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March 1st, 2011
12:27 PM ET

West Virginia students protest 10 Commandments' removal

From CNN affiliate WVVA.

The Giles County School Board voted Tuesday to removed framed copies of the Ten Commandments from its schools - for the second time in as many months. Now some students are speaking out against the decision.

Some students have posted the Ten Commandments on their lockers. One group from Narrows and Giles have ordered t-shirts to express their opinions on the issue.

The commandments were first removed in December, 2010 after a complaint.

Read the full story about West Virginia students protesting the Ten Commandments' removal
- CNN Belief Blog

Filed under: Catholic Church • Homosexuality • Pennsylvania • United States

soundoff (189 Responses)
  1. Ken

    Does CNN do any research when they do a story? Obviously not! Giles County is in VIRGINIA not West Virginia. You should be embarrassed.

    March 1, 2011 at 9:16 pm |
  2. Jon

    As a Christian, It bothers me that so many people have such a strong opinion on the Ten commandments without even understanding their purpose, as described by the Bible.

    The purpose of the Ten Commandments (the "Law of God") and the Mosaic Law (the "Law of Moses") are to prove to the world that holiness cannot be obtained by following a list of stipulations or commandments. The Law simply makes us conscious of our sin. No one is capable of being holy by virtue of his or her actions. Rather, the Old Testament law is intended to point people to Christ, as it is only through belief in him that one can obtain righteousness (see Galatians 3-4).

    For Christians, however well-intentioned, to post the Ten Commandments in an attempt to perfectly keep them misses the point; all of such attempts are in vain. Such public postings may be a good tool, but all Christians have already been made righteous through the sacrifice of Jesus, the Lamb of God (see Romans 3).

    All of the Old Testament is intended to serve as examples and pictures of New Testament truths, and are meant to drive us towards Christ (again, see Galatians).

    March 1, 2011 at 8:54 pm |
    • Dana

      As a non-Christian, it bothers me that a person can't understand why their personal beliefs, however treasured, are not welcome at a public school? How about instead of the commandments, we post the 4 Noble Truths and used school to teach all the children the 8-fold path of Buddhism? I don't believe in your fairy tale, and don't want you contaminating my kids with your religion of shame and fear. You don't believe what my family sees as demonstrable true. Since we can't all agree, we have to keep it at home and church/temple and not at school. That is how this country works.

      March 1, 2011 at 11:54 pm |
    • Jon

      I wouldn't be in favor of posting the 4 Noble Truths nor any aspects of Buddhism; they simply aren't the Word of God. Christianity is truly different from any other religion that has ever existed. I think if you take the time to learn about it and understand it, you would see how it must be true.

      Ultimately, it doesn't really matter how things work in this country or any other. I am not ashamed of the Gospel and I will continue to be a witness in an increasingly Christ-rejecting world. I am just trying to love others like Christ loved the world. I can't really die for the world like he did, but I can at least try to be an effective instrument for God in bringing people closer to him. It's called the Good News for a reason! It certainly has nothing to do with shame and fear.

      March 2, 2011 at 3:00 am |
    • Luke

      Jon – You arguement is this:

      "You're wrong and I am right. I don't need proof, but you should just shut up."

      I know 5 year olds that argue better. You fail.

      March 2, 2011 at 8:17 am |
    • Jon

      Luke,

      I made no such attempt to argue the merits of Christianity in my prior posts. I am simply trying to explain my and other Cristian's actions so that you can better understand us.

      You seem rather defensive about Christianity and it's merits. Why are you so afraid of Christianity? Actually, the Bible perfectly explains your defensiveness:

      "This is the verdict: Light has come into the world, but people loved darkness instead of light because their deeds were evil. Everyone who does evil hates the light, and will not come into the light for fear that their deeds will be exposed. But whoever lives by the truth comes into the light, so that it may be seen plainly that what they have done has been done in the sight of God" (John 3:19-21).

      March 2, 2011 at 5:32 pm |
  3. T-party

    Despite being agnostic I am smart enough to realize Judeo-Christian teachings are a large part of American history. People who have problems with In God we trust ,biblical passages on government property are American hating narrow minded idiots....

