home
RSS
September 3rd, 2010
11:02 AM ET

'My own Dad tried to kill me' survivor credits God

When a South Carolina mother recently was accused of suffocating her two young sons, CNN Radio's Amanda Moyer was asked to look for someone who had survived an attack by their mother or father.

She found the horrific yet inspirational story of Chris Keith, now 30.

When he was 5, his father killed his mother and brother in their Tulsa, Oklahoma, home. He also shot Chris in the head, before committing suicide.

Chris credits God with saving him. He now speaks to youth groups and juvenile justice centers, hoping his message will resonate with a struggling teen.

He often reflects on one of his favorite biblical passages, Jeremiah 29:11:

"'For I know the plans I have for you," declares the Lord, "plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future."

Read the full story

- CNN Belief Blog

Filed under: Christianity • Death • Journeys

soundoff (72 Responses)
  1. Renee Hernandez

    In a few weeks I shall be 56 years old, that is a"miracle". My mother tried to kill me when I was 3 months old in an oven. My father who was a Cuban immigrant saved me in the nick of time but after my mother was put in a mental institution left me with my maternal grandparents who were both alcoholics. My mother's brother heard of this when i was there about 1 month. He saved me from death again because my grandparents were too consumed with alcohol to care for me properly. I was malnourished & had pneumonia. My uncle Harvey & aunt Agnes semi-adopted me from that point. It was good for some years till I was about 8 years old when my aunt's son who was 22 years old died in a horrific car accident in N.J He was decapitated. Unfortunately my aunt worshipped her son not God. When he died her world crumbled & I was not "good" like her son. She became progressively more & more abusive verbally,physically, & their was an episode of sexual abuse. I , in my childish ways, tried desparately to be "good" for her but I could never measure up to her son. I left home finally at age 16 to save my life..one day I came home & a hammer flew by my head thrown by her in anger. I began my search for God & meaning to life very young..neither my uncle or aunt went to church but at around 7-9 years of age I started attending church....After I left home I lived in a house near Asbury Park ,N.J that was owned by a woman who was a medium. I became involved in the occult then. I had some very interesting experiences there one being my room catching on fire the night I decided to give my heart to Jesus Christ & accept his substitutionary death for me. Since then I have had other near death experiences but I know that God has protected me for a reason. These are the last days of the earth, time to take account of one's life & seek the love of God...love is pure self-sacrificial never seeks it's own but gives freely ..yet love is totally joyful!!

    September 4, 2010 at 5:06 pm |
  2. Bee Leaf

    This is an horrific story, to be sure, and his survival is amazing, astonishing and wonderful; but to claim that this survival was caused by an invisible "Superman" simply has no basis in fact.

    If he claimed that he survived because of his lucky blue rabbit's foot or that it was because he ate all of his vegetables the night before, what would you say?

    September 4, 2010 at 4:23 pm |
  3. a friend

    I can't believe how many posts are doubtful of this man's miracle. If this were your brother, son or loved one...you too would say it is a miracle he is alive when his entire family died in such a horrific way. Whether you're religious or not it is nothing short of a miracle. A miracle he was found still alive, a miracle the emergency crew got this little boy to the hospital in time, a miracle a doctor was available to perform such an operation, a miracle he survived the operation, a miracle he was not brain damaged as a result, a miracle he has a voice to share his story of survival, strength and faith, a miracle that some people still show compassion in this tragic world, a miracle that God had a guiding hand in everyone's life on that day and everyday if they just ask for his will.
    God Blessed you, Chris, and God Bless the rest of your life.
    Tim

    September 4, 2010 at 10:15 am |
    • David Johnson

      There are survivors of many horrific disasters. There were survivors of the atomic bomb drop on Hiroshima. It is a matter of random chance.

      The bomb went off. Maggie was in the basement getting a jar of pickles. She lives. No miracle, just chance. If the bomb went off 15 minutes later, Maggie would have been watering her garden outside...

      I once participated in a class experiment. A sheet of white paper was spread out on the floor. A small bucket of plastic balls, coated with blue chalk dust, was dumped onto the paper. The chalk dust left little blue "dots" and smears, all over the paper. Some of the paper, between the dots, was still perfect, not touched in any way by the chalk dust.

      Another paper was spread out and the experiment repeated. Again, the chalk dust caused dots and smears on the paper. Some of the paper remained clean. But the clean areas were different from the first paper.

      Now imagine that the dropped balls were a natural disaster. Imagine that death and destruction occurred wherever the chalk dust collected.
      Imagine that whatever was in the area, of where the paper was clean, survived untouched.

