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Harry Potter was a good Christian?
December 28th, 2010
06:00 AM ET

Harry Potter was a good Christian?

By Eric Marrapodi, CNN Belief Blog Co-Editor

In a new book out this month, author Danielle Tumminio asserts Harry Potter is good Christian. Tumminio argues Potter lives a life that lines up with Christian values.

“I see him best as a seeker in a world where Christianity is not the vocabulary. I see him best as a seeker trying to live a life of faith in the same way a Christian seeker tries to live a life grace,” Tumminio told CNN.

Tumminio said she wrote God and Harry Potter at Yale: Teaching Faith and Fantasy Fiction in an Ivy League Classroom, to explore the contention by conservative Christians that Harry Potter is akin to heresy.

“I felt like the conversation about the Harry Potter series among Christians was really narrow,” Tumminio said.

Tumminio self-identifies as a Christian in the Episcopal tradition and has a two Masters degrees in religion from Yale University’s divinity school. The book grew out of an undergraduate course on the Potter series she taught at Yale.

When the Harry Potter series first burst on to the scene in 1998, some Christians denounced the book about a young wizard learning the ways of magic. Several small independent churches even publicly burned the books. The series ranks first in the American Library Association’s Top Banned/Challenged books from 2000-2009.

Lauve Steenhuisen, a visiting assistant professor at Georgetown University, says the criticism is understandable given the framework of faith for many conservative Christians.

“The Christian paradigm is that you implore the divine - you await the grace of the divine - God is in total control. It’s dueling kingdoms,” she said. “In conservative Christianity there’s two kingdoms: the kingdom of God and the kingdom of Satan. If (Harry’s) not on one side, he’s on the other.”

But the criticism of the books stung Tumminio on a personal level. She said that criticism “wasn’t’ just doing the books an injustice, it was doing Christianity an injustice. First of all I was astounded so many of (the critics) hadn’t read the books.”

“I think that Harry lives a life that is in line with the values Christians line up with. What he grows to be good at is loving others - the fact he gives his life for his community, the fact that over and over he makes decisions that are better for others,” Tumminio said.

But that doesn’t make Harry Potter a Christian said Steenhuisen.

Hogwarts Academy is a very moral place but that morality is an ethical code entrenched in secularity, she said.

“The faculty is very eager to say we never do the curse of the this or that. There are rules that they are learning that are morally designed. I think it’s incredibly moral. There is tons of restraints of the power they’re gaining. They’re just not Christian. To be Christian it has to be intentional about being in Christ,” she said.

Steenhuisen agrees with Tumminio that Potter is doing his best to grow morally. “He is acting like a moral man. But she is appropriating Christian language and using it metaphorically. He is not a good Christian because the faith is missing,” Steenhuisen said.

Tumminio said it’s up to the reader to bring his or her own metaphorical magic to and read between the lines to see Potter’s faith. She does not think Potter author J.K. Rowling intended the series to be a tome on faith.

“It feels to me that (Rowling) is not a Christian writer in the style of C.S. Lewis, showing them how great Christianity is, to get them to convert. I think for her it’s much more the journey of a seeker exploring and deepening a faith,” she said. The books are, “not for the purpose of creating other Christians.”

Those books have sold over 400 million copies worldwide. Tumminio hopes she has enough credibility with Potter fans to sell her own book. She said she too once stood in line at midnight waiting for the newest Potter book to release.

- CNN Belief Blog Co-Editor

Filed under: Belief • Books • Christianity • Culture & Science • Movies

soundoff (857 Responses)
  1. Michael Bindner

    Harry Potter exists in an alternate universe where the question does not come up. I don't suspect he is a wiccan, since the does not cast spells skyclad. Several Christian holidays are marked – at least Christmas – so I suspect the issue is not simply dealt with – NOR NEED IT BE.

    Frankly, if there were a Voldamort, Harry would not be depended on to vanquish him. A prophet would arise who would smite him in much the same way that Eliajah smote the prophets of Baal (of course, that may be a myth – but so is Harry Potter!)

