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My Take: Why some people hate God
March 8th, 2011
10:07 AM ET

My Take: Why some people hate God

Editor's Note: Bernard Schweizer is an associate professor of English at Long Island University in Brooklyn. He specializes in the study of iconoclasts and rebels, including the controversial writer and public intellectual Rebecca West. His third book is “Hating God.”

By Bernard Schweizer, Special to CNN

There’s a lost tribe of religious believers who have suffered a lasting identity crisis. I am referring to the category-defying species of believers who accept the existence of the creator God and yet refuse to worship him. In fact they may go so far as to say that they hate God.
 
No, I’m not talking about atheists. Non-believers may say contemptuous things about God, but when they do so, they are simply giving the thumbs-down to a fictional character. They may as well express dislike about Shakespeare’s devious Iago, Dickens’ scheming Uriah Heep or Dr. Seuss’ Grinch who stole Christmas.
 
For atheists, God is in the same category as these fictional villains. Except that since God is the most popular of all fictional villains, New Atheists – those evangelizing ones such as Christopher Hitchens and Richard Dawkins - spend a considerable amount of energy enumerating his flaws.
 
But someone who truly believes in God’s existence and yet hates or scorns him is in a state of religious rebellion so perplexing as to strain our common understanding of faith to the breaking point.
 
Although these radical dissenters could steal the thunder from the New Atheists, they have remained almost unknown to date.
 
When it comes to God-hatred, a collective blindness seems to settle on us. First, we lack a generally agreed-upon name to refer to this religious rebellion. And anything that doesn’t have a word associated with it doesn’t exist, right?
 
Well, in the case of God-hatred, this principle doesn’t hold because the phenomenon does exist whether or not there’s a name for it. And in any case, I’ve ended the semantic impasse by naming these rebels and their stance once for all. My chosen term is misotheism, a word composed of the Greek root “misos” (hatred) and “theos” (deity).
 
Why do I care so much about them? They strike me as brave, visionary, intelligent people who reject God from a sense of moral outrage and despair because of the amount of injustice and suffering that they witness in this world.
 
At the same time, they are exercising self-censorship because they dare not voice their opinion openly. After all, publicly insulting God can have consequences ranging from ostracism to imprisonment, fines and even death, depending on where the blasphemy takes place (Ireland, for instance, imposes a fine of up to 25,000 Euros for blasphemy) and what God is the target of attacks (under sharia law, being found an enemy of God, or “mohareb” is a capital offense).
 
But I also care about these rebels because they chose literature as their principal medium for dealing with their God-hatred. I am a professor of literature, and the misotheists’ choice of literature as their first line of defense and preferred medium endears them to me.
 
Literature offered them the only outlet to vent their rage against God. And it was a pretty safe haven for doing so. Indeed, hardly anybody seems to notice when God-hatred is expressed in literature. Such writers cleverly “package” their blasphemous thoughts in works of literature without seeming to give offense in any overt way.
 
At the same time, these writers count on the reader’s cooperation to keep their “secret” safe. It’s like a pact between writer and reader.
 
Zora Neale Hurston could write that “all gods who receive homage are cruel” without anybody objecting that “all gods” must necessarily include the persons of the Christian Trinity.
 
Or Rebecca West could write that “something has happened which can only be explained by supposing that God hates you with merciless hatred, and nobody will admit it,” counting on the fact that, since nobody will admit it, nobody will rat her out for blasphemy.
 
There lies, in a sense, the awesome, subversive power of literary writing, something that had worried Plato 2,400 years ago when he required that all poets be removed from his ideal “Republic.” Interestingly, though, while guardians of propriety have put Huckleberry Finn on the list of proscribed texts because of its liberal use of the N-word, few people have declared Hurston’s "Their Eyes Were Watching God" or Shelley’s "Prometheus Unbound" or West’s "The Return of the Soldier" as forbidden texts because of the underlying misotheism of these works.
 
And even where the misotheism is overtly expressed, as in Elie Wiesel’s "The Trial of God" or in James Morrow’s "Godhead Trilogy," literature offers an enclave of religious freedom that is vital to the human spirit and its impulse to free itself of any shackles, even the commands of God.
 
I refer to the story of misotheism as “untold” partly because misotheism tends not to be noticed even when it hides in plain sight. Another reason why the story of misotheism is “untold” is that nobody has bothered yet to draw the larger lines of development over time, beginning with the Book of Job and ending up with utilitarianism, philosophical anarchism and feminism. That story in itself is quite engrossing, but again it is not a story that has really ever been presented.
 
