home
RSS
Motocross tragedy leads to stronger faith, clothing line
Lauren Lusk lost her husband to a motorcross accident. She launched a faith based clothing line in his memory.
January 18th, 2011
10:32 AM ET

Motocross tragedy leads to stronger faith, clothing line

By Gabe LaMonica, CNN

Tragedy tends to either destroy or strengthen the faith of those left in its wake. When Lauren Lusk’s husband Jeremy died in a motocross accident after a crash landing attempting a “heart attack Indian air back flip” at a competition in Costa Rica, the motocross world lost a burgeoning legend. But Lauren Lusk says her faith was strengthened.

Motocross is inherently dangerous. Performing a back flip had at one time been seen as an impossible move; the holy grail of freestyle motocross. Bob Kohl, the first to perform the trick in 1993, continued to do so until he was left with serious injuries from it in 1995. But by then athletes had begun to realize it was physically possible.

It is the norm in extreme sports like American freestyle motocross to push the limits of physical possibilities. Neither Lusk was a stranger to that fact, but when athletes are injured or killed performing such unnatural feats, the result can still be devastating.

“For me, it was, going through the most horrific thing anyone could ever go through and really kind of hitting rock bottom, and taking a look at my life, and having to dig down deep and being able to take something that was so bad and turn it into something positive,” said Lusk.

Lauren Lusk founded “In God’s Hands,” a faith and fashion-based clothing and apparel line, as, “something that Jeremy and I definitely would have done together, and without him here to do it with me, it was something that I could make a tribute to his life, and everything that he stood for, and everything that he was about,” she said.

"We are a faith-based brand, but we’re very accepting. No matter what background you come from, or what you’ve been through in your life, or what you are going through in your life - me and Jeremy: That’s kind of how we rolled," Lusk said.

"We took everybody in. We were those people that had lots of stragglers on Christmas and Thanksgiving and people staying with us all the time. But I think that the brand is like that too, no matter what beliefs you rock, or where you’ve been in your life, I just really believe in second chances and turning your life around," she said.

The Lusks grew up together and were high school sweethearts. “He was a great friend, a great husband,” she said. But before she met him, Lauren was not religious, and faith wasn’t important to her. “It was something that I actually got more involved in as Jeremy and I became adults and got married and started going to church together,” she said.

The Lusks went to “Revival” when they lived together in Temecula, but since moving to San Diego Lauren Lusk attends “The Rock,” a Christian church.

The gritty Southern California style portrayed evokes Christianity, daredevilry, and good music. She says the company embodies “the (motocross) guys that are Christians. They’re definitely rougher around the edges, and have tattoos and risk their lives everyday, and that was totally Jeremy: He wasn’t real straight edge.”

She said her husband “really lived life to the fullest and wanted to succeed and had big dreams and he just rubbed off on everybody around him, and his faith in God definitely did as well.”

Lusk seeks to inspire that spirit in others.

Jeremy Lusk, a man who regularly defied death performing back flips on dirt bikes, had the words “In God’s Hands” splayed in a tattoo across his chest a month or so before he was killed. His widow said she believes that is where he is today.

"I felt like my faith was all I had. Just knowing that God did have a plan for my life - it helped because I knew, I took great comfort knowing that Jeremy was in Heaven and I was going to see him again one day," Lusk said. "It really got me through my toughest days."

- CNN Belief Blog

Filed under: Americas • Bible • Christianity • Sports

soundoff (65 Responses)
  1. dutchblitz

    That was meant to be in response to NL. Reply isn't working again

    January 18, 2011 at 9:00 pm |
  2. Muneef

    Well my comment is I find the lady very young and attractive therefore am sorry for her loss.

    January 18, 2011 at 8:35 pm |
    • Peace2All

      @Muneef

      Hey Muneef...

      And... if she 'wasn't' 'young and attractive, would you still be sorry for her loss...?

      Just playin' with ya' -Muneef.

      Peace...