    December 28, 2010 at 12:57 pm |
  2. Duwayne Anderson

    Christianity doesn't mean what it used to mean. Christianity used to mean loving one's neighbor, giving money to the poor and living a life of poverty devoted to the betterment of humanity. Nowadays, though, Christianity means overdosing on Capitalism, being a Republican, and persecuting the poor, Gays, and other marginalized members of society. In short, Christianity today is the anti-Christ; the opposite of what it once was, and what it's founder (Jesus) taught.

    December 28, 2010 at 12:54 pm |
    • Steve the real one

      Where does the Bible say Christians have to live in poverty? The Bible does not say that! It does say that all good things come from above! If up to you I cannot send my children to college, live in a house, drive my car, have a job, eat a steak and all because that is what YOU think? Where did that come from? I have a home, a car, a job. I don't worship any of that stuff. I worship the one who blessed me with it! Christians ARE doctors, professors, lawyer, and pro athletes and as such get paid !

      December 28, 2010 at 1:39 pm |
    • Frogist

      @Duwayne Anderson: I agree with you. It is common in our lexicon to say "christian" when we mean a good person with all the traits you mention. Unfortunately, I've come to understand that is not necessarily true. Especially today. Living humbly, being mild, regarding others before yourself have been replaced with a biblical interpretation of greed, exclusionary att!tudes, arrogance and persecution. I suppose it's not new. But it is unfortunate. The only ones to blame are the leaders of Christianity who have encouraged this change, and the Christians themselves who have embraced it.

      @Steve, the real one: Your rant is exactly the att!tude I'm speaking of. No one says you shouldn't get paid. Rather that you should be humble about what you have, a sentiment that is severely lacking in your post. And should you be so fortunate as to have come upon a comfortable lifestyle, remember that others are less so.

      December 29, 2010 at 12:26 pm |
  3. JohnQuest

    Rosalind, I guess I am unique among our people, I am the only Brother I know that is a non believer and I don't like the HP series, I read the first two but they really didn't interest me. I don't think "race" has anything to do with it, I think it's mostly culture, I could not relate to HP, or it could be just me.

    December 28, 2010 at 12:50 pm |
  4. capnmike

    Christianity is the biggest hoax ever perpetrated on the human race. It is of so broad a scale as to boggle the mind. Brainwashing MILLIONS of people to believe hogwash and nonsense is criminal. The other religions run a close second.

    December 28, 2010 at 12:49 pm |
  5. BR

    There goes Xtianity again trying to claim something as their own. It's not enough that the character is a decent but flawed person. It has to be, somehow, tied to Xtians. So does Voldemort represent the attrocities in the OT?

    December 28, 2010 at 12:47 pm |
  6. mcore

    Why does the thoughtful, intelligent majority always have to react to / cater to the delusions of the wacky Christian minority?

    December 28, 2010 at 12:45 pm |
  7. Scott

    This insatiable need to inject Jesus into everything is a tad tiring, and at the end of the day a rueful combination of silly and offensive. We have many thousands of years of oral and written historical tradition that clearly shows moral concepts have been with us as a species far far longer than can be accounted for by the existence of Jesus or any other luminous figure in Abrahamic tradition.

    In any other domain of critical inquiry, whether it's scientific, philosophical, or historical, all opinions do not matter. The fact that some ideas and opinions must be excluded is precisely what it is to have a domain of expertise. Religious demagogues rarely display any expertise about morality (or anything else for that matter), so in a discussion about morality religion as a evident source must be excluded from reasonable discussion.

    This writer is nothing more than a religious apologist who is simply choosing to believe that morality derives from his specific religious tradition. All the evidence is that human's gain their morality independent of religion and then use this as a bizarre justification for not noticing their own religion's barbarity.

    December 28, 2010 at 12:45 pm |
    • mcore

      Here, here.