So I am doing quite a bit of connecting the dots, unearthing overlooked connections and making distinctions such as proposing a system of three different types of misotheism - agonistic (conflicted), absolute and political. Misotheism in its various manifestations is a dark, disturbing and perplexing strand of religious dissent. But at the same time, it is an attitude toward the divine that shows just how compelling belief can be.
 
If people continue to believe in a God they find to be contemptible, then belief is such a powerful force that it cannot be simply switched off on the basis of empirical data. Thus, in the last consequence, the study of misotheism is a testament to the power of belief, albeit a twisted, unconventional form.

The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of Bernard Schweizer.

- CNN Belief Blog

Filed under: Atheism • Belief • Books • God • Opinion

soundoff (1,730 Responses)
  1. Philo Cafe

    Jesus was an alien-human hybrid. Mohamed was an alien abductee. Same with Buddah. There, I said it.

    Please don't burn me at the stake!

    March 8, 2011 at 1:47 pm |
  2. Jeremy Griffin

    Some cars now don't even require a key. The locks are all, like, digital. When I get money and get a new car, I'm get me one with digital locks. I can just be like, 'Open,' and it'll open.

    March 8, 2011 at 1:47 pm |
    • MarkinFL

      Mine unlocks when I touch the handle. Never touch the key after its in my pocket in the morning. Overall, I like the system.

      (And yes, there is a backup physical key built in) 😉

      March 8, 2011 at 1:54 pm |
  3. Jeremy Griffin

    I knew a guy who once locked his keys in his car and had to break the window to get them out. I was like, 'Why didn't just call Pop-A-Lock?' He was all, 'Oh, they're way to expensive.'

    March 8, 2011 at 1:46 pm |
  4. Jeremy Griffin

    Has anyone seen them? My keys?

    March 8, 2011 at 1:45 pm |
    • Cedar Rapids

      you left them in your other life.

      March 8, 2011 at 2:01 pm |
    • David in Corpus

      Gawd took them but not directly. He put in a work order with the local chapter of The United Association of Gremlin Malcontents. They have your keys and you will never get them back unless you burn the intestines of a spring oxen upon the alter of the lord in your nearest tabernacle, make sure to give pennance (money) to the priest as if you do not the congregation will stone you to death. Remember when getting keys or socks back from the lord you must first make a pleasant odor unto him and nothing pleases him more than smelling charred animal guts. Leviticus, the whole da mn chapter.

      March 8, 2011 at 2:07 pm |
  5. Kenrick Benjamin

    Some are angry at God because of there life experiences, God cannot please everyone all the time, but he can love everyone all the time. Who among us is so righteous that we don't have consequences and who say that God is please with what is happening with his world if he was would he be changing it in the future to a righteous world.

    March 8, 2011 at 1:44 pm |
    • Dave

      Why can't this god of yours please everyone all the time? If he/she/it created the universe why is it a stretch that he/she/it can't please a mere 7 billion people?

      March 8, 2011 at 1:58 pm |
    • David in Corpus

      Last time I checked, my loving father, who I call dad always did his best to keep me safe, healthy, loved, etc., etc.
      He did not go out of his way to test my love for him by say..... insisting that I kill my own son to prove my devotion to him. If I did something my father disapproved of he never told me I would be sent to a place of eternal suffering because he loves me. Only your sick monkey gawwwwd would cast his own children into a pit of eternal fire and pain for displeasing him in a myriad of demented ways. Eat up your religion sheeper if it pleases you but if I find myself standing in front of a lord of all lords when I am dead I shall spit in his face and let him know why if I have the chance. All religions and their pig gawds are poison to humanity and always have been. You wonder why I hate religion so much? Study human history thouroughly and you will too understand why all religions deserve to be despised for what the are, evil men's way of controlling the masses and using them.

      March 8, 2011 at 2:03 pm |
  6. Naomi Chambers

    I can speak only for myself, as an atheist.

    Hating god is as logical as hating Poseidon, or hating Zeus or hating the Easter bunny. We do not hate something that does not exist.

    March 8, 2011 at 1:44 pm |
  7. Jeremy Griffin

    Did I leave them in the door lock?

    March 8, 2011 at 1:44 pm |
    • Anotheralt

      clearly you left them in your other jacket...the one you don't wear often, but did that one day because it was too cold or rainy.

