.

      July 14, 2013 at 7:33 pm |
  4. faith

    who was jesus christ?

    any one care to try to answer?

    July 14, 2013 at 10:48 am |
    • Jonah

      Jehovah

      The covenant or proper name of the God of Israel. It denotes the “Unchangeable One,” “the eternal I Am” (Ex. 6:3; Ps. 83:18; Isa. 12:2; 26:4). The original pronunciation of this name has possibly been lost, as the Jews, in reading, never mentioned it but substi tuted one of the other names of God, usually Adonai. Probably it was pronounced Jahveh, or Yahveh. In the KJV, the Jewish custom has been followed, and the name is generally denoted by Lord or God, printed in small capitals.

      Jehovah is the premortal Jesus Christ and came to earth being born of Mary (see Mosiah 3:8; 15:1; 3 Ne. 15:1–5; D&C 110:1–10). Although Ex. 6:3 states that the God of Israel was not known by the name Jehovah before Moses’ time, latter-day revelation tells us otherwise; see JST Ex. 6:3 (Ex. 6:3 note c); Abr. 1:16; 2:8; see also Gen. 22:14.

      July 14, 2013 at 11:35 am |
    • Cpt. Obvious

      Jonah, the question was about bible jesus, not bible god.

      July 14, 2013 at 11:38 am |
    • Jonah

      Cpt, the question was, "who was Jesus Christ". Jesus Christ was Jehoveh, the God of the Old Testament. He organized the world under the direction of Elohim, the father, who is also our father in the spirit, and then was born into the world and was Jesus Christ. He was resurrected after death and lives today in the flesh as our savior and continues to direct his work and his church through the living prophet.

      July 14, 2013 at 11:58 am |
    • james

      well guys the truth is that Jesus never said he was God but the son of God, Jehovah. and said that he had made his name known and would make it known.(see John 17)the whole chapter is him praying to his Father) In the time of the end the good news of God;s Kingdom would be preached in all the earth and only one group that I know of is doing all these things, making his name known and telling people over all the earth about the hope of God's Kingdom. They offer free home Bible studies and you can ask your serious sincere questions at jw.org to learn what the bible really teaches. Take a chance, check it out, what have you got to lose, nothing, and what have you got to gain? Knowledge that leads to eternal life on a paradise earth.

      July 14, 2013 at 3:26 pm |
    • Rodents for Romney

      Jebus was a mythical conflation of a number of messiah figures from around 50BCE to 75 CE. There were many Jebuses, and there is not a shred of evidence the one that Saul of Tarsus, (the founder of Paulianity, which you may know as Christianity) named as the "exalted one" ever really existed. There are no actual details about him in Paul's writings, (the earliest to be written in that cult).
      Yahweh was the 40th son of El Elyon, from the Sumerian pantheon, the Hebrew war god. He was in no way EVER once mistaken for Jebus. The word "Jehovah" has been demonstrated by scholars to be a mistaken translation. Actually the Hebrew tetragramaton, YHWH which we pronounce "Yahweh" was never written out with vowels, so no one can be absolutely sure how it was pronounced.

      July 14, 2013 at 6:53 pm |
    • james

      Wow! quick, someone get the paint thinner away from that little girl.

      July 14, 2013 at 7:14 pm |
    • jazzguitarman

      James, I cannot stop from laughing at someone that starts their post with: well guys the truth is,,,

      How arrogant can you be!

      July 14, 2013 at 7:31 pm |
      • james

        Just stating the facts sir or mam. What are you doing for the education and well being of your fellow humans?

        July 15, 2013 at 8:16 am |
    • Humility

      Hi Faith,

      Our LORD Jesus Christ is the Mesiah, the saving GRACE of our God the Father in Heaven.

      Your brother, one body with the saving Grace, our Lord Jesus Christ.

      December 8, 2013 at 7:35 pm |
  5. faith

    who was jesus christ?

    July 14, 2013 at 10:46 am |
    • Colin

      A First Century apocalyptic Jew whose religious beliefs, from what we can tell, were so different to what Christians believe today that he would not even be considred a Christian.

      July 14, 2013 at 10:49 am |
    • Attack of the 50 Foot Magical Underwear

      Triple "A" shortstop out of the Dominican Republic. Batted .286, was in the Yankees' farm system for a while, never got a call up to the bigs, died in his 40's after choking on a fish bone, wasn't resurrected, still dead.

