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June 23rd, 2010
10:49 AM ET

Billboard campaign rebuts 'one nation under God'

Religious billboards adorn the highways across the South. But a new billboard campaign in North Carolina deliberately snubs the Almighty.

A coalition of atheists and secular humanists has placed a billboard on Billy Graham Parkway in Charlotte that displays an American flag with a few key words from the Pledge of Allegiance: “One Nation Indivisible.”

Notice anything missing? The phrase “under God,” which appears between "One nation" and "indivisible" in the Pledge, is absent on the billboard.

William Warren, a member of the North Carolina Secular Association, says his group put the ads up on billboards across the state to let people know that patriotism and belief in God are not always synonymous.

The billboards are appearing in a half-dozen locations across the state, including Asheville, Winston-Salem and Raleigh, in addition to Charlotte.

Warren, an atheist, says people who share his beliefs often fear losing their job or their friendships. The billboard is designed to encourage them to be more open.

“We’re here. We’re your neighbors, your co-workers,” he says. “We’re not happy that we have to hide who we are everyday.”

Read more on this story from CNN Charlotte affiliate WBTV.

A statement on his group's website says the campaign "is intended as a consciousness-raising effort to point out how every U.S. citizen who doesn’t believe in a monotheistic god is being 'officially' marginalized, disrespected, and discriminated against by the insertion of 'under God' in the Pledge..."

The North Carolina Secular Association's statement also alleges that North Carolina's constitution "restricts anyone that doesn't believe in a monotheistic god from holding public office."

Warren says two billboard companies refused to raise the billboards. One said the Pledge ad was too controversial. Another didn’t call back when it heard about the planned message.

“It’s a pretty innocuous message,” says Warren. “If someone sees controversy in the message, they’re looking for controversy.”

Some may consider the location of the Charlotte billboard controversial: along a parkway named for the Rev. Billy Graham, the venerated evangelical minister.

But Warren says the location was chosen because the price was right. The Charlotte billboard costs $3,300 to rent for a month.

The entire billboard campaign costs $15,000, with money coming from donations from various secular groups and from a national marketing organization called FreeThoughtAction.

The North Carolina Secular Association's website explains that it chose the Pledge for its campaign because the phrase “one nation under God” was inserted into it in 1954, provoked by the Cold War. The intention then was proclaiming a Judeo-Christian American heritage in the face of godless  communism.

That change, though, stigmatized atheists and religious skeptics, Warren says.

“Instead of uniting the nation, it divided the nation,” Warren says. “You were either religious or with the godless communists.”

The Pledge was originally written in 1892 by a former Baptist minister who made no reference to religion in his version.

In 2004, the Supreme Court rejected efforts by a California atheist to revisit the issue of banning the Pledge’s recital in public schools because of its use of the words, “under God.”

- CNN Writer

Filed under: Belief • Christianity • Church • Courts • Culture wars • Politics

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soundoff (797 Responses)
  1. ttwp

    Only the Lord can can convince someone. That's why I direct people to seek him out for themselves. As his child...his creation if you seek him out with a humble heart he will direct your paths and will guide you in his ways...not the ways of the world. Unfortunately most people will not come to him to even find out for themselves. Blessed is he who is not offended because of the Lord. God bless.

    June 23, 2010 at 11:39 pm |
    • Rock God

      I asked God and He appeared to me in a plate of spaghetti and told me to going on a killing spree. I told Him I'd get back to him.

      June 24, 2010 at 12:23 pm |
  2. Damiana

    Keli: "Funny...everyone who doesn't believe in God keeps asking.."where is God..how can He allow so much hatred/sorrow/war in this world"? You don't believe in Him, so why do you care what He does or doesn't allow?"

    Oh, we don't care. We just want to hear the funny funny story you're going to make up to cover the holes in the fable of the omnipotent being who somehow can't put an end to hatred/sorrow/war, etc.

    Keli: "I mean, to you He isn't real, so don't even ask. He's non-existent to you. He doesn't NEED any of us to stand up for Him. He doesn't need to be in the pledge. The "lack of being mentioned" by people doesn't change who He is."

    So why does the vast majority of his posse insist on complaining when he ISN"T in the pledge, or on the money, or left out of civic meetings, or whatever? Why any fuss from his minions about this billboard?

    Keli: "If you don't believe, don't blame the world's problems on Him..that doesn't make sense."