      You could perform the experiment a billion times. Each time, new areas of the paper would be colored and not colored.

      If there were people and objects populating the paper, each "toss" of the chalk dusted balls, would result in new survivors and new casualties.

      It is random chance and coincidence. No miracles. No god.

      By the way, I got an "A" on this! No miracle. Just a lot of hard work.

      Cheers!

      September 5, 2010 at 1:50 pm |
    • Kate

      @David Johnson

      There's a flaw in your chaos theory logic as it might apply to God though

      During your experiment, did you at any time consciously try to influence a ball landing or avoiding one specific area? If you just dumped the bucket of balls over the paper, that would make the experiment relatively invalid to the question since it's not the level of precise control to try to influence the results that would be analogous to a deity trying to deliberately hit one, or miss one.

      This is where chaos theory falls down – it can only give you an answer that is valid in the absence of specific intention.

      In the context of this story, the chances of any direct intention by a deity, in who lived and who died, is questionable I agree. There are too many things could have been why he lived (I listed the ones that point to his faith giving him the will himself to survive, as his own, elsewhere on the thread. But you're introducing a calculation that presumes the events were, conclusively, without any intervention – which you can't rule out any more than the religious here can prove.

      Just contradictin'

      September 5, 2010 at 2:06 pm |
    • David Johnson

      @Kate

      You said, "But you're introducing a calculation that presumes the events were, conclusively, without any intervention – which you can't rule out any more than the religious here can prove."

      Nope, can't prove a negative. But the experiment shows how things happen, people die and survive, without any intervention of a god. Can the fundies say, "God was driving the bus, that hit the crowd."? Yep. But I can show them how it's possible for the bus to hit the crowd and some will survive and some will die, without a god "aiming". LOL

      People who survive a catastrophe, are free to claim god delivered them. Heck, it makes them feel special.
      The people who hear that god saved them, are happy to have confirmation of their belief.
      It's a win, win!

      Except, that's not true. What about the little boy whose mom died in the disaster? How come god didn't think she was special?
      Ahhh, what does it matter. We will tell the boy his mom is with Jesus now. Or explain to the child how god has this great plan, which unfortunately didn't include his mother. Can you say "Years of therapy"?

      You can lead a fundie to truth, but you can't make them think.

      Cheers!

      September 5, 2010 at 2:38 pm |
    • Fast Eddie

      @David Johnson

      What about the possibility of ESP? Telekinetics, telepathy, seeing the future, etc.
      hmm.

      September 5, 2010 at 2:43 pm |
    • David Johnson

      @Fast Eddie

      @David Johnson

      You asked, "What about the possibility of ESP? Telekinetics, telepathy, seeing the future, etc.
      hmm"

      Damn your eyes and keen mind!

      Yes, I have been plagued by this. There have been documented cases of people "getting" a premonition to not get on a plane. The plane later crashed. There are other events like this, but the plane is a good example.

      I don't know. But my ignorance is not a proof of god, as you know.

      September 5, 2010 at 3:02 pm |
    • David Johnson

      @Fast Eddie

      You asked, "What about the possibility of ESP? Telekinetics, telepathy, seeing the future, etc.
      hmm"

      Damn your eyes and keen mind!

      Yes, I have been plagued by this. There have been doc umented cases of people "getting" a premonition to not get on a plane. The plane later crashed. There are other events like this, but the plane is a good example.

      I don't know. But my ignorance is not a proof of god, as you know.

      September 5, 2010 at 3:04 pm |
    • Kate

      @David Johnson

      As I'm sure you and others like Fast Eddie, Frogist, and peace2all have noticed, I don't talk about my own beliefs, faith, or the like when I post. I try very hard to remain neutral and play devil's advocate both for and against out of respect for those whose beliefs may differ from my own (and that being returned by all of you has been noticed and is appreciated!)

      With that in mind, it's hard for me to give you an answer that would be honest, but keeps that neutrality.

      As usual you have extremely good points, that anyone would be hard pressed not to answer with the default "Gods will" style answer. But for most I think when faced with situations that beggar belief and understanding, falling back on that is possible the only way they can make sense out of tragedies.

      I think you should separate the "Mommy is with God now" answers to kids from the "It was part of God's plan" though. Personally, I don't ascribe to the idea that God has any plan for us in life, which is why I make that distinction between chaos and intention. There isn't any, if it's going to happen, it's going to happen, that's the way the dice roll.