      March 8, 2011 at 1:47 pm |
  8. Jeremy Griffin

    I'm going to start carrying a spare housekey in my car. This is silly.

    March 8, 2011 at 1:44 pm |
  9. Jeremy Griffin

    I feel like I set them on the counter when I got back from the gym, but they're not there.

    March 8, 2011 at 1:43 pm |
  10. Hmmmm. . .

    This is an interesting observation about literature. These themes certainly do exist in books, and they aren't talked about much–or even recognized half the time. I think this is partly because most literature is built around conflict and resolution. Whatever the conflict, most resolution brings a measure of understanding, peace, or acceptance for the protagonist. It is easy for non-"misotheistic" believers to project or attribute some of that resolution to a reconciliation or deeper understanding of God. Thus, many readers resolve the conflict for themselves. That's the way I felt when I read "Their Eyes Were Watching God." Readers always bring their own understanding of the concept of God to any text they read. I believe the motives of the author are worth considering in "misotheistic" literature. Is the author directly challenging established religion? Is the author purposefully attacking the notion of God in an attempt to destroy faith? Is the author using human characters to explore the human condition, including our desires to understand and cope with realities of life and faith and growth and disappointment? Literature is particularly good at doing the last, and is worthwhile in its efforts to do so. It helps us examine our own beliefs and questions on a deeper plain (unlike most attacking posts on comment boards), and life will be more rich if we all understand why we believe as we do.

    March 8, 2011 at 1:42 pm |
    • mjg228

      This is an excellent comment and you articulated what I was thinking.

      March 8, 2011 at 1:47 pm |
  11. Philo Cafe

    Hey all you god people...stop using capitol letters all the time for god and relative pronouns. You're not writing biblical text; and Your insistance on behaving as though You were is presuptuous of Us Misotheists, and a violation of my right to not have to feel like I'm reading biblical Text. Ok, Now I no longer Feel like I'm Reading biblical Text. Nevermind.

    March 8, 2011 at 1:42 pm |
  12. Matthew

    The editor is misguided in terms of his belief about the role of God. After reading the article, most people would reasonably infer: "If God exists, why isn't He doing anything? At issue is whether God exists actively or passively on earth. My guess is that the editor considers God a passive existence. In my view, God is very active on earth. Every injustice and atrocity on earth occurred according to the express intent of God. Yes, God was behind every life’s events, including unfortunate situations. At the end of the other spectrum, the view is that all events fall under the principle of probability.

    Probability and randomness are junctures that unite believers and unbelievers (i.e. Atheists) of God. Nonetheless, believers differ from unbelievers because their faith enables an understanding that God operates under His own secret plans. Believers will admit that events appear probable only because they cannot know the plans of God. If God is willing, He will actualize an event on earth despite any odds against it. The Israelites have experienced, in real time, the miracles of God. The Old Testament and the history of Egypt and surrounding countries are full of examples.

    Going back to the editor's main discussion, he claims himself to be a “God-hater”. He points to the book of Job that expresses a hatred towards God. As a matter of fact, Job recognizes God’s active role on earth: “You have decided the length of our lives. Your know how many months we will live, and we are not given a minute longer.” (Job 14:5). Following the editor’s line of thought, God sit back and watched the misery of Job with complete indifference. However, faithful readers of the Old Testament are able to recognize that God followed every moment of Job’s entire life. If you did not know, the book of Job contains a happy ending. Job never let his faith go and God restored Job’s wealth more than his previous possessions. In short, the editor’s “God-hating” literature is for people who are convinced about the existence of God but have no faith to trust in God’s power. If you’re among this group, you can always pray for faith to guide you in your personal life. If you’re an Atheist, the second paragraph describes your situation. There is plenty of evidence that describe the existence of God. Study the origin of Jewish people. Also, the existence of God is an undisputed issue in this article.

    March 8, 2011 at 1:39 pm |
    • Philo Cafe

      Please stop using the term "God-hater," and use instead the term "Alien-Astronaut Hater." Thank you.

      March 8, 2011 at 1:52 pm |
    • Philo Cafe

      Sorry, I meant to add "Ancient" to Alien-Astronaut, seeing how we are talking of events many thousands of years ago. Thanks again.

