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My Take: Snap out of spiritual slump with Lent
Catholics traditionally mark the start of Lent on Ash Wednesday, but Lent is for Protestants too, Mark Batterson writes.
April 3rd, 2011
01:00 AM ET

My Take: Snap out of spiritual slump with Lent

Editor's Note: Mark Batterson is lead pastor at the National Community Church in Washington, D.C. He is the author of “In a Pit with a Lion on a Snowy Day,” “Wild Goose Chase” and “Primal: A Quest for the Lost Soul of Christianity.”

By Mark Batterson, Special to CNN

When I was a seminary student, my wife and I went to downtown Chicago for a taping of “The Oprah Winfrey Show.” When the producer came out to prep us for the show, I was embarrassed for him because he had dirt on his forehead. Didn’t he look in the mirror that morning? Why didn’t someone tell him? My embarrassment for him turned into embarrassment for myself when I discovered it was Ash Wednesday and the dirt on his forehead was actually ashes that symbolized the day of repentance that begins Lent.

I grew up going to a wide variety of Protestant churches, but none of them practiced or even mentioned Lent. It wasn’t until a few years ago, well into my tenure as lead pastor of National Community Church, that I discovered the value of Lent. It has since become a meaningful season in the cycle of my spiritual life. During the last few Lenten seasons, I’ve incorporated a fast into my routine. One year I gave up television. Another year I gave up soda. I’ve also done a variety of food fasts for Lent.

In my experience, giving something up for Lent has made the Easter celebration far more meaningful and even helped me develop the spiritual discipline of fasting. Fasting during Lent has helped me identify with the sacrifices Christ has made for me, and it’s also helped me focus on the reason for the season. The celebration of the resurrection of Christ has become far more meaningful since I started observing Lent.

The church I pastor is a rather non-traditional Protestant church. We are absolutely orthodox in theology but a little unorthodox in practice. We meet in five different theaters around the metro D.C. area. We own and operate a coffeehouse on Capitol Hill that gives all of its net profits to local community projects and humanitarian causes in other countries.

Along with new innovations, however, we’ve also rediscovered the value the ancient traditions. While we may not practice Lent the same way the Catholic church does, we are reinventing it in a way that is meaningful to us. We put our unique fingerprint on those traditions, and that keeps them from being empty rituals.

I’m afraid that many Protestant churches have a very short-term memory. For them, church history only goes back to the Protestant Reformation and Martin Luther. While we may have our theological differences, we share a long history, and I believe there are things that Protestant and Catholic churches can learn from each other in ways that don’t compromise their core beliefs.

I for one am thankful for the Lenten tradition that has been cultivated, celebrated and cherished within the Catholic church. I think more Protestant churches will re-adopt some of those traditions that are part of our common church history from before the Protestant Reformation.

I think of Lent as a spiritual pre-season of sorts. The six Sundays leading up to Easter are considered mini-Easters. Like pre-season games, they prepare us for the ultimate celebration in Christendom: the resurrection of Jesus Christ. And one of the benefits, not unlike the Advent celebration surrounding Christmas, is that the celebration is extended to a longer period of time.

A few years ago I came up with a formula for spiritual growth: change of pace + change of place = change of perspective.

Let me explain what it means.

The key to spiritual growth is developing healthy and holy routines. They are called spiritual disciplines. But once the routine becomes routine, you need to disrupt the routine via a change of pace or change of place. Why? Because sacred routines can become empty rituals if you forget why you started doing them in the first place.

I’m certainly not suggesting that routines are bad. Most of us practice a morning ritual that includes showering, brushing our teeth and putting on deodorant. On behalf of your family and friends, continue practicing those routines.

But here’s the spiritual catch-22: good routines can become bad routines if we don’t change the routine. When you start going through the motions spiritually, it’s time to mix up the routine. And Lent is a great opportunity for a natural change of pace.

Lent disrupts the status quo. It can get us out of an old routine and into a new routine.

In physical exercise, routines eventually become counterproductive. If you exercise your muscles the same way every time you work out, your muscles start adapting and stop growing. You need to disorient your muscles by changing your routine. And the same is true spiritually.

When I’m in a spiritual slump, I often snap out of it by a change of pace or a change of place. And it was Jesus who modeled this practice. He would often walk the beach or climb a mountain. I think those changes in geography are not disconnected from the practice of spirituality. It is a simple change of place that precipitates many of the epiphanies that happen in Scripture.

