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Egypt beefs up security for Coptic Christmas Eve
An Egyptian Christian boy holds a cross pendant outside a Coptic church in Cairo on January 5, 2011.
January 6th, 2011
10:40 AM ET

Egypt beefs up security for Coptic Christmas Eve

Egyptian authorities beefed up security Thursday as Coptic Christians warily ushered in Christmas Eve after a New Year's Day bombing in front of a church that killed nearly two dozen of their members.

The Coptic Christians celebrate Christmas according to the Julian calendar and therefore will observe it Friday.

"Police plan a large-scale security operation for tonight to protect Egypt's Coptic Christians and their churches." Col. Alla Mahmoud of the interior ministry said.

In addition, hundreds of supporters gathered outside the prestigious Al-Azhar University on Thursday in a show of solidarity for the Coptic community.

On Wednesday, Egyptian authorities released a sketch of a man they think may be responsible for the attack.

Read the full story here about beefed up Coptic Christmas Eve security.

- CNN Belief Blog

Filed under: Belief • Christianity • Coptic • Death

soundoff (30 Responses)
  1. Mark From Middle River

    Catholic Mom-
    "http://blogs.nationalgeographic.com/blogs/intelligenttravel/2010/12/out-of-office-a-christmas-card.html"

    "The profound strife at the Holy Sepulcher dates back to the Middle Ages, when the Ottoman sultans ruled the land and the Christians couldn't decide which group among them should possess the key that opened and closed the church. The Ottomans thereby established a system now known as Status Quo, mandating that things be done as they always had been. So by default, the Muslim family that had been opening and closing the church for years continued to do so–the same family that does it to this day. "

    It is a part of a great article I once read concerning the fist fight and a ladder that has been standing at the door for over 200 or 300 years because all three groups can not trust each other to take the credit for moving it. The problem now is the roof that needs to be fixed. Each group has tons of funding to fix it but according to the Ottaman rules whoever fixes or maintians the site better than the others gets control of the site. So the roof is the issue now.

    January 8, 2011 at 5:54 pm |
  2. Reality

    Then there is the great Angel Con that all Abrahamics must someday come to grips with:

    Joe Smith had his Moroni.

    Jehovah Witnesses have their Jesus /Michael the archangel, the first angelic being created by God;

    Mohammed had his Gabriel (this "tin-kerbell" got around).

    Jesus and his family had Michael, Gabriel, and Satan, the latter being a modern day dem-on of the de-mented.

    The Abraham-Moses myths had their Angel of Death and other "no-namers" to do their dirty work or other assorted duties.

    Contemporary biblical and religious scholars have relegated these "pretty wingie thingies" to the myth pile. We should do the same to include deleting all references to them in our religious operating manuals. Doing this will eliminate the prophet/profit/prophecy status of these founders and put them where they belong as simple humans just like the rest of us.

    Some added references to "tink-erbells".

    "Latter-day Saints also believe that Michael the Archangel was Adam (the first man) when he was mortal, and Gabriel lived on the earth as Noah."

    Apparently hallu-cinations did not stop with Joe Smith.

    newadvent.org/cathen/07049c.htm

    "The belief in guardian angels can be traced throughout all antiquity; pagans, like Menander and Plutarch (cf. Euseb., "Praep. Evang.", xii), and Neo-Platonists, like Plotinus, held it. It was also the belief of the Babylonians and As-syrians, as their monuments testify, for a figure of a guardian angel now in the British Museum once decorated an As-syrian palace, and might well serve for a modern representation; while Nabopolassar, father of Nebuchadnezzar the Great, says: "He (Marduk) sent a tutelary deity (cherub) of grace to go at my side; in everything that I did, he made my work to succeed."

    Catholic monks and Dark Age theologians also did their share of hallu-cinating:

    "TUBUAS-A member of the group of angels who were removed from the ranks of officially recognized celestial hierarchy in 745 by a council in Rome under Pope Zachary. He was joined by Uriel, Adimus, Sabaoth, Simiel, and Raguel."

    And tin-ker- bells go way, way back:

    "In Zoroastrianism there are different angel like creatures. For example each person has a guardian angel called Fravashi. They patronize human being and other creatures and also manifest god’s energy. Also, the Amesha Spentas have often been regarded as angels, but they don't convey messages, but are rather emanations of Ahura Mazda ("Wise Lord", God); they appear in an abstract fashion in the religious thought of Zarathustra and then later (during the Achaemenid period of Zoroastrianism) became personalized, associated with an aspect of the divine creation (fire, plants, water...)."

