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Is America ready for a Mormon president?
Mitt Romney announcing his presidential candidacy in New Hampshire on Thursday.
June 2nd, 2011
03:04 PM ET

Is America ready for a Mormon president?

By Dan Gilgoff, CNN.com Religion Editor

(CNN) - Mitt Romney’s campaign team knows that his Mormon faith scared off Republican voters the last time he ran for president.

But they believe a lot has changed in the last four years.

For starters, Romney is now much better known. The former Massachusetts governor campaigned hard in the 2008 primaries – even addressing his Mormonism head-on in a major speech — and has stayed in the public eye since, popping up on late-night talk shows and on cable news channels.

Romney’s Mormonism, the thinking goes, is less exotic than it was four years ago because the candidate is more familiar.

Plus, unlike in 2008, there’s a Democrat in the White House for Republican voters to unite against. The Romney camp hopes the Obama factor will boost support for a battle-tested candidate who’s shown he can raise the hundreds of millions of dollars White House bids require, regardless of the candidate’s religious affiliation.

And unlike the 2008 Republican primaries, when George W. Bush was in the White House and debate over the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan loomed large, next year’s elections are poised to hang on the economy. Not a bad time, maybe, for a guy with a Harvard MBA and a career spent turning around financially troubled companies and the 2002 Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City, Utah.

“The country’s really in a tough situation — the economy’s in a bad place and so people suddenly think that a guy with Mitt Romney’s capacity and experience looks a lot more attractive than he did four years ago,” says Mark DeMoss, a senior adviser to Romney’s campaign, which launched Thursday.

“That makes his faith much less of an issue than it was four years ago,” says DeMoss, who is tasked with helping Romney woo evangelical voters, a huge chunk of the GOP base and a constituency that’s historically been wary of Mormonism.

Whether DeMoss is right may make the difference in whether Romney, the current Republican frontrunner based on polls and fundraising, can actually win the Republican nomination and, ultimately, the White House.

But Romney may not be the only Mormon running for president. Former Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman is seriously flirting with a presidential bid.

Huntsman, Obama’s former ambassador to China, recently took a five-day swing through New Hampshire, site of the first-in-the-nation Republican primary, and has hired staff in South Carolina, another key primary state.

The prospect of a Huntsman campaign means the nation could see an unprecedented test of whether the GOP — and, perhaps, the rest of the country — is ready for a Mormon president in an era when candidates’ religious beliefs have become weighty campaign issues.

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, as the Mormon Church is officially known, certainly seems eager for Mormonism to be less an issue in the presidential race than it was for Romney in 2008

“Recent media coverage seems to lean toward the conclusion that among many Americans, faith will be less of an issue in this election than it was in 2008,” church spokesman Michael Purdy said in a statement to CNN. “But it’s really for others to speculate on this.”

Public opinion polls suggest a lingering bias against Mormon candidates. A survey released Thursday by the Pew Research Center found that a quarter of American adults admit to being less likely to vote for a Mormon candidate for president.

The survey found that resistance to Mormon candidates was even higher among two groups: liberal Democrats and evangelicals, who overwhelmingly vote Republican. One in three white evangelicals said they were less likely to support a Mormon candidate.

That creates a stiff headwind for Romney and Huntsman, given evangelicals’ primary power. In 2008, evangelicals accounted for 60 percent of Republican voters in Iowa, home to the first-in-the-nation presidential caucuses, and in South Carolina, whose primaries come hard on the heels of New Hampshire’s.

In 2008, Romney’s Mormonism “was a real factor in Iowa and South Carolina that predisposed many potential voters to never to consider Romney or hear his message,” said Gary Marx, who directed conservative outreach for Romney the last time he ran.

That year, Romney placed second in Iowa and fourth in South Carolina behind then-frontrunner Mike Huckabee – a Baptist preacher who won major evangelical support.

Though Mormons consider themselves to be Christians, many evangelicals consider the Latter-day Saints to be a cult.