To snap out of a slump, sometimes all it takes is a small change in routine. Volunteer at a local homeless shelter or nursing home. Start keeping a gratitude journal. Get plugged into a small group or Bible study. Take a day off and do a personal retreat. Or just get up a little earlier in the morning and spend a little extra time with God.

One of the small changes in routine that has helped me rejuvenate me is picking up a new translation of Scripture. New words help me think new thoughts. And while you can institute those changes at any time, Lent is a perfect excuse to mix up your spiritual routine.

Why not leverage Lent by mixing up your routine? If you do, you’ll celebrate Easter like you never have before.

The opinions expressed in this commentary are solely those of Mark Batterson

- CNN Belief Blog

Filed under: Belief • Catholic Church • Christianity • Lent • Opinion • Protestant

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soundoff (834 Responses)
  1. YBP

    Mr. Batterson, why do you and hundreds of milliions (if not billions) of otherwise well educated, rational, reasonable people promote made up stories of man-gods as actual history? Just because you have a lot of company doesn't mean it is true. Only that you all have very overactive, albeit childlike imaginations. The ancient notion of vicarious expiation for sin is flawed on several levels, mainly that it is not possible, but also that it is not moral. Take responsibility for everything you do and fail to do. When people like you make a circus act out of your so-called faith, as many tend to do around this time of year, it's open season for people like me to point out the sheer absurdity of it all.

    April 3, 2011 at 12:32 pm |
  2. kdfjdlkf;

    Good story but I hope that protestants begin to look at just coming back home to the Catholic faith. Like someone already said, the issues that plagued the Church 500 YEARS AGO are gone, and more importantly, the Catholic faith IS the church that Christ founded, period. I don't think Jesus intended to have THOUSANDS of distinct Christian churches claiming to be the truth. Heck, even some Christian churches claim that they are probably not THE correct church with the correct biblical teaching. Jesus said, you are either cold or hot, any lukewarmness will not be acceptable.

    April 3, 2011 at 12:32 pm |
  3. Victor

    Hello, Judgment Day is May 21, 2011. http://www.ebiblefellowship.com/may21 http://www.familyradio.com

    April 3, 2011 at 12:32 pm |
    • YBP

      See you then.

      April 3, 2011 at 1:15 pm |
    • tallulah13

      It was March 21, 2011, according to that group that crashed the Gasparilla Pirate Festival in Tampa.

      You doomsday cultists should get organized.

      April 3, 2011 at 1:26 pm |
    • Kain

      how do you reconcile the fact that the calendar God used in the bible wasn't the Gregorian calendar?

      April 3, 2011 at 8:44 pm |
  4. angelosdaughter

    What bothers me are the people who come on here to denigrate and belittle others' beliefs. If you don't believe in anything, that's fine, but why do you feel the need to attempt to destroy what helps many get through the day? What makes you better, then, than those who try to persuade you to their beleifs? Life is hard. Many feel it's better to believe in something rather than nothing. I have left organized religion, too, but I will never ever try to persuade anyone else away from the beliefs that comfort them. I have great love and respect for the Church that nurtured me, but I cannot be a Cafeteria Catholic. We are all on different journeys.

    April 3, 2011 at 12:28 pm |
    • YBP

      There is a desperate need to educate the unenlightened. Many of us non-believers started out as believers. We looked into it very carefully. We delved very deeply. That's why we tend to know much more about it than people like you. And once you know that much about it it, there is no turning back, even if you wanted to. People lose their lives over religion and suffer terrible persecution because of it. Not just in ancient times and far away places. But here and now. I hope this answers your question. And I hope you too will look into it a bit further.

      April 3, 2011 at 1:15 pm |
    • angelosdaughter

      No, YPB, your reply doesn't answer my question. You are displaying the same ignorance and intolerance that you accuse the religious of practicing. I, too was raised in a religion, and delved very deeply; I have also investigated other religions. What I took away from that is that the only thing I know for sure is that I know nothing for sure, unlike those who are persuaded of the absolute rightness of their belief or non-belief. But I have a deep empathy for the sufferings of my fellow human beings. Whatever belief or non-belief helps them get through an often difficult existence, (life can be hard for everyone: we love and in the end we all lose: loved ones, dreams, health, things, and in the end, life), I cannot be so mean, arrogant and small-minded as to think I know better than they do, and I need to denigrate and belittle them for what comfort they find in their creeds.
      And by the way, since many in our culture are religious, to address their customs is not inappropriate on this site. It is news.

