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'Mr. Spock goes to church': How one Christian copes with Asperger's syndrome
Brant Hansen, a host on Christian radio, says his Asperger's syndrome once made him feel like an alien at church.
October 19th, 2013
10:28 AM ET

'Mr. Spock goes to church': How one Christian copes with Asperger's syndrome

Opinion by Brant Hansen, special to CNN

(CNN) - In the book “Jim and Caspar Go to Church,” an atheist turns to a Christian minister as they're watching a Sunday morning church service and earnestly asks, "Is this what Jesus told you guys to do?"

I've grown up in churches and I'm a Christian, and I'm right there with the atheist.

I honestly don't get the connection. (To be fair, I've grown up on Earth, too, and there are times that I don't understand any part of this place.)

You see, years ago, I was diagnosed with Asperger's syndrome - and like a lot of "Aspies," sometimes I'm convinced that I've landed on the wrong planet.

For those of you who don't know the medical lingo, Asperger's syndrome is an autism spectrum disorder, but not as severe as what most people think of as autism.

It basically comes down to this: those "normal human" rules for things like eye contact, when to smile, personal distance - we just don't get them.

What's more, Aspies like me don't like those rules. They make no sense to us. So usually, we just say stuff - bluntly - and stare uncomfortably at the ground. That's how we roll.

But it gets even trickier for people of faith like me.

Feeling out of place at work is one thing. Feeling like an alien at church is a whole other matter.

Imagine Mr. Spock at an evangelical Christian tent revival, and you’ll get the idea.

And my father is a pastor, so I was in church a lot.

Multiple times, each week, every week, I found myself wishing I'd be moved by the worship music, or that I could shut off my skeptical mind during the sermons.

I'd see people in church services, Christian concerts and Bible camps overcome by emotion and enraptured with charismatic speakers, and I wondered why I didn't feel that way.

Why did I always feel like a cold observer?

After going to college, I was convinced my lack of feeling meant I was missing something, spiritually, so I joined charismatic Christian groups in which emotional manifestations of the Holy Spirit are common.

I desperately wanted to have what they had - an emotional experience of God's presence - and asked them to pray over me.

It didn't work.

When I didn’t move with the Holy Spirit or speak in tongues, they told me it was because I had rejected God.

I worried that it was the other way around: God had rejected me.

Maybe I felt like an alien because I deserved it. I deserved to be alienated, irretrievably and forever far from God.

I tried to pray, read the Bible, and do all the "right stuff." But I still felt out-of-touch.

I wondered if I was so broken, such a misfit that God simply took a look at me and decided to move on.

I wish I’d known then that I was an Aspie. And that God loves Aspies.

I still feel alienated from many parts of Christian culture, but Jesus himself finally reached me.

And man, did I feel that.

To people who are beaten down or befuddled by religious rules, Jesus offers something that no one else does: rest. "Come to me, all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest," he says.

And he sums up the entirety of complex and confusing religious laws with this: “Love God, and love your neighbor.”

Beautiful. Even children can understand that.

The Bible tells a story about a man who approaches Jesus and admits that he has faith, but also strong doubts.

"Help me in my unbelief," he asks Jesus.

Jesus doesn't blast him. He loves him. To me, Jesus is the only one who really makes any sense.

Oddly enough, considering my medical condition, I'm now a radio personality on a network that plays Christian music.

It’s a beautiful fit, in many ways, because I get to talk to many people who also don’t fit in, and wonder if God loves them.

It’s true, though, others won’t understand me. I know that. I’m still an alien in the American Christian subculture.

Each evening I retreat from it, and I go straight to the Gospels.

It's not out of duty that I read about Jesus; it's a respite.

I long for it, because I'm awash in two strange and baffling cultures, both the irreligious and religious.

And I long for someone I can finally understand, and someone who might finally understand me.

Brant Hansen is a radio host on the Air1 network, where his show airs from 3-7 p.m. CT. He also writes a popular blog at air1.com. The views expressed in this column belong to Hansen. 

