home
RSS
Study: Americans want more religion in politics
A growing number of Americans want closer ties between church and state, a poll found.
October 10th, 2014
12:03 PM ET

Study: Americans want more religion in politics

By Sara Grossman, Special to CNN

(CNN) – On Sunday, pastor Jim Garlow of Skyline Church in California stood before his congregation of more than 2,000 and told them he would be making an unusual announcement.

The pastor proceeded to warn his audience against voting for a candidate in the upcoming midterm elections who supports gay marriage and abortion, even if that candidate, Carl DeMaio, is a Republican.

Garlow, an outspoken evangelical who played a major role in organizing Christian groups in support of California’s anti-gay marriage Proposition 8, spoke plainly: He would not be supporting the Republican in this race.

“I know enough that you cannot have the advancing of the radical homosexual agenda and religious liberty at the same time, in the same nation,” he preached. “One will win, and one will lose.”

Instead, Garlow told his followers he would be endorsing DeMaio’s rival, Democratic incumbent Scott Peters, representative for California’s 52nd District, to send a scathing message to Republican leadership that candidates who back abortion and gay rights are unacceptable to the party’s Christian base.

Garlow is one of a growing number of Americans who say that religion should play a greater role in politics, according to the findings of a recent study by the Pew Research Forum's Religion & Public Life Project.

The study found that almost three-quarters of the American public — 72% — believes that religion’s influence is waning in public life, the highest level in Pew Research polling over the past 10 years.

And many Americans say that trend is a bad thing, the study found.

“A growing share of the American public wants religion to play a role in U.S. politics,” the Pew study authors write.

What kind of role?

FULL POST

- CNN Belief Blog

Filed under: Church and state • Culture wars • Gay marriage • Houses of worship • Politics • Polls • United States

Why you should care about a Muslim inmate's beard
Abdul Muhammad (formerly named Gregory Holt) will have his case heard by the Supreme Court on Tuesday.
October 6th, 2014
05:25 PM ET

Why you should care about a Muslim inmate's beard

Opinion by Emily Hardman, special to CNN

(CNN) – I’m not a Muslim. I’ve never been imprisoned. And I don’t want to grow a beard. But I’m defending the rights of someone who is and does.

On Tuesday, the Supreme Court will hear Holt v. Hobbs, a landmark case cutting to the heart of the First Amendment’s protection of religious freedom.

At issue is whether refusing to allow a prisoner to peacefully practice his religion violates a federal civil rights law, the Religious Land Use and Institutionalized Persons Act, known as RLUIPA .

In this case, Abdul Muhammad (formerly named Gregory Holt) is an Arkansas inmate who wants to observe the Muslim command to grow a beard, in his case a half-inch in length.

Arkansas already allows inmates to grow beards for medical reasons and Muhammad’s beard would be permissible in 43 state and federal prison systems across the country.

The remaining outliers, including Arkansas, attempt to justify their bans in the name of security. However, Arkansas has not identified a single confirmed security problems resulting from beards.

FULL POST

- CNN Belief Blog

Filed under: Uncategorized

October 3rd, 2014
12:04 PM ET

Debate rages ahead of Vatican synod on the family

By Delia Gallagher, CNN

Rome (CNN) – More than 200 Catholic bishops, priests and laypeople from around the world gathered in Rome this weekend to begin discussing Catholic teachings on a range of hot-button topics, from contraception and same-sex unions to polygamy and communion for divorced and remarried Catholics.

The issues, which the Vatican places under the heading of “pastoral challenges of the family,” were chosen based on the results of a worldwide survey of Catholics in 2013.

Pope Francis called the meeting, known as a synod, to address modern issues facing families today a topic that he has made a priority since the beginning of his pontificate.

The Catholic Church, the Pope has said, must make sure “it really is in contact with the homes and the lives of its people and does not become a useless structure out of touch with people.”

In his short time as Pope, Francis has reached out to those who previously might have felt shunned by the church because of their family circumstances.