      January 19, 2011 at 12:53 am |
  3. MB

    Alot of these comments are in poor taste – just because someone's faith has actually helped them in a difficult situation like this, people's first inclination is to knock it. Along with being an attractive and ambitious woman, Lauren has pulled herself up and done something positive after a tragic event in her life. I'm sure most of you would just hide in a corner, or post mean-spirited comments to make yourselves feel better.

    Sure, there are religious zealots who misinterpret faith and use it a negative way, but here's an example of someone who has not only become a stronger person due to her faith, but may be inspiring other people who go through a similar event. She is a positive example of what faith can do for someone. Yes, her husband died doing a dangerous sport, but that doesn't make it any less tragic than someone dying of cancer.

    Be open-minded, people. More power to you, Lauren!

    January 18, 2011 at 8:32 pm |
  4. QS

    I rather enjoyed the concept implied by Lauren in the article, "They’re definitely rougher around the edges, and have tattoos and risk their lives everyday, and that was totally Jeremy: He wasn’t real straight edge.”

    As if she's trying to say that because he had tattoos and was rough around the edges meant they weren't like those "typical" Christians, we're more accepting!

    And then there's this: "I just really believe in second chances and turning your life around". If this was truly what she "just really believes" then there would be no need to invoke religion in order to somehow attach a phony sentimental idea to a product in hopes that it will sell better.

    Turning your life around, and even second chances, are not synonymous with religion.

    January 18, 2011 at 8:27 pm |
  5. JeSuis

    Really? There's a faith blog on CNN? How the ... is this news?????
    It's very true. When faced by tragedy a lot of people who aren't strong enough to pull themselves up by their bootstraps by themselves turn to some sort of god (or crutch). It's not surprising or even noteworthy. It's sad that her husband died, but really, wasn't it kind of always around the edges of reality, if not expected outright? Dangerous work implies that there could be a loss of life.

    I'm sorry, I really still don't get how this is news or even entertaining. CNN. Really?

    January 18, 2011 at 4:16 pm |
    • j

      Just wait for a storm that comes in your life that you can't bare on your own. I guarantee you will be crying out for Jesus. Why would you? whats wrong with asking Jesus to help settle the turbulence in our soul. WHen your going through something do you call friends or family for comfort? Why, pull yourself up by your bootstraps. My point is God loves you and wants to help you, put down your pride and ask him for help.

      January 20, 2011 at 2:43 pm |
    • Meh

      I'd rather ask Santa for help.

      January 20, 2011 at 3:06 pm |
  6. Luke

    Hi CNN – would be lovely if you told me at least WHY all of my comments are gone? Nothing was inflamitory and was on topic. Terrible.

    January 18, 2011 at 3:46 pm |
    • Reality

      • The moderators of this blog have set up a secret forbidden word filter which unfortunately not only will delete or put your comment in the dreaded "waiting for moderation" category but also will do the same to words having fragments of these words. For example, "t-it" is in the set but the filter will also pick up words like Hitt-ite, t-itle, beati-tude, practi-tioner and const-tution. Then there words like "an-al" thereby flagging words like an-alysis and "c-um" flagging acc-umulate or doc-ument. And there is also "r-a-pe", “a-pe” and “gra-pe”, "s-ex", and "hom-ose-xual". You would think that the moderators would have corrected this by now considering the number of times this has been commented on but they have not. To be safe, I typically add hyphens in any word that said filter might judge "of-fensive".

      • More than one web address will also activate “waiting for moderation”. Make sure the web address does not have any forbidden word or fragment.

      Sum Dude routinely updates the list of forbidden words/fragments.

      Two of the most filtered words are those containing the fragments "t-it" and "c-um". To quickly check your comments for these fragments, click on "Edit" on the Tool Bar and then "Find" on the menu. Add a fragment (without hyphens) one at a time in the "Find" slot and the offending fragment will be highlighted in your comments before you hit the Post button. Hyphenate the fragment(s) and then hit Post. And remember more than one full web address will also gain a "Waiting for Moderation".