    March 1, 2011 at 8:04 pm |
    • Luke

      "American hating narrow minded idiots"

      First of all. F off. Secondly, I beg to differ. The overwhelming vast majority of atheists or secular humanists are very much patriotic and in many senses, more patriotic than those that claim to be via Biblical BS. Your example of In God We Trust being attacked is pathetic at best for quite a number of reasons. First and foremost is it's lack of use at the time of the framers and founders. The forefathers gave us the brilliant national motto of e pluribus unum – out of many, one. How better to describe America with its vast melting pot of cultures? Then came the religious many many years later, long after the deaths of our forefathers, whom gave us "In God We Trust." This phrasing divided us rather than united us. Those that dislike the new motto imprinted on our currency would rather see our original motto as the the elders intended. Another example is our Pledge of Allegiance. The original Pledge did not have the phrase "under god". This was added during the Cold War, again dividing us rather than uniting us. Your argument is futile and weak.

      March 1, 2011 at 11:00 pm |
    • Estevan

      Well said Luke!

      I am an atheist and I love America.

      March 2, 2011 at 10:31 pm |
  4. holymolyman

    For me, i dont use the ten commandments to try to convert others to God. Im pretty sure that thats not what they were intended for in the first place, the ten commandments are a reminder. A reminder telling us how we should live our lives to be holy and just. Why get offended if thats what i am basing my life morals on? If those kids can look at those posters on the wall and think to them selves "thats how i can be a better person" than that is exactly what schools should be supporting.

    Schools teach us the basics, like math, reading, science, history, and all that other stuff. But there is no class (within the schools that i am familier with) that teach us morals. So if these kids are reminding themselves to be a better person, and possible reminding others to maybe try to be a better person. Where is the problem in that?? Yes i can understand that there will be those select few who will not like all ten. But that is no reason to take away all of the other kid's reminders!!

    March 1, 2011 at 7:15 pm |
    • Luke

      The Ten Commandments have no use in a functioning society anymore. Moreover, only 3 can be applied to developed societies, while the other 8 add no value in any manner.

      The first one only tell you which god to worship, which infringes upon the US const-itution and all other secular republics in the western world. Only theocracies can tell you whom to worship.

      The second says you can't make art for some reason. But that doesn't even jive with the churches across the world because they have godly images all over their walls.

      The third forces me to not say Yahweh – whatever. Religious Christians do this nonstop.

      The fourth reminds you to observe the Sabbath. Only Jews do that, and Christians ignore it altogether.

      The fifth says we have to honor our mother and father. Well, ok. But my father was a raging drunk that beat women. Should we honor him?

      Six – don't kill. Interesting that religion incites violence and all functioning societies do not allow murder, even largely atheist cultures across the globe that do not observe religions or write it into their laws.

      The seventh says we can't commit adultery – no one tells me who I can and cannot sleep with. Has nothing to do with morals.

      Eight: don't steal. Same with don't murder. We don't need religion to remind us not to steal. Theft is illegal in all developed societies.

      Nine: don't incriminate your neighbor falsely. Basically – don't lie. Again, same as murder and thievery.

      The tenth is pure madness. No coveting your neighbors house, his servant, ox or wife. Seriously, what does this have to do with a moral reminder? Most importantly, it equates your neighbor's wife with an ox and his slave, reminding us that women were property when this nonsense was written.

      March 1, 2011 at 10:51 pm |
    • Luke

      nice going Luke. 3 + 8 does not equal 10. Whatever.

      March 1, 2011 at 10:52 pm |
    • NL

      Luke-
      Besides, the 10 commandments are part of the Jewish Law and the Old Covenant. 'Real' Christians believe that Jesus established a New Covenant, which overturns all those Mosaic laws.

      Rom. 10:4 "For Christ is the end of the law for righteousness to every one that believeth."

      If anything, they should be fighting to tear them down themselves.

      March 1, 2011 at 11:49 pm |
  5. Christopher Tucker

    One of the kids in the video says, "Us CHRISTIANS want them up and we just think it's basic morals and they should be up." (forgive her grammar – she's from West Virginia after all). I wonder what the first four commandments have to do with "morals?" This is truly an example of the credulity of spiritual narcissism at a young age.

    It's interesting, when you ask most people what they think the number one commandment is (or should be), most will say "thou shall not murder." The fascinating thing is that most people who CLAIM to be religious are completely ignorant of the fact that the ban on killing others doesn't even make an appearance until commandment #6. Apparently, the ruler of the universe felt that it was far MORE important to establish his masculinity, insecurity and megalomania at the onset of the first four commandments (which have NOTHING what-so-ever to do with "morality" I might add):

    1) Thou shalt have no Gods before me.
    2) Thou shalt make unto me no graven images.
    3) Thou shalt not take the name of the Lord thy God in vain.
    4) Remember the sabbath and keep it holy.