      July 14, 2013 at 10:50 am |
  6. Tom, Tom, the Other One

    This pope appears to be a man who wants to move people to do the things that ought to be done, maybe even to the extent that he will humble the Church into being less of an opulent boy's club and more of an institution of charity. Wishful thinking: at the summit of his reforms he will announce that God may or may not exist, but should God exist everyone is redeemed (if they need redemption) by doing the things that ought to be done – look after the powerless people in need, bring down the culture of greed that keeps people in that state.

    July 14, 2013 at 10:44 am |
    • faith

      i honestly believe if you will but try, you will be able to find something you don't like about jesus

      July 14, 2013 at 10:50 am |
    • faith

      i honestly believe if you will but try, you will be able to find something you don't like about jesus

      come on, give it a shot. you can do it

      July 14, 2013 at 10:53 am |
    • Attack of the 50 Foot Magical Underwear

      @ Faith: What I don't like about Jesus was that ** spreads arms wide** he was hung like THIS! How's a guy supposed to compete?

      July 14, 2013 at 10:56 am |
    • faith

      Now some of the Jews thought that the destruction of Herod's army came from God, and that very justly, as a punishment of what he did against John, that was called the Baptist: for Herod slew him, who was a good man, and commanded the Jews to exercise virtue, both as to righteousness towards one another, and piety towards God, and so to come to baptism; for that the washing [with water] would be acceptable to him, if they made use of it, not in order to the putting away [or the remission] of some sins [only], but for the purification of the body; supposing still that the soul was thoroughly purified beforehand by righteousness.
      Antiquities of the Jews Chapter 18

      July 14, 2013 at 11:26 am |
    • FYI

      @faith,

      1. What does Josephus account of John the Baptist have to do with anything?

      2. Josephus mentioned Hercules in his writings also... and here's a report from Tacitus:

      "They say that Hercules, too, once visited them; and when going into battle, they sing of him first of all heroes. They have also those songs of theirs, by the recital of which ("baritus," they call it), they rouse their courage, while from the note they augur the result of the approaching conflict. For, as their line shouts, they inspire or feel alarm. It is not so much an articulate sound, as a general cry of valor. They aim chiefly at a harsh note and a confused roar, putting their shields to their mouth, so that, by reverberation, it may swell into a fuller and deeper sound.

      Ulysses also, in all those fabled wanderings of his, is supposed by some to have reached the northern sea and visited German lands, and to have founded and named Asciburgium, a town on the Rhine inhabited to this day. They even add that an altar consecrated by Ulysses and inscribed also with the name of his father Laertes was discovered long ago at this same place, and that certain barrows with monuments upon them bearing Greek inscriptions still exist on the borders of Germany and Raetia. I do not intend to argue either for or against these assertions; each man must accept or reject them as he feels inclined."

      http://www.unrv.com/tacitus/tacitusgermania.php

      July 14, 2013 at 11:48 am |
    • faith

      where is herc mentioned in the new testament?

      July 14, 2013 at 6:57 pm |
  7. marion boiwn

    “The Mass was pretty much a joke. I mean to have an altar made out of a boat, a wooded chalice, a lectern that had a ship’s steering wheel on it and altar girls?” he said. “It resembles the clown Masses of the 1960s. It’s not a serious way to present liturgy.”

    But in the first ever mass, the Last Supper, Jesus sat with his disciples around a simple table in an upper room. I think the Catholic liturgy has alienated ordinary people from the simplicity of His gospel. Jesus was a carpenter, who grilled fish for his disciples on the beach. Would he be turned away if he turned up in his sandals and simple robes?

    July 14, 2013 at 10:43 am |
    • Attack of the 50 Foot Magical Underwear

      Well, perhaps the Bible describes it as such, but then, the Lord of the Rings describes many meals as well. Maybe we should be asking, "What would Frodo do?"