      "Raison's Filter Fiber© (joking about the copyright)

      1. Here's my latest list – this seems like a good spot to set this down, as nobody's posting much on this thread.....
      --–
      bad letter combinations / words to avoid if you want to post that wonderful argument:
      Many, if not most are buried within other words, but I am not shooting for the perfect list, so use your imagination and add any words I have missed as a comment (no one has done this yet)
      – I found some but forgot to write them down. (shrugs).
      s-ex
      c-um.........as in doc-ument, accu-mulate, etc.
      sp-ic........as in disp-icable (look out Sylvester the cat!)
      ho-mo...whether ho-mo sapiens or ho-mose-xual, etc.
      t-it.........const-itution, att-itude, ent-ities, etc.
      an-al......ban-al
      sh-it
      fu-ck...
      who-re
      tw-at.....as in wristw-atch, (an unexpected one)
      pr-ick
      sl-ut
      c-lit
      va-g....as in extrava-gant, va-gina, va-grant
      hor-ny
      ar-se....yet "ass" is not filtered!
      nip-ple
      po-rn
      c-ock
      nig-ger
      cu-nt
      b-itch
      ra-pe
      jacka-ss...but ass is fine lol
      p-is.....as in pi-stol, lapi-s, pi-ssed, etc.
      o ficti-tious, repeti-tion, competi-tion.
      Sna-tch
      soft-ware
      Ja-panese
      There are more, so do not assume that this is complete.
      -–
      okay words that you might not expect to be filtered....!!!
      beaver
      penis
      ass
      crap
      damn
      anal
      anus
      sphincter
      testicles
      testes
      pubic
      boob
      --

      Here's a word to add to the banned list: co-co-on
      whether it's c-oc, or co-on, this is ridiculous."

      January 18, 2011 at 5:23 pm |
    • CatholicMom

      Don’t feel bad, Luke, I only wrote one, asking what the lettering on her clothes meant, and mine is gone, too.

      January 18, 2011 at 6:45 pm |
  7. Reality

    "Romans 8:38-39 (New International Version, ©2010)

    38 For I am convinced that neither death nor life, neither angels nor demons,[a] neither the present nor the future, nor any powers, 39 neither height nor depth, nor anything else in all creation, will be able to separate us from the love of God that is in Christ Jesus our Lord"

    The updated version: (based on 200 years of rational thinking about religion)

    38 For I am convinced that neither risking death for money, neither "pretty, wingie, talking thingies" nor demons of the demented, neither the present nor the future, nor any powers, 39 neither height nor depth, nor anything else in all creation, will save you when you do something stupid like an “Indian air back flip” on a motorbike sayest the unprovable god of Christianity.

    January 18, 2011 at 3:08 pm |
    • Jeff

      Reality is this– there is a heaven and a hell with believers going to Heaven and non-believers going to Hell, Reality is that we ourselves choose where to go, and this is how we do it. When we reject Jesus we choose Hell, when we accept him we go to heaven. Choose wisely. There is no more repentance when you die, it's to late, better do now , this minute because tomorrow is not promised.

      January 20, 2011 at 2:39 pm |
  8. Bob

    > @Bob, if that worldview works for you, go with it.

    Why? Am I the only person who cares about reality? I find it silly to adopt concepts to help you deal with a situation you don't like. Isn't more healty to deal with the problem then to lie and/or trick yourself?

    The concept of a place where you live forever in happiness is childish. Religion is a mental construction that people use because they can't deal with the concept of random things happening to random people. They want to feel that everything's going according to a good divine beings' will because then bad things never really happen.

    Adults deal with situations even if they don't like it. Children make up stories and hide.

    January 18, 2011 at 2:23 pm |
    • Daoud1967

      Self-aggrandizing Atheists. No better than the religious. They both believe in absolutism. They are no more credible than a streetcorner preacher.