    "The beginnings of the biblical belief in angels must be sought in very early folklore. The gods of the Hitti-tes and Canaanites had their supernatural messengers, and parallels to the Old Testament stories of angels are found in Near Eastern literature. "

    "The 'Magic Papyri' contain many spells to secure just such help and protection of angels. From magic traditions arose the concept of the guardian angel. "

    For added information see the review at:

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Angel

    January 7, 2011 at 8:44 am |
  3. Mark from Middle River

    "The Religious Right would very much like to set up a theocracy, with Jesus as the head of state. Only the Christian Right would be able to hear Jesus, so they would tell us His will. This is most certainly a power grab."

    Davey-
    I have said this many times and with mucho respect I gotta say it again... there are churches within the same conferance, let alone denomiation that almost come to fist fights over their intreptation of the scripture. Is this the same Christian Right that is supposed to be united to oppress others who are not Christians?

    When I first came here and got to speak and read what some ..non-troll atheist had to say it stunned me. As a African American male for the first time in my 30+ years I think I understood what it was like to be what some other blacks described as being white. I am talking about the deep intrenched fear that some black folks have that all white America is on the same page and believe exactly the same things.

    I am talking about black folks that believe that every white American woke up thinking about how to hang a African American and went to bed thinking about the same. The problem I had was that I had white friends and I had seen whites who where klan and nazis. They were different and flew in the face of almost all I had learned. When I came here I heard some athiest talking about , for example, all Christians the same fashion that I remembered other blacks talking about whites. Your statement Davey, sorta backs this fear up. I could not believe that those outside of the faith thought that those inisde of the faith were so "lock stepped"in our views.

    I will assure you of this, as much as I would love to see a more Christian based society and government, my fear that it would not be my form of Christianity would concern me more.

    I will leave you with this, check out house of worship called, I think, The Church of the Nativity. Three different denominations of Christianity each have been trying to control the site. It is so bad that a Muslim family has control over the keys to the front door just to keep peace.

    ""But with religion gone, there will be one less club to beat each other with. ""
    – Could you admit that there is the flip side that there would be one less hand to help folks up with. Unless you are one of those that want to say that religion has only done negative acts throughout history. 🙂

    But, let's think about that... No god, No Christian Right. No ladder for the Christian Right to climb to power. LOL

    Would people still fight for power? You, bet. There will be fighting to gain control of countries and people. But with religion gone, there will be one less club to beat each other with.

    January 7, 2011 at 3:13 am |
    • Peace2All

      @Mark from Middle River

      Interesting post -Mark...

      Peace...

      January 7, 2011 at 3:22 am |
    • CatholicMom

      Mark from Middle River,

      Thanks for bringing up the Church of the Nativity, Bethlehem. Some time ago I read about it but it didn’t sound so much that the Christian communities were struggling between themselves so much as the Muslims wanted to keep them out of the site. I cannot find any info stating that the Muslim’s hold the key ……

      Good pictures here:
      Church of the Nativity, Bethlehem

      January 7, 2011 at 11:12 am |
  4. Mark from Middle River

    Ace –

    "There are no..."..... atheist in foxholes... 🙂

    January 7, 2011 at 2:53 am |
  5. Anglican

    Reality. You act as if the Jesus Seminars are the end all regarding the life of Jesus. So typically American. Most current New Testament scholars refute the JS. Borg and Crossan, are still members of the faithful. The rest of your rant is copy and paste. Your rendition of the Nicene Creed is a pitiful example of one who once believed, but has become bitter and resentful. I will pray for you. Peace

    January 7, 2011 at 12:28 am |
    • Mark from Middle River

      Ok yall'.... brace for Realities response post ..

      January 7, 2011 at 2:52 am |
  6. Anglican

    Reality- You note the results of the Jesus Seminars as if they are the end all, know all of the life of Christ. Many New Testament scholars world wide do not agree. You seem to know so much about Jesus, though some of your rant is copy and paste. Borg and Crossan who you so much agree with are still members of the faithful. Your rendition of the Nicene Creed is an example of a pitiful, fallen soul who remembers a spark of something greater than him/herself.