Evangelicals object to the Mormon belief that the Book of Mormon is the revealed word of God and to such Mormon practices as proxy baptisms for the dead. Evangelicals and Mormons also compete for converts.

Many evangelical leaders have discouraged their followers from translating such differences into opposition to Mormon candidates. But that message isn’t always heeded.

“I don’t think it’s much of an issue among the leadership in evangelical circles,” Michael Farris, an influential evangelical activist, says of Mormon candidates. “But I don’t know if that is always true at the grassroots level.”

Richard Land, who directs public policy for the Southern Baptist Convention, the country’s largest evangelical denomination, says evangelicals could coalesce around Romney but that the conditions would have to be just right.

“If Southern Baptists have a choice between an evangelical candidate, a Catholic and a Mormon and all three appear to be equally conservative and equally likely to beat Barack Obama, they’ll vote for the evangelical,” says Land, who has informally advised Romney on how to deal with his faith on the campaign trail.

“If there’s no such evangelical [in the] race, they’ll vote for the Catholic,” he says, “But if there’s no other candidate who’s likely to beat Obama, they’ll vote for the Mormon.”

Former Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty, an evangelical, and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich, a Catholic, are running for the GOP nomination.

Beyond theological challenges, conservative activists like Land and Farris say Romney faces skepticism among religious conservatives because he once supported abortion rights and signed a healthcare law in Massachusetts that critics say represented a dramatic government overreach.

But those close to Romney argue that Huckabee’s decision not to enter the 2012 race creates an opportunity for Romney to pick up more evangelical support. Or, they say, it could wind up splitting evangelical voters among multiple primary candidates, making evangelicals a less potent force.

DeMoss, a Christian public relations executive who also helped Romney with evangelical outreach in 2008, says one of the victories from the last campaign was that no big-name evangelical came out against Romney over his Mormonism. This time, DeMoss is working to get some evangelical leaders to go a step further and publicly support Romney.

After Romney’s 2008 defeat, one nationally known evangelical leader privately told DeMoss that he’d voted for Romney in the primaries.

“I remember thinking, it would have been nice if somebody else knew that,” says DeMoss, who believes such revelations would have made more evangelicals comfortable supporting a Mormon candidate.

Huntsman’s entry into the presidential race could make Mormonism less of an issue if it has a mainstreaming effect. But the two candidates’ religious affiliations could play out quite differently.

Romney has long been active in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS), having occupied Mormon leadership positions like bishop (the rough equivalent of a lay pastor) and stake president (someone who oversees groups of Mormon congregations).

“I believe in my Mormon faith and I endeavor to live by it,” Romney said in a December 2007 speech in which he addressed his Mormonism. “My faith is the faith of my fathers — I will be true to them and to my beliefs.”

Huntsman, like Romney, spent two years abroad as a Mormon missionary but has kept some distance from the LDS church. As governor of Utah, he loosened liquor laws that had been inspired by Mormon orthodoxy and broke with his church in signing a law allowing civil unions for gay couples.

In a recent television interview, Huntsman affirmed his Mormon faith but added that Mormonism is “a very diverse and heterogeneous cross-section of people. ... I probably add to that diversity somewhat.”

A Huntsman adviser who often deals with the media declined to respond to requests for comment.

Matthew Bowman, an editor at a Mormon studies journal called Dialogue, says Huntsman hails from a slightly younger generation of Mormons who are less defensive about their Mormonism.

“Huntsman is a Mormon who thinks of his faith not as something that separates him from American culture or as something he has to defend or explain away, which is what Romney did,” says Bowman. “Romney is always hyperaware of his Mormonism.”

That means Huntsman may face fewer questions about his Mormonism should he run.

The LDS church, for its part, says its policy is to steer clear of electoral politics. Some church observers say the controversy the church generated by supporting California’s 2008 gay marriage ban, Proposition 8, exacerbated its political reticence.

At the same time, the church has capitalized on increased attention paid to Mormonism - provoked by everything from Romney’s 2008 campaign to the current hit Broadway musical, “Book of Mormon” - with a succession of public awareness campaigns.