      January 18, 2011 at 5:44 pm |
      • Yabba

        Atheists adhere to rationalism.

        January 18, 2011 at 11:20 pm |
    • Daoud1967

      @Bob, you're about as haughty as a hail/fire/brimstone Baptist Preacher. Please, since you seem to be the rosetta stone of all that is, was and will be, reveal to us the secrets of the universe.

      January 18, 2011 at 6:01 pm |
  9. Jeepers

    I just cannot wrap my brain around why people do stupid, dangerous things like motocross. Then when they die, their loved ones act surprised.

    January 18, 2011 at 2:00 pm |
    • Meh

      Seriously. This guy was skating on thin ice every time he went out to do motocross. Then he dies. Welp... God wanted him to return to heaven is what these religious people would say when in reality he was putting himself in the a situation where he was likely to die and he did! That is all it was.

      January 20, 2011 at 3:04 pm |
  10. 3ksracin

    Wow some people should be ashamed of themselves!!!!! I think this is a wonderful thing what Lauren has started, and would def. like to know where the clothing line is being sold. My heart goes out to her and the family for their loss and I'm so glad she has found some kind of piece in Jeremy's passing. I still have the LUSK picture on my garage wall the day my 8 year old found out what happened to Jeremy. Then as soon as On The Pipe came out in tribute to Lusk we had to hurry and buy it for him!!! Jeremy wasn just touched by just his friends and family but alot of lil kids as welll. All the best Lauren!!!!

    January 18, 2011 at 1:39 pm |
  11. Colin

    @Jeff, he clearly mean "funny" as a synonym for "unusual", not "humorous". More tothe point, though, it is hard to argue that the idea of people surviving their own physical deaths and living "happily ever after" in a happy kingdom of Heaven is pretty childish and outdated.

    January 18, 2011 at 1:29 pm |
  12. jeff

    @Bob, if that worldview works for you, go with it. Mine's different and it doesn't involve finding humor in other people's grief.

    January 18, 2011 at 1:25 pm |
  13. Bob

    I find it funny that she has the words strength on her clothes when she obviously had to imagine her boyfreind/husband as in heaven and still concious instead of what he actualy is, dead. There is absolutely no reason to think there is an afterlife except when you consider it as a way of people to deal with the concept of death without actually having to face the reality of it.

    January 18, 2011 at 1:00 pm |
    • BuddyKowalsk

      if you think about it, you were dead at the time of the dinosaurs, during the Roman empire, etc....

      January 20, 2011 at 6:23 am |
    • j

      Bob whats wrong with knowing that there is a place called heaven to go to that is better than where we are at right now. Come on man what hope is there if there is no heaven.

      January 20, 2011 at 2:48 pm |
      • David Johnson

        @j

        You asked: "what hope is there if there is no heaven."

        Why little j, there is false hope. LOL

        Having false hope tends to cause people to not do what they should, like address global warming, etc.

        There is no god. Accept it. It is quite liberating.

        God bless You!

        January 20, 2011 at 3:37 pm |
  14. jeff

    Romans 8:38-39, that is 🙂

    January 18, 2011 at 12:02 pm |
    • Reality

      "Romans 8:38-39 (New International Version, ©2010)

      38 For I am convinced that neither death nor life, neither angels nor demons,[a] neither the present nor the future, nor any powers, 39 neither height nor depth, nor anything else in all creation, will be able to separate us from the love of God that is in Christ Jesus our Lord".

      The updated version: (based on 200 years of rational thinking about religion)

      38 For I am convinced that neither risking death for money, neither "pretty, wingie, talking thingies" nor demons of the demented, neither the present nor the future, nor any powers, 39 neither height nor depth, nor anything else in all creation, will save you when you do something stupid like an “Indian air back flip” on a motorbike sayest the unprovable god of Christianity.-–

      January 18, 2011 at 3:10 pm |
      • jeff

        Wow, you really muffed that translation. For one, you acknowledged creation. Cool! Next, although you say the "god of Christianity" is unprovable, you attribute the saying directly to the "god of Christianity" rather than to God speaking through Paul. Awesome! Next, many people have performed and still perform the "Indian air back flip" successfully, so some are being saved. Sort of a doctrine of limited atonement. Wow!