      December 28, 2010 at 12:48 pm |
  8. Glen

    Why does everything have to relate to Christianity?? Christianity only represents 1/3 of the world population! It's not about being a good Christian, it's about being a good person–which it what most religions teach. Harry is being a good Jew, Muslum, etc...It is this sort of egotistical thinking that causes people to have wars over religion.

    December 28, 2010 at 12:44 pm |
  9. Reality

    Jesus was an illiterate Jewish peasant/carpenter/simple preacher man who suffered from hallucinations and who has been characterized anywhere from the Messiah from Nazareth to a mythical character from mythical Nazareth to a ma-mzer from Nazareth (Professor Bruce Chilton, in his book Rabbi Jesus). An-alyses of Jesus’ life by many contemporary NT scholars (e.g. Professors Crossan, Borg and Fredriksen, ) via the NT and related doc-uments have concluded that only about 30% of Jesus' sayings and ways noted in the NT were authentic. The rest being embellishments (e.g. miracles)/hallucinations made/had by the NT authors to impress various Christian, Jewish and Pagan se-cts.

    The 30% of the NT that is "authentic Jesus" like everything in life was borrowed/plagiarized and/or improved from those who came before. In Jesus' case, it was the ways and sayings of the Babylonians, Greeks, Persians, Egyptians, Hit-ti-tes, Canaanites, OT, John the Baptizer and possibly the ways and sayings of traveling Greek Cynics.
    earlychristianwritings.com/theories.html

    For added "pizz-azz", Catholic theologians divided god the singularity into three persons and invented atonement as an added guilt trip for the "pew people" to go along with this trinity of overseers. By doing so, they made god the padre into god the "fil-icider".

    Current RCC problems:

    Pedo-ph-iliac priests, an all-male, mostly white hierarchy, atonement theology and original sin!!!!

    Luther, Calvin, Joe Smith, Henry VIII, Wesley, Roger Williams, the Great “Babs” et al, founders of Christian-based religions or combination religions also suffered from the belief in/hallucinations of "pretty wingie thingie" visits and "prophecies" for profits analogous to the myths of Catholicism (resurrections, apparitions, ascensions, "living eucharists" and immacu-late co-nceptions).

    Current problems:

    Adu-lterous preachers, "propheteering/ profiteering" evangelicals and atonement theology,

    December 28, 2010 at 12:43 pm |
    • Lex

      Read C.S. Lewis Mere Christianity ...

      December 28, 2010 at 1:07 pm |
    • Silver Chair

      @Lex

      Love Lewis' Mere Christianity.

      December 28, 2010 at 1:14 pm |
    • Bob

      > Read C.S. Lewis Mere Christianity ...

      I loved it. Laughed my butt off. I love how the author sarcastically puts up philosophical arguments for why people should believe, pointing out the total absurdity of the event. Classic.

      Pete: "I don't know Jim. I think it might be the Higgs Boson that we just saw."
      Jim: "Can you verify this?"
      Pete: "Yes, there's the telltale signs, we have the proof of the event right here! We've proven the higgs boson!"
      Jim: "But pete, you're forgetting something. What does philosophy say about this?"

      ROFL.

      December 28, 2010 at 3:02 pm |
    • jules

      Lewis' chronicles of narnia each represent a planet and the pagan myths that coincide and have nothing to do with christianity.... christians twisting pagan beliefs for their own use... just like the above story

      December 28, 2010 at 4:02 pm |
    • Lex

      @Jules – I think you are wrong on Narnia – where do you see/get that info? Mine comes form study of Lewis' works in accordance with his own commentary, etc. I would be interested in it, really – I work with youth all the time and finding parallels among religions always piques their interest.

      December 29, 2010 at 12:11 pm |
  10. skivie

    to quote a wise old turtle from Kung Fu Panda, " Christianity, Not Christianity... ( noodles, no noodles)"
    this is about Tumminio selling a book, to make money, and you can take it for what it is worth in that context.
    that being said, she is correct, in stating moral, ethical persons exist outside christianity – we can be tolerannt.
    .... and christians would love to convert moral, ethical persons to christianity. indeed.