The church website Mormon.org, for example, was recently revamped with an eye toward educating non-Mormons about the religion. The site features video profiles of Mormons from different walks of life.

“The message of these ads is that members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints are your friends and neighbors,” says Purdy, the church spokesman. “We are professionals and tradespeople, artists and teachers and everything in between.”

Put another way, the message is that Mormons are normal, everyday Americans.

With the Republican primary race finally starting in earnest, the nation is about get a major glimpse into whether GOP voters agree.

- CNN Belief Blog Co-Editor

Filed under: Mitt Romney • Mormonism • Politics

soundoff (3,046 Responses)
  1. Abe

    YOU GOTTA BE KIDDING ME! Really? We were ready for the 1st Black President (LOOK WHERE THAT GOT US!) but we are somehow not ready for the 1st Mormon President?

    June 2, 2011 at 5:33 pm |
  2. Reality

    Once again, all the conservative votes in the country "ain't" going to help a "pro-life" presidential candidate, i.e Romney, in 2012 as the "Immoral Majority" rules the country and will be doing so for awhile. The "Immoral Majority" you ask?---

    The fastest growing USA voting bloc: In 2008, the 70+ million "Roe vs. Wade mothers and fathers" of aborted womb-babies" whose ranks grow by two million per year i.e. 78+ million "IM" voters in 2012.

    2008 Presidential popular vote results:

    69,456,897 for pro-abortion BO, 59,934,814 for "pro-life" JM.

    And all because many women fail to take the Pill once a day or men fail to use a condom even though in most cases these men have them in their pockets.

    (The failures of the widely used birth "control" methods i.e. the Pill and male condom have led to the large rate of abortions ( one million/yr) and S-TDs (19 million/yr) in the USA. Men and women must either recognize their responsibilities by using the Pill or condoms properly and/or use other safer birth control methods in order to reduce the epidemics of abortion and S-TDs.)

    (Currently, a perfect birth control barrier system does not exist. Time to develop one! In the meantime, mono-ma-sturbation or mutual ma-sturbation are highly recommended for hete-rose-xuals who need a contraceptive. Abstinence is another best-solution but obviously the se-x drive typically vitiates this option although being biological would it not be able to develop a drug to temporarily eliminate said drive?)

    June 2, 2011 at 5:33 pm |
  3. Liz

    You definitely do want to care about whether the guy is a Mormon, it is a big factor. Don't listen to what people say about it, read about it yourself, it will curl your socks. It is no where near being a Christian. Old Brigham Young and his harem will make your day. Find out how the Mormons are sending people on missions all over the world trying to convert them. But besides that the guy is a flip-flopping snake oil salesman and that hasnt changed one bit. He made government mandated healthcare the real deal in Massachusetts. He changes his mind on every issue when he thinks he needs to to get over.

    June 2, 2011 at 5:33 pm |
  4. Mormons Are First Century Christians

    Mormons’ theology is based on First Century Christianity, not Fourth Century Creeds. For example, the Church of Jesus Christ (LDS) views on Baptism, Lay Ministry, the Trinity, Theosis, Grace vs. Works, the Divinity of Jesus Christ comport more closely with Early Christianity than any other denomination. And Mormons’ teenagers have been judged to “top the charts” in Christian Characteristics by a UNC-Chapel Hill study. Read about it here:

    http://MormonsAreChristian.blogspot.com

    Those who would denigrate the Mormon religion, usually are mis-informed.

    Mormons have a better understanding of Christianity than any other denomination, according to a 2010 Pew Forum poll:

    http://www.pewforum.org/Other-Beliefs-and-Practices/U-S-Religious-Knowledge-Survey.aspx

    11 of the signers of the Declaration of Independence were non-Trinitarian Christians. Those who insist on their narrow definition of Christianity are doing our Republic an injustice.