      April 3, 2011 at 2:08 pm |
    • Rob

      @angelosdaughter
      Remember the trials of Job. Draw strength from those who seek to destroy rather than build. Those that would spend their precious time to come and belittle others for belief have idle hands. Be glad that their hands are on keyboards and not doing worse.

      April 3, 2011 at 10:16 pm |
  5. Gerald

    Some of you go and educate yourself of the history of one of the greatest thinkers of all time, Albert Einstein. Go look up his take on religion.

    In other words, you non-belivers need something to occupy your meaningless life with.

    April 3, 2011 at 12:24 pm |
    • tallulah13

      "The word god is for me nothing more than the expression and product of human weaknesses, the Bible a collection of honourable, but still primitive legends which are nevertheless pretty childish. No interpretation no matter how subtle can (for me) change this."
      - Albert Einstein, in a letter responding to philosopher Eric Gutkind, who had sent him a copy of his book Choose Life: The Biblical Call to Revolt

      So what was your point?

      April 3, 2011 at 1:24 pm |
    • ScottK

      "you non-belivers need something to occupy your meaningless life with." Like spending all your time and energy and limited resources attempting to convert people to believe in the same imaginary deity you do? Would that make life meaningful? Or do you derive your "meaningful" existence by "knowing" you are always right and that only YOU and those who worship like you do have a direct line to the creator of the universe. Sounds pretty arrogant to me, especially when there is NO proof of anything afterlife which is what you have been spending your life pursuing.

      April 3, 2011 at 1:32 pm |
    • Kain

      I see where you're coming from Gerald. But who cares what they think? The guy is dead.

      April 3, 2011 at 1:42 pm |
  6. Skip Guinness

    I think the point of the article is that it works for some people, and the point of many responses is that it doesnt work for other people. We should respect those differences. It works for me. http://www.skippyguinness.blogspot.com

    April 3, 2011 at 12:24 pm |
    • Gerald

      Sorry Skip. Way too many non-belivers clogging blogs and forums such as this spouting their pathetic support for a meaningless human existence.

      April 3, 2011 at 12:26 pm |
  7. Joseph

    Terrible article to be on cnn.com's online home page. Plenty of non-Catholics celebrate Lent and have certainly heard of it. I have been an Evangelical Lutheran my entire life and every year my church observes Lent and Ash Wednesday. This article is written by someone who must have not done his research. CNN, I'm surprised you let this article make the news. The article is not bad, the only problem I have is that he obviously is not aware that plenty of protestant denominations still honor and practice Lent.

    April 3, 2011 at 12:21 pm |
    • YBP

      I agree with you, Joseph. But I must also say that if you had done your research, you wouldn't go flaunting your so-called faith on a public forum. You would either choose not to be religious, or keep a very low profile, knowing that you believe in a foolish and childish worldview from an ancient and barbaric place and time.

      April 3, 2011 at 1:08 pm |
    • Plato

      YBP, just curious as to what type of research have you delved into? You seem to think you know a lot when in reality "we know nothing." Men are sinful and imperfect and therefore often fail in understanding and following the teachings of God. The only things we can do as mere men is strive to follow God's word, live moral lives and hope for the grace and mercy of God. Our life on this Earth is short and not even the equivalent to a second to the eternal life that is to come. Reconsider your stance, open up your heart, believe.

      April 3, 2011 at 9:53 pm |
  8. Croy

    This article displays a lack of knowledge - Lutherans, Episcopalians, Orthodox, etc. celebrate Lent as well. Protestants should not think it miraculous when they begin doing something that the rest of the church has been doing for hundreds of years.

    April 3, 2011 at 12:21 pm |
  9. Victor Chief

    I give up relgion during lent. It makes the rest of my year more meaningful.

    April 3, 2011 at 12:21 pm |
  10. sandrewnav

    We are all aware that religion has been guilty of much evil and still is. This is not the point. There is nothing wrong with this article and the "non-believers" here spewing venom sound eerily similar to the narrow minded bigots of religion that they are condemning. Religion has also been the breeding ground for much good and to discount this fact shows how little most of you on here "hating" religion really know or are interested in the truth. How are the "non believers" in this forum making the world a better place by condemning and criticizing their fellow man in such a childish manner.

    April 3, 2011 at 12:20 pm |
    • ScottK

      "We are all aware that religion has been guilty of much evil and still is. This is not the point." Um, thats exactly the point.