    December 28, 2010 at 12:43 pm |
  11. nopretense

    Do comments ever come out of "waiting for moderation" status? I looked and looked and have no idea why my comment is being censored, sorry "moderated".

    December 28, 2010 at 12:42 pm |
    • Reality

      • The moderators of this blog have set up a secret forbidden word filter which unfortunately not only will delete or put your comment in the dreaded "waiting for moderation" category but also will do the same to words having fragments of these words. For example, "t-it" is in the set but the filter will also pick up words like Hitt-ite, t-itle, beati-tude, practi-tioner and const-tution. Then there words like "an-al" thereby flagging words like an-alysis and "c-um" flagging acc-umulate or doc-ument. And there is also "r-a-pe", “a-pe” and “gra-pe”, "s-ex", and "hom-ose-xual". You would think that the moderators would have corrected this by now considering the number of times this has been commented on but they have not. To be safe, I typically add hyphens in any word that said filter might judge "of-fensive".

      • More than one web address will also activate “waiting for moderation”. Make sure the web address does not have any forbidden word or fragment.

      Sum Dude routinely updates the list of forbidden words/fragments.

      Two of the most filtered words are those containing the fragments "t-it" and "c-um". To quickly check your comments for these fragments, click on "Edit" on the Tool Bar and then "Find" on the menu. Add a fragment (without hyphens) one at a time in the "Find" slot and the offending fragment will be highlighted in your comments before you hit the Post button. Hyphenate the fragment(s) and then hit Post. And remember more than one full web address will also gain a "Waiting for Moderation".

      From Sum Dude:

      "Here's my latest list – .....
      --–
      bad letter combinations / words to avoid if you want to post that wonderful argument:
      Many, if not most are buried within other words, but I am not shooting for the perfect list, so use your imagination and add any words I have missed as a comment (no one has done this yet)
      – I found some but forgot to write them down. (shrugs).
      s-ex
      c-um.........as in doc-ument, accu-mulate, etc.
      sp-ic........as in disp-icable (look out Sylvester the cat!)
      ho-mo...whether ho-mo sapiens or ho-mose-xual, etc.
      t-it.........const-itution, att-itude, ent-ities, etc.
      an-al......ban-al
      sh-it
      fu-ck...
      who-re
      tw-at.....as in wristw-atch, (an unexpected one)
      pr-ick
      sl-ut
      c-lit
      va-g....as in extrava-gant, va-gina, va-grant
      hor-ny
      ar-se....yet "ass" is not filtered!
      nip-ple
      po-rn
      c-ock
      nig-ger
      cu-nt
      b-itch
      ra-pe
      jacka-ss...but ass is fine lol
      p-is.....as in pi-stol, lapi-s, pi-ssed, etc.
      soft-ware
      Ja-panese
      There are more, so do not assume that this is complete.
      -–
      okay words that you might not expect to be filtered....!!!
      beaver
      penis
      ass
      crap
      damn
      anal
      anus
      sphincter
      testicles
      testes
      pubic
      boob
      --

      Here's a word to add to the banned list: co-co-on
      whether it's c-oc, or co-on, this is ridiculous

      December 28, 2010 at 12:47 pm |
    • nopretense

      This is what I was trying to post, add sn-atch to your list:

      Some people cannot accept ambiguity at all and they grasp tightly the people and explanations that can "explain it all". When you really want to believe something, when you need to believe it, any evidence will do, even anecdotal evidence will be greedily sn-atched up like a drop of clean water in the open desert and proof to the contrary will be explained away with even the slightest imperfection.

      Religion and science have nothing to do with each other religion is about psychology and emotional need, science is about facts and measurement. It is just as laughable (maybe more so) for a scientist to proclaim that god does not exist as it is for a religious person to claim that evolution is not true.