      March 8, 2011 at 1:54 pm |
  13. Patrish

    Don't hate GOD, just the people that tried to shove their religion in my face. It's my choice if I want to believe or not. No wonder I'm a border-line atheist Want me to accept some fictional power – might as well believe in aliens.. Oh wait – I do!!!. I don't pray, but someone must like me because good things happen to me a lot... Go figure..

    March 8, 2011 at 1:39 pm |
    • ILoveJesus

      Go figure? I have, its called Mercy and Grace.

      March 8, 2011 at 1:59 pm |
  14. Fast Fred

    If god created us did we believe in god at birth? I don't think so. We were taught to believe in god, by people who were taught
    to believe......by people who were taught to believe......and so on. As we get older we take confort and solace in believing in something that helps explain to our satisfaction things we don't understand. Science having been band from most religions
    for centuries shut out many answers. That's changing fast. I predict no need for religions in 100 years. Looking for your reply
    in 2111.

    March 8, 2011 at 1:39 pm |
    • kc1me

      Your point is stupid. Noone can say whether they did or did not believe in God at birth.

      March 8, 2011 at 1:45 pm |
    • Sybaris

      Correct.

      The default position is atheism. Environment plays a huge role in religious affiliation.

      An uncomfortable truth for U.S. christians is that if they had been born and raised in say........Saudi Arabia they would most likely be defending Muhammed with as much enthusiasm as they do Jesus. The lesson is that there ws no divine or supernatural moment of cognition that "saved" them or revealed a "truth". Their beliefs are mostly just part of the local social fabric. Kinda like nationalism

      March 8, 2011 at 1:50 pm |
    • Darren Schlack

      The demise of religion was predicted over 200 years ago and even believed up until about 40 years ago. But world trends put that, and your prediction, in serious doubt.

      March 8, 2011 at 2:00 pm |
  15. Sitnalta

    "For atheists, God is in the same category as these fictional villains"

    Speaking as an atheist, this is not true. I may harp on believers for being hypocrites- Using God as an excuse to fulfill their own selfish desires or justify being a horrible person, but I don't see god as a villain, just a fictional character. Like Zeus or Odin One-Eye.

    March 8, 2011 at 1:38 pm |
    • Patrish

      Nicely put!

      March 8, 2011 at 1:41 pm |
    • MarkinFL

      Have you read the bible? Seems pretty damn villainous to me. I'd rather kiss Cruella Deville.

      March 8, 2011 at 1:51 pm |
    • Dave

      As a fellow atheist I can see why he uses the term villain. The belief in this fictional character has a negative effect on the world through the actions of itt believers. So although god is in the same category as Zeus etc we don't see the believer of Zeus blowing themselves up or shooting abortion doctors.

      March 8, 2011 at 1:54 pm |
  16. Mick

    Before god became or was a word.........there was none at all. I consider the "sun' as my god. The sun sustains everything..good or bad.

    March 8, 2011 at 1:38 pm |
    • aaron

      Do you have any sunscreen?

      March 8, 2011 at 1:47 pm |
  17. GOD

    Hi

    March 8, 2011 at 1:38 pm |
    • Patrish

      LOL!!

      March 8, 2011 at 1:41 pm |
    • MarkinFL

      I'd have to laugh at any god that bothered to reveal themselves on a CNN blog. 😉

      March 8, 2011 at 1:49 pm |
  18. SavedByJesus69

    I think a sense of moral outrage over social injustices and crimes, even when committed in a religions' name is a good thing.

    I also think iconoclasm (knocking down idols) is a good thing, as usually the status quo is the oppressor

    A questioning and open mind cannot be wrong, specially in combination with an open heart.

    Religion in general tends to have elements of mind control, specially since they all tend to devolve into tradition and ritual

    Seeking for "the truth" has to be about looking for "reality". I think once again we get lost in tradition and ritual, and we sure want to do things out own way. WE might value comfort more than truth.

    We are pretty lost. So much so, that a statement such as "looking for truth" doesn't even make sense to us. It is like being in a dark terrain looking for the highest peak with only a flashlight. You can't do it, and following another guy with a flashlight that claims he knows is just as stupid as going it alone, although it'll give you more comfort in numbers.

    The solution there is that God has to lead you to the peak. But you have to let him, since you'll be walking a lot. In order for that to happen, you have to trust him (faith) otherwise you can always go and follow one of the other guys who claim they know.

    Realizing that all these guys made mistakes is a good, intelligent thing. However, attributing those mistakes to God, because all those guys claim to follow him, is probably not good intellectual practice. They might be lying. You don't know if the follow God. You only know if God talks to you. If he doesn't, well you better ask him to ASAP.