- CNN Belief Blog

Filed under: Belief • Bible • Christianity • Church • Faith • Health • Jesus • Opinion • Spirituality

soundoff (3,030 Responses)
  1. RayJacksonMS

    He wouldn't be. There is nothing logical about christianity or the other two arms of the murderous blood god islam or judaism.

    October 20, 2013 at 12:36 am |
    • TiglathPileser

      Really, so "love your neighbor" is not logical?

      October 20, 2013 at 2:07 pm |
      • G to the T

        Partial quotes don't help "Love God and love thy neighbor as thyself..." is a very different proposition from just "Love your neighbor".

        And indeed, when that phrasing was first used in OT we can be pretty sure it only meant "love other jews".

        October 21, 2013 at 3:52 pm |
  2. Matt

    Matt

    I know its a cliche, but why in the world would someone who does not believe in God spend their time reading articles on faith and Jesus? Its because God is trying to reach them. I was in a church parking lot passing out literature to strengthen faith and I saw a Darwin fish on a truck. I am just as much of a wretch as an atheist so I am not going to condem anyone or judge anyone. I do find foul language and personal attacks hideous though. This is a good article because I can identify with the writer. I never much "belonged" anyway, even in Church.

    October 20, 2013 at 12:36 am |
    • G to the T

      I can only speak for myself, but I got my degree in comparative religion and philosphy. I try to keep my hand in and since the bible and christianity have shaped western culture for the better part of 2k years, I'd say you would be a fool not be interested in such things. PS – I am atheist, but was a christian for many years before I lost my faith for the sake of intellectual honesty.

      October 21, 2013 at 3:55 pm |
  3. Sue Moss

    Leonard Nemoy is an Orthodox Jew.

    October 20, 2013 at 12:33 am |
    • Check

      So what? This article is about the fictional character Mr. Spock, not Mr. Nimoy, the actor.

      October 20, 2013 at 1:16 am |
  4. karenjay

    Enjoyed the article. Thank you for your insights.

    October 20, 2013 at 12:33 am |
  5. Sue Moss

    Mr. Nemoy is an Orthodoax Jew.

    October 20, 2013 at 12:33 am |
  6. NOTA

    Star Trek VII: The search for Jesus (good thing they have warp drive given his 2000 year head start)

    October 20, 2013 at 12:29 am |
  7. IpseCogita

    (Releasing inner nerd) Spock was religious. His religion was discussed multiple times in the various incarnations of the series and he had religious symbols in his quarters. Irrelevant to the article really, but I couldn't help it. (Stuffing inner nerd back in the closet)

    October 20, 2013 at 12:25 am |
  8. VOR

    Of course religion is fantasy. But its more than a controlling, influencing device. It's an outlet and a reflection of the mental biology of 'believers'. Psychologists have found that the 'feeling of a presence' etc are a result of a specific brain activity that only occurs in 'believers'. And this activity can be provoked in 'non-believers' through the application of magnetic fields to the brain. If a 'believer' learns that his 'belief' is all in his head, I don't know if that would put things in a different light or not for them. I suppose that would depend on their other factors like their capacity for rational thought and desire to use it. But none of that invalidates the noble and wise edicts of love your fellow beings. You just don't need irrational, illogical religion to do that.

    October 20, 2013 at 12:24 am |
    • IpseCogita

      Almost every human that has ever walked the earth has been a believer. Atheism is a fairly new thing and we are a tiny minority of the current population. You are saying, essentially, that every human except for a very few of the last few centuries has has some sort of brain disorder. Probably not really the way to approach this.