      And to answer your other questions:
      1. Its our recently found freedom to speak out against organized religion that just a few years ago would likely have gotten us killed or at least persecuted as a non-believer in most country's. The internet provides a somewhat safe environment to speak about things that otherwise might get us punched in the face if said in person to a believer (or get you convicted of blasphemy in most Muslim country's).

      2. Atheists attempt to make the world a better place by speaking out against erroneous belief systems that have been the root of wars, genocide and countless deaths throughout history.

      April 3, 2011 at 12:51 pm |
    • YBP

      Well said, Scott K. I'm with you.

      People are not "spewing venom" by being ourspoken (and rather elequent, and also learned) about the deception and foolishness that is religion.

      April 3, 2011 at 1:04 pm |
  11. capnmike

    religion...what an incredible crock of crap. "praying" to a "god" that doesn't exist, having your mind controlled by fairytales and lies. Truly the human race are immature and downright stupid.

    April 3, 2011 at 12:20 pm |
    • Gerald

      You are an excellent example to the principle.

      April 3, 2011 at 12:21 pm |
    • YBP

      It's hard to believe that some of us are involved in computers, medicine and space travel, while others prefer the worldview of ancient nomadic desert tribal warlords. Is it a choice? Or are they born that way?

      April 3, 2011 at 1:00 pm |
  12. Pastafarian

    I gave up religon for Lent several years ago.

    April 3, 2011 at 12:16 pm |
    • YBP

      That's a rather stale old joke, but it still rings true. Very amusing. Everyone should give up religion for Lent, and then stick with it!

      April 3, 2011 at 12:57 pm |
  13. Roman, Butler, PA

    This Lent is to put the old, dead things to rest. To put that which holds you back from the Light of God to rest. For a New Beginning is at hand. This Easter a New Sign is given to humanity that the Son of God is alive and well.

    April 3, 2011 at 12:16 pm |
    • YBP

      That's quite an imagination you've got there. If not abit childlike and simple-minded. You go, girl.

      April 3, 2011 at 12:56 pm |
  14. Hamburg

    CNN lies!

    April 3, 2011 at 12:09 pm |
    • ScottK

      So does every religion on the planet, its a bit of an epidemic.

      April 3, 2011 at 12:31 pm |
  15. Audrey

    This article makes it sound as if only Catholics normally observe Lent. I know for a fact that Episcopalians (I am one myself) and Lutherans observe Lent.

    April 3, 2011 at 12:09 pm |
    • Jennifer

      I think it's great that other religions are discovering their Catholic roots. We'll leave the Light on.

      April 3, 2011 at 12:38 pm |
  16. Susan

    I didn't even realize protestants didn't observe lent. It's cute when you all come back and realize there are plenty of things your source religion got right. I never have understood why protestants even bother staying out of the catholic faith, since the original "issues" are long gone. Oh well. I guess I like Mary well enough, can't understand why you all bristle about that so much, either.

    April 3, 2011 at 12:09 pm |
    • Dean

      soy, I am Methodist and observe lent.

      April 3, 2011 at 12:14 pm |
    • Dean

      my source religion is Jesus and early Christians who were persecuted by your source church that was also warned about in the Book of Revelations.

      April 3, 2011 at 12:18 pm |
    • Kain

      Susan, last time i checked, Jesus wasn't catholic. He was in Jerusalem to observe Passover when He died. His disciples were Jews and kept the feasts...maybe you should take your own advice?

      April 3, 2011 at 12:22 pm |
    • YBP

      Susan, before you post a remark in a public forum, you should do your homework. Otherwise you run the risk of allowing your own words to betray your absolute ignorance on the matter at hand.

      April 3, 2011 at 12:49 pm |
  17. Johnny

    Does Religion control the world? Or does Government?

    April 3, 2011 at 12:08 pm |
    • John

      Do we follow religious laws or Govt laws? One cannot be a slave to two masters.

      April 3, 2011 at 12:16 pm |
    • Luc

      John, I'm not a slave, I have no "master" try it...

      April 3, 2011 at 12:30 pm |
    • John

      But your not in Prison right? That means you do follow some kind of law. Its its kinda funny isnt it?

      April 3, 2011 at 12:38 pm |
    • YBP

      In the ancient Middle East, where the "good" book comes from, religion and politics were inextricably intertwined. It's still that way in that region, which is why it is continually at war with itself. And that's what we almost have here in the US under the GOP. It's not Sharia Law. But it is Mosaic Law. Our founding fathers are rolling over in their graves.