    January 7, 2011 at 12:17 am |
    • Reality

      The Jesus Seminar makes no mention that heaven if it exists is a spirit state. That conclusion comes from common sense and the writings of Aquinas and the sermons of JPII. So where are JC's bones??????

      January 7, 2011 at 8:41 am |
    • Reality

      The Jesus Seminarians:

      Contemporary NT exegetes specializing in historic Jesus studies. Requirements to join, typically a PhD in Religious History or Religion with a proven record of scholarship through reviews of first to third century CE scripture and related docu-ments.

      "Sayings of Jesus:

      The first findings of the Jesus Seminar were published in 1993 as The Five Gospels: The Search for the Authentic Words of Jesus.[3]

      Criteria for authenticity:

      Like other scholars of the historical Jesus, the Jesus Seminar treats the gospels as fallible historical artifacts, containing both authentic and inauthentic material. Like their colleagues, the fellows used several criteria for determining whether a particular saying or story is authentic, including the criteria of multiple attestation and embarrassment. Among additional criteria used by the fellows are the following:

      Orality:

      According to current estimates, the gospels weren't written until decades after Jesus' death. Parables, aphorisms, and stories were passed down orally (30 – 50 CE). The fellows judged whether a saying was a short, catchy pericope that could possibly survive intact from the speaker's death until decades later when it was first written down. If so, it's more likely to be authentic. For example, "turn the other cheek".

      Irony:

      Based on several important narrative parables (such as the Parable of the Good Samaritan), the fellows decided that irony, reversal, and frustration of expectations were characteristic of Jesus' style. Does a pericope present opposites or impossibilities? If it does, it's more likely to be authentic. For example, "love your enemies".

      Trust in God:
      A long discourse attested in three gospels has Jesus telling his listeners not to fret but to trust in the Father. Fellows looked for this theme in other sayings they deemed authentic. For example, "Ask – it'll be given to you".
      [edit] Criteria for inauthenticityThe seminar looked for several characteristics that, in their judgment, identified a saying as inauthentic, including self-reference, leadership issues, and apocalyptic themes.

      Self-reference:

      Does the text have Jesus referring to himself? For example, "I am the way, and I am the truth, and I am life" (John 14:1-14).
      Framing Material:

      Are the verses used to introduce, explain, or frame other material, which might itself be authentic? For example, in Luke, the "red" parable of the good samaritan is framed by scenes about Jesus telling the parable, and the seminar deemed Jesus' framing words in these scenes to be "black".

      Community Issues:

      Do the verses refer to the concerns of the early Christian community, such as instructions for missionaries or issues of leadership? For example, Peter as "the rock" on which Jesus builds his church (Matthew 16:17-19).

      Theological Agenda:

      Do the verses support an opinion or outlook that is unique to the gospel, possibly indicating redactor bias? For example, the prophecy of the sheep and the goats (Matthew 25:31-46) was voted black because the fellows saw it as representing Matthew's agenda of speaking out against unworthy members of the Christian community."

      January 7, 2011 at 4:23 pm |
  7. Anglican

    @Gary. Sacred belief (sp) Not a Freudian slip. A very long day.

    January 6, 2011 at 10:50 pm |
  8. Anglican

    @Gary. Scared belief. Probably, though I wish otherwise for your sake, you can not understand. As far as Geology, I believe this earth is millions and millions of years old. I understand fossils and fuel, drilling mud etc. I am aware, and believe the proposed origins of the Himalayan mountains( continental shift) What is your point? Do you want to compare brainpans? Just because I am Christian, does not mean I am not informed.

    January 6, 2011 at 10:40 pm |
  9. Anglican

    Reality- I really hope you know what you are doing. I really do.

    January 6, 2011 at 9:54 pm |
    • Gary

      @ Anglican ,George just curious besides some religious texts written thousands of years ago. What exactly drives you to believe in your religion? What is your opinion of old earth. Have you guys ever studied Geology? Pangea puzzle,mid oceanic ridges,erosion escarpments,continental puzzles,fossils,fossil fuel derivatives?????

      January 6, 2011 at 10:12 pm |
    • Reality

      Anglican,

      Take a hard look at this before you reply. Review in your mind not only the spirit nature of heaven (if it exists) and the conclusions of rigorous historical reviews of the resurrection and ascension stories.

      Saving Christians from the Resurrection Con:

      From that famous passage: In 1 Corinthians 15 St. Paul reasoned, "If Christ has not been raised, our preaching is useless and so is your faith."