      October 20, 2013 at 12:29 am |
      • TheRationale

        To the contrary, atheism is the oldest yet. It was here before any religion 😉

        October 20, 2013 at 12:31 am |
      • essijay

        I do not think Atheism is an entirely new concept... I think there were cultures that understood enough about science to realize that the sun didn't rise and set solely because a god told it to, seasons didn't change because a god got bored of one temperature, etc. When scientists weren't advanced enough to realize these things were based upon the rotation of the earth and solar system, they rationalized that someone powerful was orchestrating it. Deities, therefore, have always been the way to explain the unexplainable. And, as our culture becomes more aware of science, there are fewer and fewer unexplainable things. It follows that there are more and more Atheists. And, in regards to the previous comment, If there is an unexplainable magnetic weirdness in the brain that only affects some people, why wouldn't we automatically explain it away as "because god" until the time scientists can pinpoint a scientific cause?

        October 20, 2013 at 12:50 am |
        • VOR

          I not a brain scientist. But I know brain activity is electrical (though chemical reactions). All sorts of weird things happen when you start applying various kinds of electricity, or electromagnetic fields, or various regions of the brain. Early research in this are was crude of course, including 'shock therapy'. It's progressing some now, become more refined and specific about exactly what types, magnitudes, duration, and frequencies of electricity applied to exactly what regions of the brain provokes exactly what kind of activity...from sensory 'illusions' to emotional and cognitive ones. But its still in it's infancy. The general purpose I suppose (as traditionally) is to provide relief to those suffering from genuine disorders, in a non-harmful way. The discovery that 'religious experiences' could be provoked in non-religious types was an unintended result, reported by volunteer subjects. It was subsequently repeated. Of course it doesn't prove that believers aren't in fact sensing something out there but it clear demonstrates that such signals can be false and internal. A somewhat related idea and what may also turn out to be relevant is that we do seem to have the ability to 'sense' when someone is watching us...to a degree slightly above chance. Another suggestion is that the mental activity of all humans on the planet, or perhaps your vicinity, create a collective brain energy field that we have some small connection to, some feeling of.

          October 20, 2013 at 1:54 am |
      • VOR

        I don't claim to excel in diplomacy. I don't intend this to sound confrontational- history is no well of rational thought. Quite the contrary. Religious belief is a combination, not just the brain activity but also the culture and tradition of religion. And yes of course they are all quite obviously wrong. It's understandable that religion would arise the way it did at the time it did for the combination of purposes it did. It's also irrational to think that the number of people involved makes their belief the slightest bit more logical or rational. It doesn't. The fact that there were/are so many is inescapably irrelevant. And I'm not exactly characterizing the brain activity as a disorder anymore than to say paranoia is a disorder. It's more an issue of degree, and possible harm. Religious thought is not intrinsically dangerous, but it's sometimes used in very harmful ways. Paranoia is not intrinsically dangerous unless its extreme or allowed to provoke harmful action. Thinking that there are forces out to harm or diminish you is just as common of a feeling. And in some non-believers there may be occasions (mostly likely in younger years) when they may have had a slight feeling of a 'presence'. None of us process our sensory intake in a completely objective or emotionless way. And this brain activity I speak of is likely not an all or nothing thing, but something that is more active is some, less in others. It's the best explanation currently available. So I'm open to a better approach, but I tend to rely on a rational approach. Being rational in this discussion is not popular, or persuasive, with believers. I'm not trying to convert anyone and don't expect to. But I think it's important to pass along the rational view and what it's based on...exactly because I believe striving for more rational thought is a requirement for the (societal, non-genetic) evolution and progress of the human race. And yes we have, thankfully progressed and evolved at least some in the last 2000 years... though there are still plenty of examples of behaviors (that seem to be related at least to some extent to false beliefs) that would argue otherwise.

        October 20, 2013 at 1:27 am |
    • VOR

      Saying it 'only' occurs in believers is probably a bit of an oversimplification, but that the general idea. Please search for these experiments and conclusions. They are relevant, perhaps profoundly so.

      October 20, 2013 at 1:34 am |
  9. Pat Rushing

    Brent, next time post your thoughts on a Christian or religious website – it cuts down the atheist trolling a tad. Not much, but a bit. Remember that whole "pearls before swine" thing.And no, being an atheist doesn't make someone a swine ... but trolling websites and blogs to throw up all your anti-Christian bile all over anyone with faith makes you, officially, a jerk.

