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August 2nd, 2010
03:09 PM ET

For sale: Bible said to have belonged to Mormonism's founder

From CNN Salt Lake City affiliate KSL:

The rarest of rare books, a one-of-a-kind family Bible, has surfaced in Salt Lake City. It's going on sale at an asking price of $1.5 million.

That's because its original owner was evidently Joseph Smith Jr., the founder of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

"It is in fact, unique," said rare books dealer Ken Sanders. "It's the only copy in the world, the family Bible belonging to the founder of Mormonism and his first wife, Emma Hale Smith."

Read the full story

- CNN Belief Blog

Filed under: Bible • Books • Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints • United States • Utah

soundoff (56 Responses)
  1. Blake

    @Puragu...now that's what I'm talking about...you hit the spot!

    November 11, 2010 at 9:23 pm |
  2. Puragu

    @peace2all:

    One can believe what one wants. God gave people free will and there is truth in all faiths and God-derived morality in all people. However, Jesus Christ founded one Church and that Church compiled the Bible, both the NT and OT and that Church is the Catholic Church whose first pope was the apostle Peter. After Christs' Resurrection and Ascension, Peter took over with the remaining disciples and followers and the Christian (Catholic) Church was born from which broke away other faiths when certain people came up with their own meanings and interpretations or simply wanted to dictate their own interpretation. Believe what you will but this is the historical truth. Christianity is not Bible worship and it makes this life more beautiful because it adds meaning to it. 🙂

    Best,
    Puragu.

    October 8, 2010 at 11:33 am |
  3. Blake

    Your're getting warmer JNO. "facts"...according to mormon research?

    August 10, 2010 at 8:24 pm |
  4. JNO

    @tony
    Now why would I want to go to a site that's full of ambiguity for some actual "facts"...come on.

    August 10, 2010 at 8:19 pm |
  5. Tony

    Wow, the number of facts I've read in these comments is lower than the average number of wives a married Mormon has– which is one. I hope nobody is believing all this garbage. Go to Mormon.org or LDS.org for some actual facts about the church instead of listening to people who were "raised in Salt Lake City".

    August 9, 2010 at 11:46 am |
  6. JNO

    @peace to all
    Mormon doctrine on the Trinity is very different than traditional Christianity.
    1. Most important is they believe Christ is a created being, just like us.
    That alone puts a permanent wedge between Catholic/Protestant/Orthodox doctrine and theirs.

    2.They do not believe in the absolute divinity/deity of Christ.

    3. They believe that the Holy Spirit left the earth when Paul died (which leads to their
    practice of baptism of the dead, Since there was no one saved since Paul's death, but
    God loves us so much, if we get our ancestors baptized, they can be redeemed). They didn't become experts at genealogy just for the fun of it.

    4.Someday, we will be like God, with our own planets to rule and start the process over.
    This supports their doctrine of polygamy, not for lust, but to bring as many children into this world as possible to ascend to their Godhood and spread throughout the universe.

    I wish I was making this up.
    PS: Many of us object to them using the term Jesus Christ of Latter day Saints. It confuses people and causes other non Christian groups to lump them in with us.
    Hope this shed a little light for ya Peace

    August 6, 2010 at 7:17 pm |
  7. protectfreedoms

    I do not understand why anyone would want the Family Bible of a known polygamist who had at least two dozen wives.

    August 6, 2010 at 1:32 pm |
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The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.