    You might mention that to God's little friend Pat Robertson, who has decided that pretty much any natural disaster of any kind in the U.S. is due to the lack of prayer in schools, lack of Ten Commandments sculptures in the courthouses, etc.

    Keli: "He give us all free will.. He doesn't control you..He doesn't make up your mind for you. You have free will to do/think/be whatever. Believe..don't believe. You have that choice. I can't explain God..if I could, He wouldn't be God. And He doesn't need me to explain Him."

    And you did this long inane post because......?

    Keli: "Believe..don't believe. Doesn't matter..Doesn't change who He is. But don't blame Him for the bad things in this world if you don't believe He exists. If a child slaps another child on the playground, it doesn't mean the parents taught him to do that..it doesn't mean the parents aren't raising that child right. It just means the child made a bad decision... the child CHOOSES to hit the other child, or not to hit the other child. God doesn't make people be bad...that person CHOOSES his/her own path."

    What does that non sequitur of a story have to do with anything? What about the child who never hits anyone on the playground? Isn't he going to burn eternally if he doesn't become a Christian? Isn't God going to make him bow his neck and bend his knee like the cosmic bully his followers proclaim him to be? What about the kid who refuses to say "under God" in the pledge, so your kid pops him in the nose for dissing God? Who fries then, and why?

    If disbelief doesn't bother you or God, both of you need to belt up and go back to your respective lives and climb down off this billboard.....someone else paid for it!

    June 23, 2010 at 11:27 pm |
  3. CatholicMom

    Drew, you wrote: Actually there's more evidence that a Santa Claus did exist, unlike Jesus.
    As for Jesus being born without sin or living a sinless life, I call BS. If you follow the bible, you'll understand that everyone is born with original sin. In order for Jesus to bypass original sin, Mary could not have been his mother because she was not exempt from original sin. Just another contradiction of the bible.

    Yes, Drew, there was a Santa Claus—his real name was St. Nicholas; he was a Bishop of the Catholic Church.

    If you follow the Bible you must read it along with the Catholic Church to get the fullness of Truth. [the Bible is a Catholic Book].

    The Holy Catholic Church teaches that Jesus was born fully man and fully God in His one being, born of Mary. He was born human just as we are in every way except in sin. He was preserved from original sin and all sin because He is God and God is all-good and so cannot sin.

    The Bible tells us that Mary was full of grace; meaning she was completely filled with grace thus no sin; that is, from the moment of her conception—Mary, by a singular grace of God and by virtue of the merits of Jesus Christ—was preserved immune from original sin. Jesus could not have born of an impure vessel. Just as we cannot enter Heaven— as unclean. And only by the grace of God and by the blood of Jesus Christ are we made clean.

    Thank you for voicing your thoughts.

    ' ORIGINAL SIN: The sin by which the first human beings disobeyed the commandment of God, choosing to follow their own will rather than God's will. As a consequence they lost the grace of original holiness, and became subject to the law of death; sin became universally present in the world. Besides the personal sin of Adam and Eve, original sin describes the fallen state of human nature which affects every person born into the world, and from which Christ, the "new Adam," came to redeem us (396-412)'. [the catechism of the Catholic Church]

    June 23, 2010 at 11:26 pm |
    • Damiana

      As far as I know, the Immaculate Conception of Mary is NOWHERE in the Bible (and St. Bernadette doesn't count). It's merely Catholic doctrine. Unless you have b/c/v to cite?

      June 24, 2010 at 12:05 am |
    • EJK

      "the Bible is a Catholic Book"

      Perhaps you might consider doing some quick research on the history of the Bible. You can start with the facts that most books of the Bible are dated to the 3rd Century or earlier, while the Catholic Church dates to the 4th Century.

      June 24, 2010 at 6:52 am |
  4. TheRationale

    There seem to be many comments claiming that this country is somehow founded upon Christian values. This could not be farther from the truth. As Thomas Jefferson said, there will always be a "wall of separation between church and state."

    Most notably, in the Treaty of Tripoli, signed by our lovely John Adams, it states that "the Government of the United States of America is not, in any sense, founded on the Christian religion."

    June 23, 2010 at 11:18 pm |
    • Umme Omar

      I am a Muslim and I am a citizen of USA. I am not sure if this country was founded on Christianity or Atheism, and all I know is that it is a free country where I can practice my faith and so can people of other faiths. I have no problem with A Nation indivisible because really we are all one nation although we may or may not be christian, Jew, Muslim or atheist. Instead of wasting our energies challenging each other's faiths, we should work as a nation towards solving its problems and facing challenges as a Nation indivisible. Peace.