      But the explanation that stops a kid (or an adult even) from falling apart at the un-knowable reasons behind such things is a stopgap, a mental pacifier of sorts, until they can move on again.

      In that respect, religion is beneficial. It's only when you get people like Pat Robertson trying to use religion to blame events on people, to blame survival on people, that you wander into the realms of destructive religion.

      Just ramblin'

      September 5, 2010 at 4:23 pm |
  4. Joan Cichon

    I guess god didn't have a plan for your mother and brother – or for your father, for that matter. But, since it is impossible to reason someone out of an opinion they didn't reason themselves into ...

    September 4, 2010 at 2:11 am |
    • Ike Abootment

      "But, since it is impossible to reason someone out of an opinion they didn't reason themselves into"

      Wow, that might just be one of the best quotes I've read on this topic...nice!

      September 4, 2010 at 10:06 am |
  5. toddsaed

    I can personally attest to the fact there is a God having gotten a vibe from a consciousness of infinite love and mercy,
    from outside the universe , behind the stars, when in the army. This was unsought for and terrifying. After the army many spiritual experiences with yoga came, not predictable, God does not control all of reality, free will is one of his main gifts so we can become perfect like him, as the BUddha, who I believe was the ninth reincarnation of God, taught, you must live right in this world, no need to fret about another world, and when desire is blown out with Nirvana, after untold number of life times, you never suffer or cause suffering again, and can save souls like the Boddhisatva, so the evil one has done will be shown in the mirror of karma and you punish yourself in a hellish after life, until the karma is used up in the world. Or you go to a blissful after life with good karma or action. This divine spirit is beyond human experience and knowledge so Hawkings proof of creation does not contradict the existence of God, or affirm it, the material universes get one quarter of his energy,
    and you can get 78% of the powers of God, do not believe me , any of the phony religions, just practice and experience it for yourself, and you will be reassured and pacified to infinity. Finding your Self in the Great Spirit vast communal Self, or playing hide and seek with it, a great adventure far beyond this world.

    September 4, 2010 at 1:22 am |
    • Marc-the-Pooh

      toddsaed wrote: "Finding your Self in the Great Spirit vast communal Self, or playing hide and seek with it, a great adventure far beyond this world."

      You must be referring to the spiritual journey as the "great adventure far beyond this world". How true!

      'You will seek me and find me when you seek me with all your heart." (Jeremiah 29:13, NIV) This passage appears one sentence after Chris K.'s favorite scripture passage or Bible verse. It tells the precondition and the "how" for finding God - to seek with all one's heart or to seek God by applying and committing one's being totally. But before that is the question "where do we do our seeking?" At the one place we never do: within our being.

      May you all discover and experience what lies at the deep center of your being.

      September 6, 2010 at 3:12 pm |
  6. Anon

    It is impossible for humans to understand by human logic God's plans and ways. It is like a cockroach able to comprehend a human being. Attempting to understand why God didn't stop the bullets fired by the father and preventing the tragic deaths of the mom and the survivor's sibling is like trying to fit God into your own understanding. Although the reasons behind the death of the mom and the sibling are beyond human understanding, it is impossible to try to understand the survivor as being a miracle of God, even though we humans can not fully comprehend it. God is not your Genie in a Bottle that you can negotiate, plead, beg, or rationalize with to have your way or for human beings to fully comprehend.

    September 3, 2010 at 7:30 pm |
  7. TammyB

    Even if you do or don't believe in God, this story is pretty awesome and the guy is inspirational if for nothing else that he went on to inspire others not to hate, no matter what the horrendous cir-c-umstances in their lives. How many of us could do the same?

    September 3, 2010 at 6:25 pm |
    • Kate

      @TammyB

      Right on the money as usual. Religion might be a factor in why the guy does what he does, but the fact he does it to begin with is the real story!

      Just praisin'

      September 3, 2010 at 7:03 pm |
  8. TammyB

    Even if you do or don't believe in God, this story is pretty awesome and the guy is inspirational if for nothing else that he went on to inspire others not to hate, no matter what the horrendous circumstances in their lives. How many of us could do the same?

    September 3, 2010 at 6:23 pm |
  9. Kate

    @TheRationale & NAS

    Why do people keep on expecting divine intervention?

    Just sayin'

    September 3, 2010 at 6:02 pm |
    • Marc-the-Pooh

      You ask: "Why do people keep on expecting divine intervention?"

      Answer: Because we as humans do not always intervene at the right point in time and/or place to prevent a wrong from being committed or to right a wrong. In most cases, there is sheer apathy or indifference on the part of the populace.