    June 2, 2011 at 5:32 pm |
    • Artist

      The size or expanse of Mormonism does not take away that it is simply a cult founded by a very delusional person or simply a con man. Hate to break it to you but there is no Israel blood over here with the indians no matter how much the church spins it. Magical discs and underwear oh my. lol
      .
      Schizophrenia is a mental disorder that makes it difficult to tell the difference between real and unreal experiences, to think logically, to have normal emotional responses, and to behave normally in social situations.

      As the illness continues, psychotic symptoms develop:
      • False beliefs or thoughts that are not based in reality (delusions)
      • Hearing, seeing, or feeling things that are not there (hallucinations)

      June 2, 2011 at 5:38 pm |
    • ScottK

      Problem is we need a 21st century President, not someone who believes baptism with water washes sin away and that a 2000 year old dead guy visited the native Americans after being whisked away from Israel on a cloud.

      June 2, 2011 at 5:39 pm |
    • Sam A.

      Mormon theology is based on having a continuum of "prophets" that live in hiding and basically have nothing to do with God. It's a secretive cult that has secretive alternate names and beliefs.

      June 2, 2011 at 5:39 pm |
    • Jim

      Mormonism is just another form of child abuse. Mormonism is NOT Christian. Just as crazy as Sciencetology.

      June 2, 2011 at 5:41 pm |
    • BS

      Yeah and Native Americans were here 10,000 years before Europeans showed up.

      June 2, 2011 at 5:45 pm |
    • rich

      No bat Sh1t crazy religion is better than the next. Hopefully this god goes the way of the gods of old in short order.

      June 2, 2011 at 5:46 pm |
    • Artist

      ScottK

      Problem is we need a 21st century President, not someone who believes baptism with water washes sin away and that a 2000 year old dead guy visited the native Americans after being whisked away from Israel on a cloud.

      -------

      Not to mention 1 of the tribes of israel came over and hooked up with the native americans. My understanding that DNA and blood testing does not support this. Of course the creator of the cult had no idea that science and actual investigating would prove him quite false. I was in SLC recently and saw they were having a convention regarding this. From what I understand from friends there, the church is spinning some fabricated bs for their followers to combat scientific findings. lol

      June 2, 2011 at 5:49 pm |
    • Erik

      So was Christ schizophrenic? You really don't know much about Mormon doctrine or history it appears. If you do not believe in God, than a Mormon should be no worse than a protestant or Catholic.

      June 2, 2011 at 5:51 pm |
    • Artist

      Sam A.

      Mormon theology is based on having a continuum of "prophets" that live in hiding and basically have nothing to do with God. It's a secretive cult that has secretive alternate names and beliefs.
      ----
      Well the founder basically copied the Masons on secrets and Masonic temple. When you look at it, the founder wasn't very creative. What is amazing is adults still trust what a drunkard and criminal created just a short time away. lol AAAAMAZING

      June 2, 2011 at 5:54 pm |
    • Artist

      Erik

      So was Christ schizophrenic? You really don't know much about Mormon doctrine or history it appears. If you do not believe in God, than a Mormon should be no worse than a protestant or Catholic.
      ------------
      Well lets see he thought he walked on water, had magical powers and talked to his father (god). Either he was nuts or one of the most famous con-men in history
      .
      Schizophrenia is a mental disorder that makes it difficult to tell the difference between real and unreal experiences, to think logically, to have normal emotional responses, and to behave normally in social situations.
      As the illness continues, psychotic symptoms develop:
      • False beliefs or thoughts that are not based in reality (delusions)
      • Hearing, seeing, or feeling things that are not there (hallucinations)

      June 2, 2011 at 5:59 pm |
    • Sam A.

      Artist

      You hit it right on the head!

      June 2, 2011 at 6:00 pm |
    • Erik

      Artist, just so we are clear, since Christ was schizophrenic according to you, no person of faith should be president? If that is not the case, leave Mitt's religion alone. I must say that he is not my first choice, but not because of religion.

      June 2, 2011 at 6:04 pm |
    • rich

      @Artist – I don't think Christ could have had Schizophrenia since there seems to be no physical evidence of Christ and a myth can't have a real illness.