    October 20, 2013 at 12:22 am |
    • Jesus Christ Son of God

      Jesus would forgive us, so why won't you?

      October 20, 2013 at 12:23 am |
      • Bange

        The post doesn't not preclude forgiveness.

        October 20, 2013 at 12:45 am |
    • Matt

      I know its a cliche, but why in the world would someone who does not believe in God spend their time reading articles on faith and Jesus? Its because God is trying to reach them. I was in a church parking lot passing out literature to strengthen faith and I saw a Darwin fish on a truck. I am just as much of a wretch as an atheist so I am not going to condem anyone or judge anyone. I do find foul language and personal attacks hideous though. This is a good article because I can identify with the writer. I never much "belonged" anyway, even in Church.

      October 20, 2013 at 12:34 am |
      • G to the T

        Hmmmm... nope. I'm hear because I've studied religion for the better part of 20 years and I like to keep my hand in. Also – I find many people have a very naive view about the bible and it's history so I try to provide insights whenever I can.

        I have no problem with people have different beliefs (I would prefer they do, it's better for humanity as a whole), but once you say you KNOW something exists without sufficient evidence, I wouldn't feel honest with myself if I didn't say something. People who are certain have caused more problems for the rest of us than for any other reason in history.

        October 21, 2013 at 4:00 pm |
    • VOR

      this is a CNN website not a Chistian one. A rational thought process is not anti-Christian bile. Certain religions can have many positive aspects, and some negative ones. But the 'belief' aspects of them are irrational and unfounded. That's not an insult or an attack. It's simple a statement of empirical fact. Belief in something with no evidence to do so is completely irrational. Not believing in something because there is no evidence is rational. Not believing in something that others believe in can be confusing and confrontational. That's why in this case it helps to understand why 'believers' believe...it's because their brains generate enough of a certain kind a brain activity to have them feel as if there is 'something' out there. It's akin to paranoia though not exactly the same since it's not a fear, but a false sense of companionship. Our only companions are likely (according to all evidence so far) our fellow humans. Seek understanding and fellowship in them. Be an example of love and tolerance to them.

      October 20, 2013 at 12:53 am |
  10. Jesus Christ Son of God

    Wait. If Spock is a vulcan, and god is everywhere, then god created him. But didn't he create man in his own image or something? So does god have pointed ears, and why don't we have pointed ears?

    October 20, 2013 at 12:18 am |
    • ClideWarren

      Maybe the pointedness of the vulcans ears represent the variations in which the human body comes in. God could be the basis for the human depiction, but the human depiction comes in various shades, shapes, and figures. Believe what you want to, but do not become the new form of the churches that chased you from their beliefs. If you are atheist, you are atheist for a reason. If you believe in god, you believe in god for a reason. People need to hold true to whatever helps them through every day.

      October 20, 2013 at 12:43 am |
    • G to the T

      Geek mode engaged – In the Star Trek continuity, there was an ancient alien race known only as "The Seeders". They are the ones that started the process towards intelligent life on many of the planets in the Star Trek universe (though I think this wa a cheesy way to explain why all the "aliens" looked like guys with green body paint).

      October 21, 2013 at 4:02 pm |
  11. allenwoll

    Both Atheists AND Theists are people of FAITH - For there is no objective confirmation possible of their beliefs, of their faiths.
    .
    They are simply two brands of essentially the same thing !

    October 20, 2013 at 12:18 am |
    • Robin Jones

      Not the same. Atheism is as much a religion as not collecting stamps is a hobby.

      October 20, 2013 at 12:31 am |
      • Rett

        If a person spends an inordinate amount of time and energy debating "not collecting stamps" and researching the benefits to "not collecting stamps"....then maybe "not collecting stamps" has become his hobby

        October 20, 2013 at 12:42 am |
        • Robin Jones

          "If".