    Context is everything. An important thing to remember is that when these commandments came about, there was an on-going struggle between the earlier feminine, holistic, Goddess/lunar Paleolithic cultures and invading linear, masculine solar Gods of the Bronze and Iron Ages (the Goddess cultures inevitably lost to the more powerful and violent monotheisms and were either displaced, completely eradicated or incorporated).

    Notice that commandments 1 and 3 unequivocally use the word "God" (diametrically opposed to the word "Goddess") which establishes the fact that the creator of the universe is obviously NOT feminine. The mythologies of these newer sky God cultures literally desecrate the earlier Goddesses, such as the Babylonian myth of Tiamat, where the masculine hero divides heaven from earth as he hacks the earth Goddess into multiple pieces to create the universe, and uses her body as a vessel for humanity.

    Also interesting (but not a coincidence) is that the written word came about around the same time the Goddess cultures begin to lose ground. Literacy inevitably causes a society to see the world in a more linear, abstract (like their image-less God), black and white fashion, relying upon more “masculine” left-brained faculties (Goddess cultures, were much more holistic and feminine and generally more right-brained). * [See Leonard Shlain’s “The Alphabet Vs. the Goddess” for more detailed information on this subject: http://www.alphabetvsgoddess.com].

    Needless to say, maybe instead of attacking people who might question the wisdom of publicly posting such exclusive, ethnocentric and divisive piece of literature people should actually take a look at WHAT it is that is being protested. I'm just sayin'.

    March 1, 2011 at 5:01 pm |
  6. Someone who can do minimal research before posting to CNN

    Luke:

    The local affiliate story names Giles County without naming the state. The area covered by WVVA (a TV station, not an abbreviation of a single state) includes both VA & WV, so I doubt anyone there would need to be enlightened as to the state in which Giles County sits. There were no errors in this story on the local affiliate's site. (Which, knowing WVVA, is miraculous - I'll grant you that.)

    March 1, 2011 at 4:08 pm |
  7. missy

    Luke – Try the link for the local affiliate's story. WVVA is well aware that while they are based in Bluefield WV, Giles county is in Virginia. This one is on CNN.

    March 1, 2011 at 4:06 pm |
    • Luke

      I bet CNN just went with where their affiliate is located. Methinks this is not a big deal either and there's no reason to lash out at the poorly compensated editors of a free service.

      March 1, 2011 at 4:35 pm |
  8. TheRationale

    I don't see how this inst-itution can be qualified to teach history if it thinks it would legally succeed in re-posting the ten commandments.

    March 1, 2011 at 4:04 pm |
    • Dana

      Good point. Do they even teach U.S. government at this school? Separation of Church and State is a core tenet of our country.

      March 1, 2011 at 6:20 pm |
  9. zach

    the funny thing is i use to go to this high school years ago and me nor did 80 percent of the student body knew we had the 10 commandments displayed... untilk someone got them taken down

    March 1, 2011 at 3:53 pm |
  10. charlie

    Does CNN not know the difference between West Virginia and Virginia. Come on, people. Do you do this with North/South Carolina? Somebody get the newsroom an Atlas.

    March 1, 2011 at 3:46 pm |
    • Luke

      Third time: Why don't you direct your anger towards the local affiliate that reported and printed the story rather than CNN which is merely linking to the story?

      March 1, 2011 at 3:48 pm |
  11. wow

    Come on CNN, do you really not know the difference between western Virginia and West Virginia? One is a state, and the other is not.

    March 1, 2011 at 3:41 pm |
    • Luke

      Once again: Why don't you direct your anger towards the local affiliate that reported and printed the story rather than CNN which is merely linking to the story?

      March 1, 2011 at 3:42 pm |
    • wow

      So CNN shouldn't be held responsible for incorrect content they link to and present on their own website as factual information?

      March 1, 2011 at 6:42 pm |
    • HotAirAce

      Who's resposnible for the bad grammar in the first sentence?

      March 1, 2011 at 8:27 pm |
  12. Luke

    I am willing to bet a lot of money that every single kid protesting cannot name the ten commandments without cheating. This says a lot, if you think about it.