      April 3, 2011 at 12:47 pm |
  18. CleetMcGee

    "life on Earth to a hokey sky-fairy is childish and ultimately self-defeating, because the next question is, well, where did god come from. Ony the scientifically illiterate believe in your "talking snake" theory."

    Amen to that 😉 Religion, the opiate of the masses. There's far more important stories I think can be featured on the front page than this...

    April 3, 2011 at 12:08 pm |
    • Susan

      You're in your 20's, right? When you think you know everything. Or your head is stuck there. Wisdom will come to you, kiddo, and you'll understand you don't control all and you haven't mastered all. God thinks you're cute, you know 😉

      April 3, 2011 at 12:12 pm |
    • Colin

      Susan. I was an atheist by the time I was 17. I still am and I am 45. I do not think I know everything. that is why I am an atheists. I reject the notion that any religion does know everything. They claim to.

      Let’s imagine that I claim I have the answer to whether there is life after death. The mother of all questions; the one with which humans have struggled for millennia. Then, just when you are recovering from slight shock, I add that I also know how the Universe started and how life on Earth began. These are obviously three of the biggest mysteries in the history of human thought – and I claim to have answered them all. To make any one such assertion is a huge claim. To claim all three is literally enormous. Such claims are so “out there” that no rational person would believe me and no rational person would ever expect to make such claims and be taken seriously. Unless, of course, such person is your local parish priest.

      April 3, 2011 at 12:21 pm |
    • ScottK

      @Susan – You seem to think that anyone who disagree's with your religious beliefs is a child and you are very very wrong. Most atheists have been raised in religious family's and it is only after years of life experience and studying the plethora of scientific data that debunks the bible and other religious "holy" books before they figure out that the books are so flawed they could never be "inspired" by God and can only be the work of imperfect humans. Sometimes this comes earlier in life if the child has a high IQ as your 14 year old seems to have since she can apparently see through the lie that is religion.

      April 3, 2011 at 12:25 pm |
    • tallulah13

      Susan: Thank you for that patronizing post. It's amazing that you can read god's mind.

      You must not get out much if you think most atheists are rebellious children. I am a 49-year-old atheist. The more I read about and learned about scientific discovery, the more I realized that there was no room for god. It was kind of sad, like realizing your imaginary friend was really just that - imaginary - but I got through it and discovered I don't need the crutch. I hope your child has the strength to resist family pressure and continue to think for herself.

      April 3, 2011 at 1:19 pm |
  19. Pacoatemiami

    Religion is for the feeble-minded to begin with... but how extra-pathetic it is to steal aspects that you like out of other religions and pretend like they are part of your religion!! "Spiritual slump", oh please... Enjoy your life, people. There is no profound higher meaning to it.

    April 3, 2011 at 12:04 pm |
    • Susan

      Yes, there is. My 14-year-old kid is going through an atheist phase, too. I just smile and assure her that with maturity, she will come to understand spirituality a little better, and I will say the same to you.

      April 3, 2011 at 12:11 pm |
    • Dean

      You are the bigger idiot for making the effort to read about something that you don't believe in and also appear to detest.

      April 3, 2011 at 12:11 pm |
    • Phage0070

      Yeah Dean, because we all don't believe in genocide and even appear to detest it, there is no possible reason why we would ever take the time to read articles about it and comment on it. Right?

      Err, maybe you don't really have a point there.

      April 3, 2011 at 12:14 pm |
    • Sean

      YOU'RE SO SMART TOOO! WOW!

      April 3, 2011 at 12:16 pm |
    • Jobin

      "The fool says in his heart there is no god" The description in the Bible is reserved only for atheists, not even applied to pagans. Atheists who can hardly even begin to explain why there are even two genders, male and female and why reproduction is so inefficient.

      April 3, 2011 at 12:19 pm |
    • Dean

      Phage0070-Lent....genocide???????I guess you must be reading a different article.

      April 3, 2011 at 12:22 pm |
    • Logan

      Susan, Your kid is already smarter than you if they are an atheist, you should support than instead of keeping them in the dark ages with your religious propaganda

      April 3, 2011 at 12:38 pm |
    • Dave

      "Religion is for the feeble-minded to begin with"

      me – PhD in EE – Catholic.
      my dad – one of the top professors in the world at his field (civil engineering) – Protestant.
      my cousin – extremely successful doctor who had 4.0 throughout college – also Catholic.
      James Chadwick whom introduced the world to the neutron and, on a side note, is a part of my family history – also Catholic

      Religion doesn't judge how smart you are. Idiot.