    If everybody really had trust in God there wouldn't be any mistakes. However, the main problem here is that you might doubt that you could talk to God in the first place. But if you don't even try, you'll be following somebody that isn't either.

    Anyway, just a bunch of random observations. I'm a former aitheist (or agnostic depending on the season I guess) that became a Christian thanks to Jesus having rescued me from serious doodoo in a supernatural way. My first encounter wasn't with God but with the other dude. I didn't believe in him. Let me tell you. He didn't much care. Anyway, no space to describe it here, but yes, we do exist (I have a PhD in hard science, and a classic atheist that used to love Carl Sagan and Bill Maher). So, just remember to open the heart and not just the brain. If you listen, God will be talking to you soon.

    March 8, 2011 at 1:37 pm |
    • SeanNJ

      I call shenanigans on your supposed supernatural saving from the doodoo. Useless claim without details.

      March 8, 2011 at 1:40 pm |
    • Anotheralt

      Hey believe what you want to believe. Just don't go about under the assumption that your experience means anything to anyone else.

      March 8, 2011 at 1:46 pm |
    • Dave

      God talked to you? Really? If so I want you to explain it out detail by detail. I'm so sick of this mysticism around how you actually talk to god, or jesus, or whoever you believe in. If there is actually someone out there who has talked to god explain it to me in the way that it made you believe. Deep down did you really talk to god or did you really want to talk to god? I know this sounds condescending, but its not I'm genuinely curious. If you found god explain it, don't just tell me you did it

      March 8, 2011 at 1:49 pm |
    • SavedByJesus69

      Believe me. It doesn't.

      March 8, 2011 at 1:50 pm |
    • ILoveJesus

      SavedByJesus69, The LORD bless thee, and keep thee; The LORD make his face shine upon thee, and be gracious unto thee; The LORD lift up his countenance upon thee, and give thee peace. May God richly Bless you all of the days of your life. 🙂

      March 8, 2011 at 1:55 pm |
    • Dave

      classic for SOME religious folk to dodge around what I'm asking. I am legitimately curious and actually wonder why you believe to maybe help myself with some insight. Still, no help at all, way to spread the word of the lord. idiots

      March 8, 2011 at 1:58 pm |
    • ILoveJesus

      Dave, right now, you are in absolute rage and anger. Any answer that anyone gives, you won't receive anyway, why?

      March 8, 2011 at 2:03 pm |
    • Dave

      No, more that I'm frustrated. I am legitimately curious about both sides of things as I find myself on the fence constantly about what I personally find believable. A higher power is definitely a possibility in my mind so when someone says they have talked to god, I would like to know how and why, or what he said, or ANY information at all. If you are willing to say you talked to a transcendent being you should be able to explain details about it. Is that not fair? God clearly doesn't talk to everyone so shouldn't you share you're experience if it truly occured? I think that is a fair question to be asked.

      March 8, 2011 at 2:07 pm |
    • SavedByJesus69

      Dave, my comment seems to be awaiting moderation so I post it again.

      Its ok. I certainly don't pretend to write two sentences with no details and have people dancing and praising. I just don't have space here, but I can say serious doodoo meant demonic manifestations and landing in the ER twice with a burst aorta. Very brutal. Sounds crazy? Yes, completely mental. Evidence that I can show you now? None. Just words but they mean nothing. Do I expect anybody to believe me here? Not really.

      Just wanted to to say do not be closed to the very possibility that God exists. Skepticism is ok, but sometimes there is a deep down feeling that drives the response, like an aversion. And then skepticism gives way to all out blindness. Those are different.

      March 8, 2011 at 2:08 pm |
    • SeanNJ

      "I just don't have space here, but I can say serious doodoo meant demonic manifestations and landing in the ER twice with a burst aorta."

      So was "god" dressed in surgical scrubs and wearing a mask? That's the only saving I'd be willing to believe.

