home
RSS
What we may have in common with 'Two and a Half Men' actor
Angus T. Jones, left, in an episode of "Two and a Half Men."
November 29th, 2012
03:12 PM ET

What we may have in common with 'Two and a Half Men' actor

By Michael Martinez, CNN

Hollywood, California (CNN) -In the introduction to the TV sitcom "Two and a Half Men," actor Angus T. Jones morphs from boy to teen before our eyes. Now we're watching the actor venture into adulthood and the complicated moral questions that come with it.

This week in posted Internet videos, Jones announced his ethical and religious awakening by condemning as "filth" the CBS show that made him rich and famous.

Jones isn't alone in facing his crisis of conscience. His experience, though dramatic, is universal in how many job holders struggle to reconcile work and spiritual values, experts say.

"At some level, all of us, probably not publicly, ask the hard question that he's asking," said David Miller, director of Princeton University's Faith & Work Initiative.

FULL POST

- CNN Belief Blog

Filed under: Money & Faith • TV • Work

November 28th, 2012
02:25 PM ET

‘Two and a Half Men’ actor’s criticism of show shines light on Seventh-day Adventists

By Dan Gilgoff, CNN.com Religion Editor

(CNN) – The Alabama-based evangelist Christopher Hudson has posted online videos promoting his Seventh-day Adventist faith for years, but none generated the response of the one he posted a few days ago, featuring “Two and a Half Men” actor Angus T. Jones.

The video shows Jones, the CBS sitcom’s “half man,” describing the show he has appeared in for nearly a decade as “filth” and discouraging viewers from tuning in - which has attracted a crush of media attention.

Hudson, who flew to Los Angeles last week to tape the video with the 19-year-old actor, says his phone has been ringing off the hook ever since he posted the video online on Sunday.

Suddenly, reporters and plenty of others who’ve tuned into the wildly popular “Two and Half Men” want to know about the Seventh-day Day Adventist tradition, which Jones says in the online video he has recently joined, connecting his conversion to his new outlook on the show.

FULL POST

- CNN Belief Blog Co-Editor

Filed under: Christianity • TV

Documentary about 'Jesus' wife' papyrus delayed
The fragment is written in Coptic, a language used by some early Christians.
October 16th, 2012
12:55 PM ET

Documentary about 'Jesus' wife' papyrus delayed

By Eric Marrapodi, CNN Belief Blog Co-Editor

(CNN)– If you set your DVR to record the Smithsonian Channel's documentary on the "Jesus Wife" papyrus fragment two weeks ago and it didn't, it wasn't your fault.

Despite the massive publicity the documentary received after the discovery was announced, the Smithsonian Channel has delayed the release of the film about the Coptic fragment with the phrase, "Jesus said to them, 'My wife..." to wait for further testing on the fragment.

"We have been allowed exclusive access to this discovery for months. Our program will take into account the upcoming tests as well as the academic response to the initial announcement," Tom Hayden, general manager of the Smithsonian Channel, said in a statement sent to CNN on Tuesday.

Academics have expressed skepticism about the fragment's authenticity following an announcement about it last month from Harvard professor Karen King.

FULL POST

- CNN Belief Blog Co-Editor

Filed under: Coptic • TV

Pronounce it for me: Sikh
A shirt at a New York vigil honoring victims of the Wisconsin temple shooting.
August 9th, 2012
02:00 PM ET

Pronounce it for me: Sikh

By Eric Marrapodi, CNN Belief Blog Co-Editor

(CNN) - As terror struck the heart of the Sikh community with Sunday's mass shooting at a Wisconsin gurdwara, a Sikh house of worship, the tiny American Sikh population was thrust into the spotlight.

Many Americans were hearing about the faith for the first time.

Among all the questions surrounding the 500-year-old faith, one stood out.

Do you pronounce it like "sick" or like "seek?"

FULL POST

- CNN Belief Blog Co-Editor

Filed under: Sikh • TV

May 25th, 2012
11:01 AM ET

Foxworthy hosts 'Biblical' new game show

(CNN)– Comedian Jeff Foxworthy will host "American Bible Challenge," a new show premiering this summer on GSN.  CNN's Carol Costello reports.