FULL POST

- CNN Belief Blog Editor

Filed under: Bishops • Catholic Church • Christianity • Culture wars • Pope Francis • Same-sex marriage • Sexuality • Women

Confessions of a Mormon housewife
Jill Strasburg, here with her husband, Dave, blogs about her family, faith and the challenges and wonders of everyday life.
October 2nd, 2014
10:15 AM ET

Confessions of a Mormon housewife

Editor’s note:  Jill Strasburg is a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, a wife and a writer who muses on life, love and faith in her blog The Strasburg Family. The upcoming episode of "This is Life With Lisa Ling" explores the scourge of prescription drug abuse in Utah and within its Mormon community at10 p.m. ET/PT Sunday on CNN.

Opinion By Jill Strasburg, special to CNN

(CNN) I became deathly ill two months into my marriage and during my long recovery, I could barely eat or drink. I certainly couldn’t do daily chores around the house, and I would stay in my pajamas throughout most days.

During this time, something remarkable happened: Women from my congregation whom I had never met began showing up at my house.

I was new to the area, had just joined the local Mormon church, and here were these women at my house with a gift, a meal for my husband, a smile, a hug and a sympathetic ear. They expected nothing in return. I could feel the love they had for me as it radiated from them.

That wasn’t the only thing I felt though.

FULL POST


NFL says ref botched call on player's Muslim prayer
Husain Abdullah celebrates after scoring a touchdown on Monday night.
September 30th, 2014
07:42 AM ET

NFL says ref botched call on player's Muslim prayer

By Daniel Burke, CNN Belief Blog Editor

(CNN) – Husain Abdullah can kneel and pray pretty much anywhere in America he wants. Except, perhaps, for an NFL end zone.

The Kansas City Chiefs' safety and devout Muslim was flagged for "unsportsmanlike conduct" after sliding to his knees in prayer to celebrate a touchdown Monday night.

On Tuesday, the NFL said the referee botched the call.

"Husain Abdullah should not have been penalized for unsportsmanlike conduct," said Michael Signora, a league spokesman.

The rules prohibit players from celebrating while on the ground, but officials should not "flag a player who goes to the ground as part of a religious celebration," Signora added.

As many observers have noted, Christian players often celebrate by kneeling in prayer after making big plays.

The Council on American-Islamic Relations, a Muslim civil rights group, called on the NFL to make its rules about on-field celebrations more clear.

“To prevent the appearance of a double standard, we urge league officials to clarify the policy on prayer and recognize that the official made a mistake in this case,” said CAIR spokesman Ibrahim Hooper.

FULL POST

- CNN Belief Blog Editor

Filed under: Islam • Muslim • Sports

September 29th, 2014
06:00 AM ET

Why India's leader won't eat with Obama

By Moni Basu, CNN

(CNN) – Fillet of sole with tyrolienne sauce. Supreme of pheasant Veronique. Chocolate lotus blossoms. These are culinary creations that were served in the past to Indian prime ministers visiting the White House.

But on Monday, when India’s newest leader meets with President Barack Obama, his plate will be empty.

That’s because Narendra Modi will be in the middle of a strict fast for Navratri, Sanskrit for nine nights. It's a Hindu festival devoted to the manifestations of the goddess Shakti, a symbol of purity and power.

Navratri’s timing depends on the lunar calendar but usually is observed once in March-April to usher in summer and again in September-October, before winter. Modi intends to survive solely on “nimbu pani” or water with lemon for nine days. FULL POST

- Moni Basu

Filed under: Asia • Faith • Food • Hinduism • India

Even on the High Holidays, this cantor is on call
Cantor Shlomo Glick both sings Jewish prayers and works as an EMT.
September 24th, 2014
12:34 PM ET

Even on the High Holidays, this cantor is on call

By Daniel Burke, CNN Belief Blog editor

(CNN) -  According to Jewish tradition, on Rosh Hashana, God decides who will live and die during the next year. For Cantor Shlomo Glick, the holy days - which begin the Jewish new year - are particularly poignant.

Not only does Glick, who lives in Jerusalem, stand at the front of synagogues and sing solemn prayers on Rosh Hashana, but he is an EMT for United Hatazalah, a volunteer emergency service.

Glick, 36, spoke to CNN via email about his spiritual and secular roles - including a time he stopped religious services to treat a man in cardiac arrest.