          October 20, 2013 at 12:50 am |
        • Blafcknblah

          Rett, you are missing a key point about those you appear to be railing against: many of them are secular (because they have no religion to follow) and humanist (because everyone is human and should be treated that way).
          If you find yourself in conflict with someone like that, just imagine what the opposition is all about: secular laws vs religious laws, and racism vs humanism, to name but two of the many battlefields to be found here.
          Atheism is not an ideology, but some ideologies have no place for any deities to be involved and so could be said to be "atheistic" in that they lack any mention of any gods in the ideology.
          Capitalism is an atheistic ideology. Republicanism is an atheistic ideology. Our Constitution is an atheistic secular framework that creates a supreme secular rule of law over all religious laws.
          You need to understand that the ideologies you are fighting are individually determined value systems, with no central command, no common thread beyond lacking religious brainwashing as controlling their brains.

          October 20, 2013 at 3:14 am |
      • ALWest1

        I disagree. Atheism is a belief system just like religion and it's subscribers are just as obsessed and devoted as those that believe in Christianity, Judaism, Islam, etc. At the end of the day religion and atheism are the same, just on different ends of the spectrum. They are just like democrats and republicans. They both want to spend money, but on different things.

        October 20, 2013 at 12:46 am |
        • Steel On Target

          I'm sorry but that's just a silly argument. You should really consult a dictionary before speaking about something you clearly do not know anything about.

          October 20, 2013 at 1:00 am |
        • Robin Jones

          By this definition, lack of belief in the Tooth Fairy or Santa Claus would qualify as a religion.

          October 20, 2013 at 1:00 am |
        • ALWest1

          Sure, I guess it's possible... lol. I sill do not think you can deny the fact that there are clear parallels between the two. I'm not on either side. I'm just saying they're similar in that they both subscribe to a belief and that they are both devoted too it. They're also both obsessed with pitching their product. Even if atheism believes in rejecting all other cultural and religious beliefs (tooth fairy included) in favor of rationalism and logic it's still a belief. Just like religion. Sorry, I had to wok the tooth fairy into that one. Too funny.

          October 20, 2013 at 1:35 am |
    • VOR

      Claiming that atheism is a faith is incorrect, yet people persist. I don't know why. It doesn't seem they are defending either view. You say there is no objective confirmation of either view, and that is correct. But there is no rational need for a confirmation of a negative. It's a rational view. It doesn't require a leap. How is it a faith to not believe in something that there is no reason to believe in? That is literally what you're saying. The logic is flawed. error, error, does not compute. Atheism is a rational view best on best current knowledge subject to change. It is not faith. Any simple analogy will do. Atheists are not people of faith anymore than people who don't believe in invisible unicorns. You do not have to have faith to not believe in invisible unicorns. Any questions?

      October 20, 2013 at 12:39 am |
      • ALWest1

        Good point, but to me they are both pitching the same thing. They're just different products . Atheism, just like religion, is a belief. Even if that belief is to reject existing cultural and religious practices in favor of rational and logic. Also, being an atheist is a commitment that requires devotion. Atheists are committed and devoted to their cause regardless of the consequences. It's also an obsession because, like religion, atheists want to the world to know what it is like to be an atheist and that it's something others should try as well. This sounds just like religion. The more you think about it, the more the parallels between the two are revealed.

        October 20, 2013 at 1:00 am |
        • VOR

          At the risk of sounding insulting, you just are being rational. Even if we entertain your characterization of some
          atheists as 'obsessive', we are STILL talking about OBSESSIVE over RATIONAL THOUGHT. OK I submit.
          I am obsessed with thinking correctly. That's what rational means. But I'm not obsessed in the sense you described.
          I do occasionally fall into such discussion in a 'reactive' way. I'm responding to incorrect thought. I should accept the fact that when I discuss how rational thought relates to religion there is going to naturally be a shortage of rational thought-
          even about what rational thought is! There's a tinge of hopelessness, or at least futility, in there somewhere, lol. Regardless of your religious leanings, please try to learn how that works-it will likely benefit you and others. So its not just a discussion about religion but about what is thinking clearly, and what is not. And as previously stated, I've no intention or expectation of 'converting' anyone, but the discussion is important to the progress of society.