      June 2, 2011 at 6:11 pm |
    • Artist

      Erik

      Artist, just so we are clear, since Christ was schizophrenic according to you, no person of faith should be president? If that is not the case, leave Mitt's religion alone. I must say that he is not my first choice, but not because of religion.

      -----------–
      I would prefer non religious but we don't live in a perfect world *sigh*. There are degrees of extremes when it comes to christians. We can see the impact and how the mormon church operates and its history. As well as how it treats non mormons. The changes the mormon church has HAD to make is because of outside pressure (outside of Utah). We cannot trust the Mormon church and we sure as heck do not want a Mormon president. Perhaps when we see the LDS power reduced in Utah government we will be able to trust them more. Make no mistake the Mormon church has its eye on the Presidency because this is part of their plan and vision.

      June 2, 2011 at 6:18 pm |
    • Artist

      rich

      @Artist – I don't think Christ could have had Schizophrenia since there seems to be no physical evidence of Christ and a myth can't have a real illness.
      -----
      It was for the sake of what we are talking about. Myself, I haven't seen any evidence that he existed and did all those magical things. He might have existed but he was a wacked out dude for sure or shrewed con-man.

      June 2, 2011 at 6:20 pm |
    • Peace2All

      @Artist

      Hey buddy...

      You Said: "I was in SLC recently and saw they were having a convention regarding this. From what I understand from friends there, (the church is spinning some fabricated bs for their followers to combat scientific findings. lol")

      On one level, I understand how that is funny, and... on another level, i'm guessing that you would agree... it's really 'not' funny at all. Actually, kind of scary IMHO.

      Peace brother...

      June 2, 2011 at 6:26 pm |
    • Erik

      The LDS church does not hold power in government in Utah, members do, but hey the majority of the population are members so why shouldn't the will of the people (majority be expressed) I personally have never lived in Utah. At no time in my life has the church bent over for the world. Some things have changed, but not out of public pressure. I will preempt you with polygamy. Many say that it was discontinued for political reasons. This is true, in a sense that in 1890 it was made illegal and since we believe in honoring and sustaining the law, God issued the revelation, that and the people had sufficiently demonstrated their faith as I see it.

      June 2, 2011 at 6:27 pm |
  5. rich

    I would prefer the president to be an atheist; I don’t want the invisible man interfering with making rational decisions.

    June 2, 2011 at 5:30 pm |
    • NewAge

      I pray that never happens in this life

      June 2, 2011 at 5:33 pm |
    • Artist

      Rich, remember we are doing god's work in the ME as Palin said. Bush talked to god to.... 😮

      June 2, 2011 at 5:39 pm |
    • rich

      @NewAge – Good thing praying does nothing. I’m sure that there have been atheist but with the christian tolerance (sarcasm) one would need to keep that a secret.

      June 2, 2011 at 5:40 pm |
    • Artist

      NewAge

      I pray that never happens in this life
      ----------–
      Do you talk to god and does god talk to you?
      .
      Schizophrenia is a mental disorder that makes it difficult to tell the difference between real and unreal experiences, to think logically, to have normal emotional responses, and to behave normally in social situations.
      As the illness continues, psychotic symptoms develop:
      • False beliefs or thoughts that are not based in reality (delusions)
      • Hearing, seeing, or feeling things that are not there (hallucinations)

      June 2, 2011 at 5:55 pm |
    • Happy Harry

      Well to be fair, this country's leaders aren't taking it to an extreme by praying that the economy magically heals back to normal or anything along those lines. I can take the occasional "thank God" or "Amen" as long as the leader is competent in making wise decisions. Isn't that what this country should be about? Freedom of religion?

      June 2, 2011 at 8:06 pm |
  6. Carol

    No problem with Romney's religion, big problem with the party he is running for. I would not vote for another Republican, for at least a lifetime. President Obama is doing a good job with the Republican mess he inherited.