      Even now Catholic/Christian professors of theology are questioning the bodily resurrection of the simple, preacher man aka Jesus.

      To wit;

      From a major Catholic university's theology grad school white-board notes:

      "Heaven is a Spirit state or spiritual reality of union with God in love, without earthly – earth bound distractions.
      Jesus and Mary's bodies are therefore not in Heaven.

      Most believe that it to mean that the personal spiritual self that survives death is in continuity with the self we were while living on earth as an embodied person.

      Again, the physical Resurrection (meaning a resuscitated corpse returning to life), Ascension (of Jesus' crucified corpse), and Assumption (Mary's corpse) into heaven did not take place.

      The Ascension symbolizes the end of Jesus' earthly ministry and the beginning of the Church.

      Only Luke's Gospel records it. The Assumption ties Jesus' mission to Pentecost and missionary activity of Jesus' followers The Assumption has multiple layers of symbolism, some are related to Mary's special role as "Christ bearer" (theotokos). It does not seem fitting that Mary, the body of Jesus' Virgin-Mother (another biblically based symbol found in Luke 1) would be derived by worms upon her death. Mary's assumption also shows God's positive regard, not only for Christ's male body, but also for female bodies." "

      "In three controversial Wednesday Audiences, Pope John Paul II pointed out that the essential characteristic of heaven, hell or purgatory is that they are states of being of a spirit (angel/demon) or human soul, rather than places, as commonly perceived and represented in human language. This language of place is, according to the Pope, inadequate to describe the realities involved, since it is tied to the temporal order in which this world and we exist. In this he is applying the philosophical categories used by the Church in her theology and saying what St. Thomas Aquinas said long before him."
      http://eternal-word.com/library/PAPALDOC/JP2HEAVN.HTM

      The Vatican quickly embellished this story with a lot CYAP.

      Of course, we all know that angels are really mythical "pretty wingie talking thingies".

      With respect to rising from the dead, we also have this account:

      An added note: As per R.B. Stewart in his introduction to the recent book, The Resurrection of Jesus, Crossan and Wright in Dialogue, ( Professors Crossan and Wright are On Faith panelists).

      "Reimarus (1774-1778) posits that Jesus became sidetracked by embracing a political position, sought to force God's hand and that he died alone deserted by his disciples. What began as a call for repentance ended up as a misguided attempt to usher in the earthly political kingdom of God. After Jesus' failure and death, his disciples stole his body and declared his resurrection in order to maintain their financial security and ensure themselves some standing."

      So where are the bones? As per Professor Crossan's analyses in his many books, the body of Jesus would have ended up in the mass graves of the crucified, eaten by wild dogs, with lime in a shallow grave, or under a pile of stones.

      January 7, 2011 at 12:00 am |
  10. George

    I have a few comments upon reading the above postings, in particular to David and Mark, please can I ask that you take on board what has happened in Egypt and respect the families and friends of who have lost loved ones over an evil and inhumane act of terrorism. There is no point in saying that God doesn't exist, for you maybe not, that it why you live for yourself and yourself alone. But those who do believe in God believe that this isn't the life we are living for. Our aim is to reach the place where the 23 people who died in Egypt are now at rest. This is called Heaven. Those who died have now reached the place that us on earth are praying to reach. Please have some compassion for this tragic and sad news. People have their right to pray FREELY and without FEARING other religion extremists will attack them in the house of our Lord. If you do not believe in God then that is your choice, but do not insult those who do by calling us DUMB for dying for our Lord. If you spent a bit more time reading the history of Christianity and in particular the persecution of Copts in Egypt then come back and comment – but I suppose the pub and beer is what you worship so you have no time to absorb this information. God bless and rest in peace all those who have died for the cross and may our thoughts and prayers be with all the families and friends of those who have been affected by this tragedy. I hope that the Christmas feast that we all celebrate across the world today will be one that is celebrated in peace, and one that we can pray for the world we live in to come together and unite against terrorism so that we all live in peace.

    January 6, 2011 at 12:18 pm |
    • HotAirAce

      I would never dare speak for others, but here's the deal – you take your religion and beliefs into your private spaces and we'll quit discussing and opposing them.

      Given the amount of violence and number of people around the world that might be "hurt" by discussions about religion, and the globalness of communications technology, halting discussions about religion because someone might be offended would effectively mean not discussing religion at all.