      July 14, 2013 at 10:47 am |
    • Bernie

      Two things come to mind Marion: First, It is unlikely, I think, that Jesus would have celebrated a Passover meal with his friends using anything but the finest table settings available. The Jews of the first century, like any cultural group, trotted out the very best for special occasions. Archeological evidence suggests that they were very conscious of quality and beauty in both their public and domestic liturgies. Likewise, they wore their Sunday best. Anything less than the best quality and most beautiful that could be afforded would have been considered an insult to the Lord. Second, the Catholic and Orthodox Mass is not an reenactment of the Last Supper. That is a Protestant understanding. The Mass is a sacrifice, the sacrifice of Christ made present to us in which the graces of His sacrifice are communicated to us. Yes, there are overtones of a meal, in the Communion and in references to the Heavenly banquet, but it is not just a meal. That would be a incorrect interpretation. It is the sacrifice of Christ to the Father on our behalf to which we join our own lives. The Mass is a special event and so we dress (or should dress) appropriately and we should offer the sacrifice with the best and most beautiful vestments and liturgical objects we can afford. Of course, those things can be our condemnation if we neglect the poor and those most vulnerable, and if we act unjustly towards others.

      July 14, 2013 at 4:01 pm |
    • faith

      It is unlikely, I think, that Jesus would have celebrated a Passover meal with his friends using anything but the finest table settings available.

      the friends of his who left everything to follow him?

      July 14, 2013 at 6:55 pm |
  8. G. W. Bush

    I don't think Diana hated gays for no reason.

    July 14, 2013 at 10:41 am |
    • HotAirAce

      So what was the reason?

      July 14, 2013 at 11:30 am |
  9. Thought Purification

    No. He is a Obama in his first term.

    July 14, 2013 at 10:32 am |
    • Saraswati

      He'll probably get the Nobel Prize.

      (chill out, I voted for Obama. But even he knows that prize was absurd.)

      July 14, 2013 at 10:35 am |
      • jazzguitarman

        Promoting the use of birth control is the best way to help poor people. Less births means less hungry people. Until the RCC promotes birth control they are part of the problem.

        July 14, 2013 at 7:44 pm |
    • R.M. Goodswell

      Obama was hobbled by the Repugnants, who stated theyd make him a 1 term president and the fact that he owed his political success to the same corporate interests as the rest of those clowns on both sides isle – Thank You supreme court for that one .

      The sad fact is the current Pope is the only champion millions of poor and desti tute have in this world. If he can help clean up some of the wreckage left by his church im all for it. Nobody should ever have to wonder where their next meal is coming from and everyone should have a safe place to call home.

      July 14, 2013 at 1:01 pm |
  10. Colin

    Please choose your favorite Catholic superst.ition from those below. For the one you choose, please say why it is any more ridiculous than the rest of the garbage Catholics swallow and give an example of a non-Catholic belief which is just as stupid.

    (a) Grocery store bread and wine becomes the flesh and blood of a dead Jew from 2,000 years ago because a priest does some hocus pocus over it in church of a Sunday morning.

    (b) When I pray for something like “please god help me pass my exam tomorrow,” an invisible being reads my mind and intervenes to alter what would otherwise be the course of history in small ways to meet my request (or "answers my prayers").

    (c) You can pray to a dead person for something. This dead person will then ask God to fulfill your wish. If this happens twice, this dead person becomes a saint.

    (d) A god impregnated a virgin with himself, so he could give birth to himself and then sacrifice himself to himself to negate an “original sin” of a couple we now know never existed.

    July 14, 2013 at 10:26 am |
    • JimK57

      Hi Colin,

      Can you explain the purpose of this post. What to you hope to achieve?
      Thanks.

      July 14, 2013 at 10:30 am |
    • Colin

      To point out some of the absurdities of Catholicism, Jim. It helps open the minds of those who were taught the doctrine before they were old enough to know it is nonsense. Do you disagree with a point I made?

      July 14, 2013 at 10:33 am |
    • Attack of the 50 Foot Magical Underwear

      Umm – to provide examples of the idiocy of religious beliefs?

      July 14, 2013 at 10:34 am |
    • JimK57

      I think you might get better resuts if you do not disrespt their faith. I find when you approach people with respect they are more inclined to listen.

      July 14, 2013 at 10:39 am |
    • Colin

      Maybe Jim. I wish a Catholic would defend their position. All I ever get by way of response, even if I am very polite, is (i) I will burn in hell; (ii) I am arrogant, evil or suffer from some other personality disorder; and/or (iii) I am “Wrong” but no specifics are ever given.

      Catholics seem very, very reluctant to defend their faith and very quick to claim it should be immune to skepticism and scrutiny. Very odd and, quite frankly, intellectually cowardly.