    June 2, 2011 at 5:30 pm |
  7. Jonathan

    Most of the comments here are idiotic. People are free to believe what they want. If you agree with his politics, vote for him. He isn't going to turn the country into mormons if elected. Did we all turn to liberals when Obama was elected? I was raised Mormon, but I only attend very infrequently (like most Christians). Every Christian group is a splinter group that disagreed with Catholocism. This country was founded by Calvinists, Quakers, Anabaptists, Anglicanists, etc. It's hard to find two people with the exact same beliefs.
    The atheists out there like to pretend they know everything, but even their convictions are based on faith based on what they have heard, read, observed, or were raised to believe. There are countless mysteries in this world, and I'm positive we will never have everything figured out. I hope we can eventually figure out how to live in harmony and be accepting of one another.
    I would probably never vote for a Mormon not because of what they believe but because a majority in this country tend to be very right wing. It's not like that with Mormons in other countries. We are in a world of hurt in this country, and we have been on a backwards path for more than a decade. We need reform in areas like education, and we need to take a long hard look at our political system. It's not working anymore. I'm not a republican, but I do thank them for our right to bear arms. Hopefully we'll never need a revolution, but I wouldn't be surprised. We have sold our country on every level to the highest bidder to the detriment of 95% of us.

    June 2, 2011 at 5:30 pm |
  8. Sam A.

    Mormon = Moron

    June 2, 2011 at 5:29 pm |
    • ScottK

      Moron=Moon
      Moon=Moo
      Moo=Mo
      Mo=o
      =0(

      June 2, 2011 at 5:42 pm |
  9. Jim

    I would never vote for a non-Christian like a Morman.

    June 2, 2011 at 5:29 pm |
    • BS

      Will you ever be able to spell it correctly?

      June 2, 2011 at 5:34 pm |
    • Mormons Are First Century Christians

      Who is the real Christian?

      http://MormonsAreChristian.blogspot.com

      http://NewTestamentTempleRitual.blogspot.com

      Reply after reading both blogs, and tell me why Mormons are not the "real" Christians.

      June 2, 2011 at 5:35 pm |
    • Erik

      Mormons are Christians. Those who don't think so are very ignorant to what a Christian is

      June 2, 2011 at 5:38 pm |
    • Sam A.

      Mormons are NOT Christians. If you are a Mormon, at least say the truth, instead of trying to hide behind another religion.

      June 2, 2011 at 5:49 pm |
    • Tim

      Mormons are Christians. Did you not read the article. Do you not know the name of the church, its not the mormons, its The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Oh you must not know what a Christian is............when was the last time you researched your own beliefs and found some truth in your assumptions. unless you like to assume falsehoods as truths everyday.I don't. go learn something true today, you'll feel better about everybody and yourself. heck this American Government would run better with a Heaping Serving of the Truth. Thanks Mitt for Jumping in there.

      June 2, 2011 at 5:50 pm |
    • ScottK

      @Erik – That is of debate. They claim to be Christians because of their faith in the book of mormon and the bible, but their teachings and rituals heavily rely on the book of mormon and without it they would not exist as a sect. And most Christians who trust their bible's but don't believe in the divine origin of the golden plates are unable to accept the additions Joseph Smith made to what they consider true Christianity and thus think of it as an aberation, not an alteration, of Christianity.

      June 2, 2011 at 5:51 pm |
    • Erik

      Well than SamA, enlightenus to what a Christian is, and why Mormons are not Christian. Yes I am Mormon and say so with conviction.

      June 2, 2011 at 5:54 pm |
    • Erik

      So basically that idea that God talked to others not in Jerusalem and that God talks to people today and calls prophets is what disqualifies Mormonism from being Christian? The LDS believe in the Bible, hold to it dearly, study and read it and I dare say understand it better than anyone. We are a very religiously and secularly educated people. Not fools following some delusional person.

      June 2, 2011 at 6:01 pm |
    • Sam A.

      Eric

      Scroll up and read my/others comments. It doesn't need so much enlightment to see that Mormonism has nothing to do with Christianity. Of course, I don't expect to convince you on this.