      Please note that when I use the word "oppose", I am not implying or threatening violence in any way. I too think it is disp-icable that everyone cannot believe whatever they like without the threat of violence or, in the extreme, death.

      January 6, 2011 at 12:41 pm |
    • Mark from Middle River

      "in particular to David and Mark, please can I ask that you take on board what has happened in Egypt and respect the families and friends of who have lost loved ones over an evil and inhumane act of terrorism. There is no point in saying that God doesn't exist, for you maybe not, that it why you live for yourself and yourself alone."

      Good grief.... now you see Davey ..... I spend so much time with yall that I got lumped in with the non-believers. I feel like I have been shot in the crossfire during a drive by shooting ...

      Geez George... Now I gotta side with Ace on his second paragraph. The first one..naah ... but the second one, not that bad. 🙂

      January 6, 2011 at 2:37 pm |
    • Peace2All

      @Mark from Middle River

      LOL...! 🙂

      Peace...

      January 6, 2011 at 2:42 pm |
    • HotAirAce

      @Mark from Middle River

      Now that I've got you leaning, repeat after me: "There are no..." :^))

      January 6, 2011 at 2:54 pm |
    • Reality

      George,

      The Apostles' Creed 2010: (updated based on the studies of historians and theologians during the past 200 years)

      I might believe in a god whose existence cannot be proven
      and said god if he/she/it exists resides in an unproven,
      human-created state of bliss called heaven.

      I believe there was a 1st century CE, Jewish, simple,
      preacher-man who was conceived by a Jewish carpenter
      named Joseph living in Nazareth and born of a young Jewish
      girl named Mary.

      Jesus was summarily crucified for being a temple rabble-rouser by
      the Roman troops in Jerusalem serving under Pontius Pilate,

      He was buried in an unmarked grave and still lies
      a-mouldering in the ground somewhere outside of
      Jerusalem.

      Said Jesus' story was embellished and "mythicized" by
      many semi-fiction writers. A bodily resurrection and
      ascension stories were promulgated to compete with the
      Caesar myths. Said stories were so popular that they
      grew into a religion known today as Catholicism/Christianity
      and featuring dark-age, daily wine to blood and bread to body rituals
      called the eucharistic sacrifice of the non-atoning Jesus.

      Amen

      January 6, 2011 at 3:02 pm |
  11. Mark from Middle River

    Davey. Folks have been getting killed for one reason or another. Land, women and just power over other men.

    All we have to do is look just south of the American southern line. Looks like folks have no problem killing folks for drug and human trafficing routes.... I think more than two dozen died in the last month of 2011, so does that now just blow your argument apart?

    How many people would just die today because they do not look a certain way, or belong to one tribe or faction or gender.

    Trust me Davey... if there were a way for mankind to not try to find newer more efficient and creative ways to kill one another... I would tell you. 🙂

    Like you said Davey, its time for you to just move on.

    January 6, 2011 at 11:44 am |
    • David Johnson

      @Mark from Middle River
      You said: " Folks have been getting killed for one reason or another. Land, women and just power over other men.
      All we have to do is look just south of the American southern line. Looks like folks have no problem killing folks for drug and human trafficing routes.... I think more than two dozen died in the last month of 2011, so does that now just blow your argument apart?"

      No Mark it doesn't. Land, Power, Women, Money, are real. The god(s) are not. Believers blow themselves up, kill and hate for an illusion. A fairy tale. If a man traffics in drugs, I might not like it, but I can understand it. At the end of the day he has the possibility of very real cash in his hand. Power and Women could be his.

      You asked: "How many people would just die today because they do not look a certain way, or belong to one tribe or faction or gender."

      Hmmm... In the past, according to the desert war god, a number of people died for these reasons. God killed or had killed thousands of people who did not belong to his chosen people. He killed men, women and children including babies. Is this tolerant? I thought it was genocide. Maybe I need to look up the word. Religion is divisive. Religion has been used throughout history to enslave and dehumanize people.

      Men will continue to kill for land, women, power and money and god. If you take god out of the mix, you simply have one less big reason for taking human lives. It is a total waste to fight and kill for a non-existent god.

      2 dozen Christians were killed. God did not prevent this killing. God did not take sides in the conflict. In fact, the bombers (Muslims?) got away. God doesn't seem to be concerned with human suffering much at all. It's as if, He does not exist.

      Cheers!