      September 6, 2010 at 2:09 pm |
    • Kate

      @Marc-the-Pooh

      You're almost as cynical as me about civilized people ... For some reason it makes me sad that I'm not the only one 😦

      September 6, 2010 at 9:16 pm |
  10. NAS

    It is fantastic that he was able to live, but "God" didn't have any part of it.

    ***He often reflects on one of his favorite biblical passages, Jeremiah 29:11:

    "'For I know the plans I have for you," declares the Lord, "plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future." ***

    So if "God" exists, what did he/she/it have planned for Chris' brother?

    September 3, 2010 at 5:57 pm |
    • Marc-the-Pooh

      It was "time's up" and exit time for the brother of Chris. Apparently for Chris, he still had a job to do in this plane of existence.

      September 6, 2010 at 1:59 pm |
  11. TheRationale

    And people still believe in God. Only a disgustingly evil, malicious, sadistic God would allow such crap to happen (oh wait, the doctors, I mean God, saved one).

    Any passing stranger would try to stop this guy's killings, but a God with all the power in the universe to does not? It is truly pitiful what some people believe.

    September 3, 2010 at 4:08 pm |
    • David Johnson

      Yes, it is pathetic.

      September 3, 2010 at 10:11 pm |
  12. David Johnson

    I have a meeting. Later!

    September 3, 2010 at 1:12 pm |
  13. Kate

    @David Johnson

    If you consider "It's a miracle he's alive" as hyperbole that is used to explain the fact surviving was "unlikely", would that be a better use of the word "miracle"?

    If you take the literal concept of miracle out of the story, it's still got a connection with a God, but switches back to the "faith" side. If belief in God gave the kid the strength to crawl and be spotted by the medics, God did play a part in that.

    Similarly, if belief in God gave the kid a purpose when he realized his family didn't die in a car wreck, and that belief gave him the strength to face that in his own mind, then God did play a part in that.

    (Incidentally, will any kid believe "Your parents died in a car crash" ever again? Why does that have to be the default lie they're told in circ.umstances where it was no such thing?)

    You can argue against evidence of direct intervention by God, miracles, if you like – but you still have to acknowledge that invoking God personally to give you strength to face things could be seen as indirect intervention, or at the very least that belief itself helps in some cases.

    Just musin'

    September 3, 2010 at 12:31 pm |
    • David Johnson

      I consider you such a good person, it is hard for me contest what you say.

      I certainly don't see how any of those things could not occur without the intervention of god.

      People have cut off their own trapped limbs to save their lives. The survival instinct is strong.

      Yes, I could not deny that his faith has helped him endure. But that is not evidence for the god, the fundies on this blog, are thanking. LOL

      September 3, 2010 at 12:54 pm |
    • Kate

      @David Johnson

      Wow, thank you, that's quite a compliment ... Step 9? *grins*

      Srsly though.

      I think that might be part of the problem with calling everything a "miracle". Is the word being used to imply direct intervention too much when really the meaning is "the situation is so extreme I can't believe how anyone could have survived".

      English sometimes sucks for a language. Anishinaabeg is much nicer.

      I also wonder if the casual use of the word "miracle" isn't one of the reasons why people react strongly against the concept.

      There are always going to be times when we have absolutely no idea how someone survives a situation – getting a .38 in the back of the head and living might be down to bad aim, might be down to great surgeons, and could be down to direct intervention by God – but it's too easy to rely on "Oh, it's a miracle" because then it diminishes what this kid survived, his strength of character, and his faith (in God, or himself, either/or).

      Try it from the opposite direction – what would people's reactions to him have been if, after surviving the massacre, he fell into depression, alcoholism – and turned into the Discovery Channel shooter, or the Veteran who shot the Mormon Bishop? The thing that people call a miracle would still have been the same, would who he became afterwards have resulted in people not calling his survival a miracle?

      Just sayin'

      September 3, 2010 at 1:17 pm |
    • peace2all

      @kate

      O.K.....So Dave is off to a meeting...... That leaves me, you, and hopefully someone else to deal with your scorching posts.

      Again, from yesterday...'please don't send the Jeh. Wits to my door....! Hopefully, you are over ...'just plottin' 🙂

      Peace....

      September 3, 2010 at 2:43 pm |
    • Kate

      @peace2all

      Frogist is lurking in wait for Reality somewhere I think, not sure where verify is though ... As for the Jehovah's Witlesses, I only use that as a threat, I would never be that cruel for real!