      June 2, 2011 at 6:05 pm |
    • Erik

      Sorry Sam, I saw nothing of substance. In addition I really believe that I have read and studied more than you so why should I believe your opinion?

      June 2, 2011 at 6:17 pm |
    • Sam A.

      Erik, you sure know much more than I, especially with all the top secret beliefs and "knowledge" that you learn in secretive temple studies and rituals. You "know" a lot, but not enough to realize that you are not Christian.

      June 2, 2011 at 6:39 pm |
    • Erik

      Have you ever even read the Bible? And who are you to set the definition of what a Christian is?

      June 2, 2011 at 6:49 pm |
    • Davey

      Its funny..Mormons will tell you that they are indeed Christians, but they do not believe that any other Christians are Christians unless they are Mormon. Sounds abit hypocritical to me.

      June 2, 2011 at 7:27 pm |
  10. Yemen mourns it's dead

    May you ask your president not to support the tribe men and the opposition parties against the legitimate country ruler....allow him to do changes while on post until his period officially ends while marking a new presidency votes and elections....we do not want to start our new country system change with a coup against the our rulers at such shaken times world wide...obvious you are supporting the tribes since they are allies of the KSA who obviously is trying to turn the whole area of the Arabian Peninsular into becoming Royalists burying therefore the orphan Republic alive..by demanding the president to leave his ruling seat to so many ghosts who will fight over it to no end??
    Why you are doing or encouraging this...it is you who should call upon youth to stay back and not be used and abused by those seeking every thing other than the good welfare of this country and population...
    Assist him to secure law and order for the benefit of the majority who are staying back at their homes...those you see in demonstrations are people who came from extreme country boarders and mountains who are paid and financed to do all the mess in the cities of the real inhabitants....our cities people are being killed and robed by such those...America you are being used to pave roads for others to dominate on account of others unrest....America are you a republic or a royalist? Or are you still ruled by the British Crown?        
    http://edition.cnn.com/2011/WORLD/meast/06/02/yemen.unrest/index.html

    June 2, 2011 at 5:28 pm |
    • Moshe

      Give it a rest, Muneef. This thread isn't about Yemen. You are posting in the wrong place again.

      June 2, 2011 at 5:45 pm |
    • Muneef

      Was that the best you could say or do?

      June 2, 2011 at 5:51 pm |
    • Muneef

      Fate of Yemeni President Ali Abdullah Saleh is unclear after attack on his compound
      Government officials in Yemen say President Ali Abdullah Saleh survived the assault by tribal foes, but an opposition TV station says he was killed in the attack. As battles erupt around the capital, there is speculation he has been wounded.

      http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/world/middleeast/la-fg-yemen-president-attack-20110604,0,2006049.story

      June 3, 2011 at 7:22 pm |
  11. gmccyclist

    Religion has been the best and worst concept for human kind. With religion has come laws and morals and a faith in something greater than ourselve. By the same token, religion has been the basis of hatred, violence against our fellow man, and bigotry and discrimination.

    June 2, 2011 at 5:26 pm |
    • Moshe

      Laws and morals were not created by religion, so your argument fails on that point. Religion is evil. Religion is going to make this world even worse as it is doing now. Just wait a bit. The violence will begin, and your religious beliefs will make you into a murderer.

      June 2, 2011 at 5:48 pm |
  12. Zambeezee

    Yo, TJinMO...why don't you run? You seem to know how incompetent OBama is but you think a martian would be better?! Really!? Better than you? You're the incompetent boob.

    June 2, 2011 at 5:26 pm |
  13. LUNA

    Why not, if you voted for a MUSLIM why not a Mormon, and one who has experience in most things that Mr. Hussein who is President doesn't. Or has no clue of. I'm sure Mitt won't be bowing down to anyone.

    June 2, 2011 at 5:24 pm |
    • Hugo

      What muslim are you talking about ? The one Bush Senior created and Obama took out after Bush Senior's son was unwilling to do so?