        January 18, 2011 at 6:47 pm |
        • Reality

          To clarify any misunderstanding:

          The Apostles' Creed 2010: (updated based on the studies of historians and theologians during the past 200 years)

          I might believe in a god whose existence cannot be proven
          and said god if he/she/it exists resides in an unproven,
          human-created state of bliss called heaven.

          I believe there was a 1st century CE, Jewish, simple,
          preacher-man who was conceived by a Jewish carpenter
          named Joseph living in Nazareth and born of a young Jewish
          girl named Mary.

          Jesus was summarily crucified for being a temple rabble-rouser by
          the Roman troops in Jerusalem serving under Pontius Pilate,

          He was buried in an unmarked grave and still lies
          a-mouldering in the ground somewhere outside of
          Jerusalem.

          Said Jesus' story was embellished and "mythicized" by
          many semi-fiction writers. A bodily resurrection and
          ascension stories were promulgated to compete with the
          Caesar myths. Said stories were so popular that they
          grew into a religion known today as Catholicism/Christianity
          and featuring dark-age, daily wine to blood and bread to body rituals
          called the eucharistic sacrifice of the non-atoning Jesus.

          Amen

          January 18, 2011 at 11:37 pm |
      • Anglican

        Reality, what does it matter to you? The girl has faith, you do not. Does it make you feel better about yourself when you belittle others.

        January 18, 2011 at 8:49 pm |
        • David Johnson

          @Anglican

          You said: "The girl has faith, you do not. Does it make you feel better about yourself when you belittle others."

          Makes me feel better when I point out how delusional believer's faith is.

          Do you have any proof that believers are not deluded? LOL

          Cheers!

          January 19, 2011 at 8:03 am |
        • Michael Wong

          Why do people use the word "faith" as if it's an asset or a special ability? Faith is a choice, not an ability. It's not a special ability to TURN OFF logic and leap to irrational conclusions. Anyone can arbitrarily choose to do it. Logical analysis skills, on the other hand, are a legitimate ability: not everyone possesses them in equal measure. They require education and effort to use.

          January 19, 2011 at 9:07 am |
        • David Johnson

          @Michael Wong

          You asked: "Why do people use the word "faith" as if it's an asset or a special ability?"

          Because that is what their religion teaches them. Faith is just as real as actual evidence. Actually better, since Jesus gives extra points for believing without seeing...and in spite of there being evidence against it.

          Believers are delusional. They are non-thinkers. They bleat in unison.

          God with god my son!

          January 20, 2011 at 3:41 pm |
      • Anglican

        Reality, what does it matter to you? The girl has faith, you do not. Does it make you feel better about yourself when you belittle others.

        January 18, 2011 at 9:28 pm |
    • David Johnson

      @Jeff

      You referenced Romans 8:38-39 (New International Version, ©2010)

      "For I am convinced that neither death nor life, neither angels nor demons,[a] neither the present nor the future, nor any powers, neither height nor depth, nor anything else in all creation, will be able to separate us from the love of God that is in Christ Jesus our Lord. "

      Subst_itute your deities' names for any other mythical god(s), in the scripture. You cannot prove or disprove the verse, either way. Try it! Put the name of Odin in for God, and Isis in for Jesus. You can't prove it true or false.

      Believers are a joke.

      Love and Prayers

      January 19, 2011 at 8:14 am |
  15. jeff

    No, there's no irony, only a man who understands Romans 8:39-39

    January 18, 2011 at 12:01 pm |
    • NL

      The passage doesn't mention anything about being separated from God by the truth, does it?