      June 23, 2010 at 11:33 pm |
  5. Happy Pagan

    I see a lot of Red Sea this and Red Sea that, You folks do know that it has been confirmed that the original translation was wrong and that the actual dead sea scrolls say REED SEA which also an actual Location. SO No one parted the Red Sea they might have parted the Marshy area called the Reed Sea but that stills needs a WHOLE Lot of belief in a ficiticitous Diety.

    Also the Roman archives do in fact mention a Yeshua ben Yusef, Jesus son of Joseph, but they have him listed as the bastard son of a Roman Legionare. So much for that Virgin Birth birth story.

    "Men never do evil so completely and cheerfully as when they do it from religious conviction". –Blaise Pascal 1623-1662

    "Man will not be free until the last king (politician)
    is strangled on the entrails of the last priest."–Deidrot

    "When Fascism comes to America it will be wrapped in the flag and carrying a cross."–Sinclair Lewis

    June 23, 2010 at 11:16 pm |
  6. ttwp

    The cross is foolishness to those who are perishing. Seek the Lord while he may still be found. If you turn to him, he will heal you and you will discover the truth and the truth will set you free. God Bless.

    June 23, 2010 at 10:57 pm |
    • TheRationale

      I can't really see how a message like that is going to convince anyone to do anything differently.

      June 23, 2010 at 11:23 pm |
  7. Alexander

    Not everyone believes in a god, let alone the Christian god. Not everyone who founded the Constitution was a Christian, either. This nation was founded upon the idea that people of all backgrounds could live together peacefully through mutual tolerance, united upon the principles embodied in the Constitution, especially as they are enumerated in the Bill of Rights. Some religious fanatics, however, have courted a delusion that the United States is, and always has been, a fundamentalist Christian theocracy destined to be ruled under barbaric Old Testament laws whose penalties are even more barbaric than the behaviors that they prohibit. This sect of religious fanatics has infiltrated the political system at its highest levels as well as its lowest ones and is causing unprecedented divisions from coast to coast. The most sickening part is that these people are an ever-shrinking minority, yet they are wielding a heavy influence that is negatively impacting everyone else. When will we say "enough!" to this primitive nonsense once and for all? It is destroying our nation and threatening to destroy the rest of the world as well.

    June 23, 2010 at 10:56 pm |
  8. Surthurfurd

    I am a Christian. I also am concerned that our imposition of "under God" and "in God we trust" as government backed proclamations is dangerous. As a Christian, I do not follow my nation first then God. By acting like we are God's nation we are like other groups that pretend that our worldly interests are the interests of God. This is not patriotism, it is blasphemy.

    June 23, 2010 at 10:35 pm |
  9. Keli

    Funny...everyone who doesn't believe in God keeps asking.."where is God..how can He allow so much hatred/sorrow/war in this world"? You don't believe in Him, so why do you care what He does or doesn't allow? I mean, to you He isn't real, so don't even ask. He's non-existent to you. He doesn't NEED any of us to stand up for Him. He doesn't need to be in the pledge. The "lack of being mentioned" by people doesn't change who He is. If you don't believe, don't blame the world's problems on Him..that doesn't make sense. He give us all free will.. He doesn't control you..He doesn't make up your mind for you. You have free will to do/think/be whatever. Believe..don't believe. You have that choice. I can't explain God..if I could, He wouldn't be God. And He doesn't need me to explain Him. Believe..don't believe. Doesn't matter..Doesn't change who He is. But don't blame Him for the bad things in this world if you don't believe He exists. If a child slaps another child on the playground, it doesn't mean the parents taught him to do that..it doesn't mean the parents aren't raising that child right. It just means the child made a bad decision... the child CHOOSES to hit the other child, or not to hit the other child. God doesn't make people be bad...that person CHOOSES his/her own path.

    June 23, 2010 at 10:31 pm |
    • Umme Omar

      Beautiful piece.

      June 23, 2010 at 11:04 pm |
    • NJ Bob

      The problems aren't caused by your God (which I don't believe in). They're caused by his followers.

      June 23, 2010 at 11:32 pm |
    • Rinoa

      The questions are rhetorical questions....