      June 2, 2011 at 5:27 pm |
    • Sam A.

      You forget to take your pill today, moron.

      June 2, 2011 at 5:31 pm |
    • Oso

      Bush holding hands with the Saudis and bowing down to them is just as relevant, yet you fail to mention it. Shame on you.

      June 2, 2011 at 5:50 pm |
  14. Soozcat

    You've got to be joking. Is this a slow news day?

    How is a candidate's personal religious belief in any way relevant to his or her candidacy? I thought we'd gotten over this nonsense when JFK was elected.

    June 2, 2011 at 5:24 pm |
    • Hugo

      Were you in space for the last 3 years? What do you think these religious nutjob repugnants think Obama is? A muslim. Is he? No. Now there...

      June 2, 2011 at 5:28 pm |
  15. ChunderHog

    I like how "cult" is defined as anything differing in opinion from "my religion". I'm sure the sectarian violence in the Arab nations stems from a similar mindset. Instead of throwing epithets around how about learning about the different belief systems. Anger is so easy, especially on the internet.

    June 2, 2011 at 5:23 pm |
  16. Traci

    BRING HIM ON!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! WE NEEEEED HELLLLLLLLLLLLLP!

    June 2, 2011 at 5:23 pm |
  17. really??

    so, is it cool now if we blast all the towel heads out there for their religious clothing? Or is it just PC to do that to Mormons? I really do not get all you who claim to be sooo tolerant, non bigot, non racial, but all you keep bringing up is Mormons sacred clothing?????? Put your berka on and shut up!!!

    June 2, 2011 at 5:21 pm |
  18. MissUnderstood

    Ooops...misread the headline; though it said "is America Ready for a Moron President...my bad!

    June 2, 2011 at 5:21 pm |
    • Hugo

      The answer to your question is 2000-2008

      June 2, 2011 at 5:25 pm |
    • Ermiberero

      People like you make this earth livable. Best comment I ever read in this article !!

      June 2, 2011 at 5:33 pm |
    • Why Does CNN Require Entering a Name?

      Well ready or not, we have one!

      June 2, 2011 at 5:38 pm |
  19. Billsen

    Speaking as an Agnostic, I fail to see any reason why any religion qualifies or disqualifies anyone from office. But feel free to let your bigot-flag fly America. You always do.

    June 2, 2011 at 5:20 pm |
  20. TJinMO

    A martian would be better than the incompetent boob in the white house now

    June 2, 2011 at 5:20 pm |
    • Hugo

      Or the egocentric moron before him

      June 2, 2011 at 5:26 pm |
    • Why Does CNN Require Entering a Name?

      Hugo, besides for taking out bin Laden, even though that hasn't done anything close to taking out Al Quida altogether, please give me one accomplishment Obama has achieved in the White House. I'm not even asking you to prove to me that he's "competent"; I'm just asking for a single accomplishment.

      June 2, 2011 at 5:43 pm |
    • ScottK

      @Why-

      7 straight quarters GDP growth.
      The health insurance reform legislation President Obama signed into law on March 23, 2010 – which is to putting American consumers back in charge of their health coverage and care. Try reading about it instead of listening to F O X pundits.
      Greatly reducing our troop levels in Iraq
      The reduction of lead in drinking water act
      The FDA saftey modernization act
      Post 9/11 Veterans educational assistance improvements act
      Helping heroes keep their homes act
      Dont' ask don't tell repeal act

      and many many more, just go to Whitehousedotgov and go through dozens of pages of laws that he has signed.

      June 2, 2011 at 6:13 pm |
    • Muneef

      Think he achieved that all those in the middle east rebel against their leaders and mess their countries up...!

      June 2, 2011 at 6:31 pm |
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About this blog

The CNN Belief Blog covers the faith angles of the day's biggest stories, from breaking news to politics to entertainment, fostering a global conversation about the role of religion and belief in readers' lives. It's edited by CNN's Daniel Burke with contributions from Eric Marrapodi and CNN's worldwide news gathering team.