      January 18, 2011 at 5:05 pm |
      • dutchblitz

        It does say "anything else in all creation," so that would include the truth.

        January 18, 2011 at 9:00 pm |
      • David Johnson

        NL

        Damn, you are clever! Love your answer!

        Cheers!

        January 19, 2011 at 8:18 am |
  16. jeff

    strength

    January 18, 2011 at 11:58 am |
  17. Heinz M

    Isn't that like saying, tragedy pushes people toward becoming more stupid? Pity. I agree with Colin above.

    January 18, 2011 at 11:38 am |
  18. Colin

    First, Lauren has my complete sympathy for her loss.

    Second, as an atheist, I cannot help but find it curious that, whatever the outcome of a tragedy, those affected by it will claim a "miracle" or that it was all part of "god's purpose." No doubt, had he lived, a "miracle" would have been proclaimed because his "guardian angel held him in his hands."

    That is to say "god" can't lose. Death results a deepening of faith and a "quest" to find purpose in the tragedy or an acceptance of "god's mysterious ways". Survival results in claims of a "miracle".

    Thirdly, Lauren is just so beautiful. Now THAT could make me believe in a god!

    January 18, 2011 at 11:20 am |
    • NL

      Yeah, the 'saved' are told to expect their own, personal proof that God has entered their lives. All they're basically told that it will be a significant event, so it could be a turn of good luck as easy as a tragedy. A narrow escape from death, a severe injury that they survive, or that someone close to them doesn't. It's basically the same as telling someone that, sometime in the future, 'something' will happen that affects you, and that will be God.

      Talk about a loose definition, and one that is never scrutinized by the faith community. I've never heard of anyone ever having their 'saved' story questioned by fellow believers. If somebody claimed they found God after being struck by lightening while bending over to pick up a mint condition issue of Superman #1 lying in the street after exiting the Harry Potter theme park dressed as a life-sized Hagrid not one person of faith would ever voice their doubt in his story. These folks are far too trusting, and the easiest mark around for con artists.

      January 18, 2011 at 1:53 pm |
    • ScottK

      @Colin – good points. Also, it doesnt seem like any of the religious folk here understand that according to their bible taking frequent chances with your life would be a sin, as would be testing God, i.e. doing a backflip on a motorcycle all the while praying to be made safe as some form of miracle.

      And whats with "The gritty Southern California style portrayed evokes Christianity, daredevilry, and good music." of “The Rock,” Christian church. Does anyone notice a bit of a contradiction, at least in root words here? Like, evoking "Chist"ianity & dare"devilry"?

      And then ""I felt like my faith was all I had. Just knowing that God did have a plan for my life – it helped because I knew, I took great comfort knowing that Jeremy was in Heaven and I was going to see him again one day," Lusk said. "It really got me through my toughest days." Are you kidding me? God had a plan for her, to have her fall in love, get married and then rip her husband away from her because God didnt have the time to help him finish that rotation and land well... or maybe people have a few to many expectations for an imaginary being to accomplish.

      January 19, 2011 at 2:53 pm |
  19. Phil

    Having just lost my brother to suicide and my father to natural causes within a week of each other it has neither strengthened or dissolved my belief. I'm still atheist.

    January 18, 2011 at 11:11 am |
    • Colin

      Indeed. 150,000 people die around the World each day. Hindus, Buddhists, Christians, atheists, agnostics and all other stripes. No doubt, many of their respective survivors who are religious will "deepen their faith" in their respective religions, see "special purpose" in the death or otherwise assume that the universe is catering to their parochial emotional distress.

      We need to get over ourselves. The universe was not made for us.

      January 18, 2011 at 11:27 am |
    • Dave

      Phil, wishing you peace in this time of loss.

      January 18, 2011 at 5:47 pm |
    • Peace2All

      @Phil

      Obviously don't know ya' ... but, I wish you Peace...

      Peace...