    March 1, 2011 at 3:28 pm |
    • Nonimus

      "every single kid"
      I'll take that bet. One of them is going to know them by heart.

      March 1, 2011 at 3:41 pm |
    • Luke

      Doubt it. Besides, clearly my statement is a sweeping phrase meant ot make a point rather than a statement of fact embedded in concrete data. Can you name all 10 without looking up? Only 2 even apply to a modern society. The others have nothing to do with a functioning society, deal with animal (and women) ownership or command belief in a single god, which is an infringement in our const-itution anyway.

      March 1, 2011 at 3:44 pm |
    • Nonimus

      Ah, just an expression, dang I was going to plan a trip with my winnings.

      And what are you talking about, coveting as.ses is very relevant to modern society. : )

      March 1, 2011 at 3:54 pm |
  13. Someone who can do minimal research before posting to CNN

    Giles County = Virginia
    There is no Giles County in West Virginia.

    See? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_counties_in_West_Virginia

    Way to edit, CNN!

    March 1, 2011 at 3:27 pm |
    • Luke

      Why don't you direct your anger towards the local affiliate that reported and printed the story rather than CNN which is merely linking to the story?

      March 1, 2011 at 3:41 pm |
  14. Luke

    Ho here we go again. For the last time, no one cares what students put in their lockers or wear on their t-shirts (to a reasonable extent). The school simply cannot endorse religion. Even the most militant or strident atheist would agree. There is no debate here.

    March 1, 2011 at 3:25 pm |
    • Dana

      As long as there are people who believe they should be allowed to force their religion on others in a public school setting, there will be debate. We can wish there were no debate here, and explain that the debate is groundless...nevertheless it continues.

      March 1, 2011 at 6:19 pm |
  15. Mike T

    JC064 must have moved up the ladder. I see he is now in charge. The Christian religion is rooted in forgiveness. Which one of us would follow Christ without a reward? We are not saved by displaying our beliefs. Now I have to excuse myself while I remove the log from My Eye. Then I will be right back to take care of yours. Have a wonderful day and may God bless you all.

    March 1, 2011 at 3:04 pm |
  16. Rachael

    Why can't they compromise and put the ten commandments IN their lockers rather than ON their lockers if it matters that much to the students? I'm a recent graduate of a high school here in Canada and we don't display our religion like the U.S. does so I don't particularly understand why Christianity is such a big deal when there are plenty of other religions that also teach moral and values like Buddhism.
    The lockers are property of the school, and ANY religious or anti-religious flyers posted on the outside of lockers here at least would get someone a suspension for placing it there because it generates a segregation of religious beliefs and isolation of the minority students.
    So, instead of protesting the removal of the Ten Commandments, why don't they give students a hand-out to place on the inside of their locker if they so choose?

    March 1, 2011 at 3:03 pm |
    • Frogist

      @Rachael: They are not trying to remove what the students are putting up. They are trying to remove framd copies that officials apparently have put up. But I do agree with you about keeping their copies inside their locker. Unfortunately, that doesn't seem to be enough for the Christian students. They would rather a prideful, overbearing show, rather than a personal, humble one that is respectful of other students' heritage or views.

      March 1, 2011 at 3:29 pm |
    • Joe

      Rachael,
      You have no backbone, whatever religion you are. Or maybe the 10 Commandments offend you Moslem bosses?

      March 1, 2011 at 4:23 pm |
    • David Johnson

      Yep, and you guys have universal health care to. *sigh*

      But that's okay, 'cause we got Jesus.

      Wanna trade?

      Cheers!

      March 1, 2011 at 9:12 pm |
    • The Truth

      @David Johnson: "Yep, and you guys have universal health care to. *sigh* But that's okay, 'cause we got Jesus. Wanna trade?"

      LOL David... that was classic! 🙂

      Just as an FYI for you, I have dual US and Canadian citizenship and I've experienced the Canadian medical system first hand and let me assure you, we here in the US do not want it. If you've got a cold or break your finger, the Canadian system is great. If you have a serious medical issue, you're up the creek. I've had an uncle who needed heart surgery and got put on a waiting list that was almost 2 years long and needed to come to the US to save his life. My father had a stroke and was "lucky" to get to share his room with 5 other people. They literally had patients on gurneys out in the hallway as their "rooms." The doctors there were way overworked and of mediocre quality as a whole. The list goes on and on.