      I think 🙂

      Just grinnin'

      September 3, 2010 at 3:19 pm |
  14. Ulises

    There is no miracle hear, It's great to hear that he survived this horrific event without a trace of remembering. Yet, he has been fed a selfish belief that some almighty being for some reason or another spared his life. He survived for some explainable reason and he rather believe that his life was spared and not his family members. How can this person believe such things. Does he believe that his god did not have a plan for his other family members. I'm sure he does not because he has been fed other irrational explanations for their deaths. He only continues to believe these things, because it brings some sort of self-satisfaction. If he did not get a feeling of being special from these beliefs then he would find other beliefs that do.

    September 3, 2010 at 12:25 pm |
  15. David Johnson

    You fundies are always inventing "miracles" to shore up your own faiths.

    A tornado races through a trailer park, destorying everything in its path. One man and his trailer are untouched. It is a miracle!

    No it isn't. It's random chance. Rewind everything and send the tornado back through the park. This time the fellow and his trailer will be toast. Someone else may well survive.

    Miracles consist of coincidence and random chance. No god required.

    September 3, 2010 at 12:21 pm |
    • Kate

      @David Johnson

      If you consider "It's a miracle he's alive" as hyperbole that is used to explain the fact surviving was "unlikely", would that be a better use of the word "miracle"?

      If you take the literal concept of miracle out of the story, it's still got a connection with a God, but switches back to the "faith" side. If belief in God gave the kid the strength to crawl and be spotted by the medics, God did play a part in that.

      Similarly, if belief in God gave the kid a purpose when he realized his family didn't die in a car wreck, and that belief gave him the strength to face that in his own mind, then God did play a part in that.

      (Incidentally, will any kid believe "Your parents died in a car crash" ever again? Why does that have to be the default lie they're told in circumstances where it was no such thing?)

      You can argue against evidence of direct intervention by God, miracles, if you like – but you still have to acknowledge that invoking God personally to give you strength to face things could be seen as indirect intervention, or at the very least that belief itself helps in some cases.

      Just musin'

      September 3, 2010 at 12:30 pm |
    • Mike

      "Miracles consist of coincidence and random chance. No god required"

      But where does the situtation come from that causes the random chance. God, so he is require. Again Gen 1&2. If there was no God there would be no tornado or trailer park. So "random chance" absolutely requires God.

      September 3, 2010 at 12:46 pm |
  16. David Johnson

    Why is it proof how great God is?

    Several years ago, this monstor kidnapped a child. He made her last minutes alive a misery and then even buried her alive.

    I thought at the time, how could this happen? Why didn't god give this guy a heart attack or stroke? Where was the lightening bolt?

    I thought more on this, and then realized I was being too dramatic. All that would have been necessary, was for god to send a policeman around at the time of the abduction. He could have caused the child to have a belly ache and to stay safe in her bed that day. A zillion small things could have been done to save this child. Yet, the police found the child in a shallow grave.

    I am glad this fellow survived his father's attack. But it wasn't a miracle. His brother died as did his mother. God didn't save them, because he didn't have a plan for them?

    This fellow didn't die, because not everyone who is shot dies. Some wounds are not fatal.

    There is no supernatural happening here. How could there be, when there is no god?

    September 3, 2010 at 12:13 pm |
    • Tacoma

      Gods purpose does not always match our purpose. Gods plan does not always match our plan. Sometimes we just can not answer or see why He prevents one thing from happening while allowing another but we have to remember that he loves everyone of us. Look at Chris, I am sure that at fourteen he couldn't have imagined the lives he would touch with his story but God could. Don't misunderstand I don't believe what happened to Chris and his family was in Gods original playbook for their lives but because of sin Chris's father chose to ignore Gods best for him and God knowing what would happen allowed it to happen (I know that is a hard thing to crasp and there are days I struggle with God about it but the cool thing is he welcomes my struggle).

      September 3, 2010 at 12:49 pm |
    • David Johnson

      @Tacoma

      I can't believe you are dragging out the "You just don't understand god's great plan defense".

      No, I don't understand his great plan. But I do understand human suffering.

      If god can prevent evil but doesn't, he is not all good. If god wants to prevent evil but can't, he is not all powerful.

      Either way, why call him god?

      If you are going to say, he will do away with evil when Jesus comes back, that is lame. A lot of misery has happened in the last 2,000 years.

      September 3, 2010 at 1:08 pm |
    • Tacoma

      @David Johnson,

      I think my responses must frustrate you as much as your responses frustrate me. Maybe what I said there wasn't for the benefit of you but to offer a counterpoint for the people reading these comments because I do not think you and I will ever come to an agreement about religion.