          October 20, 2013 at 2:19 am |
        • VOR

          correction: you just are being irrational. You wording seemingly having decent construction, it almost seems you're trolling for a reaction, that you don't really mean what you say. But that would be paranoid and dysfunction of me to interact that way. One of the limitations of the format. Yes I would like people to 'try' Atheism lol, I would love them to 'try' rational, logic thought.
          Atheism is not a belief system, its not a movement, its not a position. It is simply correct thinking based on available data.

          October 20, 2013 at 2:27 am |
        • VOR

          There are no parallels, No valid comparision. Atheism does not preach. It may help to label atheism as 'disbelief' because that is ALL that it is. Stating of conclusions based on data and lack of opposing data is not preaching. It the best we can do. Science is the best we can do. It tells us how the sun 'comes up' or rather, that it doesn't. It tell us the earth is spherical, not flat. It tells us there is no realm deep in the earth inhabited by dinosaurs, even though we've never been there. All of the archeological, sociological, psychological evidence strongly suggests that religion is a construct of man. And there is no evidence to the contrary. Therefore disbelief is a working scientific
          conclusion based on available evidence. Its a conclusion based on thinking as clearly and rationally as possible. There is no other conclusion that is more rational or more correct. Disbelief cannot be shown to be 100% reliable for the same reason that invisible unicorns cannot be disproved with 100% reliability. And perhaps such unicorns are marginally 'easier' to disprove (from a scientific point of view). But, and this is the whole point, disbelief is 100% the most correct conclusion, in fact, it is, quite literally, quite factually, the ONLY correct conclusion. The fact that negatives are intrinsically difficult to prove is an aspect of disbelief that is incorrectly used those arguing against it. It doesn't change the fact that disbelief is the ONLY correct conclusion. (based on data to date). And the word 'correct' here is literal. It is 'correct' the same way that 2+2=4 is correct. But instead of the discipline of math we are applying the other aforementioned disciplines to reach the only correct answer: It is unreasonable and irrational to believe in a god. It does not serve you or others. It may not dis-serve you or others, but such thought practices are clearly associated with behaviors that are less than optimal at best, and that can sometimes be intolerant, divisive, or even deadly. Some disbelievers, like myself, are not concerned with 'being right' about the lack of a god, but are actually concerned with the consequences of a world populated in part by those lacking the ability to think correctly, at least about this, which can be indicative (but not reliably so) of similar traits regarding other more important subjects. And yes I know how insulting that sounds. I truly wish it was merely an insult. But its actually true, they are factually not thinking clearly, at least about this, and so I'm naturally concerned about it. Upon reflection, not really a position of paranoia. Mild cynicism perhaps but the criticism is perfectly correct. My interpretation of it, open to interpretation.

          October 20, 2013 at 3:09 am |
        • Blafcknblah

          tl;dr

          October 20, 2013 at 3:19 am |
        • VOR

          in reply to: Blafcknblah : I was about to compliment your above 15 line post. And I still am. It's good, maybe better than mine. But I think you know that's not the point. I find your lack of patience with my 34 line post disappointing. Then again I don't post a lot so what do I know about it. It's not all verbosity. I expanded some related stuff, somewhat personal, that I suspect is not so unique to me. Sorry your attention span too short for it. I honestly don't know where to place blame for that breakdown. But my priority is certainly not to conform to an etiquette of brevity I consider arbitrary. And I freely admit I sometimes use too many extraneous, space-consuming, overly-descriptive, qualifying, words or sentences written quickly and in a stream-of-conscientiousness, run-on sort of fashion with occasional typos mostly due to fatigue of being up way too late (which also explains this post in general) after a long day of political discussion which refreshingly had little religious content though of course there is often much overlap between the two but posting is barely a hobby but more of an occasional passtime so now i wonder if what I write could be considered abuse as I've can't really recall seeing much if any sorrt of 'text filibustering' not that this is exactly filibustering more a spontaneous text performance response joke and meant in jest to be absurdly long and useless so of course i hope you appreciate the spirit. but obviously I would understand or even approve a deletion of this post but not my others of course,and so on. I assert that tl;dr is of no more value than the above drivel. If you are going to bother to respond, why not repsond? what is the sense of tl;dr? Seriously now...apply some logic...how can you form the opinion that something was too long if you didn't read it? Anyway...Good post!