      Trust me Davey... if there were a way for mankind to not try to find newer more efficient and creative ways to kill one another... I would tell you.

      Like you said Davey, its time for you to just move on.

      January 6, 2011 at 1:11 pm |
    • Mark from Middle River

      "Mark it doesn't. Land, Power, Women, Money, are real. The god(s) are not. Believers blow themselves up, kill and hate for an illusion.... Power and Women could be his."

      David-
      And with that last admission .... "power" I pretty much destroyed your argument. Power is and will always be there. You can understand the thirst of power on one factor but, because your not a person of faith you can not allow yourself to see the thirst of power form some on my side of the argument. That short-sightedness is the ultimate failing of your point. I understand why, because if you did see that division of those of faith that only want power over others then you would have to acknowledge that there are those amoung the faithfull that do not.

      Such an admission of "good folks" of faith existence would, for many atheist, would be equal to admission of the existence of God.

      Like I said....whoops like "you" said Davey ....time to move dude...

      January 6, 2011 at 2:32 pm |
    • Reality

      We are victims of our birth!!! What needs to happen is for all parents to instill in their children, three words, "DO NO HARM". This would start us down the road where power, drugs, money and/or religion no longer cause the slaughter of the innocent.

      January 6, 2011 at 3:00 pm |
    • David Johnson

      @Mark from Middle River

      You said: "And with that last admission .... "power" I pretty much destroyed your argument. Power is and will always be there. "

      Power is certainly a reason that humans fight and die. It was true in history. It is true today.

      The Religious Right would very much like to set up a theocracy, with Jesus as the head of state. Only the Christian Right would be able to hear Jesus, so they would tell us His will. This is most certainly a power grab.

      But, let's think about that... No god, No Christian Right. No ladder for the Christian Right to climb to power. LOL

      Would people still fight for power? You, bet. There will be fighting to gain control of countries and people. But with religion gone, there will be one less club to beat each other with.

      God does not exist, Mark.

      January 6, 2011 at 9:41 pm |
  12. David Johnson

    Article said: "Egyptian authorities beefed up security Thursday as Coptic Christians warily ushered in Christmas Eve after a New Year's Day bombing in front of a church that killed nearly two dozen of their members."

    God let 2 dozen members be killed? How many would have been killed, if there were no god? Ans. – 2 dozen.

    Coptic Christians Note! You are dying for a god that does not exist! How dumb. Go home get drunk. Have a good cry and then move on! If there was a god, I would tell you.

    Cheers!

    January 6, 2011 at 11:26 am |
  13. Reality

    Muslims demonize themselves via the history of Islam as seen in their founder, an illiterate, hallucinating, warmongering, greedy and lust-filled, long-dead Arab. As long as the Worst Book Ever Written aka koran is the operating manual of Islam, Muslims of any stripe cannot be trusted. And this ladies and gentlemen is why Islam will crash someday in a whirlwind of common sense and rational thinking.

    January 6, 2011 at 11:07 am |
  14. Reality

    Once a day WARNING for new commentators:

    • The moderators of this blog have set up a secret forbidden word filter which unfortunately not only will delete or put your comment in the dreaded "waiting for moderation" category but also will do the same to words having fragments of these words. For example, "t-it" is in the set but the filter will also pick up words like Hitt-ite, t-itle, beati-tude, practi-tioner and const-tution. Then there words like "an-al" thereby flagging words like an-alysis and "c-um" flagging acc-umulate or doc-ument. And there is also "r-a-pe", “a-pe” and “gra-pe”, "s-ex", and "hom-ose-xual". You would think that the moderators would have corrected this by now considering the number of times this has been commented on but they have not. To be safe, I typically add hyphens in any word that said filter might judge "of-fensive".

    • More than one web address will also activate “waiting for moderation”. Make sure the web address does not have any forbidden word or fragment.

    Sum Dude routinely updates the list of forbidden words/fragments.

    Two of the most filtered words are those containing the fragments "t-it" and "c-um". To quickly check your comments for these fragments, click on "Edit" on the Tool Bar and then "Find" on the menu. Add a fragment (without hyphens) one at a time in the "Find" slot and the offending fragment will be highlighted in your comments before you hit the Post button. Hyphenate the fragment(s) and then hit Post. And remember more than one full web address will also gain a "Waiting for Moderation".

    January 6, 2011 at 11:05 am |
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