      July 14, 2013 at 10:46 am |
    • Bede

      Actually, all Catholics under go confirmation during high school, so that they understand their faith and arent blindly following it. Maybe you should learn something before you do hateful posts.

      July 14, 2013 at 10:49 am |
    • Colin

      Bede, at age 13 !! Want to REALLY allow them to exercise independent thought, wait until they are 18 or 21 and not fully under their parent's influence.

      July 14, 2013 at 10:52 am |
    • JimK57

      One should never have to "defend" their position, only explain. Remember catholic belief is based on faith which by definition cannot be proven. A great site I use is criticalthinking.org. I think people of all beliefs should take a look. Make sure you check out the definition of critical thinking. I am not a catholic but do believe in a creator.

      July 14, 2013 at 10:53 am |
    • Attack of the 50 Foot Magical Underwear

      @ Bede: how was the original post "hateful"? He's simply pointing to aspects of the Catholic faith which, when examined in the cold light of reason and logic, make as much sense as attributing the existence of everything to the great Banana God Chiquita and her squad of trained invisible squid who do her bidding.

      July 14, 2013 at 10:53 am |
    • Colin

      Jim, two quick questions.

      Who created your creator?

      Why do you believe in a creator?

      July 14, 2013 at 10:55 am |
    • Cpt. Obvious

      Bede, that is a ridiculous statement. Just because certain aspects of their faith are explained to them at certain checkpoints in their lives doesn't mean that youths understand their faith. And I would say that everyone who believes in a god or is a part of a religion is using blind faith. There is no evidence, so blind faith must be employed. There's nothing else one can use regardless of the religion.

      Good opening post, Colin.

      July 14, 2013 at 10:59 am |
    • JimK57

      Who created your creator?

      I do not know.

      Why do you believe in a creator?

      My search started after I had an NDE. Since then I have read everything I could find related to an afterlife. Not just religious text but scientific and sceptical as well. My search still goes on. I consider myself an agnostic-thiest. Can I offer any proof of a creator? No I cannot.

      July 14, 2013 at 11:05 am |
    • Cpt. Obvious

      Jim, I would describe your reasoning as very sensible. You understand the tenuous nature of your position, and it doesn't seem like you want laws to favor your belief system over those who don't believe like you do, and it doesn't seem like you want people who disagree with you to be judged and sentenced to some fiery torture. Many religious people assume that everyone else should presume their religion to be correct and give them and their religious affiliations special treatment under the law, and they think it's some sort of evil for anyone to question their assumptions. Colin's remarks challenge such silly and incorrect assumptions.

      July 14, 2013 at 11:23 am |
    • faith

      (8) These Jews, as they are here called, whose blood Pilate shed on this occasion, may very well be those very Galilean Jews, "whose blood Pilate had mingled with their sacrifices," Luke 13:1, 2; these tumults being usually excited at some of the Jews' great festivals, when they slew abundance of sacrifices, and the Galileans being commonly much more busy in such tumults than those of Judea and Jerusalem, as we learn from the history of Archelaus, Antiq. B. XVII. ch. 9. sect. 3 and ch. 10. sect. 2, 9; though, indeed, Josephus's present copies say not one word of "those eighteen upon whom the tower in Siloam fell, and slew them," which the 4th verse of the same 13th chapter of St. Luke informs us of. But since our gospel teaches us, Luke 23:6, 7, that "when Pilate heard of Galilee, he asked whether Jesus were a Galilean. And as soon as he knew that he belonged to Herod's jurisdiction, he sent him to Herod ;" and ver. 12, "The same day Pilate and Herod were made friends together for before they had been at enmity between themselves;" take the very probable key of this matter in the words of the learned Noldius, de Herod. No. 219: "The cause of the enmity between Herod and Pilate (says he) seems to have been this, that Pilate had intermeddled with the tetrarch's jurisdiction, and had slain some of his Galilean subjects, Luke 13:1; and, as he was willing to correct that error, he sent Christ to Herod at this time."