          October 20, 2013 at 3:59 am |
    • Steel On Target

      You should really consult a dictionary. It would help to not make such foolish statements. Not believing in something has nothing to do with faith.

      October 20, 2013 at 12:41 am |
  12. Michael Smith

    There are many churches and practices in those churches that boggle the mind. Life as a Christian is not based upon my service to Jesus, but His love for me. I have found that Jesus is great in love, mercy and grace toward me and toward all. You are right that Jesus does not condemn, but He came to restore our relationship with His and our heavenly Father.

    It is simple, He loves us all and has forgiven us. Being a Christian is difficult for all, but Brant, your walk of faith is powerful and inspiring, not because of Asperger's syndrome, but because of the simplicity of your reliance upon the Lord Jesus and His love for you.

    October 20, 2013 at 12:16 am |
    • allenwoll

      This fellow has an EXCEPTIONALLY strange way of demonstrating love ! ! ! . Endless recrimination, YES ! !

      October 20, 2013 at 12:20 am |
  13. Haters Abound

    It's unsurprising the usual swarm of anti's in here, attacking this man's good story with the usual intolerance toward religion, where an individual's faith is met with opposition that can only mention "fairy tales" as the reason for their intolerance.

    October 20, 2013 at 12:15 am |
    • Lisa

      Very well said.
      It seems tolerance in a one way street for some.

      October 20, 2013 at 12:24 am |
      • Blafcknblah

        Yeah, we need you to tell us the obvious shortcomings of religious nutcases. Thanks for the major newsflash. *facepalm*

        October 20, 2013 at 3:22 am |
  14. Matt

    Spock was logical, he wouldn't put stock in a being of which there has never been a whit of concrete evidence.

    October 20, 2013 at 12:11 am |
    • Jesus Christ Son of God

      You must have not seen my post below. Kirk, McCoy and Spock spoke to him on an episode of Star Trek. Do you need more proof than that!

      October 20, 2013 at 12:15 am |
    • Christian7

      God is logical and real. Spock was imaginary.

      October 20, 2013 at 12:19 am |
      • That's rubbish

        LOL

        October 20, 2013 at 12:20 am |
      • Edward

        god is in no way logical or real. Spock, however, is truly imaginary.

        October 20, 2013 at 12:37 am |
        • Christian7

          Forever is a very long time to be wrong.

          October 20, 2013 at 12:50 am |
        • redzoa

          "Forever is a very long time to be wrong."

          Pascal? That you?

          October 20, 2013 at 12:56 am |
        • Check

          redzoa,

          Just wanted to compliment you on your excellent, detailed 20-point rebuttal to that apologist's video in a conversation from last night. I cannot find it anymore - a crying shame if it has been deleted. Thank you for taking the time to write that up.

          October 20, 2013 at 1:05 am |
        • redzoa

          I appreciate your kind words Check. Tried to go back to see if Paul had left a response, but also couldn't locate it. Mysterious, this CNN Belief Blog . . .

          October 20, 2013 at 1:16 am |
      • Steel On Target

        ahahahahahaha, good joke!

        October 20, 2013 at 12:43 am |
  15. bluemarine

    So not making eye contact and being blunt is considered a ' disorder' ,however a religion calling for its participants to modify their behaviors to follow certain codes in the religion is considered ' normal.

    October 20, 2013 at 12:10 am |
  16. Jesus Christ Son of God

    Sorry, hit post to early. The text below is from an episode of Star Trek, and proves god exists, as Kirk, McCoy and Spock talked to him. And he threw some lightning bolts. How cool is that. Now, every time I see lightning, I'll know that is god trying to electrocute a non-believer.