      In any event, I enjoy your posts and know you are a smart guy, so I'm just giving you a head's up on this in case you were unaware. I fully support health care for all Americans regardless of income, but the Canadian system is not the answer. You might find this very interesting/enlightening:

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l9u2UU6-wlk

      Keep up the great posts!
      Cheers!
      🙂

      March 1, 2011 at 9:23 pm |
    • HotAirAce

      @The Truth

      You know that you and I generally agree on most things, and I'm not going to argue about your and your family's experience or even quibble much with the cases presented in the video, but...

      I don't think the Canadian medical system is as bad as some would like folks to believe. I could give you N examples, everything from broken bones, two births (the first a C section), and most recently heart problems, and my and our family's experience is that we have received outstanding care at reasonable cost – less than $2,000/year above what my employer pays for a level of care higher than provided by "the government" for 4 people and including all drugs, including for about a year a new drug that would have cost $3,000/month, as well as asthma drugs for one son for going on 12 years.

      I don't think there's any question that you can get world class care in the US quicker then in Canada – if you want to pay. To some extent, I think that Canada has handled the affordability issue by setting expectations about service, and to another extent but what they government will pay for services which in turn does affect the number of medical professionals in Canada, which affects waiting times. This could be considered, to some extent, to be a self-regulating mechanism. In general, if you really, really need care, you get it in a reasonable timeframe. If you can wait, yes you will. But the various provinces and cities help the situation postively by attracking doctors and nurses, often to non-metro areas, so towns that would not otherwise have a doctor nearby do. And they build medical facilities in rural areas, that again would not otherwise have them.

      So things are not all that bad.

      And to David, a polite but emphatic "No Thanks to jesus!" I'll take an even partially functioning health care system rather than any imaginary being and tribal myths, every time out!!

      March 1, 2011 at 10:54 pm |
    • The Truth

      ***@HotAirAce You know that you and I generally agree on most things, and I'm not going to argue about your and your family's experience or even quibble much with the cases presented in the video, but...***

      What's up Ace? I enjoy your posts as well.

      ***I don't think the Canadian medical system is as bad as some would like folks to believe. I could give you N examples, everything from broken bones, two births (the first a C section), and most recently heart problems, and my and our family's experience is that we have received outstanding care at reasonable cost – less than $2,000/year above what my employer pays for a level of care higher than provided by "the government" for 4 people and including all drugs, including for about a year a new drug that would have cost $3,000/month, as well as asthma drugs for one son for going on 12 years.***

      Three things:

      1) I'm glad to hear that you are having good experiences.

      2) I'm sorry to hear about your heart problems.

      3) I've had good experiences as well with the Canadian system. Yet at the same time, it is the serious times where I've seen the problems. I've got family all across the Great White North and it seems like some places tend to be better than others. In the cases I mentioned, my uncle lived in a medium sized town in Sask and my parents lived in Victoria (which is of course the capital of BC). My parents had moved from California to BC to retire and had a beautiful house with a 270 degree of the ocean. Because of the horrific medical care, they actually packed up and moved back to the US into a house that is a major downgrade from what they had in Canada just for the healthcare system here. It has also been my own experience that the Canadian system seems to work better for the younger demographic... say age 50 and below.

      ****I don't think there's any question that you can get world class care in the US quicker then in Canada – if you want to pay.****

      Just as a frame of reference, I could hop in my car right now, and within a 15 minute radius, there are a double digit number of hospitals that I could go to and get an MRI within a matter of hours.

      ***To some extent, I think that Canada has handled the affordability issue by setting expectations about service, and to another extent but what they government will pay for services which in turn does affect the number of medical professionals in Canada, which affects waiting times. This could be considered, to some extent, to be a self-regulating mechanism. In general, if you really, really need care, you get it in a reasonable timeframe. If you can wait, yes you will. But the various provinces and cities help the situation postively by attracking doctors and nurses, often to non-metro areas, so towns that would not otherwise have a doctor nearby do. And they build medical facilities in rural areas, that again would not otherwise have them.***

      Agreed.

