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Iranian TV to air interview with woman sentenced to death by stoning
December 10th, 2010
08:49 AM ET

Iranian TV to air interview with woman sentenced to death by stoning

A program on Iran's government-backed Press TV recently took a woman convicted of adultery and murder back to her home in Osku "to produce a visual account" of the death of her husband "at the crime scene."

Press TV posted a story on its website early Friday morning explaining that the program "Iran Today," which will air Friday night, would include interviews with - among others - Sakineh Mohammadi Ashtiani, who was sentenced to be stoned to death.

Press TV's release of still photographs of Ashtiani and her son from the interview, which took place on Sunday, fueled some speculation that they had been released, but there was no evidence or confirmation to support that conjecture.

Read the full story of the woman sentenced to be stoned for adultery here.

- CNN Belief Blog

Filed under: Belief • Courts • Death • Iran • TV

soundoff (8 Responses)
  1. Reality

    Calling All Muslim Wind Breakers and Witness Bearers:

    (function() { var scribd = document.createElement("script"); scribd.type = "text/javascript"; scribd.async = true; scribd.src = "#{root_url}javascripts/embed_code/inject.js"; var s = document.getElementsByTagName("script")[0]; s.parentNode.insertBefore(scribd, s); })()

    "Farting is problematic in Islam. During prayer, a worshipper must not fart. Sahih Bukhari (1.4.137) writes that Allah will not accept a Muslim's prayer if he/she passes wind during the ritual.

    The exception occurs if the worshipper farts silently, or the fart does not smell. In such a case, he/she may continue with the prayer (ibid, 1.4.139).Sunaan Nasai (1.162) writes that if you fart during a prayer you must redo ablution. Sahih Bukhari (9.86.86) says that for a "farter" Allah will not accept his/her prayer until he/she performs another ablution."

    December 12, 2010 at 9:36 pm |
    • Sum Dude

      Since so many people think their shlt doesn't stink, how hard is it to guess that many of them will say their farts don't stink either?

      December 13, 2010 at 10:39 am |
  2. Jamal Ali

    Reality Reality Reality (smh) you crack me up.

    December 12, 2010 at 2:00 pm |
  3. gomezstega

    Let me say that the "United Forensic College" is the friendliest, most helpful and accessible college out there right now. The Criminal Justice curriculum isn’t going to overwhelm you.

    December 11, 2010 at 4:34 am |
  4. Peace2All

    From the Article:

    "Two German journalists who interviewed Ashtiani were arrested in October and charged with espionage. He son and lawyer also were arrested, but it was not clear on what charges."

    "Press TV's release of still photographs of Ashtiani and her son from the interview, which took place on Sunday, fueled some speculation that they had been released, but there was no evidence or confirmation to support that conjecture."

    This whole thing is a tragedy. Oh, and glad to see that there is *no doubt* about her guilt from the wonderful government of Iran...! (*dripping with sarcasm*)

    Peace...

    December 10, 2010 at 8:12 pm |
  5. Reality

    Sir Salman Rushdie captured the foul odor of Islamic laws in his satire,

    "Satanic Verses", p. 376, paperback issue – :

    Mahound = Mohammed
    Gibreel = Gabriel

    "The faithful lived by lawlessness, but in those years Mahound – or should one say the Archangel Gibreel? – should one say Al-Lah? – became obsessed by law.

    Amid the palm-trees of the oasis Gibreel appeared to the Prophet and found himself spouting rules, rules, rules, until the faithful could scarcely bear the prospect of any more revelation, Salman said, rules about every da-mn thing, if a man farts let him turn his face to the wind, a rule about which hand to use for the purpose of cleaning one's behind.

    It was as if no aspect of human existence was to be left unregulated, free. The revelation – the recitation- told the faithful how much to eat, how deeply they should sleep, and which se-xual positions had received divine sanction, so that they leamed that so-domy and the missionary position were approved of by the archangel, whereas the forbidden postures included all those in which the female was on top.

    Gibreel further listed the permitted and forbidden subjects of conversation, and earmarked the parts of the body which could not be scratched no matter how unbearably they might itch.

    He vetoed the consumption of prawns, those bizarre other-worldly creatures which no member of the faithful had ever seen, and required animals to be killed slowly, by bleeding, so that by experiencing their deaths to the full they might arrive at an understanding of the meaning of their lives, for it is only at the moment of death that living creatures understand that life has been real, and not a sort of dream.

    And Gibreel the archangel specified the manner in which a man should be buried, and how his property should be divided, so that Salman the Persian got to wondering what manner of God this was that sounded so much like a businessman.

    This was when he had the idea that destroyed his faith, because he recalled that of course Mahound himself had been a businessman, and a damned successful one at that, a person to whom organization and rules came naturally, so how excessively convenient it was that he should have come up with such a very businesslike archangel, who handed down the management decisions of this highly corporate, if noncorporeal, God."

    December 10, 2010 at 5:37 pm |
    • Laura

      Reality does someone pay you to write all the garbage you post all over the net? I see you everywhere spewing hatred. Clean out your heart man and get a life!

      December 12, 2010 at 6:03 pm |
    • Sum Dude

      I like that Salmon Rushdie quote. It puts Islam into the proper perspective, I think. Nothing but lies to be found in the Q'uran anyway...but preaching to the choir makes Laura all itchy...hmmm.

      December 13, 2010 at 10:37 am |
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About this blog

The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.