      January 19, 2011 at 12:49 am |
    • David Johnson

      @Phil

      Phil, I'm sorry for your loss. But, look on the bright side. Jesus has a clothing line!

      When my niece passed away, several of the believers reminded me that this was the best day of her life. They proclaimed Jesus would clothe her in the finest linen. Oh yeah, I forgot. They also said God needed another angel in heaven.

      These were the same believers that prayed for her healing, before god required her presence in Heaven.

      Again, sorry for your loss. You made the right decision. There is no god. Believers are deluded.

      Cheers!

      January 19, 2011 at 7:50 am |
  20. doctore0

    So god stepped in, helped them doing business; Meanwhile tens of thousands of children die everyday from starvation... WOW

    January 18, 2011 at 10:51 am |
    • john

      So Doc! You have so much to say. What are you doing to help these starving people? The Christian church does a lot, quietly, in the name of God. We know that God is working through us to feed the starving. What about you? Or do you just enjoy pointing fingers and placing blame?

      January 18, 2011 at 1:25 pm |
    • And the winner is...

      Many churches also do unsavory things quietly and I am confident that the little good does not out weigh the bad. If any god is working through someone perhaps the god should have done a little more to ensure we fit the mold of his image a little better, therefore accomplishing a little more. God may save a few hundred through a church but in the meantime more than 100,000 have died today, waiting on that god, just as they waited for years suffering to no avail. Many more will have been killed for believing in the wrong god in the wrong place. Epic fail.
      As far as this story goes, this is just another example of the exploitation of popular culture. Perhaps I should set out to sell a divinely appointed fish tank so that all good Christians can have their infamous fish symbol displayed properly, a sunken cross might really set it off.

      January 18, 2011 at 5:28 pm |
    • FurtherThanYou

      It's fine if you want to use a fairytale about an invisible man in the sky as a crutch to get you thru the rough parts of life, but do us all a few favors along the way:
      1. Stop acting like our beliefs in atheism aren't JUST as valid, moral, and respectable. We never went on crusades to convert millions thru torture. So F off.
      2. Stand UP and physically control your extremists. Your culture created these snake juggling, pre-teen marrying, veteran-funeral-picketing loony-toons. If you can't control this flock, maybe you're shepherd isn't all he's cracked up to be.
      3. Keep YOUR F-ING Priests away from our kids genitals!!!
      We won't even go IN to how many die from holy wars....yeesh....grow up, the easter bunny isn't real either.

      January 18, 2011 at 6:33 pm |
    • Nursehope

      Hey John! Ever hear of Mercy Corps? Ever hear about Doctors and Nurses Without Borders? No? I thought not. Some of us volunteer whenever where ever we can. Where do YOU volunteer???!!!

      January 18, 2011 at 10:36 pm |
    • David Johnson

      OMG! You non-religious folk, are missing the point! God never closes a door that he does not open a window!

      Yes, the husband died, but Lauren Lusk founded “In God’s Hands,” a faith and fashion-based clothing and apparel line.

      Jesus now has a clothing line just like Kate and Mary Olsen!

      Look for Jesus on the label!

      Cheers!

      January 19, 2011 at 7:36 am |
    • Jeff

      Doc,
      Stop blaming God for this, he put us on this earth to take care of those that are starving. Sin, or disobediance to God has caused the problems that we are having today, it's not Gods Fault that we removed him from the Schools and government etc. He's only going to come where he is welcomed. God came to this earth and put himself in a body called Jesus to save us from this world not condemn us. So Doc or anyone else reading this that is still looking to blame God for the problems we caused ourselves, recognize that we are the problem and we have all sinned and come short of Gods Glory, and realize that God come down from heaven to earth to save our lost sinful souls l, if we would just admit we sinned against a Holy God and Repent and believe that Jesus is Lord, and believe in your heart that God raised him from the dead and you will be saved and on your way to heaven and not hell anymore.

      January 20, 2011 at 2:25 pm |
1 2
Advertisement
About this blog

The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.