      ***So things are not all that bad.***

      I hear what you are saying and I think it depends upon the condition and the location. We could look at Belinda Stronach as an example. While being an elected sitting member of the Canadian Parliament and a member of the prestigious Queen's Privy Council, she came down with breast cancer. And where did she have her surgery done? She came all the way from Eastern Canada to California. And what did her spokesperson say was the reason? He said that it was because the United States was the best place to have it done. Belinda later stated that the doctors in Canada couldn't offer saving her ni-pple as an option, but instead wanted to put on a "ni-pple tattoo." Being a member of Parliament, she would have had access to all of the best doctors and facilities in Canada and yet they couldn't even offer it as an option. IMHO, giving a woman a tattoo of a ni-pple instead of trying to preserve something so sacred that helps create her actual identi-ty as a woman is baffling. After all, apparently it's only a ni-pple to the Canadian doctors.

      As an aside, you mentioned heart issues. My father also had heart issues while he was in Victoria (before his horrific experience in the Canadian hospital with his stroke). They offered him 2 options to fix a leaky heart valve. Those two options were a pig valve or a metal valve. Each has pros and cons. I wasn't convinced that the system was giving him good care. So I did some checking around. To make a long story short, I contacted the Mayo Clinic and they told me that they could offer him 4 options... pig valve, metal valve, human cadaver valve or repair the currently leaky valve. Thus he got DOUBLE the choices here.

      So my dad went to the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota (thousands of miles away from us) to go with the repair the valve option (as it had some major advantages that he could have never received in Canada). And when the Mayo Clinic doctors examined him, they found that he needed a QUADRUPLE bypass as well that the Canadian doctors never even noticed. The facilities were second to none. The doctors were second to none. The cutting edge technology was second to none. And perhaps even the most important was that the "human care factor" of the staff, nurses and doctors was beyond amazing. Less than 24 hours after this massive surgery, they had him up and walking around. I couldn't believe it.

      I've also had several surgeries there from a sports accident and they were amazing to me as well. I could not recommend this place any more highly. I'm mentioning this to you because heart issues are a serious deal. You don't want to go there for a broken hand, but for a brain, heart, cancer, etc, issue, it is worth every penny because nothing is more important than your life. And the hospital bills there were amazingly cheap by our standards here.

      If you are interested:

      http://health.usnews.com/best-hospitals/rankings

      http://www.mayoclinic.org/cardiovascular-disease-rst/

      http://www.mayoclinic.org/cardiovascular-surgery-rst/

      http://www.mayoclinic.org/hospitals-rst/

      http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/heart-disease/DS01120 (their dot com site has a wealth of information for free on it about all sorts of medical conditions).

      If you live far away, you can gather your medical records, X-rays, MRI's, etc and send them to the Mayo Clinic and they will look at them and tell you over the phone what they think they can or can't do for you in many instances.

      If I can help by answering any questions for you, feel free to ask.

      Wishing you good health and keep up the great posts!

      Cheers!
      🙂

      March 2, 2011 at 5:38 am |
  17. Phoena

    I have no problem with the students having the ten commandments on their lockers. This way it is easier to hold them to their beliefs and call them on it when they break their own rules. It's good lesson for the kids that they need to live authentically and not preach something if they aren't planning to live by it. If they don't plan to live by it, then they need to stop preaching it.

    March 1, 2011 at 3:02 pm |
  18. Irvin Gavidor

    Schools are there for the dissemination of knowledge. Knowledge is based on facts, Religion is based on beliefs. Thus knowledge should be imparted in schools and Religion at home, churches, synagogs, temples, or mosques. If there was a God, anyone who violated 'Its' commands would instantaneously be punished. If they are willing to post the Ten Commandments, why don't they post the Seven Deadly Sins? Pride, Greed, Envy, Wrath, Lust, Glutony and Sloth.

    March 1, 2011 at 2:56 pm |
    • Ykcyc

      They are displaying their beliefs (pride) to impose their view and beliefs to everyone and show that they are right and those who do not agree are wrong. They don't see it as a sin. They just like to be right. So young and so brainwashed, with so little of lifes experience, they are pretending, imitating, and modeling behaviour they have learned. Why els would they do such a thing?
      Peace.

      March 1, 2011 at 3:09 pm |
    • Irvin Gavidor

      o Ykcyc:

      Yes, I agree, this askew view of reality begins at home. Just as sure as everyone 'hates' liars and loves their parents, they are never willing to come to the realization that their parents were the first people to lie to them. To believe is to have certainty in something for which one has no proof, and to have 'faith' is to hold a blind trust on that certainty for which one has no proof. An illogical and unreasonable argument for any half-wit hominid, but resoundingly popular with the masses. It was Confucius who pointed out the most apparent role of Religion in society. Although, in accordance with Ockham's philosophy the simplest explanation is most likely the correct one, or as another brilliant philosopher would have put it:

      "The surest way to corrupt a youth is to instruct him to hold in higher esteem those who think alike than those who think differently."
      – Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche

      March 1, 2011 at 3:47 pm |
    • Irvin Gavidor

      The previous response was for commentator "Ykcyc", I apologize I didn't grab the "T" on my 'cut and paste'. Sorry.