- CNN Belief Blog Co-Editor

Filed under: Bible • TV

My Take: 'Desperate Housewives' wrestled with big Christian issues
Lynette (Felicity Huffman), Gaby (Eva Longoria), Susan (Teri Hatcher) and Bree (Marcia Cross) tried to be good neighbors.
May 15th, 2012
01:26 PM ET

My Take: 'Desperate Housewives' wrestled with big Christian issues

Editor's note: Danielle Elizabeth Tumminio is an ordained Episcopal Church priest and author of "God and Harry Potter at Yale: Teaching Faith and Fantasy Fiction in an Ivy League Classroom."

By Danielle Elizabeth Tumminio, Special to CNN

(CNN) - A neighbor recommended I watch "Desperate Housewives" when it premiered eight years ago, and I was hooked from the moment I saw that snake hand Eve the apple during the opening credits.

I was a grad student at the time, poor and living in an attic apartment, studying Christianity and trying to figure out who I was and who I would become.  Every Sunday night, my neighbor and I got together to cook dinner - her meals were always perfectly prepared and mine were always burnt - and watch the adventures of four neighbors, Susan, Lynette, Bree and Gaby, as they negotiated the quirky dynamics of their relationships.

Watching "Desperate Housewives," which had its series finale Sunday night, became a non-negotiable ritual that nothing interfered with, in part because I treasured my neighbor’s inspired cooking and in part because I was convinced this show had something to say to people of faith such as myself.

FULL POST

- CNN Belief Blog

Filed under: Christianity • Opinion • TV

Delta pulls 'Daily Show' ads over 'vagina manger' skit
A Jon Stewart skit that referenced "vagina mangers" has angered a conservative Catholic group.
May 8th, 2012
05:12 PM ET

Delta pulls 'Daily Show' ads over 'vagina manger' skit

By Dan Gilgoff and Dave Alsup, CNN

(CNN) - Delta Air Lines has pulled its advertising from “The Daily Show with Jon Stewart” over a skit in which Stewart featured a picture of a manger in between a naked woman’s legs, the company said Tuesday.

In the April skit, Stewart jokingly encouraged women to use “vagina mangers” to “protect their reproductive organs from unwanted medical intrusions.”

In a statement Tuesday, Delta Air Lines spokesperson Leslie Parker said that “We're always re-evaluating our advertising opportunities and updating our strategy in an effort to reach our desired audience.”

FULL POST

- CNN Belief Blog Co-Editor

Filed under: Catholic Church • TV

April 30th, 2012
09:44 AM ET

What's Joel Osteen's secret?

- CNN Belief Blog

Filed under: Christianity • TV

'All-American Muslim' won't have second season
'All-American Muslim' tracked five families in Dearborn, Michigan.
March 7th, 2012
04:28 PM ET

'All-American Muslim' won't have second season

TLC's look into the everyday lives of Michigan-based Muslims was a short one. The network confirms that "All-American Muslim" won't return for a second season.

The eight-episode docu-series followed five families in Dearborn, Michigan, depicting how they balance their faith and customs with their average American lifestyle.

TLC didn't offer more information as to why the series won't return, although some cast members told the Detroit Free Press that they were told the decision was made based on ratings.

Read the fully story about 'All-American Muslim'
- CNN Belief Blog

Filed under: Islam • TV

My Take: New TV series 'GCB'  portrays Christians as caricatures
Actresses Leslie Bibb, left, and Annie Potts at a 'GCB' event in January.
March 5th, 2012
02:35 PM ET

My Take: New TV series 'GCB' portrays Christians as caricatures

Editor's Note: Margaret Feinberg is an international speaker and author of "Scouting the Divine" and "The Sacred Echo." Follow her on Twitter.

By Margaret Feinberg, Special to CNN

Originally dubbed “Good Christian Bitches” after the book by Kim Gatlin, a television series that debuted on ABC on Sunday night had its name changed to “Good Christian Belles” before being shortened to “GCB.” Whatever meaning you assign to those three letters, the show portrays Christians as caricatures and feels a little desperate.

The show serves up predictable night-time soapy-ness that’s lured audiences for years. The only difference is that instead of an emergency room, GCB serves it up Texas-style, in the buckle of the Bible Belt, complete with more Scripture ripped out of context than most churchgoers can keep count.

FULL POST

- CNN Belief Blog

Filed under: Christianity • Opinion • TV

« newer posts    older posts »
Advertisement
About this blog

The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.

Advertisement
Advertisement