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Islamists protest women's rights in Bangladesh
April 5th, 2011
09:53 PM ET

Islamists protest women's rights in Bangladesh

By Farid Ahmed, for CNN

Dhaka, Bangladesh (CNN) - Dozens of people were injured in Bangladesh as riot police clashed with thousands of Islamists protesting women's rights, authorities and witnesses said.

The protesters damaged buses and cars Monday, setting several on fire, while police used clubs and tear gas to disperse the Islamists, who were wearing skullcaps and burial cloths.

"We'll die for the cause of Islam, but (will) not allow the government to disrespect (the) Quran," one protester shouted during the demonstration near the national mosque in downtown Dhaka.

The government recently announced its National Women Development Policy 2011, which ensures women expanded rights in property and education. The protesters said the policy is against the Quran.

Read the full story here about the protest in Bangladesh.

- CNN Belief Blog

Filed under: Culture wars • Islam

Protests continue in Afghanistan against Quran burning
Afghans pray inside the Hazrat-i Ali shrine in Mazar-i-Sharif, where an angry mob stormed a U.N. compound on April 1.
April 5th, 2011
01:46 PM ET

Protests continue in Afghanistan against Quran burning

About 1,000 protesters gathered in front of Kabul University on Tuesday morning, as protests continue throughout Afghanistan to condemn the burning of a Quran by a pastor in the United States.

The demonstrators marched toward the city center amid a heavy police presence but without incident, said Kabul City police official Abdullah Mahboob.

The sight was in marked contrast to earlier demonstrations, some of which turned deadly.

Read the full story
- CNN Belief Blog

Filed under: Afghanistan • Quran • Religious violence

April 5th, 2011
01:00 AM ET

Eyeing a national museum, a collector’s Bibles hits the road

By Gabe LaMonica, CNN

Washington (CNN) - Steve Green owns a lot of Bibles, and he’s starting to show them off.

The president of Hobby Lobby, a national chain of craft stores, Green bought his first biblical artifact less than a year and a half ago. But his is already considered one of the world’s largest private collection of biblical texts and artifacts, and Green is taking it on tour in advance of opening what he says will be a national Bible museum.

The tour kicked off last week with a party at the Vatican embassy in Washington that highlighting samples from a 14,000 square foot traveling exhibition, which is called “Passages.” It’s a prelude to the high-tech Bible museum Green wants to open in the next five or so years.

“The Bible has had a huge impact on societies - politics, the arts, science, music, literature,” says Green, who is Christian. “The impact of the book is a story that we feel needs to be told and that is what we are interested in doing - and encouraging people to consider what it has to say.”

FULL POST

- CNN Belief Blog

Filed under: Bible • Christianity • DC • United States

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About this blog

The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.

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