      July 14, 2013 at 11:41 am |
    • faith

      (8) These Jews, as they are here called, whose blood Pilate shed on this occasion, may very well be those very Galilean Jews, "whose blood Pilate had mingled with their sacrifices," Luke 13:1, 2; these tumults being usually excited at some of the Jews' great festivals, when they slew abundance of sacrifices, and the Galileans being commonly much more busy in such tumults than those of Judea and Jerusalem, as we learn from the history of Archelaus, Antiq. B. XVII. ch. 9. sect. 3 and ch. 10. sect. 2, 9; though, indeed, Josephus's present copies say not one word of "those eighteen upon whom the tower in Siloam fell, and slew them," which the 4th verse of the same 13th chapter of St. Luke informs us of. But since our gospel teaches us, Luke 23:6, 7, that "when Pilate heard of Galilee, he asked whether Jesus were a Galilean. And as soon as he knew that he belonged to Herod's jurisdiction, he sent him to Herod ;" and ver. 12, "The same day Pilate and Herod were made friends together for before they had been at enmity between themselves;" take the very probable key of this matter in the words of the learned Noldius, de Herod. No. 219: "The cause of the enmity between Herod and Pilate (says he) seems to have been this, that Pilate had intermeddled with the tetrarch's jurisdiction, and had slain some of his Galilean subjects, Luke 13:1; and, as he was willing to correct that error, he sent Christ to Herod at this time."

      etc

      July 14, 2013 at 12:30 pm |
    • R.M. Goodswell

      a and d are ties for me....love those two! symbolic cannibalism and rigged S&M scenarios never get old.

      July 14, 2013 at 12:46 pm |
  11. JimK57

    I found the article well written and informative. Thank you Eric.

    July 14, 2013 at 10:21 am |
  12. St Xavier

    The comment SHE'S HOTTER is a shameful remark to say especially about a man of GOD. In this comment the person making it surely doesn't have any respect for such a man of GOD. On the day of judgment for this person he or she better hope his or her judgment about the pontiff will not be held against he or she

    July 14, 2013 at 10:21 am |
    • Saraswati

      I suspect he has a better sense of humor than that.

      July 14, 2013 at 10:22 am |
    • Attack of the 50 Foot Magical Underwear

      @ St. X: I agree – a completely shameful comment. The Pope is WAY hotter than Diana!

      Better?

      July 14, 2013 at 10:32 am |
  13. Jonah

    What a fine example he is setting! We should all be part of the solution and not part of the problem!

    July 14, 2013 at 10:19 am |
  14. Rodents for Romney

    He does have lots of pretty red and blue dresses, but that hat .... ummm, that helmet has to go. She would never had worn a "fish lips" hat from the ancient order of the Fish-god, Dagon's temple. He does have the fashion sense to coordinate his walking sticks though.

    July 14, 2013 at 10:08 am |
  15. Vik100

    Pope Francis is following nobody's steps but Jesus'!!

    July 14, 2013 at 10:06 am |
    • Attack of the 50 Foot Magical Underwear

      Yeah – just hanging with twelve other dudes. No chicks allowed. Just him and 12 sweaty, muscular guys .....

      July 14, 2013 at 10:14 am |
    • Bede

      What about Mary Magdeline?

      July 14, 2013 at 10:54 am |
    • Attack of the 50 Foot Magical Underwear

      @ Faith -the bible got it wrong. It was actually Marty Magdeline, one of the earliest known cross-dressers

      July 14, 2013 at 10:57 am |
  16. kevin

    "Is Pope Francis the Catholic Princess Diana?"–No, she was much hotter.

    July 14, 2013 at 9:59 am |
  17. truthsayer

    Of course the Pope could never be a princess - it is obvious he is a Queen

    July 14, 2013 at 9:35 am |
    • rg500g

      Only if he has a fierce pair of red, peek toe slingbacks in his closet. Oh yes, closet...

      July 14, 2013 at 10:43 am |
  18. Brad Miner

    Must be the most idiotic headline ever. Oh well at least you write: "There are obvious differences between a Catholic pontiff and a princess." Such soaring insight!

    July 14, 2013 at 8:50 am |
    • Vik100

      Agree 100%. CNN is always attacking Catholicism. DIrty journalism.

      July 14, 2013 at 10:12 am |
    • Saraswati

      It's just standard marketing...seriously, chill. Diana was popular and the royals are in the headlines again these days. Anywhere you can stick Diana's name in a headline is added traffic.

      July 14, 2013 at 10:15 am |
  19. Reality

    Is this some kind of joke?

    July 14, 2013 at 8:09 am |
  20. HarryGP

    No

    July 14, 2013 at 7:28 am |
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
Advertisement
About this blog

The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.