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Why you should leave religion off your resume
A new study hints that religion and resumes don't always mix well.
July 2nd, 2014
09:24 AM ET

Why you should leave religion off your resume

By Sara Grossman, CNN

(CNN) – If you’re applying for a new job, it may be best to leave religion off your resume, according to a new study.

Job applicants who mentioned any form of faith affiliation on their resumes were 26% less likely to be contacted by employers than candidates who didn't, according to the study conducted by sociologists at the University of Connecticut.

Muslim, pagan and atheist job applicants were the least likely to get callbacks from potential employers.

“People have a fear of the unknown,” said Michael Wallace, a co-author of the study and a sociology professor at the University of Connecticut. The study “implies that when people don't know much about a religion, they have an instinctive fear of that group.”

FULL POST

- CNN Belief Blog

Filed under: Business • Christianity • Discrimination • Economy • Islam • Judaism • Muslim • Prejudice • Work

Pope Francis: Worker exploitation "goes against God"
May 1st, 2013
01:48 PM ET

Pope Francis: Worker exploitation "goes against God"

By Jethro Mullen and Farid Ahmed, CNN

Savar, Bangladesh (CNN) - Pope Francis, speaking at a Mass on Wednesday, made reference to the Bangladesh building collapse that killed upwards of 400 people in a sharp condemnation of worker exploitation and "slave labor."

"Not paying a just (wage), not providing work, focusing exclusively on the balance books, on financial statements, only looking at making personal profit. That goes against God!" Pope Francis said.

He continued: "When society is organized in such a way that not everyone has the opportunity to work, to be anointed with the dignity of work, then there is something wrong with that society: it is not right! It goes against God himself, who wanted our dignity, starting from here."

FULL STORY
- Dan Merica

Filed under: Asia • Pope • Pope Francis • Work

What we may have in common with 'Two and a Half Men' actor
Angus T. Jones, left, in an episode of "Two and a Half Men."
November 29th, 2012
03:12 PM ET

What we may have in common with 'Two and a Half Men' actor

By Michael Martinez, CNN

Hollywood, California (CNN) –In the introduction to the TV sitcom "Two and a Half Men," actor Angus T. Jones morphs from boy to teen before our eyes. Now we're watching the actor venture into adulthood and the complicated moral questions that come with it.

This week in posted Internet videos, Jones announced his ethical and religious awakening by condemning as "filth" the CBS show that made him rich and famous.

Jones isn't alone in facing his crisis of conscience. His experience, though dramatic, is universal in how many job holders struggle to reconcile work and spiritual values, experts say.

"At some level, all of us, probably not publicly, ask the hard question that he's asking," said David Miller, director of Princeton University's Faith & Work Initiative.

FULL POST

- CNN Belief Blog

Filed under: Money & Faith • TV • Work

Preachers confront 'last taboo': Condemning greed amid Great Recession
The nation is being savaged by the Great Recession, but many pastors are afraid to talk about its causes, some say.
October 1st, 2011
10:00 PM ET

Preachers confront 'last taboo': Condemning greed amid Great Recession

By John Blake, CNN

(CNN) – Bishop Harry Jackson is a former college middle linebacker who can still hit hard.

He once described same-sex marriage as a satanic plot to destroy the family, called on Republicans to get “political Viagra” and said African-Americans needed to abandon what he called the Gospel of Victimization.

Jackson is not shy about stirring up controversy, but he stops short when it comes to preaching about greed. The Maryland bishop said he encourages his congregation to get through the Great Recession by saving and sharing. But he doesn’t want to alienate well-off members by talking about what’s behind the nation’s economic woes.

"I've got to watch it," said Jackson, pastor at Hope Christian Church in Beltsville, Maryland. "I could get into some big teaching on greed, but the reality is that a lot of that teaching may wind up creating anti-economic-growth and anti-capitalism concepts (in people’s minds). ... I always talk about personal responsibility so we don't get into the blame game."

The Great Recession is more than an economic crisis. It has become a spiritual dilemma for some of the nation’s pastors and their parishioners, religious leaders say.

FULL POST

- CNN Writer

Filed under: Belief • Bible • Catholic Church • Charity • Christianity • Church • Church and state • Culture wars • Economy • Pastors • Politics • Poverty • Protest • Work

October 27th, 2010
01:19 PM ET

Zen at your desk: how to meditate

More on meditation here.

- CNN Belief Blog

Filed under: Buddhism • Journeys • Meditation • Work

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About this blog

The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.

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