      September 3, 2010 at 1:48 pm |
    • Marc-the-Pooh

      To: David Johnson

      You are right that there is no God in the human scene... not until and unless God is released from within our hearts and souls through our individual transformation into the "Christ" of God. In the meantime, the human condition will prevail and human suffering will persist in the world. The kingdom (consciousness) of God needs to be established in our individual hearts and souls, not in our church, mosque, synagogue, or temple buildings.

      September 6, 2010 at 10:42 am |
  17. Ashley M.

    This is proof to how great God really is.

    September 3, 2010 at 11:54 am |
    • freetime1

      "This is proof to how great God really is."

      If you think this is proof of anything,you would have gotten an F in the logic classes I have taken.

      September 3, 2010 at 12:06 pm |
    • CatholicMom

      freetime1,

      People should screen more carefully the schools they attend.

      September 3, 2010 at 12:13 pm |
    • Ulises

      I know, who else could drive a loving father to kill his family.

      September 3, 2010 at 12:26 pm |
    • Kate

      @Ulises

      That really makes no logical sense, you know – you're willing to consider God would drive a father to kill his family, but not that God might save one on the grounds there isn't a God to begin with.

      Curious.

      September 3, 2010 at 12:34 pm |
  18. Monique Manna

    This story was so sad yet amazing...to live through this and become the man that he has become, the father and husband...simply amazing. Reading what he does today is truly an inspiration!

    September 3, 2010 at 11:30 am |
  19. Ron A.

    Thank you for sharing your experience, strength and hope. One reason why you survived to tell your story so I could read it.
    To remind me we serve an awesome God. We are loved. God loved your father too. Your whole life has touched many and will continue to. Your mother shines down with the love of Christ and your family. That is why you survived to give your son life and a father who loves him. It does not get more simplier than that. Bless you Chris. Thank you!

    September 3, 2010 at 11:11 am |
    • freetime1

      " One reason why you survived " is because smart educated men worked hard to save you. It was not god that fixed the gunshoot wound to your head, it was doctors.

      September 3, 2010 at 12:09 pm |
    • David Johnson

      @Ron A.

      You said, "Thank you for sharing your experience, strength and hope. One reason why you survived to tell your story so I could read it.
      To remind me we serve an awesome God."

      Duhhh! Hello! That awesome god let the guys mother and brother die. Consider how much more awesome god would have been, if he had the father get help, before he became this insane.

      Answer me this: How would this of happened any different if there was no god? Where is the supernatural event, that could not have happened, without the aid of a god? Has no one ever survived being shot before?

      September 3, 2010 at 12:37 pm |
    • Mike

      Without God nothing would have happen at all. Gen 1&2

      September 3, 2010 at 12:43 pm |
    • peace2all

      @Mike

      As you know, that does not answer the question. I think we have been here before, where you are quoting bible verses.

      Does not answer, David's questions....

      Peace....

      September 3, 2010 at 2:37 pm |
    • Peter F

      It is definitely an inspiration to read about how God takes someone who is 5 years old with a crazy dad and a bullet in the head and turn him into someone who spreads the love of Christ to our broken world. Astounding!

      September 3, 2010 at 3:01 pm |
    • carol

      God allows us to go through certain situations in order to prove to you that he is there and that he is the one in control not you... and the doctors who saved his life were given the talent and skills to save the boy by God. Don't try to separate science and God i believe they work hand in hand. Einstein proved it.

      September 4, 2010 at 2:41 am |
    • peace2all

      @Carol

      O.K..... It is really F******* late,,, and what exactly have you been smokin'.....?

      I don't even know where to start to...hmmmm 'respectfully' suggest that you may be a bit off in your perception and ... oh facts.

      Good night....

      Peace.....

      September 4, 2010 at 4:24 am |
  20. David Johnson

    This was a terrible tragedy, but I fail to see a miracle.

    September 3, 2010 at 11:07 am |
    • Unregistered.Coward

      Would depend upon ones definition of a miracle, wouldn't it? One might see the simple fact that he survived a gunshot to the head as rather amazing.

      September 3, 2010 at 12:10 pm |
    • carol

      the miracle is that he survived the gunshot to the head..

      September 4, 2010 at 2:32 am |
    • You.Idiot

      How many gunshots to the head can you survive? Test it out sometime.

      September 4, 2010 at 9:34 am |
1 2
Advertisement
About this blog

The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.