      June 24, 2010 at 6:11 am |
    • Drew

      So ask yourself this then, if God is all knowing, he knows the past, present and future like most religions claim and he punishes you for eternity if you take your own life, that means he knew it well ahead of time, before you came into existence, so he doomed you to hell before you were even born because he knew you would take your own life. Doesn't sound like a all loving supreme being to me. Another sad contradiction of the bible.

      June 24, 2010 at 10:43 am |
  10. Paul Ronco

    Stop fomenting hatred, CNN. How does this billboard "snub the Almighty?" All it does is affirm the separation of church and state, which I think is something God would want as well, as per Jesus' own testimony: "Render under Caesar what is Caesar's, render unto the Lord what is the Lord's."

    June 23, 2010 at 10:25 pm |
  11. Sly

    This is definitely a step in the right direction. It's not an attack on Christian beliefs, values, etc, it's just making the point that it's not a requirement for American patriotism to believe in the God in Christianity. Nonetheless, the more close minded people will fuss and fight it, saying that it's an invention of commies/democrats/republicans/evil toilet people, or whoever is the demon of the day for them.

    LOVE this billboard, we need more of those in Texas!

    June 23, 2010 at 9:33 pm |
  12. NJ Bob

    I approve of this billboard!!!!!!!

    June 23, 2010 at 9:06 pm |
  13. Greg

    What's the difference between the religious mind and the atheist / freethinker?
    The religious position is based on LACK of factual information,
    otherwise you wouldn't NEED the faith. By definition, faith would be impossible if you had the knowledge.
    My position, and the one echoed in any individual thinking outside the confines of theistic dogma,
    is that there is zero factual evidence to support your claim of your specific deity, or anyone's else's.
    There is nothing to be tested, nothing to be coroborated and nothing open to genuine scrutiny.
    Your Christian God is one of hundreds, if not THOUSANDS of gods and demons various human cultures have prayed to, worshiped, lived, died, and killed for. Nothing separates yours from any of those others. Nothing.
    The infered conclusion is that they are all false. That's all. Atheism means literally the lack of god belief.
    The lack of theistic thinking. It is in this arena that true scientific discovery can be made, and mistakes discovered.
    This gives genuine science the property of being a self-correcting system.
    Religion, on the other hand, starts with the conclusion, and pays attention only to that.
    It ridicules, decrys and twists anything that does not support the original premise.
    No one else's conclusions matter unless they agree with the zealot's narrow dogma.
    That's not true of an atheist, nor of a scientist. Atheism is NOT dogma, it's the lack of it.
    Atheism is NOT a religion, it's the rejection of ALL religion.
    We don't "believe" anything. We either understand something or we do not.
    And that in which we place our confidence is open to any and all scrutiny.
    It can and DOES change as new facts come to light. But NO fact has ever indicated the presence of an all powerful
    God; Christian, Bhuddist, Taoist, etc etc modern or ancient, NONE.
    If there IS EVER to be a paradise, it is something we must work toward here on this Earth, as we all live here,
    alive together in a common struggle to survive and find happiness.
    THAT, ladies and gentleman, is the difference.
    Only then could we ever truly be one nation, Indivisible.
    In fact, perhaps the concept of nations and borders and politics must entirely go away before that can happen,
    but let's start by getting rid of the BAD IDEAS before acting on some good new ones.

    June 23, 2010 at 8:38 pm |
    • Umme Omar

      If the religious books are based on lack of factual information, where is an atheist's big book of factual information, knowledge, factual evidence so that it can be tested, coroborated and is open to genuine scrutiny and blah blah blah?
      Religious books not only command their followers to worship God, they also have guidance for them. Where is an atheist's book for code of conduct? The obejctive of the religious people is to gain rewards for being kind to the Creation of the God. What is the purpose of life for an atheist?

      Moreover, the biggest scientist of all times, Einstein may not be a religious person but he believed that there is a supreme being.

      I don't know about others, but my religious book 'Quran' challenges the non believers to write a book which is its equivallent if they think that its written by men. Islam is here for 1400 years but where is the book of atheists?

      June 23, 2010 at 11:22 pm |
    • Greg

      Response to "Umme Omar":

      The athiest's big "book" of facts is any that contains them. It's called education, and it involves
      teaching the mind HOW to think, not WHAT to think.

      You are correct that a religious person's motivation for all actions is to seek reward or avoid punishment
      in a claimed "afterlife". That's called abdication of personal responsibility and removes any genuine
      selfless motivation for any action or inaction. The non-believer is no so constrained.