      April 3, 2011 at 1:24 pm |
  20. VegasRage

    Religion is the scourge of the planet, 2000 year old dogmatic beliefs limit what we can do.

    April 3, 2011 at 12:01 pm |
    • Sonya

      Totally agree with u!!!

      April 3, 2011 at 12:04 pm |
    • Susan

      Religion is tons older than 2,000 years.

      April 3, 2011 at 12:10 pm |
    • Sean

      WOW YOU'RE SO COOL AND SMART!

      April 3, 2011 at 12:13 pm |
    • Jobin

      The article wasn't meant for you.
      Now go lead your empty aimless life.
      Atleast religionists know wheee they are going.

      April 3, 2011 at 12:14 pm |
    • Aaron

      Many great scientists, thinkers, and leaders have used religion to expand beyond themselves and develop and imagine things that have developed society in amazing ways. I suggest you take more time to read about Isaac Newton, Louis Pasteur, George Washington, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., etc.

      April 3, 2011 at 12:15 pm |
    • Lake Hart - A Native American Writer

      Vegas Rage,
      When they say "Repent, I wonder whaqt they ment!" Check out Leanord Cohen – Future – London. Religion, self empowerment in the name of a "god" to do what the hell they want, lie, cheat and steal – then repent and do it again and again and again! Regards, Lake.

      April 3, 2011 at 12:15 pm |
    • Colin

      Jobin, and what exactly makes an atheists life meaningless? We don't need the self serving fantasy of living forever to lead full, wonderful lives.

      April 3, 2011 at 12:15 pm |
    • Ally Buster

      Catholicism: Where a grown man in a dress serves the body and blood of another man to happless idiots.....all while thinking about raping the young boy at the altar with him.

      Yeah....that's a winner of a religion all right!

      April 3, 2011 at 12:21 pm |
    • VegasBeliever

      Too bad you have yet to discover the strength and power God gives us to do more with our lives than we ever thought possible. Here's hoping you find that for your life.

      April 3, 2011 at 12:25 pm |
    • Luc

      Why does this not get to the front of CNN's US Page?

      April 3, 2011 at 12:26 pm |
    • Tom

      @Jobin

      Because it's obvious that you can only lead a full life if you fill it with faith in something that can't be proven, carefully orchestrated books that leave out as much as they include, and dogmatic principles that were usefully applied to an uneducated populace over the ages but whose relevance today are greatly diminished, at least in religious form. For example, we know not to eat spoiled pork and don't need religious dogma to inform us of that. But this eating the body of Christ has always struck me as more than a little weird – how does man benefit from cannibalism?

      April 3, 2011 at 12:30 pm |
    • Sima

      You should try to keep Lent the way it is required in the Orthodox Church: no meat, eggs, milk, cheese, fish, butter, at all. And this is not the only period we fast like this. 40 days before Christmas as well, two weeks in August before the Falling Asleep of the Mother of God, and the Monday after All Saints Day until the feast of the Apostles Peter and Paul, June 29. Not to speak of Wednesdays and Fridays throughout the year. Of course, there are many who do not observe these fasts, or at least, they do to one degree or another, but it is basically required of all Orthodox Christians and is very ancient in practice. A good way to really appreciate the Resurrection of Christ when it comes–and a good way to lose weight too!!!

      April 3, 2011 at 12:33 pm |
    • Eye Roller

      This is the "Belief Blog". If you don't believe, why are you even reading this page?

      April 3, 2011 at 12:34 pm |
    • Dan

      I agree. I don't need an old made up book to tell me how to behave.

      April 3, 2011 at 12:35 pm |
    • Jers

      Religion isn't the scourge of our planet – people like you who look down in contempt upon others who do not share your (unfalsifiable, untestable) belief are the scourge of our planet. It grieves me to know such people exist and hate me because of my own unfalsifiable, untestable belief system.

      April 3, 2011 at 12:36 pm |
    • Gary Lombardo

      @ Ally You couldn't be more wrong and sound pretty ignorant on what it means to be a Catholic Christian. Rather than espouse anti-Catholic falsehoods, come learn what it really means.

      April 3, 2011 at 12:40 pm |
    • YBP

      @ Ally Buster. Yes, Ally, we also watch Bill Maher. Thanks for quoting him. Next time give credit where credit is due.

      April 3, 2011 at 12:41 pm |
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