      December 28, 2010 at 1:06 pm |
    • RichardSRussell

      To this exceedingly helpful list, please add crac-ker as a trigger word.

      Also, a few more examples of words that look perfectly OK but contain hidden mammary glands: ficti-tious, repeti-tion, competi-tion.

      December 28, 2010 at 1:40 pm |
  12. Tam

    It's a work of FICTION!!!!

    December 28, 2010 at 12:41 pm |
    • DrFood

      They're too far gone to heed that dude...

      December 28, 2010 at 12:44 pm |
    • NL

      It's known to be fiction because we have the author's word on that but, in a few hundred years, when people read how JKR 'met' Harry fully formed on a train ride, they might decide that maybe he was a real person after all. Fiction tends to slip into the realm of 'maybe' rather easily when people want the characters to be real.

      December 28, 2010 at 1:02 pm |
  13. suteki

    They have 'Christmas' break so obviously most of the characters *are* Christian but don't talk about it. But this is silly–just because Harry was moral doesn't mean he is automatically a 'good Christian'. Loads of stories out there from non-Christian people are filled with the same types of things–moral people who do the right thing and even give their lives for the good of the community. That doesn't make a non-Christian Christian. Maybe some Christians should consider that there are people who are good who aren't Christian. Amazing? Hopefully not so amazing. Should just be obvious. The fact that this is a PhD working on this is sad to me because it shows a lack of awareness of other cultures. This is at least better than those who burned the books.

    December 28, 2010 at 12:41 pm |
    • RichardSRussell

      So anyone who takes time off around the solstice is automatically a Christian, eh? Interesting. I wonder if all the early Christians who celebrated the feast of Sol Invictus were automatically Mithraites? Be sure to mention this theory to any illegal immigrants you happen to know; they'll be thrilled to discover that taking the day off on the 4th of July makes them Americans.

      December 28, 2010 at 1:34 pm |
    • Frogist

      @RichardSRussell: Harry actually has a Christmas celebration. He is wished "Happy Christmas" and wishes others the same. It not just a break from school to which suteki is referring. Now that doesn't make Harry a fundamentalist or conservative Christian, but it does mean he at least partakes in the Christmas holiday. Personally, I think he celebrates it as any other kid does. Enjoying his presents and being part of a family.

      December 29, 2010 at 11:56 am |
  14. JohnQuest

    Ykcyc, good point we were going a bit off topic, have you read "American Gods", by Neil Gaiman? I read it about 5 or so months ago, it's about our myths and how our "modernity" is changing us and killing our myths. At least, that's what I got out of it. I think that's where the idea accepting a fictional character like HP comes from, it could not have been widely accepted even 100 years ago, our ideas of morality are evolving.

    December 28, 2010 at 12:41 pm |
    • Ykcyc

      I have not, friend. But for anyone with an open mind and an open heart, I would highly recommend the following two books. One is called "A New Earth" by Eckhart Tolle and the other "Dimond in Your Pocket", by Gangagi. It could be an eye opening and a life-changing experience. Or not. In either case...
      Peace.

      December 28, 2010 at 2:26 pm |
  15. Rosalind

    I agree with Steenhuisen. I'm a member of one of the most religiously conservative ethnic groups (black American), in one of the most religiously conservative denominations (Baptist), from one of the most religiously conservative states (S. Carolina) in the United States, and I claim to be a "born again Christian". And, I'm a HUGE Harry Potter fan.

    Unlike some other Christians, I see these books for what they are – ENTERTAINMENT – and I don't read more into them than that. With that said, I do have to say that I do NOT agree with Ms. Tumminio. I agree with Dr. Steenhuisen. Harry Potter is NOT a "good Christian" because to be a good Christian, one first has to BE a Christian. It's not enough to be a good person. As Dr. Steenhuisen writes of Harry, the wizarding world, and Hogwarts: "They’re just not Christian. To be Christian it has to be intentional about being in Christ.”