      You asked me, in a roundabout way, "what is the meaning of life" (if you're an athiest), assuming that
      since my meaning is not yours, I must not have one. Ok, do you see the problem with that??
      The meaning of life from a biological standpoint is to have one, i.e. TO LIVE.
      As long and as healthy as possible, and to reproduce.
      The meaning of life from a philosophical / moral standpoint is different from person to person,
      whether they worship (or "kinda" believe) in your God or any other, or none at all.
      There is no single answer to "what is the meaning of life".
      I would however say this; my own secular (non-religious) meaning of life involves the following:
      To live long, and to live well, while doing no harm to others.
      To contribute to ...whatever. Society, family, the world in general... one can do that simply by helping any other
      living thing to live long and live well. Save a dog from the pound, save a person from hunger or depression, whatever.
      So why do I want to help anyone? Not because I seek the approval of some vain God who demands tribute in the form of obedience (despite "free will"), but because I (like you, like ALL) are descended from social primates.
      We too, are social primates. Locked alone in a room, we go insane. We need human interaction.
      "No man is an island", so to speak. I want to leave this world a bit better off for me having existed at all.
      And to me, that includes educating young (or any) minds with factual information about their existence, and not wishful thinking. It's amazing how much respect for life you gain as an athiest. You realize that since you do "only live once",
      make the most of it. I won't die, kill or harm in the name of anything. I will defend the tangible, but not ideology.
      I do not pledge alleigence to flags, statues or symbols. I live in the United States, and I will defend my home and my family.
      But I do not accept rhetoric. Such as "My country, right or wrong". No no no.

      Get the idea? Being an atheist does not make one immoral or sad or angry, nor dies ti reveal some dark character flaw.
      Being a religious zealot, on the other hand, is a position of self superiority over your fellow man, to the exclusion of anyone who does not believe as you do. It is this dehumanizing that has fueled so many wars and atrocities in the name of various gods.
      The very seed, the first thought of religion, the NOTION of an invisible overseer in the sky
      is inherently dangerous to rational thinking.

      June 24, 2010 at 12:44 am |
    • Greg

      Further response to "Umme Omar":
      Oh, about Einstein believing in a supreme being, as you claimed.
      In his own words, and I am quoting Einstein himself here, it would seem he disagrees with you.

      "My position concerning God is that of an agnostic. I am convinced that a vivid consciousness of the primary importance of moral principles for the betterment and ennoblement of life does not need the idea of a law-giver, especially a law-giver who works on the basis of reward and punishment.” -A. Einstein, 1950

      “The idea of a personal God is quite alien to me and seems even naïve.” -A. Einstein, 1952

      “It seems to me that the idea of a personal God is an anthropological concept which I cannot take seriously. I feel also not able to imagine some will or goal outside the human sphere. My views are near those of Spinoza: admiration for the beauty of and belief in the logical simplicity of the order which we can grasp humbly and only imperfectly. I believe that we have to content ourselves with our imperfect knowledge and understanding and treat values and moral obligations as a purely human problem—the most important of all human problems.” -A. Einstein, 1947

      “I am a deeply religious nonbeliever.… This is a somewhat new kind of religion.” -A. Einstein, 1954

      June 24, 2010 at 1:15 am |
    • Drew

      In another response, I feel most atheists live life to the fullest. We live a good moral life, good to others because we have this one shot at life. It's short, we live it up the best we can because we know when we die, there is no wonderful paradise called heaven. We are already in heaven, it's called life itself, so cherish it now and don't take it for granted like a lot of religious people do in which they believe they can screw up all they want but if they accept the magic man/woman/spirit of their choice, they will live with him in harmony for eternity. As an atheist, the thought of eternal life seems boring, if I live a good 50 years plus here in reality, I'll be happy and content with that.

      June 24, 2010 at 10:36 am |
    • Vivian

      @Greg
      >What's the difference between the religious mind and the atheist / freethinker?
      No difference. All 3 are wrong.

      >Nothing separates yours from any of those others. Nothing.
      I agree to disagree. My 'personal relationship' with Jesus Christ as my Lord and Savior is not religion. Religion is rules and regulations that man cannot possible live by. Jesus fulfilled the law and I now live under grace of God.