    Kirk: What does God need with a starship?
    McCoy: Jim, what are you doing?
    Kirk: I'm asking a question.
    "God": Who is this creature?
    Kirk: Who am I? Don't you know? Aren't you God?
    Sybok: He has his doubts.
    "God": You doubt me?
    Kirk: I seek proof.
    McCoy: Jim! You don't ask the Almighty for his ID!
    "God": Then here is the proof you seek.
    [Hits Kirk with lightning]
    Kirk: Why is God angry?
    Sybok: Why? Why have you done this to my friend?
    "God": He doubts me.
    Spock: You have not answered his question. What does God need with a starship?
    "God": [hits Spock with lightning; then addresses McCoy] Do you doubt me?
    McCoy: I doubt any God who inflicts pain for his own pleasure.

    October 20, 2013 at 12:07 am |
    • Xty

      Why can't you come off fiction, and be real? Star Trek was a fiction, so also was Spock.

      October 20, 2013 at 12:32 am |
      • Check

        Xty,

        Uh, check out the ti.tle of this article...

        October 20, 2013 at 1:01 am |
    • G to the T

      I believe that was from one of the movies – the one with Spock's brother... #5 maybe?

      October 21, 2013 at 4:16 pm |
  17. brian

    I have visited evangelical churches. One of them had barf bags on the back of the pews. Some people get so full of the spirit of Christianity that they throw up. That's my reaction to this article.

    October 20, 2013 at 12:00 am |
    • Steel On Target

      Thats why you get the juice and cookies at the end.

      October 20, 2013 at 12:04 am |
  18. Jesus Christ Son of God

    Kirk: What does God need with a starship?
    McCoy: Jim, what are you doing?
    Kirk: I'm asking a question.
    "God": Who is this creature?
    Kirk: Who am I? Don't you know? Aren't you God?
    Sybok: He has his doubts.
    "God": You doubt me?
    Kirk: I seek proof.
    McCoy: Jim! You don't ask the Almighty for his ID!
    "God": Then here is the proof you seek.
    [Hits Kirk with lightning]
    Kirk: Why is God angry?
    Sybok: Why? Why have you done this to my friend?
    "God": He doubts me.
    Spock: You have not answered his question. What does God need with a starship?
    "God": [hits Spock with lightning; then addresses McCoy] Do you doubt me?
    McCoy: I doubt any God who inflicts pain for his own pleasure.

    October 19, 2013 at 11:59 pm |
  19. kmag

    If spock went to church....his already intelligent, logical mind would tell him he didn't feel moved by a holy spirit or a god because it's all fairy tales made up to control others.

    October 19, 2013 at 11:59 pm |
    • Christian7

      Star Trek was fiction, not the Bible.

      October 20, 2013 at 12:20 am |
      • That's rubbish

        LOL. Well not that funny. Don't quit your day job.

        October 20, 2013 at 12:31 am |
        • Christian7

          Laughing is not a logical argument.

          October 20, 2013 at 12:48 am |
      • Steel On Target

        There was more non-fiction in Star Trek than the bible.

        October 20, 2013 at 12:44 am |
        • Christian7

          There is more error in your statement than my statement

          October 20, 2013 at 12:49 am |
      • Steel On Target

        The bible is absolute fiction which modern archaeology has proven. Its a horrible history book and has about as much "truth" as the book Arabian Nights.

        October 20, 2013 at 1:03 am |
  20. Cassarit

    Why is this story on the front page 2 days straight?
    Aren't there other more important articles than this?
    What is CNN trying to do?
    Why the rush to dechristianize Jesus?
    We Christians shoeld start fighting back.

    October 19, 2013 at 11:53 pm |
    • C2H5OH

      Advertising dollars. Page hits & views. Holy rolling in the dough...

      And Christmas is coming. The most un-Christ like pagan holiday on the calendar. Big business has high jacked Jesus.

      October 20, 2013 at 12:37 am |
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The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.