    So, as much as I like Harry, Ron, Hermione, Dumbledore, and all the rest (except the Malfoys) they don't meet this "criteria". So, while I can definitely see Ms. Tumminio's point of view, I can't agree with her. However, I would like to see some dialogue about the very short part in one of the books (I forget which one) where Harry & company discuss religion. It was very interesting.

    December 28, 2010 at 12:39 pm |
    • Know What

      Rosalind,

      Good that you can see HP as mere entertainment. Now, why can't you see that the Bible is the same thing. Imaginative JK Rowling types lived back then too, you know. The Bible is a work of historical fiction (do you know what that is?: some true events/people embellished with made-up details) , with a few valid morality tales, but rife with myth, legend, fantasy and superst!tion.

      December 28, 2010 at 1:16 pm |
    • bluerosejaci

      I 100% agree with you. The reason others don't understand why we as Christians don't see the Bible as fiction is because they haven't experience the love of God giving them a new life, fiction stories can't do that, but the Bible did say that there will come a time when people will turn from God as I'm seeing happening more and more. Once you understand the message Jesus gave, the hope, joy, love, all the things that Jesus still does for us today, you'll understand how the Bible isn't fiction, its a guide for our life!

      December 28, 2010 at 2:21 pm |
    • Rosalind

      Know What,

      It's not that I can't see the bible as the same thing as a Harry Potter book – it's that I choose not to. I made a conscious choice to be a Christian and believe what I believe. Just as you made a conscious choice to do the opposite. To each his own. Why do you care so much about what I believe?

      December 28, 2010 at 3:47 pm |
    • Frogist

      @bluerosejaci: I've found that fictional stories can do everything you described. And not only literature, but other forms of art as well.
      @Rosalind: How do you make a conscious choice to believe a fictional thing is real? Can I make the choice to believe that Harry Potter and Hogwarts is a real place? I'm curious.

      December 29, 2010 at 11:46 am |
    • Know What

      Rosalind,

      "Why do you care so much about what I believe?"

      I don't care too much what you personally believe (it is a curiosity, though), but when your religion (any religion) insists on controlling the lives of all of us according to its precepts, then it does concern me.

      December 29, 2010 at 12:11 pm |
  16. qmcs

    Conservative Christian are just a tad nuts. All religions that feature a god is just nuts. Period. So who cares about a made up character have the same values as another made up character?

    December 28, 2010 at 12:34 pm |
    • Reality

      Christianity in 2010: a synopsis based on the conclusions of many contemporary historic Jesus experts:

      Jesus was an illiterate Jewish peasant/carpenter/simple preacher man who suffered from hallucinations and who has been characterized anywhere from the Messiah from Nazareth to a mythical character from mythical Nazareth to a ma-mzer from Nazareth (Professor Bruce Chilton, in his book Rabbi Jesus). An-alyses of Jesus’ life by many contemporary NT scholars (e.g. Professors Crossan, Borg and Fredriksen, ) via the NT and related doc-uments have concluded that only about 30% of Jesus' sayings and ways noted in the NT were authentic. The rest being embellishments (e.g. miracles)/hallucinations made/had by the NT authors to impress various Christian, Jewish and Pagan se-cts.

      The 30% of the NT that is "authentic Jesus" like everything in life was borrowed/plagiarized and/or improved from those who came before. In Jesus' case, it was the ways and sayings of the Babylonians, Greeks, Persians, Egyptians, Hit-ti-tes, Canaanites, OT, John the Baptizer and possibly the ways and sayings of traveling Greek Cynics.
      earlychristianwritings.com/theories.html

      For added "pizz-azz", Catholic theologians divided god the singularity into three persons and invented atonement as an added guilt trip for the "pew people" to go along with this trinity of overseers. By doing so, they made god the padre into god the "fil-icider".

      Current RCC problems:

      Pedo-ph-iliac priests, an all-male, mostly white hierarchy, atonement theology and original sin!!!!