      >Atheism is NOT a religion, it's the rejection of ALL religion.
      I disagree. Atheism is a group, some call it a cult just like some say religion is a cult and money is gathered just like in religion. Madelyn O'hare, her son and grand-daughter were murdered b/c of money sent in by all of the atheist groups to support their cause just like religion does.

      >We don't "believe" anything. We either understand something or we do not.
      A wise person once said if one doesn't stand for something they will fall (believe) for anything. Relying on man's wisdom is the same as humanism and the worshipping of idols created by man and what they can see, touch and feel. Ignorance is not a reason, it is an excuse. I do not understand how a lightswitch and a lightbulb work yet by faith I know when I flip the switch the bulb will light up.

      >And that in which we place our confidence is open to any and all scrutiny.
      You may be an exception; however, the tone of some posts are hateful, on both sides. Neither are open to "any and all scrutiny." Christ is my confidence and in Him alone I trust.

      >It can and DOES change as new facts come to light.
      Seek and you shall find when you seek with your Whole heart.

      June 24, 2010 at 5:51 pm |
  14. David Houston, TX

    How can anyone possibly be moral without believing in God?

    A: Pretty much the same way that anyone else can be moral: by considering their actions, weighing the consequences, and deciding whether they are doing more harm than good to themselves and other people.

    Despite what evangelists tell you, the threat of hell is not what stops most people from, say, going on a mass-murdering spree. Even if there was no hell, there are still bad consequences for bad behavior. Our society has laws that threaten criminals with fines, imprisonment and sometimes death. And even if those laws didn't exist, there would still be the threat of punishment from other sources. For instance, if you commit a murder, the victim's family and friends might come looking for revenge. Nobody likes to be taken advantage of. The justice system just makes the whole process a little more orderly, which is a good thing.

    However, it seems like the threat of punishment and the promise of rewards is not really the only thing that keeps people from being bad. With or without religion, people don't like to be hurt, and they usually recognize that other people getting hurt is a similarly undesirable thing. Jesus didn't invent the principle of treating others the way you would like to be treated; it was around for centuries before. When people are in danger of being mistreated, they seek out protection through cooperation and relationships. Society is simply a much larger extension of those relationships.

    With rare exceptions, people (atheists included) don't really have the urge or desire to run out and kill or steal or otherwise harm other people. And honestly, when people say "If it weren't for God holding me back, there would be nothing to stop me from being a criminal", we worry about them. If your grasp of right and wrong is so shaky that you can't stop yourself from doing bad things, and you need someone threatening you with eternal punishment to keep you in line, then we wonder how safe you really are to be near

    June 23, 2010 at 8:28 pm |
  15. Eric G.

    I saw a billboard that said "Worship Me or I Will Torture You Forever. Have a Nice Day."­ -God. Should I be offended?

    June 23, 2010 at 8:25 pm |
  16. jmb2fly

    Just fyi, i think saying under God, more than anything is a form of humility. By saying under God we are putting God in His place relative to our nation; putting our nation under God's authority. Keeping the priorities straight. I realize that for a bunch of ya'll it seems to drive you nuts........ Sorry....Have a nice day.

    June 23, 2010 at 7:45 pm |
  17. Neamiah Scudder

    "Most Athiest are awful, hate filled hurt, people" Well, if this is your actual experience, then it is regrettable that the Athiests you have met so far in life have behaved that way. Maybe they're just tired of religionists demanding that they conform. Nonetheless, throughout history, even up to the present day, religionists have clamoured for the exclusion, torture, and even execution of those who don't follow their religious dictates. The reverse has never been true.

    June 23, 2010 at 7:38 pm |
  18. Eric G.

    If there is no god, then what makes the next kleenex pop up?

    June 23, 2010 at 7:08 pm |
    • Nurse K in San Diego

      Magic?

      June 23, 2010 at 7:39 pm |
  19. RAS

    Not brain washed here thank you very much! Do you think the Matrix was really about religion? Which should be seperate from government... But is intertwined more than a well illustrated kama sutra!

    June 23, 2010 at 6:56 pm |
  20. John

    Awesome. I'm going to get my picture taken with that billboard. We non-believers have to push back against iron-age dogma and faith-based politics. God "told" W. to invade Iraq...that worked out really well.

    June 23, 2010 at 6:43 pm |
    • hunter

      I am not getting sucked into these arguments. But you can't exactly quote one word such as "told." it really doesn't give any sort of context. and once again, that is strictly a literary point, not delving into politics or religion. 🙂

      June 24, 2010 at 10:57 am |
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