This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

Q: For people who might not know, can you explain a bit about the role of a cantor?

A: A cantor leads Jewish congregations in prayer. We are professional singers who have extensively studied the order and meaning of the prayers in addition to how to carry our voices. A good cantor tailors the tunes and style of prayer with the audience to ensure that everybody sings in unison and finds meaning in the service.

Q: Which job, EMT or cantor, do you think is more important?

A: I love performing and inspiring people in prayer, but there is no greater feeling than saving a life.

Q: You work closely with human frailty. Does that make the High Holy Days more poignant for you?

FULL POST

- CNN Belief Blog Editor

Filed under: Faith & Health • Holidays • Israel • Judaism • rosh hashanah

Former Vatican envoy placed under house arrest
Jozef Wesolowski, a former papal ambassador, has been accuse of sexually abusing children.
September 23rd, 2014
05:35 PM ET

Former Vatican envoy placed under house arrest

By Daniel Burke, CNN Belief Blog Editor

(CNN) – The Vatican announced on Tuesday that it has placed a former ambassador under house arrest while he faces charges for "serious acts of abuse of minors."

Jozef Wesolowski is accused of molesting young boys during his stint as the pope's official representative in the Dominican Republic. Wesolowski had been appointed to the post in 2008 by Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI.

The former envoy, who was defrocked by the Vatican in June, is one of the highest-ranking church officials to be accused of abusing children during the Catholic Church's widespread and costly sexual abuse scandal. It is the first time a top Vatican ambassador has faced such charges.

Wesolowski's arrest, the Vatican said Tuesday, "is a result of the express desire of the Pope, so that a case so serious and delicate would be addressed without delay."

Francis has pledged to maintain a policy of "zero tolerance" for Catholic clergy who abuse children.

Wesolowski's case provides a high-profile chance for the Pope, who has been accused by some victims' groups of downplaying the sexual abuse scandal, to take concrete action against one of the Vatican's own.

The Vatican said that Wesolowski suffers from an unnamed but medically documented health condition, and will be placed under house arrest in Vatican City, which is a sovereign state.

Pressure had been building on the Vatican to proceed with criminal charges against Wesolowski, a Polish native ordained by Saint John Paul II, since the accusations against him became public.

That pressure intensified when The New York Times reported last month that Wesolowski had been seen walking freely about Rome.

The United Nations Committee Against Torture has also urged the Vatican to move swiftly on Wesolowski. A report by the committee in May noted that Poland had reportedly asked for the archbishop's extradition.

Under Vatican law, Wesolowski, if found guilty, could face a maximum sentence of 12 years in prison.

 

- CNN Belief Blog Editor

Filed under: Catholic Church • Pope Francis

September 23rd, 2014
12:30 PM ET

Suspension of belief? Football coach sidelined over prayer

(CNN) - The football coach at a publicly funded charter school in Arizona has been suspended after directing a player to lead a team prayer.

One side says it's a violation of the coach's religious liberty. The other says it's a violation of the players' rights to have a religion-free locker room.

Watch the video above to see more.

- CNN Belief Blog Editor

Filed under: Belief • Christianity • Church and state • Culture wars • Prayer • Religious liberty

The faces of Jesus
September 21st, 2014
09:44 AM ET

4 teachings from Jesus that everybody gets wrong

Opinion by Amy-Jill Levine, special to CNN

(CNN) – It was once said, “religion is designed to comfort the afflicted and to afflict the comfortable.”

Jesus’ parables – short stories with moral lessons – were likewise designed to afflict, to draw us in but leave us uncomfortable.

These teachings can be read as being about divine love and salvation, sure. But, their first listeners – first century Jews in Galilee and Judea – heard much more challenging messages.

Only when we hear the parables as Jesus’ own audience did can we fully experience their power and find ourselves surprised and challenged today.

Here are four examples of Jesus’ teachings that everybody gets wrong:

FULL POST

- CNN Belief Blog Editor

Filed under: Bible • Christianity • History • Jesus • Judaism • Opinion

« newer posts    older posts »
Advertisement
About this blog

The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.

Advertisement
Advertisement