      Thanks to Mr. or Mrs. "Ykcyc" for your commentary.

      March 1, 2011 at 3:56 pm |
    • Moses Assistant

      Facts – Hmmm = Is NOT Civics/American History taught in Schools?

      Have you or anyone in the last 50 yrs. of Public Education been taught or are you aware that the governing body that wrote the 1st amendment, in the same session, asked George Washington to declare a National Day of prayer thanking some Jewish guy named Jesus who had been dead for 1770some years? Are you aware that the Capitol Rotunda in D.C. was used for Church services by three separate Churches for its first 100 yrs and that the man who is held up (mistakenly) as the Father of sep. of church/state, Thomas Jefferson attended Church services there when he was President? Are you aware that every preamble of every State in the Union (that would be 50) begin by recognizing God, thanking Him for His Blessing and continued blessing? And finally, are you aware the the Judeo-Christian ethic is the primary driving force for the Western Civilization that you now enjoy?
      Secular indeed.
      Not one of these locker displays is the Government establishing a State Run Church nor is it forcing any student to believe the Commandments as a rule of faith. I believe your thought is trampling on their freedom of speech. If lockers may be decorated then let them decorate.
      ACLU batting 500 on this one …Yahoo!!!

      March 1, 2011 at 5:37 pm |
    • Dana

      Are you aware that our forefathers - and I mean the forefathers of George Washington, even - were people who fled their home countries to escape persecution because their beliefs did not jive with the people in power? Now you want to pretend that forcing a religion on others is a good thing for this country? Separation of Church and State was one of the best ideas our founders ever had. If you don't see it that way, you can go check out how theocracy works out, in a country such as Iran. As soon as God is brought into government, that God only becomes a tool for people to subjugate other people.

      March 1, 2011 at 6:26 pm |
    • ST Mannew

      Why do atheists believe their worldview takes precedence over anyone else's worldview? Your beliefs are no better than anyone else's. Or do you believe that atheism is a pedestal of neutrality that you can look down and judge all others, don't worry, you have company, Stalin believed the same thing. Atheists have no self-awareness whatsoever.

      March 1, 2011 at 8:06 pm |
    • SB

      ST Mannew, religious worldviews are paraded, protected, and celebrated all over the globe. In America we have a national holiday dedicated specifically to Christianity. Our money says “In God We Trust”. The national pledge of allegiance was changed to include the word “God” only sixty years ago. Poll after poll demonstrates that atheists are the most hated minority group in America thanks largely to very ignorant beliefs perpetuated by a self-righteous religious majority. And you are complaining about atheist arrogance!?!?!? What rock do you live under that I might lift so you can see what’s actually going on?

      March 1, 2011 at 9:46 pm |
    • The Truth

      ***@SB What rock do you live under that I might lift so you can see what’s actually going on?***

      Just a guess, but perhaps the one in the new Geico commercial. lol

      ST Mannew writes: "Or do you believe that atheism is a pedestal of neutrality that you can look down and judge all others, don't worry, you have company, Stalin believed the same thing. Atheists have no self-awareness whatsoever."

      He complains about atheists judging others and then he turns around 1 second later and judges atheists. Fricken' classic! None of that even begins to address that Christians and Atheists are on different playing fields about this... Christians are not supposed to judge and turn the other cheek where atheists are not necessarily held to those same self-imposed requirements. So in this case, it is a double hypocrisy.

      Peace!

      March 1, 2011 at 9:52 pm |
  19. Reality

    A simple "Do No Harm" sign would eliminate all the fuss!!!

    March 1, 2011 at 2:52 pm |
    • Eric G.

      Or......how about a "Do your Science" sign?

      March 1, 2011 at 3:11 pm |
  20. joe

    This was in western VIRGINIA, not the state of West Virginia. Close to W.Va., near Bluefield, where the report originated.

    March 1, 2011 at 2:51 pm |
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About this blog

The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.