      March 8, 2011 at 2:11 pm |
    • Dave

      I agree that aversion can start take control of skepticism, but isn't it fair to say that having lots of terrible things (demonic manifestations) could cause someone to want help so badly that they create their help through faith. To rule out that god exists seems arrogant to me, just like the idea that if he does exists that he truly deeply cares about everyone of us here on earth. And btw, don't just throw out the idea that words won't do any good, if you express yourself in a well thought out way then you can probably get people to believe you. After all isn't that what the bible is? Words, regardless of who they came from Man or God, they still have made a hell of an impact on the world just through words. So once again, explain how you came into connection with god. Use a million posts if you have to, I find it hard to believe that if you truly met with this transcendent being that you would want to hold that to yourself. if so, that's not cool

      March 8, 2011 at 2:17 pm |
    • SeanNJ

      @Dave: You clearly want to believe, or you're talking to yourself. I haven't figured out which yet.

      March 8, 2011 at 2:22 pm |
    • SavedByJesus69

      Sean, ok. Have it your way

      Dave, no. I'm not keeping it to myself. If you truly want to know, write to me at souza_peixoto@hotmail.com.

      March 8, 2011 at 2:26 pm |
    • SavedByJesus69

      @IloveJesus

      Thanks man. God bless you

      March 8, 2011 at 2:27 pm |
    • Dave

      Dave

      It's not that simple. Would I love to believe that there is a god who loves me and who wants me to do all these things so that way I can live in a gold kingdom? Haha who doesn't want that, serously. If you don't want that you are lying to yourself or haven't accepted what you're own issues are. Unfortunately, I really believe that there is no God and at the very least he is a creator who moved on a long time ago to leave humans to their own doing. Even that seems like a stretch. I think we all need to just worry about creating a happy environment for eachother and worship WHATEVER we want in our private time. We worry too much from day to day about religion while the world turns to crap. Also, I really love getting people who say they've talked to god to try and explain it. It's all interesting stuff.

      March 8, 2011 at 2:30 pm |
    • SeanNJ

      @Dave: Or presumably you can go here: http://www dot testimonyshare dot com/demons-attacked-me/. Impressive psychosis on display.

      March 8, 2011 at 2:32 pm |
    • Dave

      @ Sean
      wow, that's pretty funny. What's your take on all of this? athiest, christian, buddhist, hindu?

      March 8, 2011 at 2:34 pm |
    • SeanNJ

      @Dave: Atheist. To quote George Carlin, "I was Catholic...until I reached the age of reason."

      March 8, 2011 at 2:39 pm |
    • Dave

      @ Sean
      hahaha great quote. Hard to consider yourself anything with so much unknown and so little time to figure it out. might as well just live.

      March 8, 2011 at 2:42 pm |
  19. Tony

    ARE YOU ******** SERIOUS?!

    This is the most ridiculous, ignorant, dumb article I've read today. There's no such thing as an atheist that hates "God". Why would an atheist hate something he doesn't believe in?

    March 8, 2011 at 1:36 pm |
    • MarkInPDX

      Somebody didn't comprehend the article.

      March 8, 2011 at 1:41 pm |
    • HeIsGod

      @ Tony-

      ARE YOU ******** SERIOUS????? Wny would ANY Atheist spend too much time debating about God when there is no God go them? They spend so much time talking about God than any of us who believe in God!!!

      March 8, 2011 at 1:42 pm |
    • Will G

      if you at all read the article its not about atheists that hate god

      March 8, 2011 at 1:43 pm |
    • WOBH

      You missed his point. He wasn't focusing on athiests. He was focusing on theists (believers) who hate God

      March 8, 2011 at 1:46 pm |
    • lwrennie212

      You didn't read the article very well, did you?

      March 8, 2011 at 1:48 pm |
    • P

      Hey Tony, find someone who knows how to read and have them go over the first 3 paragraphs for you.

      March 8, 2011 at 1:48 pm |
    • WBM

      Tony..."Why would an atheist hate something he doesn't believe in?"...is a good question.

      March 8, 2011 at 1:50 pm |
  20. Brian

    "Bernard Schweizer is an associate professor of English"..........

    Maybe that's his problem. One of my history professors made an interesting comment. He said "English is a 9th grade subject and it should not be taught in college." English professors know this so they have to come up with these crackpot essays to justify their jobs. In academe it's "publish or perish."

    March 8, 2011 at 1:36 pm |
    • Anotheralt

      I doubt your history professor knows anything of the complexities of rhetoric and composition. Having said that, I find the author's work questionable.

      March 8, 2011 at 1:41 pm |
    • Doctordonna

      Well if that were the case then they could hire high school graduates to teach English in schools. Considering the butchering of the language that appears on the internet on a daily basis, I hardly think that would be a good idea.

      March 8, 2011 at 2:36 pm |
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The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.