      Luther, Calvin, Joe Smith, Henry VIII, Wesley, Roger Williams, the Great “Babs” et al, founders of Christian-based religions or combination religions also suffered from the belief in/hallucinations of "pretty wingie thingie" visits and "prophecies" for profits analogous to the myths of Catholicism (resurrections, apparitions, "living" eucharists, ascensions and immacu-late co-nceptions).

      Current problems:

      Adu-lterous preachers, "propheteering/ profiteering" evangelicals and atonement theology,

      December 28, 2010 at 12:41 pm |
  17. LOL

    Y'all do realize he is not a real person, right?

    December 28, 2010 at 12:32 pm |
  18. Dom

    Why doesn't anyone ever refer to Acts 19 where those in Ephesus burned their books on magic upon converting to Christianity?

    There is clear precedent that this sort of thing was rejected by the 1st century Church.

    I have NOT read the books nor intend to. The fictional character may display "Christian" values. There are many good people in the world and good fictional characters in many forms of liturature. But sorcery/magic/witchcraft are not compatible with the behavior one should pursue as a Christian.

    December 28, 2010 at 12:32 pm |
    • Frogist

      @Dom: This is the problem. You have not even read the books and do not intend to, but enjoy condemning them all the same. How do you approach a non-believer who condemns Christianity? I hope it's not be telling them they cannot because they have never read your bible. Otherwise you would be hypocritical to do so.
      Another thing, I've noticed people who condemn the HP books do so because they say it is an endorsement of witchcraft. But is that true? According to the pagans who have posted, it is not witchcraft. It's fantasy. Do Christians also not read anything by or about Islam, Judaism, Bhuddism fantasy, science fiction etc etc ? Do they reject all of it? Or is it just Harry? If it's just Harry, it does make you wonder why.

      December 29, 2010 at 11:39 am |
    • Know What

      @Dom,

      "But sorcery/magic/witchcraft are not compatible with the behavior one should pursue as a Christian."

      Maybe you mean that sorcery/magic/witchcraft *other than what is found in traditional Christian belief* is not compatible - burning bush, Aaron's staff, magical miracles of all sorts from water to wine to faith healing to baptism. Prayer itself is a kind of sorcery/magic/witchcraft (incantations) and the rituals of many Christian sects qualify under that definition.

      December 29, 2010 at 12:03 pm |
    • Dom

      @ the two comments:

      Question do I really need to read the books to find that the subject does not interest me/undermine my faith? I am sure that everyone has seen a preview for the associated Potter movies or read some type of review of the books. Paul warned the church of the dangers of partaking at the table of God and the table of Satan.

      Yes I will grant that the Bible does contain supernatural events (Burning bush, resurrections, and miracles) as well as the casting out of Demons. But for what purpose? Practice of witchcraft or spiritism was addressed directly in the letter to Galatians as a fleshly work. So there is some sort of distinction between the miracles and witchcraft, sorcery, or magic. So no, prayer to God does not make one a practicer of magic in the context the Bible objects to.

      To put it to rest my opinion is that Potter is not a Christian. He may have been according to the novel’s setting and time period. But the events as portrayed in the novels do not make him a practicing one. Oh, and he's a fictional character. Whoever is attempting to put a *serious* label on a book of fiction is doing Christianity a greater disservice.

      December 30, 2010 at 9:51 am |
  19. Data

    Seriously – There IS news out there CNN – Please go get it. And stop this sort of biased b.s.
    "Potter lives a life that lines up with Christian values." So do I but it does not make me Christian!

    December 28, 2010 at 12:30 pm |
    • DrFood

      Dude...this is the BELIEF BLOG. Look under the US or World sections for current events.

      December 28, 2010 at 12:39 pm |
  20. JohnQuest

    RUSH, Semper Fi, and thank you for the reality check. we are discussing fictional characters and our brothers and sisters-in-arms (our children) are still dying in far away lands. I am a non-believer but I was a Marine before I was a man, my heart breaks with every death, my thoughts and good wishes go to the family.

    December 28, 2010 at 12:30 pm |
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The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.